2013 - 2014 Academic Catalog

Exercise Science

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions Department Faculty

Exercise Science specialists are knowledgeable in the areas of human performance assessment, fitness, and strength and conditioning. As members of the health care community, they are dedicated to health enhancement and are responsible for the development and coordination of exercise programs as well as the training and education of patients and clients. Using exercise as a preventative measure or a rehabilitative tool, exercise science specialists work in a variety of settings including professional athletics, public schools, hospitals, rehabilitation clinics, fitness centers, universities and research institutions.

Lasell College's Exercise Science program is accredited by theCommission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) in accordance with guidelines set forth by the Commission on Accreditation for Exercise Science (CoAES). In addition to being CoAES and CAHHEP accredited, the program is endorsedby the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). The Exercise Science program curriculum provides knowledge, skills and abilities, to prepare students for entry into the exercise science industry in a variety of specialty areas. Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible to take the NSCA, Certified Strength and Conditioning Exam, National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM), Certified Personal Trainer Exam, and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), Health Fitness Specialist (HFS) Exam. Additional cost is associated with each certification exam. While enrolled in the program, students are afforded the opportunity to acquire certifications in CPR/AEDfor the Professional Rescuer, first aid and coaching.

Coursework focuses on the study of the cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system, human metabolism, and behavioral sciences. Utilizing our connected learning philosophy, concepts, theories and skills learned in the classroom are reinforced in our various exercise science laboratories, service learning projects and internships.

Students are immediately introduced to discipline specific concepts and skills during the first year in the program. During the final year of the program students are actively engaged in the the capstone course, emphasizing research and two exercise science field experiences that offer students the opportunity to specialize in areas of interest.. The connected-learning experiences allow students to apply their knowledge of exercise science to work settings in universitys, fitness facilities, hospitals, clinics, and research centers. Lasell's affiliation with nationally known organizations in the Boston area provides students the opportunity to gain invaluable experience while working with leaders in the field.

Academic standards for the Exercise Science program include grades of "C" or better in all EXSC, BIO and AT courses.
In order to be admitted initially into the Exercise Science Major, students need to have completed the following coursework with grades of C or better: two years of high school math (preferably algebra and geometry) and one year of lab science (preferably biology). Students may substitute a year of college algebra and biology with grades of C or better in place of the high school coursework.

The Exercise Science curriculum fulfills most of the prerequisites for graduate study in the health professions, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, sports performance and kinesiology. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Science.

Students with associate degrees in allied health and related fields can enter the Exercise Science program and complete their degree in two years (assuming all graduation requirements have been fulfilled).

Transfer applicants may be accepted into the Exercise Science at Lasell College based upon their previous record of academic performance. Transfer students will only be considered on a space-available basis, as admission is competitive in nature, and need to be aware of the possibility of additional time beyond eight academic semesters of college work in order to complete all of the program requirements due to the sequencing of courses and their prerequisites.

Undeclared-Allied Health students wishing to transfer in to the Exercise Science Program will be considered on a space-available basis following their freshmen year. A change of major form should be filed with the Program Director at the end of the spring semester of their freshmen year. The applicants' grades for their freshmen year will then be reviewed. Specifically, a "C" or better is needed for all AT, EXSC and BIO courses. A GPA of 2.0 or better will be required for admission into the Exercise Science Program.

Program Fee
Each Exercise Science student is charged a program fee for each semester. The program fee is used to provide instructional supplies, discipline specific technology, guest speaker honorariums, educational opportunities outside of the classroom and miscellaneous materials/supplies needed to maximize student learning.

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Exercise Science:

Goal 1: Communication
Upon completion of the major program of study in Exercise Science, students will be able to:

  1. Conduct literature reviews, research writing, and formal professional written work
  2. Engage in disciplinary research
  3. Understand and create discipline specific written work (i.e., exercise prescriptions)
  4. Engage in reflective writing for the purpose of self-assessment
  5. Interact professionally and educate clients, patients, peers, colleagues, and medical/athletic personnel
  6. Utilize and incorporate technology into discipline specific written and oral work

Goal 2: Ethical Decision Making
Upon completion of the major program of study in Exercise Science, students will be able to:

  1. Adhere to the ACSM, NSCA and NASM code of ethics
  2. Identify ethical issues
  3. Translate ethical issues into responsible actions in the exercise science field

Goal 3: Professional Competence/ Application of KSA learning domains
Upon completion of the major program of study in Exercise Science, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge (cognitive) in core exercise science content areas defined by the Committee on Accreditation for the Exercise Sciences (CoAES)
  2. Demonstrate skills (psychomotor) in core exercise science content areas defined by the Committee on Accreditation for the Exercise Sciences (CoAES)
  3. Demonstrate abilities (affective) in core exercise science content areas defined by the Committee on Accreditation for the Exercise Sciences (CoAES)

Goal 4: Professional Decision Making/Critical Thinking
Upon completion of the major program of study in Exercise Science, students will be able to:

  1. Incorporate evidence based practice into discipline specific programming
  2. Create discipline specific programs to address special patient population and individual needs
  3. Modify discipline specific programs to address special patient population and individual needs

Goal 5: Professional and Personal Development
Upon completion of the major program of study in Exercise Science, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the need to engage in continuous education regarding the KSAs
  2. Model professional conduct and behavior

General Education Core Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 24 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120
* In order to qualify for Clinical Education, students must obtain and maintain certificates in First Aid/ CPR. Students will receive training in the prevention of transmission of blood-borne pathogens prior to clinical affiliations. Some clinical sites may require a CORI check of students.

** The following courses may require additional coursework depending upon Math placement:
Math 203: Pre-calculus
Math 208: Statistics

*** Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:
Moral and Ethical/Multicultural
AT 104: Professional Interactions & Ethics
Scientific
BIO 205 & BIO 205L: Anatomy & Physiology I
Quantitative
MATH 208: Statistics
Psychological and Societal
PSYC 101: Intro to Psychology

Program Course Retake Policy
Students in the program are limited to only one retake of two required AT, BIO or EXSC course during their enrollment in the program. Students will progress through the program on a case by case basis after meeting with the Department Chair to review their transcript if more than one retake of a required course is needed.

Retention Policy
The following requirements exist for progression through the Lasell College Exercise Science Program. The coursework, with associated prerequisites, need to be completed in sequence to successfully fulfill the guidelines for progression through the academic program. In order to advance into the second semester of your first year in the Exercise Science program, you must receive a grade of "C" or better in all AT, BIO and EXSC courses. Failure to do so will necessitate the repetition of this course and the inability to progress in the program.

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
AT103 Techniques of Emergency Care 3
AT104 Professional Interactions 3
AT202 Foundations in Sport Medicine 4
AT301 Pathophysiology 3
BIO205 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO206 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
EXSC101 Essentials of Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2
EXSC107 Lifestyles & Human Behavior 3
EXSC209 Performance Nutrition 3
EXSC211 Personal Fitness 3
EXSC222 Kinesiology 4
EXSC302 Exercise Physiology 4
EXSC304 Exercise Testing & Prescription 4
EXSC305 Strength Training & Conditioning 4
EXSC307 Advanced Sports Performance 3
EXSC340 Research Concepts 3
EXSC401 Exercise Science Seminar II 1
EXSC403 Exercise for Special Populations 3
EXSC405 Organization & Healthcare Administration 3
EXSC406 Advanced Topics in Exercise Physiology 3
EXSC410 Exercise Science Field Experience I 3
EXSC420 Exercise Science Field Experience II 6
EXSC430 Exercise Science Capstone 3
MATH203 Precalculus 3
MATH208 Statistics 3
PHYS111 General Physics I 4
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives 3
PSYC240 Sport Psychology 3
Choose 1 from the following:
PSYC221 Child Development 3
PSYC223 Adolescent Psychology 3

General Education Core Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 24 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120
* In order to qualify for Clinical Education, students must obtain and maintain certificates in First Aid/ CPR. Students will receive training in the prevention of transmission of blood-borne pathogens prior to clinical affiliations. Some clinical sites may require a CORI check of students.

** The following courses may require additional coursework depending upon Math placement:
Math 203: Pre-calculus
Math 208: Statistics

*** Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:
Moral and Ethical/Multicultural
AT 104: Professional Interactions & Ethics
Scientific
BIO 205 & BIO 205L: Anatomy & Physiology I
Quantitative
MATH 208: Statistics
Psychological and Societal
PSYC 101: Intro to Psychology

Program Course Retake Policy
Students in the program are limited to only one retake of two required AT, BIO or EXSC course during their enrollment in the program. Students will progress through the program on a case by case basis after meeting with the Department Chair to review their transcript if more than one retake of a required course is needed.

Retention Policy
The following requirements exist for progression through the Lasell College Exercise Science Program. The coursework, with associated prerequisites, need to be completed in sequence to successfully fulfill the guidelines for progression through the academic program. In order to advance into the second semester of your first year in the Exercise Science program, you must receive a grade of "C" or better in all AT, BIO and EXSC courses. Failure to do so will necessitate the repetition of this course and the inability to progress in the program.

ANTH103 - Human Origins

This course considers the morphological, behavioral and life history features that distinguish the primates from other mammals, and the hominoids from other primates. We begin with an overview of the primates and their behavioral ecology, and then explore in detail the adaptations of each of the major groups of extant primates. Finally, we apply our knowledge of morphology and behavioral patterns in living primates to the fossil record.

ENG208 - The Structure of the English Language

This course focuses on essential elements of the structure of the English language: its phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), and syntax (sentence structure). Students draw on their own knowledge of language as they examine spoken English; they then study the relationship between spoken and written language. As students discuss issues pertinent to teachers and to writers, the relevance of linguistic analysis both to written language development and to writing practice is considered. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG209 - Intro to Literature & Literary Studies

This is a foundations course required for the major and the minor in English. The course provides an introduction to a variety of forms and styles in poetry, drama, short story, fiction and memoir, or essay, including European, African, North, Central and South American, and Asian literature. The focus is on interpreting texts, including an introduction to preferred approaches of various schools of interpretation and standards for supporting one’s interpretation. Students become familiar with the conventional elements of each genre and the terminology of critical interpretation. The course introduces print and database tools for research on literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG210 - Survey of American Literature

This course surveys representative periods, authors, or genres in American literature from beginnings in Native American oral literatures through the present day. Individual sections organize study of classic and contemporary texts around particular themes, such as Queering American Literatures, American Migrations, Hemispheric American Literature, or Americans on the Edge: "Frontiers" in the American Imagination. Individual sections also trace twentieth or twenty-first century movements to their roots in or resistance to earlier periods or movements, such as captivity narratives and colonial "Brief and True Relations," American Romanticism and the American Renaissance, escaped slave narratives and the Civil War, Reconstruction and Reform, American Modernism, Harlem Renaissance, Beat Generation, Southern Gothic, or Postmodernism. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG218 - British Literature

This course surveys British writing in poetry, fiction, and drama, with a focus on key periods in the development of British literature. Emphasis is on representative writers in each period. Periods and movements surveyed include Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary or Postmodern. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG304 - Stories of Origin

This course considers both written and oral traditional texts. Texts originating in expressions of faith, devotion, cultural origin or expression, and ethnic identity are examined, with attention to narration, characterization, sacred mystery, moral /ethical content, and interpretation. Readings include selections from Ancient Greek and Roman literature; the Bible and/or the Qur’an, and world myths and folktales. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

ENG312 - Literature of Post-Colonial World

In this course, students consider issues, movements, or traditions in literatures that respond to a history of colonization and/or imperialism. Latin American, African, and Asian cultures or traditions are emphasized in English or in English translations; issues addressed might include matters of publication and criticism, myths about the "third world," nationalism, fundamentalism, human rights, technology, and cultural resistance. Examples include The Novel in India, Caribbean Dub Poetry, Prison Writing, Major South African Writers, Magic Realism. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

ENG313 - American Multi Ethnic Literature

This course focuses on the history, variety, and aesthetic conventions of one or more racial-ethnic traditions in American writing. Individual courses might focus on key forms or authors; distinct traditions such as African-American, Latino, Asian-American, or Native American literature; or a survey across several traditions. Examples include Barack Obama and the African-American Tradition, Contemporary Latino Literatures, or Haiti and the US in Haitian-American Writing. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

ENG340 - Classics of World Literature

This course explores representative fiction, poetry, or drama by major figures in world literature, centering on a theme such as love, tragedy, comedy, immortality, madness, wasteland, quest for knowledge, voyages, or exploration. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

ENV211 - Environmental Science

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell College on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

ENV220 - World Geography

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

HIST203 - The History of Women in U.S.

This course explores the social history of women in the United States, beginning in the colonial period and ending with an examination of twen­tieth century issues. Emphasis is on the image of women held during these periods, in contrast to actual conditions. Contributions of women to social change and the growth of women’s move­ments are also analyzed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST204 - Recent American History

This course focuses on the presidencies beginning with Kennedy to the present. Work is divided roughly into three areas: foreign affairs; domestic politics; economic, social, and cultural needs. Topics range from the Vietnam War to the Iraq War, the weakening of Congress and the expansion of the presidency, the women's movement, changes in popular culture, and domestic economic developments. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST207 - African American History

This course explores the history of African Americans in the United States from their African beginnings to the present. It traces the lives and status of African Americans, enslaved and emancipated, as they confronted the barriers of legal, institutional, and cultural prejudices; examines the socioeconomic and political experiences of blacks in America; and investigates strategies of accommodation, resistance, and protest in the struggle of African Americans to gain human and first-class citizenship rights. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST208 - Sub-Saharan Africa after 1800

This survey of sub-Saharan African history explores the ongoing story of African political, social, and economic developments from the post trans-Atlantic slave trade period to the present. The course includes treatment of the impact of European merchants, missionaries, and adventurers on Africa from the time immediately preceding imperialism and colonialism up through the emergence of nationalism and decolonization and liberation movements. The new nation-states, their post-colonial economies, and their developing systems of justice, education, and rule are investigated. Finally, topics such as soil erosion, disease, conservation, famine, and Africa’s relationships with the wider world are discussed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST209 - China from 1600 to Present

This course is a survey of modern Chinese history from the founding of the Qing Dynasty in the seventeenth century to Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms of the 1990s. Special attention will be paid to modernization, Western and Japanese imperialism in China, and the rise of Communism under Mao Zedong. In addition to learning about important milestones in Chinese history, students will also be introduced to aspects of Chinese art, culture, and women's issues through primary sources translated into English. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST210 - Latin Amer Colonial Period to Present

This survey looks at Latin American history from pre-Columbian to contemporary times. Emphasis is on native cultures, the “discovery” of the New World, European presence, colonialism, imperialism, the creation of the peasantry, wars of independence, the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, slavery and racism, development and underdevelopment, the Catholic Church, liberation theology, poverty, and revolution. Major emphasis in South America is on Argentina, Columbia, Peru, Chile, Venezuela, and the Portuguese speaking nation of Brazil. The course also includes examination of foreign intervention and inner instability in Mexico, including struggles for democracy, economic rights, and social justice. In the Hispanic Caribbean and Central America, especially, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama, land and labor systems, gender relations, race and ethnicity, and varied forms of rule are discussed. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST211 - Middle East & Islamic World Since 1800

This course looks at the Middle East and its relations with the wider world, from the appearance of Napoleon to the present. Topics include attempts at reform and modernization in the Ottoman Empire; the impact of Western imperialism on the region as a whole; and twentieth-century developments in the area, including nationalism, pan-Arabism, pan-Islamism, the cult of the personality, coup, revolution, Zionism, and the Palestinian-Israeli confrontation. The economic and social impact of oil, the influence of fundamentalism, and the Great Power rivalry down through the position of the United States toward the area are investigated. The efforts of Iran to gain acceptance in/by the contemporary world is examined, as is the shifting attitude of Egypt toward modernity. Finally, connections between the region and the rest of the Islamic world are explored. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HUM420 - Seminar in Humanities

This capstone course focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and problem-solving. The topic will change; however, the course emphasizes extensive research projects related to students' fields of interest. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HUM419 and Senior standing. Humanities Department and IDS majors only.

Marisa Hastie

Associate Professor and Program Director of Exercise Science

Office: 70 Maple Street

Cristina Haverty

Chair of Athletic Training & Exercise Science; Associate Professor of Athletic Training

Office: 70 Maple Street

Ron Laham

Visiting Assistant Professor of Athletic Training

Office: 70 Maple Street

Dominique Ross

Assistant Professor of Athletic Training and Coordinator of Clinical Education

Office: 70 Maple Street

AT103 - Techniques of Emergency Care

This course emphasizes principles and techniques for recognition and management of life-threatening and non-life-threatening medical emergency situations. Additionally, the course content includes a variety of injury and illness prevention techniques including, taping, bracing and proper hydration. The lab component of the course includes techniques for immobilization, airway management, athletic equipment management, and removal in emergency situations. At the completion of the course students will be eligible for certification in CPR Professional Rescuer/AED and First Aid by the American Red Cross.

AT104 - Professional Interactions

This seminar style course introduces students to current concepts and theories of medical ethics and ethical decision making, understanding personal and professional values, exposure to multiculturalism and diversity and patient instruction in various professional settings. This course has a connected learning component that develops professional communication skills, patient education and recognition of cultural, ethical and socioeconomic diversity through a discipline-specific environment. Students also complete a service-learning component to gain a greater understanding of civil responsibility, multiculturalism and diversity and personal values. Prerequisite: EXSC 101 or AT101

AT202 - Foundations in Sport Medicine

This course is a basic athletic training course providing an overview of prevention, recognition, and initial management of common athletic injuries. Additional topics covered in the course include: issues in health care administration, nutritional considerations, environmental issues, protective equipment, tissue healing, bloodborne pathogens and rehabilitation concepts. Formerly - AT201

AT301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course also describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Corequisite: BIO 206L.

EXSC101 - Essentials of Musculoskeletal Anatomy

This course provides students with foundational concepts associated with the healthcare and fitness industry. Through connected learning projects, emphasis is placed on understanding musculoskeletal anatomy and medical nomenclature Formerly - AHLT101

EXSC107 - Lifestyles & Human Behavior

This course focuses on the benefits of a healthy lifestyle and the interactive principles of human behavior across the lifespan from adolescence through adult development. Topics include exercise adherence and maintenance, weight management, smoking cessation, and stress management. Formerly - AHLT107

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC211 - Personal Fitness

This course prepares students for national certification exams as personal trainers. Each class addresses pertinent topics of the health fitness professional. These topics include health screening and assessment and comprehensive program design for multiple populations. The course empowers students with the skills necessary to become qualified fitness professionals.

EXSC222 - Kinesiology

This course examines the anatomical and mechanical concepts required for critical assessment, description, and qualitative analysis of human motion. The laboratory component includes analysis of human motion. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206, PHYS 111.

EXSC302 - Exercise Physiology

This course explores the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the structure and function of the body with an emphasis on the acute responses of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neuromuscular systems. Various concepts related to physical fitness such as body composition, skill related fitness, and cardiovascular fitness are introduced. The practical applications of major principles are demonstrated in a laboratory setting. Students are advised that the capability to exercise moderately and maximally may be required and that documentation of a medical examination indicating cardiopulmonary status and exercise capacity may be requested by the instructor. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC304 - Exercise Testing & Prescription

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to engage in the application of physiological principles and development of practical skills for fitness evaluation and exercise prescription. Course content will emphasis: pre-test screening and assessment and prescription fundamentals for cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness, body composition, and flexibility. Prerequisite EXSC 302.

EXSC305 - Strength Training & Conditioning

Lecture and practical sessions include principles of weight training and conditioning, orientation to different modalities, including free weights, weight machines (i.e., Nautilus), and circuit training and development of individual and group exercise programs. Students may be required to obtain medical clearance prior to participation. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EXSC307 - Advanced Sports Performance

This course is designed to provide students advanced concepts in strength and conditioning. Emphasis is placed on the application of principles and theories covered in the Strength and Conditioning class. Students focus on the development of sports specific programs for the purpose of improving athletic performance. Prerequisite: EXSC 305.

EXSC340 - Research Concepts

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industy including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

EXSC401 - Exercise Science Seminar II

This course provides students with the skills needed to prepare for entrance into the workforce or graduate school. Emphasis is placed on cover letters and resume writing, interview skills, the graduate school application process, professionalism, and ethical decision making. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Co-requisite - EXSC 340

EXSC403 - Exercise for Special Populations

This course provides the exercise physiologist with an in-depth knowledge of application of exercise principles for patients participating in adult fitness programs. It includes client characteristics, screening, and program supervision. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: EXSC 304

EXSC405 - Organization & Healthcare Administration

This course presents the principles of managing physical education, intramural and athletic programs, and sport and fitness businesses. Course topics include facility management, human relations, legal issues, scheduling, drug testing, staffing, and related duties of facility managers. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

EXSC406 - Advanced Topics in Exercise Physiology

This course explores and evaluates current concepts in the understanding of physiological function and effects of exercise. Particular emphasis is placed on the physiological function and effects of exercise across the lifespan and in-depth examination of current literature in advanced exercise science topics. Pre-requisite: EXSC 302.

EXSC410 - Exercise Science Field Experience I

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 150 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC 302, EXSC 305 and Permission of Department Chair.

EXSC420 - Exercise Science Field Experience II

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic,corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 300 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC 302, EXSC 305 and Permission of Department Chair.

EXSC430 - Exercise Science Capstone

The capstone course synthesizes theories and practices of exercise physiology into one culminating and progressive exercise program for a client. Students serve as subjects, technicians, and administrators. The primary goal is to better prepare students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for exercise program design and undergraduate research, with three course design option; development of original case study research, with focus on adhering to written and oral presentation standards within the field; development of an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis; or development of an understanding of the research process, with focus on review of the literature, defining the research question, and study methodology. Prerequisite: EXSC 340

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 104 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 104, MATH 109, or MATH 204 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS 111L.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course examines the adolescent period of life as one of multiple simultaneous changes in the mind and body that set the stage for adult life. Particular attention is paid to gender differentiated experiences in adolescence; how males and females differ in their experience of the changes that occur during adolescence. The role of culture in determining the adolescent experience is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.