Humanities with Elementary Education Concentration

Humanities with Elementary Education Concentration

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions Department Faculty

Lasell College's Connected Learning approach is incorporated through curriculum based on current practice and research, diverse field-based experiences, and supportive faculty-student relationships. Students in licensure programs take many courses which embed service-learning, beginning with ED 110, Teaching and Learning in American Schools, and culminating in the practicum/student teaching experience in the senior year. Each program culminates in a capstone experience that features practice-based research with problems arising from and explored in classroom teaching.

Students in any of the education programs must meet department standards for progress in their major. To enter and continue in any education program, students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 and earn at least a B- in each ED course required for the major or concentration. . In addition to the GPA and grade requirements, students must fulfill the prerequisite of passing both Communication & Literacy subtests of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) prior to enrollment in any junior-level courses required for an education program. Prior to enrollment in all senior-level ED courses, licensure students must meet the GPA and minimum grade requirements and pass all required MTEL tests. (Some individual courses have additional pre-requisites.)

This major provides effective instructional strategies and content knowledge in all areas of elementary curriculum as well as coursework in a range of humanities disciplines.

The Humanities major with an Elementary Education Concentration incorporates Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education requirements for initial licensure as a teacher of elementary grades (1-6) teacher or teacher of elementary mathematics (grades 1-6). Graduates receive a Bachelor of Arts degree in Humanities with a concentration in Elementary Education.

Additional Requirements: 25 credits
SCI 103 or 104 Science for Educators: 3 credits
Choose one approved course (information provided by Education Department) from ECON, ENV, POLS, or HIST: 3 credits
Lab Science Elective: 4 credits
Choose five additional courses from the following areas; at least three different areas must be represented, and at least two courses (6 credits) must be at the 300 level - Art, History, Communication, English, History, Music, Philosophy: 15 credits

General Education Core Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 2-7 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 126

Students placing out of MATH 104 will take MATH 203, Precalculus.

Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:
Aesthetic
ARTH 103: Art History I
ARTH 104: Art History II
MUS 101: Music Appreciation I
MUS 102: Music Appreciation II
Historical
HIST 103: World Civilization I
HIST 104: World Civilization II
HIST 123: American Civilization I
HIST 124: American Civilization II
Moral and Ethical
ED 494: Professional Standards & Ethics
Multicultural
ED 219: Supporting Learner Variability
Psychological and Societal
PSYC 101: Psychological Perspectives
Quantitative
MATH course approved by Department Chair 
Scientific
SCI 103 or SCI 104: Science for Educators

Additional Requirements: 25 credits
SCI 103 or 104 Science for Educators: 3 credits
Choose one approved course (information provided by Education Department) from ECON, ENV, POLS, or HIST: 3 credits
Lab Science Elective: 4 credits
Choose five additional courses from the following areas; at least three different areas must be represented, and at least two courses (6 credits) must be at the 300 level - Art, History, Communication, English, History, Music, Philosophy: 15 credits

General Education Core Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 2-7 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 126

Students placing out of MATH 104 will take MATH 203, Precalculus.

Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:
Aesthetic
ARTH 103: Art History I
ARTH 104: Art History II
MUS 101: Music Appreciation I
MUS 102: Music Appreciation II
Historical
HIST 103: World Civilization I
HIST 104: World Civilization II
HIST 123: American Civilization I
HIST 124: American Civilization II
Moral and Ethical
ED 494: Professional Standards & Ethics
Multicultural
ED 219: Supporting Learner Variability
Psychological and Societal
PSYC 101: Psychological Perspectives
Quantitative
MATH course approved by Department Chair 
Scientific
SCI 103 or SCI 104: Science for Educators

ED109 - Invitation to Teaching

This course explores careers in teaching beginning with the unifying question: Why should I become a teacher? Students examine their motivations to become teachers while they learn about college and state requirements and expectations.

ED110 - Teaching & Learning in American Schools

This course provides students pursuing or considering initial teacher licensure with an overview of the teaching profession. Students study and discuss history and philosophies of education systems, as well as current trends and issues. Massachusetts professional standards and requirements for licensure are explored. This course is a prerequisite for all other ED courses. Twenty-five hours of observation and tutoring in varied school settings are required. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ED206 - Early Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the preschool and early elementary years, including transitions to reading and writing, role of phonemic awareness and phonics in emergent and early literacy, varied assessments to measure developing literacy, instructional strategies and materials to support young learners. 25 pre-practicum hours. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ED 110.

ED208 - Elem Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the elementary years (through grade 6), including reading in content areas, fluency, reading/writing connections, varied assessments to measure literacy development, and instructional strategies and materials to support elementary learners through grade 6. 25 pre-practicum hours. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED219 - Supporting Learner Variability

This course introduces students to characteristics of learners with special needs in classroom and community settings. It focuses on principles of Universal Design for Learning in developing appropriate learning environments to meet the variability of all students in Pre-K through high school settings. A required 25-hour pre-practicum provides opportunities to teach and observe in area classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED330 - Pre-Internship Seminar

Usually taken in spring of the junior year, this seminar helps students identify objectives and potential sites for the internship. Prerequisites: Junior standing and department permission.

ED413 - Prof, Respon, & Ethics in Curr Instr

This capstone course integrates classroom practice, course work, and current developments in curriculum and instruction. The course includes a weekly seminar addressing problem solving in the field placement as well as current professional, ethical, moral, and legal issues facing professionals in education-related fields. Prerequisite: Senior standing or department permission. Co-requisite: ED 427.

ED427 - Curriculum & Instruction Internship

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours in a supervised setting, arranged in ED 330 (Pre-internship seminar) related to their career interest. Prerequisites: Senior Standing and permission of Department Chair. Co-requisite: ED 413

HIST203 - The History of Women in U.S.

This course explores the social history of women in the United States, beginning in the colonial period and ending with an examination of twen­tieth century issues. Emphasis is on the image of women held during these periods, in contrast to actual conditions. Contributions of women to social change and the growth of women’s move­ments are also analyzed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST204 - Recent American History

This course focuses on the presidencies beginning with Kennedy to the present. Work is divided roughly into three areas: foreign affairs; domestic politics; economic, social, and cultural needs. Topics range from the Vietnam War to the Iraq War, the weakening of Congress and the expansion of the presidency, the women's movement, changes in popular culture, and domestic economic developments. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST207 - African American History

This course explores the history of African Americans in the United States from their African beginnings to the present. It traces the lives and status of African Americans, enslaved and emancipated, as they confronted the barriers of legal, institutional, and cultural prejudices; examines the socioeconomic and political experiences of blacks in America; and investigates strategies of accommodation, resistance, and protest in the struggle of African Americans to gain human and first-class citizenship rights. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST210 - Latin Amer Colonial Period to Present

This survey looks at Latin American history from pre-Columbian to contemporary times. Emphasis is on native cultures, the “discovery” of the New World, European presence, colonialism, imperialism, the creation of the peasantry, wars of independence, the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, slavery and racism, development and underdevelopment, the Catholic Church, liberation theology, poverty, and revolution. Major emphasis in South America is on Argentina, Columbia, Peru, Chile, Venezuela, and the Portuguese speaking nation of Brazil. The course also includes examination of foreign intervention and inner instability in Mexico, including struggles for democracy, economic rights, and social justice. In the Hispanic Caribbean and Central America, especially, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama, land and labor systems, gender relations, race and ethnicity, and varied forms of rule are discussed. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

Elizabeth Hartmann

Associate Professor of Education

Office: Brennan Library

Amy Maynard

Associate Professor of Education

Office: Winslow Putnam Center

Claudia Rinaldi

Chair of Education, Associate Professor of Education

Office: Brennan Library

Catherine Zeek

Dean of Curricular and Faculty Innovation; Professor of Education

Office: Brennan 101