Skip top navigation

2019 - 2020 Academic Catalog

Lifespan Development Minor

The Lifespan Development minor is an individualized program of study consisting of 15 credits ( 3 credits must be Intergenerational Studies Linked Credits*).

Course Code Course Title Credits
Minor Courses
PSYC111 Generations in America 3
Choose 1 from the following:
PSYC221 Child Development 3
PSYC223 Adolescent Psychology 3
Choose 2 from the following:
CJ202 Juvenile Justice 3
CJ309 Children & Violence 3
COM321 Media & Children 3
ENG212 Literature for Young Adults 3
EXSC107 Healthy Lifestyles and Human Behavior 3
HIST218 Global History of Childhood 3
PSYC221 Child Development 3
PSYC223 Adolescent Psychology 3
PSYC226 Living & Learning with Dementia 3
PSYC241 The Psychological Life of Girls & Women 3
PSYC328 Cognitive Processes 3
SOC214 Family Diversity 3

Choose 3 Intergenerational Linked Credits attached to classes of the student's choice or a 3 credit internship that involves an aging or intergenerational population or issue: 3 credits 

*Note: When a linked credit is attached to a class that, in itself, is not related to intergenerational studies, only the linked credit will count towards the minor, not the credits for the class.

Credit Requirements for minor: 15 credits

PSYC111 - Generations in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

CJ202 - Juvenile Justice

This course focuses on the history and philosophy of juvenile justice, landmark court cases, police handling of juveniles, the juvenile court, the deinstitutionalization of status offenders, and juvenile rehabilitation. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC101, or SOC 101.

CJ309 - Children & Violence

This course examines the psychological, criminal justice, and legal issues surrounding children who experience violence in their lives, either as victims or perpetrators of violence. Topics include child maltreatment, pedophilia, online child predators, school victimization, domestic violence, juvenile delinquency, child sex offenders, and youth homicide. Prerequisite: PSYC 221, PSYC 223, CJ 201, or LS 204.

COM321 - Media & Children

This course examines the uses and effects of mass communication among children and adolescents. By taking a developmental perspective, the course explores how youth at different stages of cognitive development watch, understand, and respond to media content. The first part of the course focuses on children’s uses and processing of media. The second part of the course reviews the effects of various types of content (e.g., advertising, stereotypes, violence). The final part of the course considers the role of interventions (e.g., media literacy, ratings, parental mediation) in preventing media-related outcomes that are harmful and promoting those that are positive. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to critically evaluate the role of media in the lives of children.COM 101 or PSYC 101.

ENG212 - Literature for Young Adults

This course surveys current literature for adolescent and teen readers. It prepares students to evaluate young adult books in terms of literary quality, reader interest, and social and political perspectives. Strategies for use in the classroom are explored; various genres are examined. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

EXSC107 - Healthy Lifestyles and Human Behavior

This course focuses on evaluating and implementing healthy lifestyles and human behavior for longevity of lifespan fraom adolescence through adult development. Focus will be placed upon cultivating a holistic approach to health and wellness that is rooted within strategies for implementing healthy lifestyle changes, as well as "living through prevention": a description relating to methods of preventing long term disease and disability.

HIST218 - Global History of Childhood

This course introduces students to the ways in which cultural ideas about childhood and childrearing have changed over time. Using Western history as a departure point, the course will compare and contrast key topics of childhood, such as child labor and child rights, in various cultures. This is primarily a discussion seminar, in which students present and discuss a variety of academic readings. There is also a service-learning component. This is a presentation-intensive course.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC226 - Living & Learning with Dementia

Living & Learning with Dementia

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 & MATH 208

SOC214 - Family Diversity

This course explores the meaning of "family" in a historical and cross-cultural context - it looks at the way families and households are constructed, and at how these institutions are impacted by social forces including demographic, ideological, and economic changes in societies. Family diversity is discussed in the context of social constructions such as race, class, and gender. Current themes in family sociology that are covered include, amongst others, sexuality, marriage, parenting, violence, divorce and remarriage, and family policy. Prerequisite: SOC 101.