2018 - 2019 Academic Catalog

Applied Forensic Science

Forensic Science is the application of science to law. The Lasell College Bachelor of Science in Applied Forensic Science degree program prepares students for careers in crime scene investigations, law enforcement crime laboratories, trace evidence examination, and commercial laboratories.  Students take  a wide range of courses in both the traditional sciences and criminal justice. Applied coursework is focused on conducting criminal investigations, collection and preservation of evidence, and analysis of evidence.  Culminating coursework involves the use of case studies, field experiences, and mock crime scene scenarios as a means of using our connected learning philosophy to reinforce theory and concepts learned in the classroom. In addition to this, students are presented with meaningful educational experiences based on the knowledge perspectives of the Lasell College core curriculum: creativity and aesthetics, scientific inquiry and problem solving, individuals and society, and global and historical perspectives.

Candidates for admission are expected to complete a college preparatory program of an approved secondary school, satisfying the following Carnegie Units: 
4 Units of English       
3 Units of Mathematics, including Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry (4 recommended)       
2 Units of Laboratory Science (preferably biology and chemistry or physics, 3 recommended)  

Lasell College will also consider applicants who have successfully fulfilled the requirements for a secondary school diploma or GED.

Academic standards for the Applied Forensic Science Program include grades of "C" or better in all CJ and FSCI courses

Goals and Outcomes
The following goals and learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Forensic Science:

Goal 1: Communication

Upon completion of the major program of study in Applied Forensic Science Program, students will be able to:  
1.      Interpret, develop, produce and disseminate disciplinary research
2.      Understand and create discipline specific written work
3.      Deliver professional oral presentations
4.      Interact professionally and educate clients, peers, colleagues and law enforcement personnel.  

Goal 2: Professional Behaviors

Upon completion of the major program of study in Applied Forensic Science, students will be able to:  
1.      Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethical behavior 
2.      Model professional conduct and behavior
3.      Respect the role and responsibilities of each professional member of a multidisciplinary team    

Goal 3: Knowledge and Skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Applied Forensic Science, students will be able to:
 1.      demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of criminalistics
2.      demonstrate the use of instrumentation commonly used in forensic analysis
3.      demonstrate techniques used in processing a crime scene including documentation, collection and preservation of evidence
4.      demonstrate the ability to apply qualitative and quantitative reasoning skills 

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
BIO101 Principles of Biology I (KP) 4
BIO102 Principles of Biology II (KP) 4
BIO211 Microbiology 4
BIO310 Genetics 3
CHEM203 General Chemistry I (KP) 4
CHEM204 General Chemistry II 4
CHEM303 Organic Chemistry 4
CJ101 Introduction to Criminal Justice (KP) 3
CJ201 Criminology 3
CJ205 Forensics 3
CJ207 Criminal Investigations 3
CJ316 Criminal Procedure 3
CJ331 Research Methods in Criminal Justice 4
FSCI309 Forensic Science II 3
FSCI311 Applied Forensic Science Case Studies 3
FSCI407 Field Experience 3
FSCI450 Special Topics on Applied Forensic Scien 3
FSCI480 Capstone in Applied Forensic Science 3
MATH203 Precalculus 3
MATH208 Statistics 3
PHYS111 General Physics I (KP) 4
PHYS112 General Physics II (KP) 4

Major requirements: 75 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.


CJ101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (KP)

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, and legal issues related to the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, focusing on critical decisions with an emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends.

CJ103 - Principles of Human Rights

This course takes a global perspective defining human rights, reflecting on violations of these rights, considering arguments in support of human rights, and examining various new initiatives designed to protect human rights in different countries in all parts of the world. This course focuses on issues pertaining to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights such as slavery, personal security and equality before the law, freedom of marriage, freedom of assembly, and freedom of movement.

CJ201 - Criminology

In this course, contemporary criminological theories are analyzed and evaluated with an emphasis on the social construction of crime, criminal offending, and victimization. Theories of crime are distinguished from theories of criminality. Assessments of theoretical advances, including theory integration and general theories of crime are examined. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101, or SOC 101

CJ202 - Juvenile Justice

This course focuses on the history and philosophy of juvenile justice, landmark court cases, police handling of juveniles, the juvenile court, the deinstitutionalization of status offenders, and juvenile rehabilitation. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC101, or SOC 101.

CJ203 - Juvenile Delinquency & Gangs

This course examines juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime. There is consideration of factors and theories that attempt to explain delinquency, gangs, and status offending. The course also examines delinquent subculture, and programs for control and prevention. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

CJ205 - Forensics

This course provides an introduction to the modern methods used in the detection, investigation, and solution of crimes. Practical analysis of evidence such as: fingerprints and other impressions, ballistics, glass, hair, handwriting and document examination, and drug analysis are studied. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ206 - Drugs & Society

This course examines the social origins and consequences of the use and abuse of consciousness-altering substances (including alcohol) within American society. It considers how society defines drug use, drug abuse, and social harm, as well as how society responds to drug use and abuse. Included is examination of socio-historical perspectives on drug consumption and control, the structure of legal and illegal drug markets, the relationship between drugs and crime, and competing models of drug policy and enforcement. Prerequisite: CJ 101, PSYC 101, SOC 101, or LS101

CJ207 - Criminal Investigations

This course examines the fundamentals of criminal investigation including scientific aids, interviews, interrogations, collection and preservation of evidence, methods of surveillance, follow-up and case preparation. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ210 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

This course provides special subjects in Criminal Justice in order to satisfy interests of both faculty and students. Examples of such topics are: restorative justice, global violence against women, or computer crime.

CJ211 - Terrorism

No other issues generate as much discussion and controversy as the contemporary debate over "terrorism". But what is terrorism? And how should we respond to it? This course examines terrorism with a critical eye, looking at the different ways that the subject is framed by various disciplines and examines the ways that terrorism has been presented, debated, and analyzed. The course addresses the social-political conditions that spawn terrorist organizations, examines terrorism in a historical context, and looks at methods of terrorism. The course explores the psychological processes that create a terrorist, the psychological impact of terrorist activities, and explores counter-terrorism strategies through creative problem-solving.

CJ213 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

The field of criminal justice operates most effectively when it relies on a core of ethical principles to guide discretionary actions. If criminal justice professionals are to maintain our personal integrity in light of organizational and social demands can be difficult. As criminal justice professionals our choices and policies emanate from our personal beliefs and values. In principle we intend to come to an understanding of what various ethical considerations can assist us to make the right decision when exercising our discretion. Prerequisite: CJ101 or LS101 & ENG102

CJ303 - Domestic Violence

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of the law relating to domestic violence. In addition the course examines the existence of violence among family members and in relationships in today's society. Topics include child abuse, partner abuse, and elder abuse. Prerequisite: LS 101, CJ 101 or any introductory social science course.

CJ305 - Crime & Popular Culture

Crime is considered a major social problem in our country, but our understanding of crime and justice are derived more from indirect mediated images than direct personal experience. Popular culture, distributed through mass media and composed of popular news and entertainment, is a major source for shaping this understanding, especially when it comes to crime a staple of mass media. This course will examine images of crime and justice in popular culture and consider the sources of these popular culture accounts of crime and justice. It also will evaluate the influence popular culture has on our understanding of crime and criminal justice policy. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing & ENG102

CJ309 - Children & Violence

This course examines the psychological, criminal justice, and legal issues surrounding children who experience violence in their lives, either as victims or perpetrators of violence. Topics include child maltreatment, pedophilia, online child predators, school victimization, domestic violence, juvenile delinquency, child sex offenders, and youth homicide. Prerequisite: PSYC 221, PSYC 223, CJ 201, or LS 204.

CJ311 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

This course provides students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the criminal courts. In addition, the course covers the assumptions underlying the rules of criminal procedure, how they evolved, and the goals they hope to achieve. Students also learn how the dynamics of the courtroom and the criminal justice system itself affect the actual application of the law. Prerequisite: POLS 101. F.

CJ312 - Corrections

Corrections is the vast collection of persons, agencies, and organizations that manage convicted criminals. This course examines theories of punishment, the history of corrections, classification and sentencing schemes, prisons, probation and parole, and alternative sanctions. It also explores corrections-related personnel issues, legal issues, and specific concerns dealing with race, age, and gender. Prerequisite: CJ101 or LS101 & Sophomore standing

CJ313 - Police & Society

This course examines policing from a variety of perspectives. The philosophical foundations of social control in relation to policing, as well as the emergence, organization, and structure of police systems are examined. There is also an examination of the relationship between the police and the public in different historical, political, and economic contexts. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

CJ314 - White Collar and Organized Crime

This course addresses the definition, detection, prosecution, sentencing, and impact of white collar, occupational, and organized crime. Special consideration is given to the role of federal law and enforcement practices due to the frequent national and international scope of these types of crimes.

CJ315 - Global Technology & Crime

In this course the advances in technology developed in crime investigation will be examined, like crime mapping. The impact of technology and media on international crime and new globally-oriented cooperative enforcement strategies will also be examined. Students will gain a better understanding of crime control in a global society.”

CJ316 - Criminal Procedure

Criminal procedure refers to the process whereby the criminal law is enforced. Major topics to be covered in this course include: the exclusionary rule, search and seizure, identification, interrogation, trial rights, sentencing, and due process. Special emphasis is placed upon how the rules of procedure affect the components of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ317 - Comparative Justice Systems

This course analyzes differences in global approaches to law enforcement, criminal procedure, criminal law, corrections, juvenile justice, and prevention. The material provides a worldwide overview of cultural and legal traditions that are related to crime. Through cross-cultural comparisons, the course examines whether due process rights must be sacrificed in order to achieve crime control effectiveness and efficiency. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ318 - Violence & Aggression

This course investigates and analyzes aggression and violence as forms of individual, group, and societal behavior. It includes an assessment of anthropological, biological, philosophical, political, and sociological theories of violence. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or Permission of Dept Chair

CJ319 - Victimology

This course presents an overview of the history and theories of victimology. Students analyze victimization patterns with special emphasis on types of victims and crimes. The course also examines the interaction between victims of crime and the criminal justice system, the victim’s rights movement, and services offered to victims of crime. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

CJ321 - Probation, Parole & Other Sanctions

This course examines the development and application of traditional forms of conditional and unconditional prison release, as well as a variety of new intermediate or alternative sanctions. Different sentencing options are evaluated to determine which, if any, of the theories of criminology or philosophies of sentencing are satisfied by their use. Current research and analytical perspectives are examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, or SOC 101.

CJ323 - Justice, Class, Race & Gender

This course explores issues unique to individuals of different classes, gender, and/or races or ethnic groups. The course focuses on these issues specifically in the context of the American criminal justice and legal systems. Issues of diversity relevant to all aspects of the criminal justice system are examined. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101, Sophomore standing.

CJ331 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

"The course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research using the field of criminaljustice as the backdrop. The purpose of this course is to provide the background that will help thestudent to read, understand, and critique data and studies in the field. Students will acquire aworking knowledge of programs like excel to collect and also analyze federal and other statisticalstudies. Required for all CJ majors.Prerequisite: MATH 208

CJ332 - Criminal Profiling Strategies

Criminal Profiling Strategies

CJ335 - Sexual Violence Advocacy

This sexual violence class uses the Boston Area Rape Crisis Curriculum to teach students how to recognize, advocate for and support survivors of sexual assault in an advocacy capacity. Through articles, role plays, videos and active participation, students will learn the importance of identifying the impacts and symptoms of sexual violence and will receive training in how to lend support and offer a myriad of resources to survivors of sexual violence. The class will explore historical and cultural components of sexual violence as well as activist movements led by student survivors to change the landscape of how sexual violence is perceived and addressed on college campuses. Turning our lens toward college campuses, students will develop and institute a service project designed to change or inform sexual violence on college campuses. Upon successful completion of the course as defined by the professor, students will receive 30 hours of sexual violence training which they can use to leverage internships and professional opportunities. This class is designed to inform, educate and professionally prepare students who may encounter sexual violence survivors in their work such as human services, legal services, education, athletic training, law enforcement and psychology.

CJ421 - Investigative Methods & Procedures

This upper level introductory course focuses on crime classification and uses the standard manual for investigating and classifying violent crimes. Gang and cult investigative methods are discussed. Up-to-date information on forensic investigations, collecting evidence, and processing crime scenes is presented as well.

CJ422 - Principles of Crime Analysis

This course will enable the student to understand the principles of crime analysis. It will cover the five principles consisting of data collection, collation, analysis, feedback and evaluation. It will also explain forecasting of criminal events as well as identification of crime trends, series and patterns. Students will also learn statistical analysis in crime patterns.

CJ441 - Topics in Crime & Public Policy I

This course is the first portion of the Capstone course offered in the fall semester to introduce seniors to a general understanding of policy studies. Students examine what policy analysis consists of, stages of policy analysis, and assessment of policy change. The class examines current policy issues in Criminal Justice such as community policing, sentencing, and minority overrepresentation in prison populations. The course examines various research strategies, design and methods and addresses research problem definition and how to produce a state of the art policy paper and literature review. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: PSYC 331,CJ331 or SOC 331.

CJ442 - Topics in Crime & Public Policy II

In this part of the Capstone course offered in the spring semester, the student can use the field internship placement as the target for the individual policy analysis paper. The student can acquire data available at the agency or use generally available data from different sources to answer a policy question that can be applied to the agency the student works in or to similar agencies. The student is required to submit a detailed policy analysis and produce a paper and project to be presented at the Connected Learning Symposium. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: CJ 441, SR Standing & CJ331X or SOC331.

CJ443 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar I

This course provides an opportunity for participants to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours during the fall semester in a professional work setting related to the student’s interest. Each student is monitored throughout the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Dept Chair approval.

CJ444 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar II

This course provides an opportunity for participants to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours during the spring semester in a professional work setting related to the student’s interest. Each student is monitored throughout the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisites: CJ/LS 443, Senior standing and Dept Chair approval.

FSCI309 - Forensic Science II

This course will introduce various methodologies and applications used in the forensic context. Topics discussed include organic and inorganic chemical analyses of physical evidence; principles of serology and DNA analysis, an introduction to quality assurance and quality control concepts; principles and techniques for forensic toxicology, fire debris and explosive examinations. Techniques for the analysis of inks, dyes, polymers and colors will be introduced. Pre-requisites: CJ 205, CHEM 304

FSCI311 - Applied Forensic Science Case Studies

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge that they have and/or are developing. The five required case studies are applied research projects that include requirements of research literature, study of cases, writing, and oral presentation of at least three of these cases. The focus of this course is to provide students with realistic case experiences while being mentored by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Applied Forensic Science Program.

FSCI407 - Field Experience

This is an off-campus experience in an appropriate Forensics Science work-setting that offers students an opportunity to apply concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 150 hours of field experience in addition to course assignments.

FSCI450 - Special Topics on Applied Forensic Scien

This course provides specialized topics in Applied Forensic Science in order to address current disciplinary trends. Using a problem-based learning model, students will engage in collaborative work, facilitated by faculty, to solve cases based on current issues. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Applied Forensic Science Program.

FSCI480 - Capstone in Applied Forensic Science

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge that they have acquired in the program and to demonstrate their level of skill. The senior capstone projects are applied research projects that include requirements of research literature, study of cases/or forensic science, a written report and an oral presentation of the project. The focus of this course is to provide students with realistic case experiences while being mentored by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Applied Forensic Science Program.

MAHT304 - Mathematics for Educators

Mathematics for Educators

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH209X - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH301 - Mathematical Modeling

Mathematical ModelingPrerequisite: C or better in MATH 205, 206, and 208

MATH303X - Problem Solving

This course will be an exploration into the mathematics exemplified in high quality high school and undergraduate mathematics competitions and mathematical research. The emphasis will be placed on building a repertoire of mathematical strategies and tactics, then applying these methods in unfamiliar situations. Topics will include: Combinatorics, Binomial Theorem, Conditional Probability, Roots of Unity, Symmetric Polynomials, Polynomial Interpolation, and topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry. Students will hone their ability to solve mathematical problems through hands-on practice and obtain an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and tools of the problem solver as illustrated by the textbook and the instructor. Strategies and tools for solving problems include, but are not limited to: •Draw a Diagram•Systematic Lists•Eliminate Possibilities•Matrix Logic•Look for a Pattern•Guess and Check•Sub Problems•Unit Analysis•Solve An Easier Related Problem•Physical Representations•Work Backwards•Venn Diagrams•Finite Differences

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vector functions, advanced techniques of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH322X - Special Topics in Mathematics

Special Topics in Mathematics

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants. Applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, economics, connectivity of networks, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH328 - Mathematics Applied to Management

This course explores the art of mathematical modeling of managerial decision problems and the science of developing the solution techniques for these models. Topics include management science techniques used in today’s businesses, e.g., break-even analysis, presentation models, linear programming, transportation and assignments problems, decision theory, forecasting and inventory models, Markov analysis, and solution of nonlinear models in business using calculus-based optimization. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Capstone Seminar

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS111L, PHYS111R.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS112L, PHYS112R.

Deirdre Donovan

Assistant Professor of Mathematics; Program Director of Mathematics

Office: Science and Technology Center

Christianne Eason

Assistant Professor of Athletic Training, Graduate School Coordinator

Office: Science and Technology Center

Kimberly Farah

Professor of Chemistry, Program Director of Applied Forensic Science

Office: Science and Technology Center

Monica Hall-Porter

Assistant Professor of Biology, Program Director of Science

Office: Science and Technology Center

Neil Hatem

Associate Professor of Mathematics

Office: Science and Technology Center

Joanna Kosakowski

Professor Emerita

Ron Laham

Assistant Professor of Exercise Science

Office: Science and Technology Center

Elyssa Miller

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Office: Science and Technology Center

Esther Pearson

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Office: Science and Technology Center

Stephen Sarikas

Professor of Biology

Office: Science and Technology Center

BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Corequisite: BIO 101L.

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

BIO211 - Microbiology

This course introduces the microbial world and the laboratory required for its study. Topics include the basic characteristics of fungi, algae, bacteria, and viruses. Topics and applications that relate to humans are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO 102

BIO310 - Genetics

The course will focus on principles related to the inheritance of traits regulated by genes. The chemical and physical nature of chromosomes and genes and gene expression and regulation will be covered. Systems in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms exemplifying Mendelian and modern molecular genetic principles will be discussed.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM203L and CHEM203R.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubiity equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: CHEM 203. Corequisite: CHEM 204L.

CHEM303 - Organic Chemistry

This course is focused on the structure and chemistry of organic compounds. Topics include thermodynamics, resonance, reaction mechanisms of organic functional groups and stereochemistry. The course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM204. Co-requisite CHEM303L

CJ101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (KP)

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, and legal issues related to the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, focusing on critical decisions with an emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends.

CJ201 - Criminology

In this course, contemporary criminological theories are analyzed and evaluated with an emphasis on the social construction of crime, criminal offending, and victimization. Theories of crime are distinguished from theories of criminality. Assessments of theoretical advances, including theory integration and general theories of crime are examined. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101, or SOC 101

CJ205 - Forensics

This course provides an introduction to the modern methods used in the detection, investigation, and solution of crimes. Practical analysis of evidence such as: fingerprints and other impressions, ballistics, glass, hair, handwriting and document examination, and drug analysis are studied. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ207 - Criminal Investigations

This course examines the fundamentals of criminal investigation including scientific aids, interviews, interrogations, collection and preservation of evidence, methods of surveillance, follow-up and case preparation. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ316 - Criminal Procedure

Criminal procedure refers to the process whereby the criminal law is enforced. Major topics to be covered in this course include: the exclusionary rule, search and seizure, identification, interrogation, trial rights, sentencing, and due process. Special emphasis is placed upon how the rules of procedure affect the components of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ331 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

"The course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research using the field of criminaljustice as the backdrop. The purpose of this course is to provide the background that will help thestudent to read, understand, and critique data and studies in the field. Students will acquire aworking knowledge of programs like excel to collect and also analyze federal and other statisticalstudies. Required for all CJ majors.Prerequisite: MATH 208

FSCI309 - Forensic Science II

This course will introduce various methodologies and applications used in the forensic context. Topics discussed include organic and inorganic chemical analyses of physical evidence; principles of serology and DNA analysis, an introduction to quality assurance and quality control concepts; principles and techniques for forensic toxicology, fire debris and explosive examinations. Techniques for the analysis of inks, dyes, polymers and colors will be introduced. Pre-requisites: CJ 205, CHEM 304

FSCI311 - Applied Forensic Science Case Studies

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge that they have and/or are developing. The five required case studies are applied research projects that include requirements of research literature, study of cases, writing, and oral presentation of at least three of these cases. The focus of this course is to provide students with realistic case experiences while being mentored by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Applied Forensic Science Program.

FSCI407 - Field Experience

This is an off-campus experience in an appropriate Forensics Science work-setting that offers students an opportunity to apply concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 150 hours of field experience in addition to course assignments.

FSCI450 - Special Topics on Applied Forensic Scien

This course provides specialized topics in Applied Forensic Science in order to address current disciplinary trends. Using a problem-based learning model, students will engage in collaborative work, facilitated by faculty, to solve cases based on current issues. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Applied Forensic Science Program.

FSCI480 - Capstone in Applied Forensic Science

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge that they have acquired in the program and to demonstrate their level of skill. The senior capstone projects are applied research projects that include requirements of research literature, study of cases/or forensic science, a written report and an oral presentation of the project. The focus of this course is to provide students with realistic case experiences while being mentored by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Applied Forensic Science Program.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS111L, PHYS111R.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS112L, PHYS112R.