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Becker College Students

Lasell to Becker Academic Programs

BUSS104X - Professional Development in Business

For freshman only. This is a comprehensive course that introduces students to the skills they need to develop themselves professionally. It cultivates and hones the skills necessary for students to communicate effectively and professionally in a business environment. This course provides students with the skills necessary to engage in field experience, internship and post-graduate employment searches as well as for the general business world around them. Using myriad methods, students will develop the necessary professional skills for professional presentation, professional communication, negotiation, personal branding, networking and team building. Students will also be introduced to the concept of emotional intelligence and its impact on overall career and academic outcomes. Students will complete a minimum of three professional presentations as part of this course.Prerequisites: None

BUSS105 - Excel for Business

This course introduces students to basic Microsoft Excel skills. Excel is an electronic spreadsheet program used for storing, organizing and manipulating data. It is critical to the business world today as the volume data generated has exploded. This introductory course will provide students with information and skills needed to create basic workbooks and worksheets, create simple formulas, copy and move data, format data and cells, work in large spreadsheets and with data series, create pivot tables, and more. As part of this course, all students will have the opportunity to become certified in Microsoft Excel through the professional certification called Microsoft Office Specialist: Excel 2016 – Core Data Analysis, Manipulation, and Presentation. The certification also comes with an electronic badge. Students are also introduced to Income Statements, Balance Sheets, Statement of Cash Flows, Ratios, and the Basic Accounting Cycle

BUSS205 - Business Law

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to both business and personal needs. The primary focus is on contract law and property law. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major.

BUSS220 - Principles of Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, COM101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102 AND ENG102 OR WRT102.

BUSS227 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions.

BUSS440 - Business Capstone

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. This is a writing intensive course. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Prerequisite: Senior standing, Major within the School of Business

BUSS497 - Business Internship Seminar

This internship for students within the School of Business is scheduled to take place during the student's senior year (juniors are permitted with permission). Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours in a position related to their field of study. The hours are completed concurrently with weekly class meetings and course work. Detailed reports, reflective exercises, weekly journal entries, a final comprehensive project, and other written requirements are completed throughout the internship process. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major. Prerequisite: Senior Standing, Major within the School of Business

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

INTC202 - Data Analytics 

This course provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various aspects of Big Data Analytics. The purpose is to help students acquire foundation skills in Big Data – which can be used to further their specialization in a niche within Big Data. Upon completion of the course students should be able to:•Understand what is Big Data, Cloud Computing and NoSQL Databases.•Various components and architecture of Big Data Analytics.•Different types of Analytics: Text, Descriptive, Predictive and Prescriptive.•How Big Data Analytics is used in different contexts.•Using Analytics and Dashboards to present Actionable Insights.Prerequisite: MATH208

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

BIO104 - Foundations in the Health Professions

This course provides a description of the various health care professions including educational and licensing requirements. The concepts of professionalism, health care teams, and current health care policies will be covered. Students will increase their knowledge of the various health care professions through job shadowing.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO205 with a C or better. Corequisite: BIO206L.

BIO301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course also describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC103 - Skills & Techniques for the Exercise Sci

The purpose of this course is to provide foundational skills in measurement techniques of health and physical activity that are necessary and relevant for a professional in the field of exercise science, fitness management and related disciplines. Students will learn how to screen exercise participants for health risks, to assess basic anthropometrics, body composition, cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness, and flexibility in apparently healthy individuals, across the lifespan, using a variety of techniques and technologies. In addition, principles and techniques for recognition and management of non-life-threatening and life-threatening emergencies will be covered. Students will be exposed to evidence-based foundations within the discipline, as well as career options and the role of the exercise, health, and fitness professional in the health, wellness and sport disciplines. At the completion of the course, students will be eligible for Professional Rescuer CPR/AED certification.

EXSC106 - Functional Anatomy & Resistance Trainig

This course applies principles of anatomy to the study of human motion and resistance training. The course will explore human movement through applied anatomy and biomechanics, as well as through the analysis of exercises and sport movements. Students will be able to identify, describe, execute, and progress common resistance training exercises for the upper extremity, lower extremity, and trunk that target specific musculature. Students will utilize their anatomical knowledge base to evaluate exercise technique and form.

EXSC107 - Healthy Lifestyles and Human Behavior

This course focuses on evaluating and implementing healthy lifestyles and human behavior for longevity of lifespan from adolescence through adult development. Focus will be placed upon cultivating a holistic approach to health and wellness that is rooted within strategies for implementing healthy lifestyle changes, as well as "living through prevention": a description relating to methods of preventing long term disease and disability.

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC211 - Principles of Personal Training

This course prepares students for national certification exams as personal trainers. Each class addresses pertinent topics of the health fitness professional. These topics include health screening and assessment and comprehensive program design for multiple populations. The course empowers students with the skills necessary to become qualified fitness professionals.

EXSC222 - Kinesiology

This course examines the anatomical and mechanical concepts required for critical assessment, description, and analysis of human motion. The laboratory component includes analysis of human motion. Prerequisites: BIO205, BIO206, PHYS111. Corequisite EXSC222L

EXSC302 - Exercise Physiology

This course explores the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the structure and function of the body with an emphasis on the metabolic cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neuromuscular systems. Also discussed are the effects of environmental factors and ergogenic aids on exercise performance. The objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding and working knowledge of how the body responds to exercise so that they may apply this knowledge to their chosen field. The practical applications of the major principles are demonstrated in a laboratory setting (EXSC 302L). Students are advised that the capability to exercise moderately and maximally may be required and documentation if a medical examination indicating cardiopulmonary status and exercise capacity may be requested by the instructor. Prerequisite BIO 205/BIO 206. Corequisite EXSC 302L

EXSC304 - Exercise Testing & Prescription

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to engage in the application of physiological principles and development of practical skills for fitness evaluation and exercise prescription. Course content will emphasis: pre-test screening and assessment and prescription fundamentals for cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness, body composition, and flexibility. Prerequisite EXSC302. Co-requisite EXSC304

EXSC305 - Strength Training & Conditioning

Lecture and practical sessions include principles of weight training and conditioning, orientation to different modalities, including free weights, weight machines (i.e., Nautilus), and circuit training and development of individual and group exercise programs. Students may be required to obtain medical clearance prior to participation. Pre-requisite BIO205, BIO206. Co-requisite EXSC305L

EXSC340 - Research Concepts

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industry including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH208.

EXSC401 - Professional Development Seminar

This course will prepare students to sit for the certification in the field of exercise science, with emphasis on the NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and the ACSM, Certified Exercise Physiologist certifications. Students will assess their current level of knowledge, and identify and actively improve upon areas of weakness. Students will develop a personal study plan, which will involve review sessions and practice tests both in and out of the classroom, Students will develop a post-graduation plan and prepare the necessary materials to carry out their individual plan, including GRE preparations, resume, cover letter, personal statement writing, as well as mock interview sessions. Prerequisite: Senior level standing

EXSC403 - Exercise for Special Populations

Exercise for Special Populations explores the role of exercise in health and disease and how the normal physiological response to exercise changes in the presence of disease. This course will specifically focus on pathophysiology, treatments and medications, acute and chronic effects of exercise, and exercise testing and prescription guidelines for individuals with cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, neurological and immunological diseases and disorders. This course will allow students to understand the effect of exercise, chronic diseases and conditions, and allow them to apply this knowledge in the field. Prerequisite: EXSC302.

EXSC405 - Org & Admin of Health & Sports Programs

This course presents the principles of managing physical education, intramural and athletic programs, commercial fitness and strength and conditioning/sports performance businesses, issues, scheduling, staff, financial planning and related duties of faculty mangers. Likewise, it is important to note that this is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Junior Standing

EXSC410 - Exercise Science Field Experience I

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 150 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC302, EXSC305, current CPR/AED certification

EXSC425 - Exercise Science Field Experience III

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 150 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC302, EXSC305, current CPR/AED certification

EXSC430 - Exercise Science Capstone

The capstone course synthesizes theories and practices of exercise physiology into one culminating and progressive exercise program for a client. Students serve as subjects, technicians, and administrators. The primary goal is to better prepare students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for exercise program design and undergraduate research, with three course design option; development of original case study research, with focus on adhering to written and oral presentation standards within the field; development of an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis; or development of an understanding of the research process, with focus on review of the literature, defining the research question, and study methodology. Prerequisite: EXSC 340

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS111L, PHYS111R.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

BIO104 - Foundations in the Health Professions

This course provides a description of the various health care professions including educational and licensing requirements. The concepts of professionalism, health care teams, and current health care policies will be covered. Students will increase their knowledge of the various health care professions through job shadowing.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO205 with a C or better. Corequisite: BIO206L.

BUSS101 - Fund of Bus in a Global Environment

This course is designed to familiarize students with various aspects of the business world. Areas covered include: private enterprise, forms of ownership, legal aspects, management practices in a diverse and global business environment, marketing, human resources, global operations management, labor relations, and finance. In addition, students become aware of how business functions are integrated into an organization to achieve specific goals both locally and internationally.

BUSS201 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with the fundamentals of accounting processes and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements and how to become intelligent users of financial information.

BUSS205 - Business Law

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to both business and personal needs. The primary focus is on contract law and property law. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major.

BUSS220 - Principles of Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, COM101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102 AND ENG102 OR WRT102.

BUSS224 - Org Behavior in the Global Workplace

In this course, students study individuals and their interactions within group settings as they affect efficiencies in diverse business organizations. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior on a global scale. Areas covered include structure, leadership, and change as they affect a multitude of cultures. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course.

BUSS231 - Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation

Entrepreneurship drives global innovation and economic growth. This course exposes business students to the study of entrepreneurship and the venture creation process. Topics include analyzing new business opportunities, developing business propositions, new venture planning and financing, marketing activities, financial controls, and other topics relevant to the entrepreneurial process. Students interact with faculty, local entrepreneurs, and small business owners/managers. As a culmination activity of this course, students are responsible for the development and presentation of a business plan. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101 or SMGT102

BUSS232 - Global Operation Strategies

This course examines how operations can be used as sources of competitive advantage in international business. The class will focus on understanding the need to formulate an operational strategy (long-term plan) and making strategic operational decisions. The old view of operations management as the task of maintaining a comparatively static production or service facility has given way to one characterized by a need for renewed flexibility, relentless improvement, and the development of new capabilities at the operating unit level. As a result of this changing environment, the skills required of operations managers across the globe have changed as well. This course is based primarily on case studies supported by conceptual frameworks.

BUSS336 - Human Resource Management

In this course, students will examine the staffing function of management including planning, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, appraisal, compensation, labor laws, and organizational development. The course also addresses current issues affecting the human resource manager, including the changing work force and need to increase productivity, as well as changes in the area of unions and affirmative action. Both class discussions and case studies are used to prepare students for the personnel and related tasks involved in a management position. Prerequisite: BUSS224

COM103 - Human Communication (KP)

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

EXSC103 - Skills & Techniques for the Exercise Sci

The purpose of this course is to provide foundational skills in measurement techniques of health and physical activity that are necessary and relevant for a professional in the field of exercise science, fitness management and related disciplines. Students will learn how to screen exercise participants for health risks, to assess basic anthropometrics, body composition, cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness, and flexibility in apparently healthy individuals, across the lifespan, using a variety of techniques and technologies. In addition, principles and techniques for recognition and management of non-life-threatening and life-threatening emergencies will be covered. Students will be exposed to evidence-based foundations within the discipline, as well as career options and the role of the exercise, health, and fitness professional in the health, wellness and sport disciplines. At the completion of the course, students will be eligible for Professional Rescuer CPR/AED certification.

EXSC106 - Functional Anatomy & Resistance Trainig

This course applies principles of anatomy to the study of human motion and resistance training. The course will explore human movement through applied anatomy and biomechanics, as well as through the analysis of exercises and sport movements. Students will be able to identify, describe, execute, and progress common resistance training exercises for the upper extremity, lower extremity, and trunk that target specific musculature. Students will utilize their anatomical knowledge base to evaluate exercise technique and form.

EXSC108 - Group Exercise

This course will introduce students to group exercise instruction methods. Students will gain knowledge of and skill in planning exercise sessions for groups of exercisers using a variety of formats and instructional techniques. Communication, instruction, safety, motivation, organization, music selection, and choreography with be discussed and practiced. In addition, the application of common anatomy, physiology, and behavior modification principles will be used in designing and progressing group exercise sessions. A variety of fitness activities will be explored including sports conditioning, circuit training, boot camp, step aerobics, kickboxing, strength training, yoga and indoor cycling. This course will also prepare students to sit for national certification exams.

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC211 - Principles of Personal Training

This course prepares students for national certification exams as personal trainers. Each class addresses pertinent topics of the health fitness professional. These topics include health screening and assessment and comprehensive program design for multiple populations. The course empowers students with the skills necessary to become qualified fitness professionals.

EXSC340 - Research Concepts

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industry including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH208.

EXSC405 - Org & Admin of Health & Sports Programs

This course presents the principles of managing physical education, intramural and athletic programs, commercial fitness and strength and conditioning/sports performance businesses, issues, scheduling, staff, financial planning and related duties of faculty mangers. Likewise, it is important to note that this is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Junior Standing

EXSC410 - Exercise Science Field Experience I

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 150 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC302, EXSC305, current CPR/AED certification

HEM205 - Private Club Management

This course explores many areas vital to the success of club management, including business, finance, food, beverage, facilities, sales, operations, and multiple recreational activities while stressing the supreme importance of customer service quality. By taking this course, students will explore a field that covers all aspects of the hospitality industry. We are privileged to be in a great location, close to many of the area’s most notable private clubs, which provides students with employment experience and internship opportunities. Prerequisite: HEM 101

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Co-requisites: BIO101L and BIO101R.

BIO209 - Molecular Biology

This lecture and laboratory will present the basic principles of molecular biology. Topics include nucleic acid-protein interactions, the Central Dogma, gene regulation, and genetic evolution. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce the methodology and research used in molecular biology, including nucleic acid extraction, PCR, Western Blot, and gel electrophoresis. Prerequisite: BIO101 Corequisite: BIO209L

BIO211 - Microbiology

This lecture and laboratory introduces the microbial world and the laboratory techniques required for its study. Topics include the basic characteristics of fungi, algae, bacteria, and viruses. Topics and applications that relate to humans are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO211L

BIO310 - Genetics

This lecture and laboratory will focus on principles related to the inheritance of traits regulated by genes. The chemical and physical nature of chromosomes and genes and gene expression and regulation will be covered. Systems in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms exemplifying Mendelian and modern molecular genetic principles will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO310L

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM203L and CHEM203R.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubility equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and CHEM203. Co-requisites: CHEM204L and CHEM204R.

CHEM301 - Biochemistry

This course is an in-depth study of biochemical substances and their reaction in the body with major emphasis placed on metabolism at the cellular level and examined in the tissues of the various organs where these reactions occur. Correlation of biochemical processes underlying pathologic conditions are made whenever practical. Prerequisite: CHEM 204

CHEM303 - Organic Chemistry

This course is focused on the structure and chemistry of organic compounds. Topics include thermodynamics, resonance, reaction mechanisms of organic functional groups and stereochemistry. The course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM204. Corequisite CHEM303L

CHEM304 - Organic Chemistry II

The second half of a two-semester sequence. Topics include synthetic applications of organic reactions, delocalization and aromaticity. Principles and application of instrumental methods for organic structure determination will be studied in the laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM303. Corequisite CHEM304L

CJ101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (KP)

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, and legal issues related to the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, focusing on critical decisions with an emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends.

CJ201 - Criminology

In this course, contemporary criminological theories are analyzed and evaluated with an emphasis on the social construction of crime, criminal offending, and victimization. Theories of crime are distinguished from theories of criminality. Assessments of theoretical advances, including theory integration and general theories of crime are examined. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101, or SOC 101

CJ316 - Criminal Procedure

Criminal procedure refers to the process whereby the criminal law is enforced. Major topics to be covered in this course include: the exclusionary rule, search and seizure, identification, interrogation, trial rights, sentencing, and due process. Special emphasis is placed upon how the rules of procedure affect the components of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

FSCI205 - Forensics

This course is in introductory course in forensic science focusing on the methodologies of proper recognition, documentation, and collection of physical evidence. Topics also include practical analysis of evidence such as fingerprints, ballistics, hair, drugs, serology, and DNA. Prerequisite: CJ101 or LS101.

FSCI207 - Criminal Investigations

This course examines the fundamentals of criminal investigation including scientific aids, interviews, interrogations, collection and preservation of evidence, methods of surveillance, follow-up and case preparation. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

FSCI309 - Forensic Science II

This lecture and laboratory will introduce various methodologies and applications used in forensic science. Topics include organic and inorganic chemical analyses of physical evidence, principles of serology and DNA analysis, an introduction to quality assurance and quality control concepts, principles and techniques for forensic toxicology, fire debris and explosive examinations. Techniques for the analysis of inks, dyes, polymers and colors will be introduced. Prerequisites: CJ205, CHEM304. Corequisite: FSCI309L.

FSCI407 - Field Experience

This is an off-campus experience in an appropriate Forensics Science work-setting that offers students an opportunity to apply concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 150 hours of field experience in addition to course assignments. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Chair, Junior standing, FSCI309

FSCI411 - Trace Evidence and Microscopy

This lecture and laboratory introduces students to the field of forensic microscopy and the various types of microscopes in forensic analysis such as compound, comparison, and polarizing light microscopes. Trace evidence, including hair, soil, glass, paint, and gunshot residue will be analyzed. Additional topics include the preparation of case files to develop an understanding of evidence control, experimental protocols, reporting results, and drawing conclusions. Pre-requisites: BIO101, FSCI205, and CHEM 204. Corequisite: FSCI411L.

FSCI413 - Forensic DNA Analysis

This lecture and laboratory introduces the evaluation of biological evidence using forensic DNA methodologies to aid criminal investigations. Topics include the isolation of DNA from cells, techniques for DNA quantitation, electrophoretic separation, data analysis, statistical analysis, and report writing. Pre-requisites: BIO209 and BIO211. Corequisite: FSCI413L.

FSCI450 - SPT in Applied Forensic Science

This course provides specialized topics in forensic science in order to address current disciplinary trends including evidence identification and processing, quality assurance, courtroom testimony, ethics, and professional practice. Using a problem-based learning model, students will engage in collaborative work, facilitated by faculty, to review cases based on current issues. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Forensic Science Program.

FSCI480 - Capstone in Applied Forensic Science

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge that they have acquired in the program and to demonstrate their level of skill. The senior capstone projects are applied research projects that include requirements of research literature, study of cases/or forensic science, a written report and an oral presentation of the project. The focus of this course is to provide students with realistic case experiences while being mentored by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Applied Forensic Science Program.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS111L, PHYS111R.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111 with a C or better. Corequisite: PHYS112L, PHYS112R.

ARTH107 - Special Topics in Art (KP)

This course introduces students to the study of art history by focusing on one theme, one artist, or one form of art. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints and drawings may be considered. Stylistic, cultural, and historic elements are components of the course.

ARTS101 - Studio Drawing I

This course introduces students to a variety of drawing tools and media. Drawing from life, line, tonality, illusional space, and perspective are explored. Creativity and individual expression are stressed.

ARTS126 - Fundamentals of Visual Art (KP)

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and strategies for visual art-making and art appreciation, with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one's life and as a way to complement one's aesthetic needs. This is a lecture course with studio art-making modules designed to complement visual material, critical essays, museum/gallery trips and impart basic skills in visual communication.

ARTS201 - Studio Drawing II

This course offers the experienced drawing student a chance to continue building life drawing, human figure, still lifes and landscape skills. In addition to studio work, students learn what is necessary to advance their knowledge of design by studying the masters. Periodic class discussions help students learn visual analysis and a general approach to the criticism of art. Prerequisite: ARTS101 Studio Drawing I or permission of instructor.

ARTS219 - Digital Photography I

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to Photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

ARTS319 - Digital Photography II

This course involves the study of the graphic image and how visual messages are used in a diverse media. This is an advanced photography course with an emphasis on technical methods. Hands-on studio projects give the student skills that contribute to thoughtful and effective communication. Prerequisite: ARTS219 Digital Photography I.

GRAP105 - Digital Design Essentials

This course offers an introduction to three of the most important software applications in the Adobe Creative Cloud for a student who is interested in Graphic Design:  Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Students learn image generation and editing in both pixel-based and vector-based environments as well as digital page composition for print publishing. This is a project-based course that initiates and improves students' skill set for the implementation of computer graphics.

GRAP201 - Imaging for Graphic Design

This illustration course is designed to develop students' compositional and image development skills for the field of Graphic Design. Using a combination of traditional and digital methods of imaging, students expand their visual vocabulary for successful graphic communications. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent (such as FASD205 Digital Design for Apparel or FASH207 Digital Tools for Fashion).

GRAP204 - Graphic Design I

This is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of graphic design, with an emphasis on developing a working literal and visual vocabulary. Students are challenged with conceptual design exercises that promote the essential values of good research, process, and presentation practices. Prerequisite: GRAP201 Imaging for Graphic Design.

GRAP205 - Graphic Design II

This course builds on the foundational principles that are introduced in Graphic Design I. Students strengthen their design skills through a series of design briefs in the areas of print and electronic media. Reflective writings and research assignments contribute to improved critical thinking and writing skills. Prerequisite: GRAP204 Imaging for Graphic Design.

GRAP207 - Web Design & Development

This course introduces the student to the most current coding and markup languages that are integral to successful Web site development. It also introduces the student to authoring software, such as Adobe Dreamweaver, that assists designers with the coding demands of Web authorship. Other topics which add to this comprehensive course are the history of the Internet and World Wide Web Consortium, the power of CSS, and the design and layout principles that contribute to successful Web site development from technical, interactive, and aesthetic viewpoints. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent

GRAP208 - Graphic Design History

This course introduces students of design to the origins of the discipline. It emphasizes the Modernist period, during which design rapidly evolved as typography, photography and new printing methods were explored by artists of the Bauhaus and other European schools and movements. The course demonstrates how these innovators influence graphic design as we know it today.

GRAP301 - Typography I

This course surveys the application of expressive letterforms since the invention of the printing press. With a historical overview that illuminates the terminology used by professional designers, students are encouraged to explore their own means of typographic expression. The fundamentals of structure, spacing, and rhythm are emphasized as they influence form and function. Prerequisites: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials.

GRAP302 - Typography II

In this course, students expand their design practice in the application of typography to a variety of forms and contexts. This is a process-oriented course focused on the advancement of a personal "typographic voice." Students learn to structure informational hierarchies and how to sequence typographic materials across multiple pages. Issues of personal interpretation and legibility are emphasized. Prerequisite: GRAP301 Typography I

GRAP307 - Motion Graphics

In this course, students develop conceptual and visual problem-solving skills as they relate to motion studies and time-based art. Through demonstrations, studio sessions and critiques students create portfolio-quality animation and motion study projects.

GRAP308 - Interactive & UX Design

This course offers a deeper exploration of designing and authoring interactive content on a variety of platforms with an emphasis on user experience (UX), building upon skills and strategies acquired in basic web design and graphic design courses. Students will use designer tools such as Adobe Animate and Adobe XD, which offer designers the opportunity to create code-based interactions with minimal knowledge of programming languages, such as HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript and proprietary app building languages and workflows. Prerequisite: GRAP207 Web Design and Development and GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

GRAP309 - Graphic Design for the Marketplace

This course engages advanced Graphic Design students with a curriculum derived from a collection of prepared design briefs. With established methods of research, conceptualization, innovation and art production, students are offered "real world" challenges for graphic design solutions. This course emphasizes sound business practices and ethical guidelines for a career in commercial art. Prerequisites: GRAP205 Graphic Design II and GRAP201 Imaging for Graphic Design.

GRAP311 - Digital 3D Design

This is a digital imaging course that introduces students to creating within three-dimensional, virtual space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive geometric process. Students develop design solutions and construct various models that involve texture mapping and placing those models in convincing three-dimensional environments. Problem solving for creative imaging as it applies to commercial graphic projects is emphasized.Prerequisites: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials and GRAP201 Imaging for Design

GRAP322 - Photography for Design

This course will emphasize graphic design workflows that use photography as key elements of design. Students will deepen their understanding of shooting for design outcomes, exploring product shot staging and lighting, working with models, props and sets. In turn, they will add to their image editing, compositing and layout skills by working with their photos using a powerful digital toolset. Prerequisites: ARTS219 Digital Photography I and ARTS319 Digital Photography II or instructor approval.

GRAP399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful Internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter and resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Must have Junior standing.

GRAP400 - Field Experience

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing. Prerequisite: GRAP399 Internship

GRAP401 - Publication Design

This course involves Graphic Design students in the theoretical and practical processes of successful publication design through research, conceptual explorations, studio practice, and presentations. This course offers experience in the design of traditional and electronic publications in order to prepare students for a career in graphic design. Prerequisite: GRAP302 Typography II.

GRAP403 - Senior Portfolio Development

This course prepares design students for effective and personalized presentation of their design work. Students are encouraged to create an online portfolio and relevant self-promotional materials (business card, designed resume, artist statement). Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP404 - Senior Thesis Assignment

Students engage in an individual research and writing practice that challenges them to analyze and articulate their personal philosophy of design, while studying designers of the Post-Modern era. This capstone course also provides students an opportunity to clarify their professional goals based on their interests in Graphic Design. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP406 - Senior Practicum Project

The senior practicum provides an opportunity for students in their final semester of the design program to produce a self-directed capstone project that applies the design theory and studio techniques that they have been developing over the last four years. The practicum project is presented in a Senior Show at the end of their final semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

LS101 - Foundations of American Legal System(KP)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the law. Students are introduced to the basics of the legal system in the United States including its organization and operation. The course covers major areas of legal practice and the legal principles that apply. Legal concepts are explained and legal terminology defined.

LS202 - Legal Research & Analysis

This course serves as an introduction to American constitutional interpretation. Topics to be covered include legal precedent, legal issues surrounding the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the role of the Supreme Court as a political institution, and the Court’s interpretations of issues dealing with the Bill of Rights. Prerequisite: LS 101.

LS203 - Justice, Law & the Constitution

This course serves as an introduction to American constitutional interpretation. Topics to be covered include legal precedent, legal issues surrounding the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the role of the Supreme Court as a political institution, and the Court’s interpretations of issues dealing with the Bill of Rights.

LS301 - Legal Writing & Reasoning

This course focuses on the development of fundamental skills necessary for successful legal writing that could assist in employment in a law office, such as drafting correspondence, developing various documents, and preparing legal memoranda. It looks at legal research, writing, and reasoning as a continuum, since the results of nearly all legal research must be submitted in written form. Legal writing is examined as a three step process. The steps consist of identifying the document’s purpose, audience, and constraints; developing a structure and draft; and editing and rewriting. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: LS 101 & LS202.

LS325 - Evidence

This course provides a detailed examination of the law of evidence. Topics include types of evidence, principles of exclusion, evaluation and examination of evidence, competency of witnesses, and the rule against hearsay evidence and the exceptions to this rule. Prerequisite: LS 101 or CJ 101.

LS441 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law I

This fall portion of the Capstone course is designed to identify and discuss various legal and political issues in society today, including but not limited to issues of gender, race, and other relevant historical and contemporary political topics and movements. This first semester develops the student’s ability to research, write and debate current issues. This is a writing intensive and speaking across the curriculum course. Limited to Legal Studies and Law and Public Affairs majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

LS442 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law II

The spring semester of the Capstone course focuses on the process of producing a final legal research paper on one of the topics of the first semester. Students hone their research and writing skills culminating in the presentation of a final capstone project presentation. This is a writing intensive and speaking across the curriculum intensive course. Prerequisites: LS 441 and Senior standing.

LS443 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar I

This course provides an opportunity for students to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours in the fall semester in a professional work setting related to their interest. Each student is monitored during the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

LS444 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar II

This course provides an opportunity for students to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours in the fall semester in a professional work setting related to their interest. Each student is monitored during the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Prerequisites: LS/CJ 443 and Senior standing

POLS101 - American Government

This is an examination of the basic principles that form the foundation for the structure and practice of American government. The impact of the political system on the citizen is explored along with the central assumptions and concepts that serve as the basis for the field of political science.

POLS201 - State & Local Government

This course begins with the constitutional and legal basis for state and local government. The functions of the executive and legislative branches are examined. Governmental bureaucracy and budgetary processes are studied as well as political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and political reporting in the press.

POLS210 - Political Theory

In this course, central questions in political theory are addressed. What is justice? What is freedom? What is the state? What makes a government legitimate? Is there any general obligation to obey the state? The course also focuses on theories of modernity and communities, the evolution of liberalism and individualism, and the relationship between politics and economics. Readings range from the Greeks to modern thinkers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination (KP)

In this course we explore our awareness of the relationship between our experience and broader society. How are our lives shaped by our social positions in society – our social class, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, and more? How do the members of different groups view each other and interact with each other? Why do inequalities exist and how do these affect us? How does culture shape our behavior, and why do religions, schools, families, and other institutions remain stable but also change over time?

BUSS104X - Professional Development in Business

For freshman only. This is a comprehensive course that introduces students to the skills they need to develop themselves professionally. It cultivates and hones the skills necessary for students to communicate effectively and professionally in a business environment. This course provides students with the skills necessary to engage in field experience, internship and post-graduate employment searches as well as for the general business world around them. Using myriad methods, students will develop the necessary professional skills for professional presentation, professional communication, negotiation, personal branding, networking and team building. Students will also be introduced to the concept of emotional intelligence and its impact on overall career and academic outcomes. Students will complete a minimum of three professional presentations as part of this course.Prerequisites: None

BUSS105 - Excel for Business

This course introduces students to basic Microsoft Excel skills. Excel is an electronic spreadsheet program used for storing, organizing and manipulating data. It is critical to the business world today as the volume data generated has exploded. This introductory course will provide students with information and skills needed to create basic workbooks and worksheets, create simple formulas, copy and move data, format data and cells, work in large spreadsheets and with data series, create pivot tables, and more. As part of this course, all students will have the opportunity to become certified in Microsoft Excel through the professional certification called Microsoft Office Specialist: Excel 2016 – Core Data Analysis, Manipulation, and Presentation. The certification also comes with an electronic badge. Students are also introduced to Income Statements, Balance Sheets, Statement of Cash Flows, Ratios, and the Basic Accounting Cycle

BUSS205 - Business Law

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to both business and personal needs. The primary focus is on contract law and property law. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major.

BUSS220 - Principles of Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, COM101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102 AND ENG102 OR WRT102.

BUSS227 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions.

BUSS440 - Business Capstone

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. This is a writing intensive course. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Prerequisite: Senior standing, Major within the School of Business

DSCI202 - Business Analytics

This course provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various aspects of Data Analytics. The purpose is to prepare students with foundation skills in Big Data, a skill widely needed and valued across the business world. The course will expose students to the data analytics practices executed in the business world and explores key areas of the analytical process, how data is created, stored, accessed, and how organizations work with data and creates the environment in which analytics can flourish. This course will provide students with a strong foundation in all the areas that support analytics and will help them to better position themselves for success within any organization.This course provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various aspects of Big Data Analytics, including cloud computing, NoSQL Databases, predictive and prescriptive analytics.Prerequisite: MATH208 or MATH209

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

SMGT407 - Sport Management Internship I

The internship provides students with administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisites: SMGT 205 and SMGT 305 .