Human Resource Management Concentration

Human Resource Management Concentration

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions Department Faculty
In the Human Resources Management concentration, students learn the skills needed to hire and keep employees and address the issue of increasing productivity in the workplace. Graduates will earn a Master of Science in Management in Human Resources Management through a course of study that focuses on, among other topics, the staffing function of management including recruiting, training, motivation, and organizational development, developing policies and procedures, human rights legislation in the workplace, the termination of employment, and designing creative strategies to improve organizational effectiveness.

Two Electives: 6 credits
Students may take any courses offered at the graduate level to fulfill their elective credits. View course options here.

Course Code Course Title Credits
Choose 1 from the following:
COM206 Professional Communication 3
COM208 Public Relations 3
COM209 Journalism 3
COM213 Writing for Public Relations 3
COM215 Radio Production 3
COM217 Video Production 3
COM218 Digital Video Editing 3
COM221 Advertising 3
COM304 TV Studio Production 3
COM312 Radio Production II 3
COM313 Video Production II 3
COM314 Magazine & Feature Writing 3
COM317 Media Relations 3
COM319 Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns 3
Aging Studies
Core Courses
PSYC111 Generations in America 3
PSYC213 Ethics Across Generations 3

BIO101 - Principles of Biology (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Corequisite: BIO 101L.

BIO102 - Diversity of Living Organisms

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

BIO112 - Human Biology

This is a one semester lab course focusing on the functions of the human body in health and disease. The structure and function of the major body systems are emphasized. Systems discussed include: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, excretory, reproductive, nervous and endocrine. Corequisite: BIO 112L.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Corequisite: BIO 206L.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH 106 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM 203L.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubiity equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: CHEM 203. Corequisite: CHEM 204L.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

ED109 - Invitation to Teaching

This course explores careers in teaching beginning with the unifying question: Why should I become a teacher? Students examine their motivations to become teachers while they learn about college and state requirements and expectations.

ED110 - Teaching & Learning in American Schools

This course provides students pursuing or considering initial teacher licensure with an overview of the teaching profession. Students study and discuss history and philosophies of education systems, as well as current trends and issues. Massachusetts professional standards and requirements for licensure are explored. This course is a prerequisite for all other ED courses. Twenty-five hours of observation and tutoring in varied school settings are required. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ED206 - Early Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the preschool and early elementary years, including transitions to reading and writing, role of phonemic awareness and phonics in emergent and early literacy, varied assessments to measure developing literacy, instructional strategies and materials to support young learners. 25 pre-practicum hours. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ED 110.

ED208 - Elem Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the elementary years (through grade 6), including reading in content areas, fluency, reading/writing connections, varied assessments to measure literacy development, and instructional strategies and materials to support elementary learners through grade 6. 25 pre-practicum hours. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED219 - Supporting Learner Variability

This course introduces students to characteristics of learners with special needs in classroom and community settings. It focuses on principles of Universal Design for Learning in developing appropriate learning environments to meet the variability of all students in Pre-K through high school settings. A required 25-hour pre-practicum provides opportunities to teach and observe in area classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED330 - Pre-Internship Seminar

Usually taken in spring of the junior year, this seminar helps students identify objectives and potential sites for the internship. Prerequisites: Junior standing and department permission.

ED413 - Prof, Respon, & Ethics in Curr Instr

This capstone course integrates classroom practice, course work, and current developments in curriculum and instruction. The course includes a weekly seminar addressing problem solving in the field placement as well as current professional, ethical, moral, and legal issues facing professionals in education-related fields. Prerequisite: Senior standing or department permission. Co-requisite: ED 427.

ED427 - Curriculum & Instruction Internship

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours in a supervised setting, arranged in ED 330 (Pre-internship seminar) related to their career interest. Prerequisites: Senior Standing and permission of Department Chair. Co-requisite: ED 413

ENG210 - Survey of American Literature

This course surveys representative periods, authors, or genres in American literature from beginnings in Native American oral literatures through contemporary works. Individual sections organize study of classic and contemporary texts around particular themes, such as Queering American Literatures, American Migrations, Hemispheric American Literature, or Americans on the Edge: "Frontiers" in the American Imagination. Individual sections also trace twentieth- or twenty-first-century movements to their roots in or resistance to earlier movements or forms. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG218 - British Literature

This course surveys British writing in poetry, fiction, and drama, with a focus on key periods in the development of British literature. Emphasis is on representative writers in each period. Periods and movements surveyed include Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary or Postmodern. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG235 - From Sounds to Sentences

This course considers the acquisition of human language as a biologically based and species-specific communication system. The interaction, from infancy through early and later childhood, between biological preparedness and environmental influence is studied, as is the development of phonology (sound system), lexicon (vocabulary), syntax (sentence structure), and pragmatics (language use). The developmental phases through which a young learner passes as the language systems develop are also studied in this course. Bilingualism, dialect, language disorder, and early written language development are considered. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG340 - Classics of World Literature

This course explores representative fiction, poetry, or drama by major figures in world literature, centering on topics such as love, tragedy, comedy, immortality, madness, wasteland, quest for knowledge, voyages, or exploration. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

HIST123 - American Civilization I

This course examines the chief political, social, and cultural features of American society as they have developed through the period of Reconstruction. Emphasis is on Colonial America, the War of Independence, the Constitution, and the emergence of the Republic through the Civil War.

HIST124 - American Civilization II

This course is a continuation of HIST 123 from the period of Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is on reconstruction, industrialization, immigration, constitutional issues, and the emergence of American foreign policy. There is some examination of American political life in the nuclear age.

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS 111L.

PHYS112 - General Physics II

This is a continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS 112L.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

COM206 - Professional Communication

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the most important communication and career-related formats of professional writing, including power point presentations, memos, business letters, reports, brief speeches, instructions, newsletters and brochures. Special emphasis is given to various writing processes one must complete on a tight deadline for a business audience of peers, customers or employers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles. Assignments may include politics, sports, entertainment, and interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, and graphic designers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast; and on what page to display them or in which order to broadcast them. The various reporting specialties covered in journalism – Health, Education, Business, Arts, Sports, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Travel - are explored. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM213 - Writing for Public Relations

This course serves as a workshop in which students apply the fundamental skills of journalism to the different formats commonly used in writing copy for public relations and advertising, including press releases, public service announcements, profiles, brochures, and advertisements. In addition, students continue to sharpen their editing skills by revising their own work and by copyediting and critiquing the work of other students. Central to the objectives of this course is that students improve their ability to write clearly and concisely, avoiding common errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM215 - Radio Production

This course introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell College Radio station.

COM217 - Video Production

This course introduces students to the basics of video production. Students learn basic videography techniques using professional video cameras such as the SONY HVR-HD1000U. In addition to videography, students learn the basics of digital video editing using industry-standard Avid nonlinear editing programs. Video projects include a video camera roll test, Avid editing assignment, news package, and a short movie where students shoot, direct, and edit their own creative narrative.

COM218 - Digital Video Editing

This course teaches students the basics of editing digital media using the popular software program Adobe Premiere Pro. The aesthetics of editing are also discussed and analyzed through screening various types of edited media. Projects for the course include editing TV commercials, news packages, movie scenes, and music videos. It is recommended that students have acquired basic computer skills prior to taking this class.

COM221 - Advertising

This course introduces students to the field of advertising, including the role of promotional elements (advertising, direct mail, promotion, etc.) found in an advertising agency or in the communication program of an organization. In this course, students learn that advertising is more than just ads on television, on a web page or in print. Advertising is a process that starts with research and moves through analysis, planning, action, and evaluation. The development of an effective advertising strategy requires an understanding of overall communication processes and theoretical principles, how organizations organize and brand themselves for advertising and other promotional functions, consumer behavior, and how to set goals and objectives. A cooperative learning project requires students to engage in the kind of strategic thinking, planning and execution that is done by advertisers, researchers, media planners, and copywriters. The course also addresses how the advertising industry is regulated and how key social issues and various consumer constituencies can present problems for advertising professionals. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM304 - TV Studio Production

This course introduces the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment at NewTV - Newton's own public access television studios. Students learn pre-production planning, live-to-tape directing, and participate in full television crew rotations to produce high quality PSAs and their very own TV show to be aired on local access television. Throughout the semester, students develop a variety of production skills from hands-on television studio operation.

COM312 - Radio Production II

This course brings students with basic radio production skills to a higher level of proficiency. There is strong emphasis on radio as a digital medium and digital (nonlinear) audio editing with Adobe Audition. Projects include editing music for radio play, writing and mixing radio commercials, creating a radio interview podcast, and the development of an Air Check radio demo for student portfolios. Students also develop a deeper understanding of the radio business. Prerequisite: COM 215.

COM313 - Video Production II

This course takes students with basic video production skills to a higher level of expertise. There is strong emphasis on pre-production planning, teamwork, lighting, sound and special effects. The aesthetics of video production are also discussed by analyzing various film and video productions. Projects include a special effects reel, television commercial, short documentary, and a short screenplay adaptation. Throughout the semester, students develop a deeper understanding of the business of video production. Prerequisite: COM 217.

COM314 - Magazine & Feature Writing

This course is focused on the longer pieces of magazine writing, such as feature articles and interview profiles, and other forms of narrative, nonfiction journalistic writing. The course includes reading, analyzing, and modeling well-written newspaper and magazine articles that entertain as well as inform readers. Students have the opportunity to provide editorial support for and submit feature articles for publication to Polished, a Lasell College produced magazine. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 209.

COM317 - Media Relations

Managing media relations for public relations professionals is the focus of this course. The course is intended to increase students’ knowledge of the principles and methods of generating publicity and to introduce the basics of planning and writing media relations campaigns. The rapidly changing nature of global companies and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways that communication professionals achieve their goals. Media relations can be a highly competitive and challenging field, where you must prove your productivity, accuracy, and creativity. Students discuss and experiment with successful strategies for gaining coverage in the press for clients, and they plan a comprehensive media relations program. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 208.

COM319 - Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns

This course provides an environment for students to become engaged in a professional style media planning and buying campaign, which is an essential strategic focus of the advertising industry. Students develop a full advertising plan based on the current planning structure of a contemporary advertising agency. Working in teams, students conduct a detailed advertising analysis that allows them to provide strategic and creative solutions to problems they have identified in their research. Student teams construct an advertising plan that positions and promotes a product, a message, a politician, or a brand to a con­sumer audience. Each student team produces a comprehensive media campaign that identifies and targets the appropriate media outlets for advertising placements. The class has a modicum of pressure and intensity that reflects some of the challenges necessary to succeed in the advertising industry. Prerequisite: COM 221.

PSYC111 - Generations in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC213 - Ethics Across Generations

A growing interest in ethics across different generations has emerged with dramatic changes in the age demographics of our society. This course examines a range of ethical dilemmas both unique to and common across different generations. Intervening factors such as generational identity, personal attitudes, and social forces are explored to understanding how individuals approach and behave in these situations.