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2021 - 2022 Academic Catalog

Bachelor Completion in Psychology

The Lasell University Bachelor Completion for a Bachelor of Science in Psychology will provide the critical thinking and counseling skills to prepare you for work in fields like counseling, law, ministry, research or clinical psychology. Learn how functional and dysfunctional behavior patterns develop and the interaction of neurobiological, interpersonal, cultural, community, and societal processes.

The course was designed to increase your appreciation of diversity and develop sensitivity to the dynamics of social oppression and the consequences of social change. 

The skills taught in the major prepare students to seek employment in a wide variety of social service or therapeutic settings in administration, education, child welfare settings, research and human service agencies in positions such as a counselor, personnel interviewer, case manager, market researcher, test administrator, research assistant, or rehabilitation worker.

Lasell University has a connected learning philosophy where what is learned is consistently applied to the real-world. 

The Degree Completion for a BS in Psychology is delivered in a mobile-first online format. It consists of 14 -18 courses or 120 total credits delivered in 8-week sessions to help you complete your degree faster. 

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Curriculum
MATH106 Mathematical Reasoning 3
PHIL302 Ethical Reasoning 3
PSYC202 Psychology of Personality 3
PSYC220 Social Psychology 3
PSYC302 Biological Basis of Behavior 3
PSYC316 Psychology of Diversity 3
WRT101 Writing I 3
WRT102 Writing II 3
Electives
MATH208 Statistics 3
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives (KP) 3

Candidates seeking admission to Lasell University Degree Completion Program for a Bachelor of Science in Psychology can transfer up to 90 credits from other accredited institutions. Students would need to complete at least 30 credits at Lasell University to earn their degree. If you transfer to a course that fulfills a core requirement, you will be able to take a business elective course in its place. 

  • Applicants must have completed at least 15 credits at a U.S. institution, no other prerequisites required 
  • 30 credits of major core courses
  • Transfer up to 90 credits (Credits over 10 years old care considered)
    • Earned grade 'C' or higher on transfer credits
    • Related core course requirements can be waived
    • Minimum of 120 credit hours required for the degree
  • 30 Lasell BSBA core credits required. (These credits are required despite previous coursework)

Students eligible for this program must meet at least one of the following criteria: 

  • Must have completed 15 credits at a U.S. Institution
  • Has not been enrolled with an institution for an entire calendar year
  • Veteran or Serviceperson
  • Has the approval of the Lasell University undergraduate Dean and Vice President of Graduate and Professional Studies


Admission Requirements Checklist:

  1. Online application
  2. Personal Statement
  3. Official transcripts of all college-level coursework 
  4. Resume


International Students

  • Are eligible if the program is completed online in their country of origin
  • Are NOT eligible for the program if they wish to obtain a student visa and/or want to live on-campus

HS101 - Human Services: Systems & Skills

This course encourages an examination of one’s own value system, motivations and interests in relation to the wish to pursue a career working with people. Students are introduced to the history and development of the field: the concept of the social welfare system; resources and services offered by a range of community agencies; a model to understand social and psychological problems; and interventions to address social needs interventions range from individual case management and counseling to community organizing and planning. The course highlights a social justice basis for human service work. A 10-hour service learning requirement enables students to examine their interests and apply the concepts learned in class.

HS206X - Peer Health Education

This course enables students to become Peer Health Educators, to assist the Office of Health Education (OHE) with the promotion of health and well-being at Lasell, including physical, mental, sexual, and relational health, at both the one-on-one and campus-wide levels. The Director of the OHE mentors the student(s) in health and wellness topics, public health promotion, behavior change, and peer-to-peer health coaching. Peer Health Educators will be involved in generating, promoting, and advocating for health and well-being and related programming around campus (e.g., small and large events), on social media, and peer-to-peer. Formal, personal engagement in students’ own health and well-being, and engagement in behavior change toward their desired goals, will also be important aspects of this course.

HS210 - Case Management & Counseling

This course introduces students to interviewing skills used by counselors and case managers and to the types of counselor responses that can be effective in human services work. Students learn to assess clients and interventions at the micro, meso and macro levels and explore issues of professional ethics and values. Students also examine cultural contexts as they impact the client, counselor, and client-counselor relationship. Some of the contexts may include race, class, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender, and immigration status. The course relies heavily on in-class exercises. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, HS 101 with a C or better.

HS214 - Counseling Theory & Practice

This seminar provides a forum for discussing common human service experiences, including pathways to professional careers and practice related issues, and includes an introduction to confidentiality and privacy in the examination of ethical dilemmas. Students will become familiar with the theoretical bases of major counseling approaches, and the course will illuminate the connection between theory and practice in mental health settings. Students will review the efficacy of a major counseling approach in addressing a specific psychological issue by reviewing current research literature. In addition, students in the course will learn about career options in the discipline, engage in reflection about their emerging professional identities, and participate in activities to sharpen their career readiness. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HS 210 with a grade of C or better; and permission of the Internship Coordinator required.

HS215 - Foundation Internship

This internship provides human service students the opportunity to experience field work. Training in the skills by which students can offer direct and indirect assistance to the client population is provided. Prerequisites: HS 210 with a grade of C or better; and permission of Internship Coordinator. Corequisite: HS 217.

HS217 - Foundations of Ethical Fieldwork

This seminar is taken concurrently with the Foundation Internship (HS 215). The seminar provides a forum for discussing common human service experiences, including pathways to professional careers and practice-related issues, and includes an introduction to ethical issues such as confidentiality and privacy in the context of an examination of ethical dilemmas. It also gives students an opportunity to build skills necessary to offer direct and indirect assistance to clients at internship sites. Students review professional and research literature in relation to a topic connected to the internship experience. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HS210 with a grade of C or better; and permission of the Internship Coordinator required. Co-requisite: HS 215.

HS415 - Advanced Internship I

Seniors who have met program requirements spend 125 hours in an approved supervised internship. Prerequisites: HS 215, HS 217, with a grade of C or better; and permission of the Internship Coordinator; Co-requisite: HS 417.

HS417 - Field Intervention Strategies

This seminar is taken concurrently with Advanced Internship I (HS 415). Students integrate theory learned throughout their college career with their fieldwork experience. The seminar further develops professional behaviors such as record keeping, creating and maintaining supervisory relationships, conflict resolution, and job effectiveness. Students are also offered an opportunity to analyze cases and tasks assigned to them in their field placements, providing a theoretical framework for understanding them. There is an intensive examination of the ethical considerations involved in working with clients. Students identify and develop a research topic and conduct an extensive review of current literature on a topic related to their internship. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HS 215, HS 217 with a grade of C or better, and permission of the Internship Coordinator; Co-requisite: HS 415.

HS425 - Advanced Internship II

This seminar is a continuation of HS 415. Students spend 125 hours working in an approved supervised field site. Prerequisite: HS 415 with a grade of C or better; Co-requisite: HS 427.

HS427 - Systems & Organizational Change

This capstone seminar is a continuation of Field Intervention Strategies (HS417) and is taken concurrently with Advanced Internship II (HS425). Building on knowledge and skills gained throughout the Social Sciences program, students continue to integrate theory with practice through seminar discussion and internship-related experiences. There is an increased focus on the delivery of services, examination of ethical dilemmas, and analysis of the broader systems in which services are delivered and policies are formulated. Students also have an opportunity to explore career development issues through examination of the graduate school and employment processes. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course and also has a strong public speaking component. Prerequisites: HS 415, HS 417 with a grade of C or better; and either PSYC 331 or SOC 331. Corequisite: HS 425.

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application-based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH108X - Mathematics of Design

This course explores elements of mathematics within the design field from the incorporation of algebra to concepts of geometry. Students will have the opportunity to integrate numerical fluency, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning and communicating quantitative information through group problem solving and class discussions. Topics include pattern drafting, layouts cutting, revenue, cost, and profit modeling, measurement systems, Euclidean geometry, and spatial reasoning.

MATH110X - Introduction to Logic

An introduction to symbolic logic, including sentential and predicate logic. Its purpose is to familiarize you with certain formal methods for representing and evaluating arguments and reasoning. These methods can be used for any subject matter. The focus is on translating English statements into symbolic notation, and evaluating arguments for validity using formal proof techniques.This course is recommended for data science students, math majors, students who are contemplating graduate school admissions tests, and for general knowledge and application (so, for instance, all computer programming is based on fundamental logic rules and applications). s

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH202 - Applied Mathematics for Business

This course will be a “Choose Option across Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Event Management, Hospitality Management, Accounting and Resort and Casino Management Majors. This course will introduce a variety of mathematical principles and techniques that emphasize applications in business and economics. Topics covered include: systems of linear equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear programming, as well as the development and applications of rates of change. Prerequisite: MATH106

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Prerequisite: MATH205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215 - Discrete Math

Topics will include elementary logic and set theory, equivalence relations, functions, counting arguments, inductively defined sets, recursion, graphs and trees, Boolean algebra and combinatorial circuits, and countability arguments. Prerequisite: MATH203 with a C or better.

MATH303X - Problem Solving

This course will be an exploration into the mathematics exemplified in high quality high school and undergraduate mathematics competitions and mathematical research. The emphasis will be placed on building a repertoire of mathematical strategies and tactics, then applying these methods in unfamiliar situations. Topics will include: Combinatorics, Binomial Theorem, Conditional Probability, Roots of Unity, Symmetric Polynomials, Polynomial Interpolation, and topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry. Students will hone their ability to solve mathematical problems through hands-on practice and obtain an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and tools of the problem solver as illustrated by the textbook and the instructor. Strategies and tools for solving problems include, but are not limited to: •Draw a Diagram•Systematic Lists•Eliminate Possibilities•Matrix Logic•Look for a Pattern•Guess and Check•Sub Problems•Unit Analysis•Solve An Easier Related Problem•Physical Representations•Work Backwards•Venn Diagrams•Finite Differences

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem-solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure.

MATH305 - Advanced Statistics

Quantitative statistical tools for modern data analysis are used across a range of disciplines and industries to guide organizational, societal and scientific advances. Using data sets from across a variety of fields, the focus will be on applications and analysis. Topics include two sample confidence intervals, Chi Square tests, multiple regression analysis, ANOVA, non- parametric tests, sampling, and simulation. Prerequisite: Math 208 or Math 209

MATH306X - Mathematical Content Knowledge for Ed

This course engages students in hands-on, in-depth, practical applications of the mathematical reasoning and computational techniques taught in MATH 304. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Prerequisite: Permission of Education Program Director

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vector functions, advanced techniques of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH322X - Special Topics in Mathematics

Special Topics in Mathematics

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants. Applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, economics, connectivity of networks, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Capstone Seminar

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

MATH706X - Mathematical Content Knowledge for Ed

This course engages students in hands-on, in-depth, practical applications of the mathematical reasoning and computational techniques for teachers. This course is for students seeking elementary or moderate disabilities licensure.

PHIL101 - Introduction to Philosophy

This course is an introduction to the basic problems of philosophy, such as the sources of knowledge, the relationship between mind and body, freedom as opposed to determinism, and the nature of values.

PHIL106 - World Religions

This course provides an overview of the major religious traditions: Taoism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Central themes from these traditions are studied through selected scriptures and texts of each tradition.

PHIL109X - Introduction to Logic

An introduction to symbolic logic, including sentential and predicate logic. Its purpose is to familiarize you with certain formal methods for representing and evaluating arguments and reasoning. These methods can be used for any subject matter. The focus is on translating English statements into symbolic notation, and evaluating arguments for validity using formal proof techniques.This course is recommended for data science students, math majors, students who are contemplating graduate school admissions tests, and for general knowledge and application (so, for instance, all computer programming is based on fundamental logic rules and applications).

PHIL203 - Existentialism

This course examines such questions as “Who am I?” or “What relationship do I have with myself,with others, and with the universe?” Readings are taken from Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Buber, Jaspers, Sartre, and others. The influence of existentialism on psychology, society, art, religion, and politics is explored.

PHIL208 - Knowing & Reality

This course is a comparative analysis of Eastern and Western perceptions of reality in philosophy and literature, beginning with an historical overview of theories of knowledge and truth as well as the psychological factors in learning.

PHIL302 - Ethical Reasoning

This course will address the interaction between the lives we lead and the application of traditional (and some nontraditional) ethical theories and principles to important decision points in our lives. Students will take on real-life ethical problems and dilemmas for each class; each student will be responsible for presenting a number of issues, as well as for guiding the discussion of those issues in class. The problems we address will largely span a lifetime of experiences and concerns. Students will also write several papers that evaluate formal arguments, using standard tools of critical thinking and philosophy. The course is discussion based, so a willingness to read carefully, to think critically, and to engage in classroom presentations and discussions is essential. Prerequisite: Junior standing, MDSC203 & ENG102.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC104 - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive. This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well-being. This course would substitute for PSYC101 (Psychological Perspectives) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class but can be taken in addition to PSYC101.

PSYC111 - Generations in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC201 - Psychology of Drugs & Behavior

The course examines the relationship between drugs and behavior, including evidence about the effects of drugs on the brain. Several classes of drugs, including chemically or psychologically addictive substances, psychoactive and therapeutic agents, as well as recreational drugs, are examined. Drug use is related to psychological variables such as personality structure and interpersonal relationships, and theories of addictive processes and factors influencing drug use are examined, as are treatment strategies. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC205 - Human Sexuality

This course is designed to introduce factual information about gender identity and gender role theories, sexual preference and sexual orientation, and psychosexual development. The course examines issues related to research on human sexuality and behavior, as well as sexual education, sexual disorders, and societal impacts on sexuality. Students are challenged to think critically about many issues surrounding human sexuality and all of its manifestations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC209X - Psyc of the Black American Experience

This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Blacks in the United States, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. Connections between Africa, the Caribbean, and Black America will be examined with respect to culture, belief systems, and values. At the same time, we will also explore the many differences in history, culture, and experience within numerous groups and individuals of African-descent in the U. S. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC218 - Dynamics of Small Groups

This class examines the basic theory and application necessary to understand and facilitate small groups. Topics may include group types, formation, roles and stages; group process; cultural awareness; group interventions and ethics within the field of psychology and human service; therapeutic value of groups; and the family, classroom, and peers as small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course will provide you with an introduction to central concepts/issues related to the developmental phase of adolescence from historical, psychological, social, and cultural perspectives. The course will also focus on major problems and challenges facing adolescents in modern society. Prerequisite PSYC101

PSYC226 - Living & Learning with Dementia

Careers in aging are one of the fastest growing fields for students with a background in psychology, human services, and related areas. . Do you want to explore working with older adults? Do you have family members or friends who has experienced memory loss as they have aged and you want to learn why and how to help them? People in our society have the opportunity to live very long lives; however, with age comes the possibility that some individuals will experience cognitive changes like those associated with dementia (e.g., Alzheimer’s Disease). In this course, students will learn about the bio-behavioral determinants of these changes along with their social and personal implications. Drawing on a dementia-friendly framework, students will also learn to design and lead interactive activities with older adults living at Lasell Village who have experienced cognitive change, offering everyone an opportunity to learn from each other in a collaborative pre-professional class setting.

PSYC229X - Addictions

Addictions

PSYC231 - Stress and Trauma

This course provides an overview of stress and trauma including physical, psychological and sociocultural implications. Emphasis is made on the stress-trauma response including the neurobiology of information and memory processing and attachment theory. Evidence-based prevention and intervention strategies are explored in consideration of mind-body research on stress and stress related disorders.

PSYC232X - Death & Dying

Death & Dying

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC304 - Sensation & Perception

It is estimated that our five senses take in 11,000,000 bits of information per second, yet we weed out much of this information. Our unique ability to sense but selectively perceive allows us to survive and live our life without being bombarded by information. In this class, students will experience and examine how humans sense and perceive the world. Topics covered will include the sensory pathways, perceptual processing, and how we create meaning from our senses. We will discuss the orienting senses, skin senses (such as touch and pain), chemical senses (such as smell), hearing, vision, and the perception of time. Perceptual processes will include physiological, psychophysical, ecological, motivational, and computational. Pre-requisite: PSYC101

PSYC307 - Forensic Psychology

This course deals with the application of psychological knowledge to the judicial process and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include effects of defendant, juror and case characteristics on verdicts, variables affecting eyewitness accuracy, identification and testimony, and the role of forensic psychologists in competency and criminal responsibility assessments as well as criminal profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or PSYC 101.

PSYC308 - Black Psychology

This course is designed to introduce the varied psychological experiences of Black individuals, including the cultural, sociohistorical, and political influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. The course will examine the experiences of Black individuals living in the United States, but will also draw strong connections to the experiences of Black individuals throughout the African Diaspora including Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and Western Europe. Several topics will be explored within the Black psychology paradigm including racial identity, racism and discrimination, kinship and family, religion and spirituality, and achievement and schooling. Throughout the course, a central objective will be to consider how knowledge of such topics can be used to promote mental health and wellness among these populations. Students will be strongly encouraged to discuss current topics and controversies as they relate to the Black psychology paradigm, and to use course material to design a service learning project for the neighboring community. PSYC308X substitutes for PSYC316/SOC301 for Psychology, Sociology, and Human Services majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of instructor

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

PSYC318 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. Both traditional and contemporary theories of psychopathology are reviewed. Emphasis is also placed on the tools, techniques, and process of both the diagnosis and the treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 202 or PSYC 220.

PSYC322 - Abnormal Child Development

This course examines common psychological disorders that affect children and adolescents. Students review factors that contribute to emotional, behavioral, cognitive and social problems in children and adolescents, as well as specific diagnostic criteria of psychological disorders. In addition, treatment of childhood disorders is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 221.

PSYC323 - Brain Function & Dysfunction

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 & MATH 208

PSYC331 - Experimental Design in Psychology

PSYC331?–?Experimental Design in Psychology?This laboratory course covers concepts of the scientific method in psychology including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. As part of the lab,?students learn to use statistical software to create a database and perform statistical analyses. Prerequisites: MATH208 and either PSYC101 or SOC101 or approval of Program Chair.

PSYC333 - Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and Permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

PSYC345 - Assessment of Individual Differences

This course studies a wide variety of tests and measurements used to assess intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality in clinical and counseling psychology, in education, and in business. Consideration of the history and theory of these tests is complemented by discussion of practical concerns related to their selection, their administration, and their interpretation in specific settings. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and PSYC 101.

PSYC714 - Psyc of Sport, Injury & Rehabilitation

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the theory and application of psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation. Topics covered include cognitive appraisal, emotional response, behavioral response, motivation, mental skills training and use, psychological antecedents of injury, adherence to rehabilitation/exercise, sociocultural factors and psychology of injury, and research methods related to the psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation.

WRT100I - Writing Skills: Multilingual Writers

This course, designed to prepare multilingual writers for the core Writing I - Writing II sequence, addresses the development of reading and writing competencies crucial to the successful completion of college coursework. Students work on their writing skills through multiple drafts and revisions of essays from different genres. Students are provided with time during the second half of class to work on their writing while the instructor and a tutor are present to provide assistance. Students must receive a grade of "C" or higher in order to pass this course.

WRT101 - Writing I

In this course, students gain understanding of and confidence in strategies for effective writing by composing and reading in a variety of genres. The course emphasizes writing as a process and focuses on the rhetorical choices writers make. Students engage critically with sources by examining how genre, context, purpose, credibility, and bias work together to create meaning and impact audiences. Students who choose to take Writing I Workshop are provided with time during class to work on their writing while the instructor and a writing tutor are present to provide assistance. Students must earn a “C” or higher in order to pass this course

WRT102 - Writing II

This course is a continuation of Writing I and focuses on research and public writing. Theme-based courses provide students with lenses to explore issues of interest and develop their reading, research, and writing skills. Students work with a topic of their choice, broadly based on the course theme. Assignments build upon each other, lead up to a researched position paper, and culminate in a public piece. Students who choose to take Writing II Workshop are provided with time during class to work on their writing while the instructor and a writing tutor are present to provide assistance. Students must earn a grade of “C” or higher in order to pass this course. Prerequisite: WRT 101

WRT106 - Writing I Bridge

This course is designed for students who completed WRT 101 Writing I or Writing I Workshop and earned a grade between a C- and D-. Students will finish meeting the course objectives of WRT 101 through intensive daily writing, the redevelopment of two major writing assignments from WRT 101, peer review, virtual meetings with the instructor, and the creation of a final metacognitive essay.

WRT107 - OralCommunication & Presentations Skills

This course is designed to help international students develop confidence in their oral English skills, so that they can participate freely in classroom discussions and present comfortably in the classroom context. Students work at their English listening and speaking skills in order to improve their English fluency and comprehensibility, benefiting from the regular practice and from instructor feedback; coursework focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary, and English usage conventions. Course activities include speaking opportunities, vocabulary building exercises, group discussions, and a series of presentations scheduled during the semester.

Cristina Haverty

Dean, School of Health Sciences; Professor of Athletic Training

Office: Science and Technology Center

Lori Rosenthal

Dean, School of Humanities, Education, Justice & Social Sciences; Professor of Psychology

Office: Plummer

Janice Barrett

Professor of Communication; Chair, Graduate Communication Program

Office: Donahue 108

Keith Belmore

Associate Professor of Athletic Training and Program Director of Athletic Training

Office: STC 104N

Linda Bucci

Professor & Program Chair of Justice Studies, Graduate Program Chair of Criminal Justice

Office: Plummer

Sarah Giasullo

Assistant Professor of Athletic Training, Coordinator of Clinical Education and Internships for Athletic Training and Exercise Science

Office: STC 104T

Elizabeth Hartmann

Professor of Education

Office: Brennan Library

Janet Huetteman

Associate Professor of Marketing, Graduate Program Chair for MBA/Management

Office: 23 Maple Street, Office #5

Young-Tae Kim

Associate Professor of Sport Management

Office: Science and Technology Center

Ron Laham

Assistant Professor of Exercise Science

Office: Science and Technology Center

Luis Lopez-Preciado

Associate Professor of Communication

Office: Donahue

Amy Maynard

Associate Professor of Education

Office: Brennan Library

Meryl Perlson

Professor of Communication, Program Chair of Communication

Office: Donahue 107

Karin Raye

Assistant Professor of Legal Studies

Office: 70 Maple/IC3

Matthew Reilly

Dean of the School of Business, Assistant Professor of Marketing

Office: DeArment

Claudia Rinaldi

The Joan Weiler Arnow ’49 Professor/Professor of Education, Program Chair of Education

Office: Brennan Library

Daniel Sargeant

Associate Professor of Sport Management, Graduate Program Coordinator of Sport Management

Office: Science and Technology Center

Nancy Waldron

Professor of Marketing; Program Chair of Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship and International Business

Office: DeArment

Martin Walsh

Professor of Management

Office: DeArment

Brian Wardyga

Professor of Communication; General Manager, 109.2FM WLAS & LCTV

Office: Brennan Library, G04F

Edward Weeks

Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice

Office: Winslow

Catherine Zeek

Professor Emerita

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application-based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

PHIL302 - Ethical Reasoning

This course will address the interaction between the lives we lead and the application of traditional (and some nontraditional) ethical theories and principles to important decision points in our lives. Students will take on real-life ethical problems and dilemmas for each class; each student will be responsible for presenting a number of issues, as well as for guiding the discussion of those issues in class. The problems we address will largely span a lifetime of experiences and concerns. Students will also write several papers that evaluate formal arguments, using standard tools of critical thinking and philosophy. The course is discussion based, so a willingness to read carefully, to think critically, and to engage in classroom presentations and discussions is essential. Prerequisite: Junior standing, MDSC203 & ENG102.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

WRT101 - Writing I

In this course, students gain understanding of and confidence in strategies for effective writing by composing and reading in a variety of genres. The course emphasizes writing as a process and focuses on the rhetorical choices writers make. Students engage critically with sources by examining how genre, context, purpose, credibility, and bias work together to create meaning and impact audiences. Students who choose to take Writing I Workshop are provided with time during class to work on their writing while the instructor and a writing tutor are present to provide assistance. Students must earn a “C” or higher in order to pass this course

WRT102 - Writing II

This course is a continuation of Writing I and focuses on research and public writing. Theme-based courses provide students with lenses to explore issues of interest and develop their reading, research, and writing skills. Students work with a topic of their choice, broadly based on the course theme. Assignments build upon each other, lead up to a researched position paper, and culminate in a public piece. Students who choose to take Writing II Workshop are provided with time during class to work on their writing while the instructor and a writing tutor are present to provide assistance. Students must earn a grade of “C” or higher in order to pass this course. Prerequisite: WRT 101

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.