Academic Programs

Health Science

Health Sciences

The Health Science Major at Lasell has a professional focus, rooted in Connected Learning, that seeks to educate students by promoting self-expression, academic exploration and critical thinking in academic, civic, and career-relevant areas.

  • The Health Science major at Lasell is a pre-professional program, designed to prepare students for graduate work in fields including nurse practitioners, genetic counseling, physician's assistants, physical therapy, and occupational therapy, while still providing students the option to focus on business and management to go into such fields as healthcare management or administration.
  • Lasell's distinguished faculty supports the success of students by linking academic expertise with professional experience.

Request more information about the Health Science Major:

Undergraduate admission applications may be completed and submitted online at, Apply NOW, or via Lasell's membership with the Common Application.

Apply on paper:
Print and complete a PDF of the Lasell College Undergraduate Application and return to:

Office of Admission
Lasell College
1844 Commonwealth Avenue
Newton, MA 02466

My experiences as a practicing athletic trainer turn the classroom’s hypothetical situations into real case scenarios.

Associate Professor of Athletic Training

Read More About Professor Haverty

BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Corequisite: BIO 101L.

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

BIO104 - Foundations in the Health Professions

This course provides a description of the various health care professions including educational and licensing requirements. The concepts of professionalism, health care teams, and current health care policies will be covered. Students will increase their knowledge of the various health care professions through job shadowing.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Corequisite: BIO 206L.

BIO211 - Microbiology

This course introduces the microbial world and the laboratory required for its study. Topics include the basic characteristics of fungi, algae, bacteria, and viruses. Topics and applications that relate to humans are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO 102

BIO301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course also describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

BIO340 - Research Methods

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industry including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208

BIO420 - Field Experience in Health Science

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 200 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 340 and Permission of Department Chair.

BIO430 - Health Science Capstone

The capstone course prepares students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for undergraduate research. Students will develop an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 340

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH 106 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM 203L.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubiity equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: CHEM 203. Corequisite: CHEM 204L.

CHEM301 - Human Biochemistry

This course is an in-depth study of biochemical substances and their reaction in the body with major emphasis placed on metabolism at the cellular level and examined in the tissues of the various organs where these reactions occur. Correlation of biochemical processes underlying pathologic conditions are made whenever practical. Prerequisite: CHEM 202.

EXSC107 - Lifestyles & Human Behavior

This course provides students with foundational concepts associated with the healthcare and fitness industry. Through connected learning projects, emphasis is placed on understanding musculoskeletal anatomy and medical nomenclature

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC302 - Exercise Physiology

This course explores the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the structure and function of the body with an emphasis on the acute responses of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neuromuscular systems. Various concepts related to physical fitness such as body composition, skill related fitness, and cardiovascular fitness are introduced. The practical applications of major principles are demonstrated in a laboratory setting. Students are advised that the capability to exercise moderately and maximally may be required and that documentation of a medical examination indicating cardiopulmonary status and exercise capacity may be requested by the instructor. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS 111L.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS 112L.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.