Academic Programs

Public Relations

Public Relations

The Communication Major with a concentration in Public Relations Concentration at Lasell has a professional focus, rooted in Connected Learning, that seeks to educate students by promoting self-expression, academic exploration and critical thinking in academic, civic, and career-relevant areas.

Lasell College provides an active learning environment that robustly links learning to multiple experiences.  The community is a collaborative one powered by possibilities, enhanced by high social interaction and meaningful practices. 100% of students complete at least one internship to gain experience and build their resumes. Located just outside of Boston, Lasell is a professional and educational hub of opportunities with small class sizes to provide a co-constructed, supportive learning space. At Lasell, many doors are opened for students, they just have to choose which one to go through.

  • Students in the Public Relations concentration develop a variety of communications skills such as writing press releases, biographies, news advisories, brochures and other PR related materials and speaking effectively in public during a crisis.
  • Lasell is home to several student- run publications, including: the 1851 Chronicle student newspaper; Tarnished, which celebrates the visual and written arts; and Polished, our award-winning fashion magazine.
  • Lasell's distinguished faculty supports the success of students by linking their academic expertise with professional experience in global communications, social media, film, broadcasting, and journalism.
  • Lasell offers a Fifth Year option to students so they can complete both their bachelor's degree and a Master's of Science in Communication (MSC) in as little as five years.
  • The Communication Major is intentionally multidisciplinary and has concentrations in Creative AdvertisingEntertainment MediaJournalism and Media WritingPublic RelationsRadio and Video Production, and Sports Communication

For more information about the Public Relations curriculum, click here.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM103 - Human Communication (KP)

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM399 - Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop professional objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. In this seminar students identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will develop effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students apply search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. The internship course is comprised of a minimum of 150 hours in the field, the weekly seminar, and its assignments, including an oral presentation. Students also write weekly reflections on their experience, complete written assignments, and do an oral presentation to a group of their peers. The field supervisor contributes to the student’s learning through guidance, feedback and evaluation of the students work.

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.