Academic Programs

Online Summer Courses

Online Summer Courses | Lasell College

Lasell College is offering 100% online summer courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels, allowing students to get ahead in a way that is flexible and convenient to their personal and professional lives.

The Online Summer Courses at Lasell College are offered:

  • Summer Main: May 15 to August 27
  • Summer Session I: May 15 to July 3
  • Summer Session II: July 5 to August 27

Lasell College provides an active learning environment that robustly links learning to multiple experiences.  Located just outside of Boston, Lasell is a professional and educational hub of opportunities with small class sizes to provide a co-constructed, supportive learning space.  At Lasell, many doors are opened for students, they just have to choose which one to go through.

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BUSS497 - Mgmt & Mrkt Internship Seminar

This internship is scheduled to take place during the student's senior year (juniors are permitted with permission). Students serve as interns for a total of 144 hours in a position related to their field of study, The hours are completed concurrently with weekly class meetings and course work. Detailed reports, reflective excersizes, weekly journal entries, a final comprehensive project, and other written requirements are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed.

ENG102 - Writing II

This course builds on and refines skills and techniques gained in Writing I. Readings in a variety of genres from across disciplines are included, and students write in multiple genres with a heavy emphasis on research writing. Prerequisite: ENG101 or ENG101 Workshop with a grade of C or better

EXSC410 - Exercise Science Field Experience I

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 150 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC 302, EXSC 305.

EXSC420 - Exercise Science Field Experience II

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic,corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 300 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC 302, EXSC 305.

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Collaborative experience affords students capability to maximize opportunities and explore career path optionswhile receiving four academic credits Prerequisites: FASH 401 and senior standing

HEM299 - Field Experience I

This course provides a supervised work experience in the hospitality or event management industry as a complement to academic coursework. Students earn 150 hours in the field, gain practical skills in a business environment, and begin to view the workplace from a management perspective. During the course of the field experience, students keep a personal reflective journal of critical incidents. In addition, they complete a detailed profile of the management systems and policies at their workplace for submission at the end of the field experience. Students participate in weekly discussion groups during the course of the semester to evaluate and compare their experiences. Prerequisites: HEM199

HEM499 - Internship

Hospitality and Event Management students are involved in practical on-the-job experience (250 contact hours) in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member. Prerequisites: HEM 299

SMGT407 - Sport Management Internship I

The internship provides students with administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisites: SMGT 205 and SMGT 305 . 

SMGT408 - Sport Management Internship II

The internship provides students with additional administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisite: SMGT 407. 

ARTS126 - Principles of Design & Color (KP)

This course is an introduction to the theories and concepts of design and color with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one’s life and as a way to complement one’s aesthetic needs. This is a lecture/discussion/critique course with visual material, critical essays, individual expression, and museum/gallery trips. NOTE: First year Graphic Design majors should seek out the majors-only section when enrollling.

AT301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course also describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

BUSS201 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with an applied knowledge of the fundamental accounting process and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements, as well as how to become intelligent users of financial information.

BUSS220 - Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102; ECON101.

BUSS224 - Organizational Behavior

In this course, students study individuals within the context of the organization using a behavioral approach. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior. Areas covered include: structure, leadership, and change. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

CJ101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (KP)

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, and legal issues related to the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, focusing on critical decisions with an emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM103 - Human Communication (KP)

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ENG218 - British Literature (KP)

This course surveys British writing in poetry, fiction, and drama, with a focus on key periods in the development of British literature. Emphasis is on representative writers in each period. Periods and movements surveyed include Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary or Postmodern. This is a writing-intensive course.

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell College on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

GRAP207 - Web Design & Development

This course introduces the student to the most current coding and markup languages that are integral to successful Web site development. It also introduces the student to authoring software, such as Adobe Dreamweaver, that assists designers with the coding demands of Web authorship. Other topics which add to this comprehensive course are: the history of the Internet and World Wide Web Consortium, the power of CSS, and the design and layout principles that contribute to successful Web site development from technical, interactive, and aesthetic viewpoints. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

HIST103 - World Civilization I

Beginning with prehistory, this course explores early civilizations and then follows developments in a global context, showing interconnections between Asia, Africa, and Europe. Emphasis is placed on cultural, social, economic, religious, and political developments.

IDS101 - Field Assignment Seminar

Field Assignment Seminar

IDS400 - Field Experience

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting (for a total of 150 hours minimum). Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors and the Director of Internship Programs. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing. Prerequisite: IDS399, COM 399, HUM 399. In addition, IDS398X may be a substitution for these.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

POLS101 - American Government

This is an examination of the basic principles that form the foundation for the structure and practice of American government. The impact of the political system on the citizen is explored along with the central assumptions and concepts that serve as the basis for the field of political science.

POLS210 - Political Theory

In this course, central questions in political theory are addressed. What is justice? What is freedom? What is the state? What makes a government legitimate? Is there any general obligation to obey the state? The course also focuses on theories of modernity and communities, the evolution of liberalism and individualism, and the relationship between politics and economics. Readings range from the Greeks to modern thinkers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

SCI118 - Crime Lab Science (KP)

This course is an introductory survey course in crime lab science. The focus will be on the recognition, collection, preservation and analysis of physical evidence. Students will be presented with various state of the art techniques utilized in the analysis of physical evidence from a non-science major perspective with the presumption that students do not have technical backgrounds (i.e. chemistry, biology and/or physics). The goal of this class will be to provide students with an understanding of what forensic science entails.

SMGT207 - Special Topics in History of Sport

This course explores various aspects of sports and their historical development. The integration of gender, ethnic, religious, and other factors are discussed. The role that each area of sport plays within our society is examined.

SMGT401 - Special Topics in Sport Management

This course explores special segments and contemporary trends in the sport management industry. Topics may include sports medicine, health promotion, intercollegiate athletics, campus recreation, sport tourism, and international sport.

BUSS202 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a grade C or better.

BUSS205 - Legal Environment of Business

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to business and personal needs. The focus is primarily on contract law and property law.

BUSS232 - Operations Strategy

This course examines how operations can be used as sources of competitive advantage. The class will focus on understanding the need to formulate an operational strategy (long-term plan) and making strategic operational decisions. The old view of operations management as the task of maintaining a comparatively static production or service facility has given way to one characterized by a need for renewed flexibility, relentless improvement, and the development of new capabilities at the operating unit level. As a result of this changing environment, the skills required of operations managers have changed as well. This course is based primarily on case studies supported by conceptual frameworks. Prerequisite: BUSS101

CJ201 - Criminology

In this course, contemporary criminological theories are analyzed and evaluated with an emphasis on the social construction of crime, criminal offending, and victimization. Theories of crime are distinguished from theories of criminality. Assessments of theoretical advances, including theory integration and general theories of crime are examined. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101, or SOC 101

COM206 - Professional Communication

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the most important communication and career-related formats of professional writing, including power point presentations, memos, business letters, reports, brief speeches, instructions, newsletters and brochures. Special emphasis is given to various writing processes one must complete on a tight deadline for a business audience of peers, customers or employers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ED110 - Teaching & Learning in American Schools

This course provides students pursuing or considering initial teacher licensure with an overview of the teaching profession. Students study and discuss history and philosophies of education systems, as well as current trends and issues. Massachusetts professional standards and requirements for licensure are explored. This course is a prerequisite for all other ED courses. Twenty-five hours of observation and tutoring in varied school settings are required. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ENV220 - World Geography (KP)

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

HIST123 - American Civilization I

This course examines the chief political, social, and cultural features of American society as they have developed through the period of Reconstruction. Emphasis is on Colonial America, the War of Independence, the Constitution, and the emergence of the Republic through the Civil War.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

POLS201 - State & Local Government

This course begins with the constitutional and legal basis for state and local government. The functions of the executive and legislative branches are examined. Governmental bureaucracy and budgetary processes are studied as well as political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and political reporting in the press.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

SMGT208 - Sport Governance

This course focuses on the important role that governance plays within the sport industry. Students study the governance structures of various sports and sports governing bodies, including professional sports leagues, players’ associations, intercollegiate athletics, and Olympic sports, both within the United States and internationally.