2019 - 2020 Academic Catalog

Sociology

Sociologists study all social relationships among people - everything from how two individuals make sense of a conversation to how cultures spread across the globe. Learning sociology opens our eyes to how our social setting influences us and how we can influence our social setting. The sociological imagination enables us to transform individuals' personal troubles into social issues by spotting and interpreting trends.

 At Lasell, the focus is on applied sociology, which means that there is an emphasis on thinking critically about social problems, oppression and social injustices, and on developing skills that can be applied to bring about positive social change. Students investigate the relationship between individuals and society with a particular focus on inequalities related to race or ethnicity, social class, gender, disability, sexuality and other socially constructed identities. Because sociology courses explore various social institutions, such as family, education, social movements, and the economy, a sociology major is good preparation for careers in many different fields.  Skills emphasized in the major prepare students for careers in social services, politics and policy development, education, community organizing, social research, advocacy, public relations, and nonprofit administration and program development. The undergraduate sociology major also prepares the capable student for graduate programs in social work, management, public health, law and criminal justice and, of course, sociology. Through Lasell's Connected Learning philosophy, sociology majors have opportunities to apply concepts learned in the classroom to service learning and social justice advocacy.  

Sociology majors build their professional resume with at least five accomplishments in the field. They all take at least two hands-on courses involving group projects for a public interest cause. In addition, with support from professors, they create two small independent research, advocacy or public education projects, connected to courses of their choosing. During these experiences, they have contact with legislators, journalists and professionals in the nonprofit and public sectors. 

Finally, as the culminating capstone experience in their senior year, students engage in a two-semester, intensive internship placement, accompanied by seminars. They practice professional skills in a mission-driven nonprofit, legislative office or human services agency.

Through their field projects, internship and course work, students develop and practice professional skills and master the writing styles needed for careers in the nonprofit sector, in public affairs, human services, media or marketing, or for graduate school.  

Academic Standards for Sociology Majors:  

1.   Students must earn a grade of C or above in each of the following courses:
SOC101 Sociological Imagination
SOC331 Research methods in the Social Sciences

2.   Students must receive a grade of C-minus or above in any required course or any course that serves as a substitute or alternative for such a requirement.

3.   The senior level internship courses (HS415 and HS417) and seminar courses (HS425 and 427) form yearlong courses. Failure to receive a minimum grade of C in any one of these courses will result in the student having to repeat the entire sequence, unless there are extenuating circumstances.  

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Sociology.
Goal 1: Knowledge in the discipline
Upon completion of the major program of study in Sociology, students will be able to:
1.    describe key concepts and theories within the field of Sociology
2.    use Sociological theories to understand the social and cultural systems
3.    demonstrate knowledge of professional codes of ethics

Goal 2: Service learning and social justice
Upon completion of the major program of study in Sociology, students will be able to:
1.    engage in action to address the issues of justice by raising awareness or advocating for change
2.    reflect on the results of service
3.    recognize and describe social injustice
4.    analyze issues that cause social and economic disparities

Goal 3: Scientific reasoning
Upon completion of the major program of study in Sociology, students will be able to:
1.    demonstrate facility with research methodology
2.    demonstrate ability to apply statistics
3.    develop a substantiated argument

Goal 4: Communication within the discipline
Upon completion of the major program of study in Sociology, students will be able to:
1.    demonstrate proficiency in professional Sociological writing style
2.    write a preliminary grant proposal
3.    deliver a professional presentation

Course Code Course Title Credits
Major Courses
HS415 Advanced Internship I 3
HS417 Field Intervention Strategies 3
HS425 Advanced Internship II 3
HS427 Systems & Organizational Change 3
MATH208 Statistics 3
PSYC220 Social Psychology 3
SOC101 Sociological Imagination (KP) 3
SOC221 Contemporary Social Problems 3
SOC223 Social Movements 3
SOC301 Race & Ethnicity 3
SOC307 Action & Social Justice 4
SOC310 Sociological Perspectives 3
SOC331 Research Methods in the Social Sciences 4
Choose 1 from the following:
SOC102 Women and Gender in Social Context(KP) 3
SOC214 Family Diversity 3
Choose 1 from the following:
ECON103 Economics of Social Issues 3
SOC207 Wealth & Poverty 3
Choose 1 from the following:
CJ303 Domestic Violence 3
ENV303 Environmental Justice 3
SOC212 Wellness & Society 3
Choose 1 from the following:
BUSS224 Organiz Behavior in a Global Environment 3
BUSS334 Nonprofit Management 3

Linked Credits: 2 credits

Major Requirements: 55 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.



BUSS101 - Fund of Bus in a Global Envrionment

This course is designed to familiarize students with various aspects of the business world. Areas covered include: private enterprise, forms of ownership, legal aspects, management practices in a diverse and global business environment, marketing, human resources, global operations management, labor relations, and finance. In addition, students become aware of how business functions are integrated into an organization to achieve specific goals both locally and internationally.

BUSS104X - Professional Development in Business

For freshman only. This is a comprehensive course that introduces students to the skills they need to develop themselves professionally. It cultivates and hones the skills necessary for students to communicate effectively and professionally in a business environment. This course provides students with the skills necessary to engage in field experience, internship and post-graduate employment searches as well as for the general business world around them. Using myriad methods, students will develop the necessary professional skills for professional presentation, professional communication, negotiation, personal branding, networking and team building. Students will also be introduced to the concept of emotional intelligence and its impact on overall career and academic outcomes. Students will complete a minimum of three professional presentations as part of this course.Prerequisites: None

BUSS105 - Excel for Business

This course introduces students to basic Microsoft Excel skills. Excel is an electronic spreadsheet program used for storing, organizing and manipulating data. It is critical to the business world today as the volume data generated has exploded. This introductory course will provide students with information and skills needed to create basic workbooks and worksheets, create simple formulas, copy and move data, format data and cells, work in large spreadsheets and with data series, create pivot tables, and more. As part of this course, all students will have the opportunity to become certified in Microsoft Excel through the professional certification called Microsoft Office Specialist: Excel 2016 – Core Data Analysis, Manipulation, and Presentation. The certification also comes with an electronic badge. Students are also introduced to Income Statements, Balance Sheets, Statement of Cash Flows, Ratios, and the Basic Accounting Cycle

BUSS201 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with the fundamentals of accounting processes and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements and how to become intelligent users of financial information.

BUSS202 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions. Prerequisite: BUSS 105

BUSS203 - Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of finance. Various techniques of analysis that reveal the relationships of risk, return, and value are demonstrated. Topics include: financial reporting; long- and short-term forecasting; managing working capital; capital budgeting; and the nature of corporate securities and debt-equity mix. Prerequisites: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better & ECON 102.

BUSS205 - Business Law

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to both business and personal needs. The primary focus is on contract law and property law. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major

BUSS208 - Financial Statement Analysis

In this course, students will examine financial statements and other financial reports with a view towards using accounting information in making investing, lending, and other potential management decisions. Students explore methods of constructing, comparing, and analyzing these statements and reports and the various uses of such analyses. Prerequisite: BUSS202 with a grade of C or higher

BUSS210 - Federal Income Taxes

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, businesses, and not-for-profit, taxable entities. Students will explore a broad range of tax topics, emphasizing the role of taxation in business decision-making process, tax research, and tax planning. -Prerequsite: BUSS201 with a grade C or better

BUSS211 - Fundamentals of Financial Modeling

In this course, students will build applications and models in Excel to support financial analysis and decision-making. Students will begin by building financial documents using basic Excel applications and functions. They will then move into more advanced skills that include time value of money and statistical functions, text and date usage, regression, conditionals, data tables and random number generation. All techniques will be applied to the most common financial applications and models including present value, cost of capital, financial statement forecasting, and valuation. Also included are the preparation of charts and graphs for use in professional presentations and reports. Problem-solving cases will serve as the foundation for the course. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a “C” or better.

BUSS212 - Management Information Systems

This course takes a managerial approach to information technology concepts and applications. Given the pervasiveness of technology in today's world, professionals in various fields of endeavor often have a major responsibility for determining an organization's information needs and for designing and implementing information systems that support those needs. Students study concepts and issues related to information technology with the goal of understanding how it can be effectively used to improve an organization's over­all effectiveness and increase it's level of success. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, SMGT102, or FASH101.

BUSS213X - Excel for Business

Excel is an electronic spreadsheet program used for storing, organizing and manipulating data. Excel and other programs have become essential to many of today’s businesses as the volume of data generated has increased dramatically and become critical to most business functions. This introductory course will assist students in developing and/or furthering basic Excel skills.

BUSS218X - Business Operations Simulation

This one-credit course utilizes the exciting business simulation program GoVenture CEO. It is a revolutionary business simulation where students manage companies on their own or in teams. Choosing from dozens of ready-to-play industries, students will engage in a simulation that models current events, historical successes or failures, and targets specific challenges or learning outcomes. Students manage their own strategies while monitoring competitive positioning, actions, and other market forces that arise. This simulation is appropriate for any major and any business student who wants a hands-on business management experience.Prerequisite: BUSS 101 or HEM 101

BUSS220 - Principles of Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102 AND ENG102 OR WRT102.

BUSS224 - Organiz Behavior in a Global Environment

In this course, students study individuals and their interactions within group settings as they affect efficiencies in diverse business organizations. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior on a global scale. Areas covered include structure, leadership, and change as they affect a multitude of cultures. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course.

BUSS231 - Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation

Entrepreneurship drives global innovation and economic growth. This course exposes business students to the study of entrepreneurship and the venture creation process. Topics include analyzing new business opportunities, developing business propositions, new venture planning and financing, marketing activities, financial controls, and other topics relevant to the entrepreneurial process. Students interact with faculty, local entrepreneurs, and small business owners/managers. As a culmination activity of this course, students are responsible for the development and presentation of a business plan. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101 or SMGT102

BUSS232 - Global Operation Strategies

This course examines how operations can be used as sources of competitive advantage in international business. The class will focus on understanding the need to formulate an operational strategy (long-term plan) and making strategic operational decisions. The old view of operations management as the task of maintaining a comparatively static production or service facility has given way to one characterized by a need for renewed flexibility, relentless improvement, and the development of new capabilities at the operating unit level. As a result of this changing environment, the skills required of operations managers across the globe have changed as well. This course is based primarily on case studies supported by conceptual frameworks.

BUSS233 - American Enterprise Experience

This course examines the American enterprise experience from colonial times until the present. The course touches upon the business component of the American experience beginning with the individual artisan-merchant through the great innovators and organizers of the 19th and 20th centuries and beyond. The historical events, cultural changes, social upheavals, and political shifts that have influenced the development of the American business environment are the core of the study. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, FASH101, or SMGT102

BUSS235 - Ethics in Business

This course analyzes ethical issues that arise in a wide range of contemporary business practices, both domestically and globally. It is designed to stimulate critical thinking on ethical issues, corporate social responsibility, and professional challenges encountered in business. The course material enables students to recognize and manage ethical issues and to develop their own standards of integrity and professionalism as applied to the business world. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102

BUSS237 - Global Leadership

In this course, students analyze what it means to be a global leader in the 21st century and identify the skills necessary to be successful in an increasingly global business climate. Students explore this question personally, collectively, and globally in a creative and collaborative atmosphere. Students examine classic as well as contemporary theories of leadership and how they apply to the dynamic global business culture. The course provides students with the opportunity to acquire perspectives and skills essential to successful management in the emerging markets that are increasingly becoming key contenders in world commercial enterprise. Prerequisite BUSS 224.

BUSS301 - Intermediate Accounting I

This course builds on concepts developed in Financial Accounting. Concentration is on the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to the preparation of financial statements with an in-depth review of cash, receivables, inventories, and plant assets. The course also covers the concept of the time value of money and the application of present value techniques to accounting valuations. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS302 - Intermediate Accounting II

This course is designed to continue the concepts of financial accounting and present a more thorough analysis of the requirements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Included in this course are earnings per share calculations, lease accounting, and pension accounting. The cash flow statement is also studied. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a grade C or better.

BUSS304 - Working Capital Management

This course explores working capital management, credit management, working capital funding, and the major sources of financing debt and equity. Students undertake financial analyses of theoretical models and real-world firms and organizations, recommend financing strategies, and present their findings by using management reporting methods. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade C or Better

BUSS305 - International Accounting

This course addresses significant accounting matters experienced by multinational companies. Accounting matters include currency transactions and translational transfer price, and management planning and control. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a C or better.

BUSS306 - Accounting Information Systems

The course teaches conceptual, analytic and technical skills necessary to work efficiently and productively as an accountant or auditor in an automated environment. The course focuses on today’s typical business that is heavily dependent on information and how the business entity collects enormous volumes of data, stores that data and when needed, transforms that data into usable business information. The course involve hands on use of Microsoft Excel spreadsheet skills and will further develop these skills to use Excel's more advanced functions suitable for data storage and analysis. Hands on use of Microsoft Access is also utilized to teach data modelling skills. Prerequisite: BUSS202 with a C or better.

BUSS307 - International Finance

This course explores the ways and means to reduce financial risk involved in international financial management. The course deals with the interrelationship between the international monetary environment and financial planning for corporations with overseas operations. Students will analyze the effects on international financial planning of such factors as exchange rate fluctuations, currency restrictions, and tax regulations. Students will examine financial aspects of multinational businesses including foreign investment, trade, and transfer of funds. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade C or Better

BUSS308 - Government & Not-for-Profit Accounting

This course introduces financial accounting and reporting issues related to state and local government and non-profit organizations, including universities and health care facilities. Prerequisite: BUSS201 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS309 - Fraud Examination

This course covers techniques for identification and detection of asset misappropriation schemes and fraudulent financial statements, who commits fraud and why, and controls to prevent and detect problems. Prerequisite: BUSS201 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS310 - Advanced Financial Management

This course builds on the concepts introduced in BUSS203 and focuses on financial decisions made within corporate environments. Financial risk and return, capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure, working capital management, and distribution policy are emphasized. Current topics in financial management will also be included. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade of or better.

BUSS311 - Investments

This course explores the fundamentals of investing. The strategies used to create money from financial capital are thoroughly examined. Financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, futures, options, and commodities are explored. The measurement tools used to assign risk and rate of return, performance, and value are covered. Students learn how to develop, analyze, and maintain a portfolio. Regulatory and ethical issues are examined and considered in the decision-making process. Prerequisite: BUSS201 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS312 - Risk Management

The basics of risk management are covered in this course. Problems of liability and personal loss exposures of a business are examined. Private insurance programs such as health and life insurance, and employee benefit plans are examined and assessed. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS313 - Business Negotiations

This course examines various negotiating tactics and techniques as they relate to different situations and environments. Particular attention is paid to buyer-seller communications, including negotiations of contracts and agreements. Students study the strengths and weaknesses of strategies used by both buyers and sellers. Prerequisites: BUSS 201, BUSS 220 and MATH 104.

BUSS315 - Emerging Global Markets

This course focuses on developing skills, strategies and insights crucial to conducting successful business operations in the emerging markets of Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Africa, including the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for unprecedented economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and incomes, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. In this course, students study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors (such as the government and NGOs); analyze opportunities and risks presented by emerging markets; and analyze the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets. Prerequisite: BUSS101

BUSS319 - Cost Accounting

This course focuses on a typical firm’s cost data and how that data can transformed into information for business analysis and decision making. Topics include how to identify fixed versus variable cost, cost volume profit analysis, flexible budgeting, Activity Based Costing, and standard cost systems with detail variance analysis. Process and job order costing systems are examined in terms of how these systems are used to accumulate cost to determine accurate product or service costs and why this is necessary in setting product/service selling prices to maximize profits. Other topics include the numerous cost allocation processes that take place in the typical manufacturing and service industries, and transfer pricing within companies that are doing business internationally. Prerequisite: BUSS202 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS320 - Consumer Behavior

This course examines the behavior of individuals and markets in relation to the purchase decision, including post-purchase evaluation and con­sumption. A behavioral science approach is taken. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS322 - Marketing Communications

This course focuses on a broad view of advertising dealing with planning, creation, and execution in relation to the marketing cycle. Topics include: organization and operation of the advertising agency; publicity; public relations; behavioral sciences as applied to advertising; budgeting; and planning. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS324 - E-Business

This course explores, in detail, how the Internet affects the buying and selling of goods and services in the marketplace. Topics include Internet and mobile business models, electronic commerce infrastructure issues, designing effective web sites, payment and security issues, and the legal and ethical challenges of electronic commerce. The course will culminate in the development of an e-business plan and webpage. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101 or SMGT102

BUSS325 - Sales Principles

Students in this course will analyze salesmanship in modern business with emphasis placed on the principles and techniques of individual selling styles in both retail and wholesale markets. Topics covered include: dramatization of the sale presentation; the selling role; buyer characteristics and motivations; modern sales practices; corporate sales planning; sales-force policies; time and territory management; forecasting, budgeting; and expense control. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS327 - Life, Health, and Disability Insurance

This course studies the financial implications of death, disability and retirement, and multiple types of life insurance and annuity contracts and their uses. Regulations of life and health insurers, insurer operations and functions, legal aspects, group and individual life and health insurance products including medical, disability income and long-term care policies are covered. Prerequsite: BUSS203 with a grade C or better

BUSS328 - Entertainment Marketing

This course will provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of several major sectors within the entertainment industry. Students will compare and contrast successful entertainment marketing strategies with traditional product-based companies. Entertainment Marketing surveys the strategy, techniques and communication media employed to market the range of entertainment available to the American audience. The course examines the organizations and people who conceive, create and distribute video, film, print, interactive and new technology within the framework of the entertainment promotion landscape. The course demonstrates how advertising, publicity, promotion, research and overall marketing campaigns are created and the impact on the creative and business operations of entertainment companies.The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of the marketing issues faced by entertainment companies, highlighting the experiential nature of the products and the fast-pace of change within the industry. Prerequisite: COM216 or COM302

BUSS329 - New Product Development

New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. A major goal of this course is to help students learn to use an analytic decision-making approach in developing and marketing new products and services that meet customer needs in the consumer, industrial, and service settings. At the end of the course, the student should understand the role of decision models in analytic marketing decision-making; be able to follow the basic steps in opportunity identification, design, testing, and implementation; and know how to read and interpret new product and service market research. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS330 - Managing Change in a Global Marketplace

This course examines the unique problems associated with managing organizations, including those who compete in markets outside of the U.S., during mergers, reorganizations, and other times of significant change. Strategies to cope with change, as well as induce it across cultures, are examined

BUSS331 - Money and Capital Markets

The course offers an extensive examination of the money and capital markets and their importance to the US and global economy. This course will provide students with analytic tools to assess risks faced by investors and savers interacting through financial institutions and financial markets, as well as strategies for assessing and controlling these risks. The course places a heavy emphasis on the study of interest rates due to its importance in all capital markets and as one of the key determinants of the price of any financial asset. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade of C or better

BUSS332 - Cross Cultural Management

In this course, students will explore the process of cross-cultural management and the challenges of working internationally. The course focuses on international organizational behavior, human resource issues and practices in global organizations. The course is divided into three parts: The first focuses on understanding the cultural roots of behavior in organizations; the second on the Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management issues that are relevant to international managers; and the third seeks to prepare students for international assignments. Prerequisite: BUSS224

BUSS333 - Estate Planning and Trust

This course provides students with the knowledge base and analytical skills needed for effective financial planning and administration. Topics include wills, lifetime transfers, trusts, gifts, estate reduction techniques, tax implications in estate planning, business and inter-family transfers, dealing with incompetency, post mortem techniques, and the role of fiduciaries. Prerequsite: BUSS210 with a grade of C or better and BUSS207 with a grade of C or better

BUSS334 - Nonprofit Management

In this course students explore businesses that do not intend to maximize profit and retain it for future expenditures. Managers for nonprofit operations must operate under more regulated conditions and must be well prepared to interact within the public sector. Not-for-profit managers must be well versed in public policy and other regulations that affect them. Students will engage in real projects with non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102.

BUSS336 - Human Resource Management

In this course, students will examine the staffing function of management including planning, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, appraisal, compensation, labor laws, and organizational development. The course also addresses current issues affecting the human resource manager, including the changing work force and need to increase productivity, as well as changes in the area of unions and affirmative action. Both class discussions and case studies are used to prepare students for the personnel and related tasks involved in a management position. Prerequisite: BUSS224

BUSS337 - Managing the Growing Company

This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities of managing a growing entrepreneurial venture. Using practical management techniques, students address the management of rapidly growing entrepreneurial firms. Through a variety of learning activities, including case studies, reading, and visiting entrepreneurs, students examine companies, often family-run, during dynamic transition. The course specifically addresses the challenges faced by companies in various stages of growth and the exceptional challenges of rapid growth. Prerequisites: BUSS 201 & BUSS 231.

BUSS341 - Social Media Marketing

This course takes an in-depth look at social networks, social media platforms and online advertising to offer students an advantage in many positions involving marketing, consulting and brand management, both on the buyer and seller side of social media. Students with an interest in entrepreneurship will also find the course useful as new businesses often rely on social media marketing. The course covers a number of topics including the differences and interaction between traditional and social media; two-sided markets and social media platforms (including verticals such as gaming, shopping and entertainment); basic theory of social networks online and offline (graph theory, sociology, information diffusion); consumer behavior and digital media; social media analytics and monitoring; brand strategies on social media; best marketing practices for paid and unpaid social media; and B2B marketing and social media. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to become Hubspot certified. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS403 - Advanced Accounting

This course examines specialized topics in financial accounting. Problems associated with the partnership form of business organization, including partnership formation, division of income and losses, changes in ownership, and partnership liquidation are reviewed. Topics also include the subject of business combinations with emphasis on consolidated financial statements of parents and subsidiaries and elimination of intercompany transactions, accounting for foreign operations, and fund accounting as it relates to municipalities. Prerequsite: BUSS302 with grade of C or better and Senior Standing

BUSS406 - Financial Strategy

This is a capstone course utilizing lecture, discussion, and case analysis to define the process of financial management. The course of study presents the concepts of the advanced capital budget centering on decision-making concerning capital structure, dividend policy, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, reorganization, and international finance and exchange rates. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade of C or better & Senior Standing

BUSS407 - Digital Branding

The art of good branding requires a meaningful promise, strong values and a consistent experience. As business is driven from traditional to digitally-driven models, brands must adapt and consider how they best respond without abandoning core principles. Students in Digital Branding will learn best practices on how companies translate brand tenets to a digitally-driven world, focusing on the online experience, social media and mobile platforms. In a team, project-based approach, students will also have the opportunity to apply best practices to develop digital branding strategies for those companies who may be falling behind. Prerequisite: BUSS220, COM221 or FASH310

BUSS408 - Auditing

This courses examines the impact of auditing on constituencies external and internal to organizations, especially stockholders and management. Students examine the role of both the independent public accountant and the internal auditor, and study various control and reporting techniques involved in auditing. Prerequisites: BUSS302 with a grade of C or better and Senior Standing

BUSS420 - Marketing Research

Students in this course will examine the process and tools involved in collecting, coding, and analyzing data. The course further integrates the application of computer software in compiling and interpreting statistical data in relation to marketing decisions, such as those related to market segmentation and distribution. Prerequisites: BUSS220 and MATH208

BUSS422 - Global Marketing

The complexity of operating in the global marketplace makes many demands on the marketer. The globalization of marketing takes place after the company has international experience in multiple markets. The three fundamental areas of corporate globalization are covered in this course: (1) integrate sourcing, production, and marketing; (2) allocate resources to achieve a balanced portfolio and growth; and (3) coordinate marketing activities across countries and regions. Importing, exporting, and licensing considerations are also explored. Prerequisite: BUSS220 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS425 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

This seminar offers an in-depth exploration of advanced entrepreneurship topics of current interest and importance. Using case studies and actual entrepreneurial ventures, students explore entrepreneurship with a focus on leadership, marketing, development, management, and growth of new business ventures. Students learn the practical skills needed to succeed as an entrepreneur and how to apply best practices for planning, initiating, and growing new companies. The course also emphasizes the analysis and evaluation of actual entrepreneurial ventures. Subjects vary from semester to semester. Prerequisites: BUSS 337 and Senior standing.

BUSS431X - Branding Strategy

The purpose of this course is to create an understanding of the role of branding in driving business growth and the larger role of brands in popular culture. Students will study examples of both for profit and non-profit brands from the 20th and 21st centuries to see what constitutes success and how brands stay relevant in terms of social, cultural, and technological trends. Students will learn the key processes entailed in developing a brand strategy and the elements that drive brand admiration. Students will apply these principles utilizing a project-based approach for a brand in development or an established brand in need of repositioning. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS432 - Marketing Strategy

This course is designed to facilitate the formulation and implementation of marketing strategy. The course builds upon topics and concepts covered in more junior marketing courses. As part of the learning experience, students will engage in a simulation program with teams taking charge of a company within a competitive environment. Prerequisite: BUSS220 with a grade of C or better

BUSS440 - Business Capstone

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. This is a writing intensive course. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Major within the School of Business

BUSS497 - Business Internship Seminar

This internship for students within the School of Business is scheduled to take place during the student's senior year (juniors are permitted with permission). Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours in a position related to their field of study. The hours are completed concurrently with weekly class meetings and course work. Detailed reports, reflective exercises, weekly journal entries, a final comprehensive project, and other written requirements are completed throughout the internship process. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major. Prerequisite: Senior Standing, Major within the School of Business

BUSS498 - Internship Seminar Accounting/Finance

A critical component of the internship experience is participating in a weekly seminar where students discuss and reflect on their experiences to gain a broader view of the workplace, contemporary issues and organizational trends, as well as their own developing abilities and career interests. This one credit course covers professional issues as they arise during the student's internship. Some of the topics covered include: supervision, boundary issues, self-care, stress management, and professionalism. Students are required to write a weekly reflective journal on their internship experience. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. This course is designated for Accounting or Finance majors only. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS499.

BUSS499 - Internship Accounting/Finance

The internship is scheduled to take place during the senior year. Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours over a 12-week period, completed concurrently with BUSS 498. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. This course is designated for Accounting or Finance majors only. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS498.

BUSS500 - Business Internship & Seminar II

Course Description: This second internship for students within the School of Business should take place during the student's senior year. Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours in a position related to their field of study. The hours are completed concurrently with weekly class meetings and course work. Detailed reports, reflective exercises, weekly journal entries, a final comprehensive portfolio project, and other written requirements are completed throughout the internship process. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. The concepts and assignment expectations from BUSS 497 Business Internship are expanded upon and addressed with more depth in this internship course, taking a deeper dive into student’s ultimate career aspirations and goals.Prerequisite: Senior Standing, Major within the School of Business

CJ101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (KP)

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, and legal issues related to the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, focusing on critical decisions with an emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends.

CJ103 - Principles of Human Rights

This course takes a global perspective defining human rights, reflecting on violations of these rights, considering arguments in support of human rights, and examining various new initiatives designed to protect human rights in different countries in all parts of the world. This course focuses on issues pertaining to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights such as slavery, personal security and equality before the law, freedom of marriage, freedom of assembly, and freedom of movement.

CJ201 - Criminology

In this course, contemporary criminological theories are analyzed and evaluated with an emphasis on the social construction of crime, criminal offending, and victimization. Theories of crime are distinguished from theories of criminality. Assessments of theoretical advances, including theory integration and general theories of crime are examined. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101, or SOC 101

CJ202 - Juvenile Justice

This course focuses on the history and philosophy of juvenile justice, landmark court cases, police handling of juveniles, the juvenile court, the deinstitutionalization of status offenders, and juvenile rehabilitation. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC101, or SOC 101.

CJ203 - Juvenile Delinquency & Gangs

This course examines juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime. There is consideration of factors and theories that attempt to explain delinquency, gangs, and status offending. The course also examines delinquent subculture, and programs for control and prevention. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

CJ205 - Forensics

This course provides an introduction to the modern methods used in the detection, investigation, and solution of crimes. Practical analysis of evidence such as: fingerprints and other impressions, ballistics, glass, hair, handwriting and document examination, and drug analysis are studied. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ206 - Drugs & Society

This course examines the social origins and consequences of the use and abuse of consciousness-altering substances (including alcohol) within American society. It considers how society defines drug use, drug abuse, and social harm, as well as how society responds to drug use and abuse. Included is examination of socio-historical perspectives on drug consumption and control, the structure of legal and illegal drug markets, the relationship between drugs and crime, and competing models of drug policy and enforcement. Prerequisite: CJ 101, PSYC 101, SOC 101, or LS101

CJ207 - Criminal Investigations

This course examines the fundamentals of criminal investigation including scientific aids, interviews, interrogations, collection and preservation of evidence, methods of surveillance, follow-up and case preparation. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ210 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

This course provides special subjects in Criminal Justice in order to satisfy interests of both faculty and students. Examples of such topics are: restorative justice, global violence against women, or computer crime.

CJ211 - Terrorism

No other issues generate as much discussion and controversy as the contemporary debate over "terrorism". But what is terrorism? And how should we respond to it? This course examines terrorism with a critical eye, looking at the different ways that the subject is framed by various disciplines and examines the ways that terrorism has been presented, debated, and analyzed. The course addresses the social-political conditions that spawn terrorist organizations, examines terrorism in a historical context, and looks at methods of terrorism. The course explores the psychological processes that create a terrorist, the psychological impact of terrorist activities, and explores counter-terrorism strategies through creative problem-solving.

CJ213 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

The field of criminal justice operates most effectively when it relies on a core of ethical principles to guide discretionary actions. If criminal justice professionals are to maintain our personal integrity in light of organizational and social demands can be difficult. As criminal justice professionals our choices and policies emanate from our personal beliefs and values. In principle we intend to come to an understanding of what various ethical considerations can assist us to make the right decision when exercising our discretion. Prerequisite: CJ101 or LS101 & ENG102

CJ303 - Domestic Violence

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of the law relating to domestic violence. In addition the course examines the existence of violence among family members and in relationships in today's society. Topics include child abuse, partner abuse, and elder abuse. Prerequisite: LS 101, CJ 101 or any introductory social science course.

CJ305 - Crime & Popular Culture

Crime is considered a major social problem in our country, but our understanding of crime and justice are derived more from indirect mediated images than direct personal experience. Popular culture, distributed through mass media and composed of popular news and entertainment, is a major source for shaping this understanding, especially when it comes to crime a staple of mass media. This course will examine images of crime and justice in popular culture and consider the sources of these popular culture accounts of crime and justice. It also will evaluate the influence popular culture has on our understanding of crime and criminal justice policy. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing & ENG102

CJ309 - Children & Violence

This course examines the psychological, criminal justice, and legal issues surrounding children who experience violence in their lives, either as victims or perpetrators of violence. Topics include child maltreatment, pedophilia, online child predators, school victimization, domestic violence, juvenile delinquency, child sex offenders, and youth homicide. Prerequisite: PSYC 221, PSYC 223, CJ 201, or LS 204.

CJ312 - Corrections

Corrections is the vast collection of persons, agencies, and organizations that manage convicted criminals. This course examines theories of punishment, the history of corrections, classification and sentencing schemes, prisons, probation and parole, and alternative sanctions. It also explores corrections-related personnel issues, legal issues, and specific concerns dealing with race, age, and gender. Prerequisite: CJ101 or LS101 & Sophomore standing

CJ313 - Police & Society

This course examines policing from a variety of perspectives. The philosophical foundations of social control in relation to policing, as well as the emergence, organization, and structure of police systems are examined. There is also an examination of the relationship between the police and the public in different historical, political, and economic contexts. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

CJ314 - White Collar and Organized Crime

This course addresses the definition, detection, prosecution, sentencing, and impact of white collar, occupational, and organized crime. Special consideration is given to the role of federal law and enforcement practices due to the frequent national and international scope of these types of crimes.

CJ315 - Global Technology & Crime

In this course the advances in technology developed in crime investigation will be examined, like crime mapping. The impact of technology and media on international crime and new globally-oriented cooperative enforcement strategies will also be examined. Students will gain a better understanding of crime control in a global society.”

CJ316 - Criminal Procedure

Criminal procedure refers to the process whereby the criminal law is enforced. Major topics to be covered in this course include: the exclusionary rule, search and seizure, identification, interrogation, trial rights, sentencing, and due process. Special emphasis is placed upon how the rules of procedure affect the components of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ317 - Comparative Justice Systems

This course analyzes differences in global approaches to law enforcement, criminal procedure, criminal law, corrections, juvenile justice, and prevention. The material provides a worldwide overview of cultural and legal traditions that are related to crime. Through cross-cultural comparisons, the course examines whether due process rights must be sacrificed in order to achieve crime control effectiveness and efficiency. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ318 - Violence & Aggression

This course investigates and analyzes aggression and violence as forms of individual, group, and societal behavior. It includes an assessment of anthropological, biological, philosophical, political, and sociological theories of violence. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or Permission of Dept Chair

CJ319 - Victimology

This course presents an overview of the history and theories of victimology. Students analyze victimization patterns with special emphasis on types of victims and crimes. The course also examines the interaction between victims of crime and the criminal justice system, the victim’s rights movement, and services offered to victims of crime. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

CJ321 - Probation, Parole & Other Sanctions

This course examines the development and application of traditional forms of conditional and unconditional prison release, as well as a variety of new intermediate or alternative sanctions. Different sentencing options are evaluated to determine which, if any, of the theories of criminology or philosophies of sentencing are satisfied by their use. Current research and analytical perspectives are examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, or SOC 101.

CJ323 - Justice, Class, Race & Gender

This course explores issues unique to individuals of different classes, gender, and/or races or ethnic groups. The course focuses on these issues specifically in the context of the American criminal justice and legal systems. Issues of diversity relevant to all aspects of the criminal justice system are examined. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101, Sophomore standing.

CJ331 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

The course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research using the field of criminal justice as the backdrop. The purpose of this course is to provide the background that will help the student to read, understand, and critique data and studies in the field. Students will acquire a working knowledge of programs like excel to collect and also analyze federal and other statisticalstudies. Required for all CJ majors.Prerequisite: MATH 208

CJ332 - Criminal Profiling Strategies

Criminal Profiling Strategies

CJ335 - Sexual Violence Advocacy

This sexual violence class uses the Boston Area Rape Crisis Curriculum to teach students how to recognize, advocate for and support survivors of sexual assault in an advocacy capacity. Through articles, role plays, videos and active participation, students will learn the importance of identifying the impacts and symptoms of sexual violence and will receive training in how to lend support and offer a myriad of resources to survivors of sexual violence. The class will explore historical and cultural components of sexual violence as well as activist movements led by student survivors to change the landscape of how sexual violence is perceived and addressed on college campuses. Turning our lens toward college campuses, students will develop and institute a service project designed to change or inform sexual violence on college campuses. Upon successful completion of the course as defined by the professor, students will receive 30 hours of sexual violence training which they can use to leverage internships and professional opportunities. This class is designed to inform, educate and professionally prepare students who may encounter sexual violence survivors in their work such as human services, legal services, education, athletic training, law enforcement and psychology.

CJ421 - Investigative Methods & Procedures

This upper level introductory course focuses on crime classification and uses the standard manual for investigating and classifying violent crimes. Gang and cult investigative methods are discussed. Up-to-date information on forensic investigations, collecting evidence, and processing crime scenes is presented as well.

CJ422 - Principles of Crime Analysis

This course will enable the student to understand the principles of crime analysis. It will cover the five principles consisting of data collection, collation, analysis, feedback and evaluation. It will also explain forecasting of criminal events as well as identification of crime trends, series and patterns. Students will also learn statistical analysis in crime patterns.

CJ441 - Topics in Crime & Public Policy I

This course is the first portion of the Capstone course offered in the fall semester to introduce seniors to a general understanding of policy studies. Students examine what policy analysis consists of, stages of policy analysis, and assessment of policy change. The class examines current policy issues in Criminal Justice such as community policing, sentencing, and minority overrepresentation in prison populations. The course examines various research strategies, design and methods and addresses research problem definition and how to produce a state of the art policy paper and literature review. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: PSYC 331,CJ331 or SOC 331.

CJ442 - Topics in Crime & Public Policy II

In this part of the Capstone course offered in the spring semester, the student can use the field internship placement as the target for the individual policy analysis paper. The student can acquire data available at the agency or use generally available data from different sources to answer a policy question that can be applied to the agency the student works in or to similar agencies. The student is required to submit a detailed policy analysis and produce a paper and project to be presented at the Connected Learning Symposium. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: CJ 441, SR Standing & CJ331X or SOC331.

CJ443 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar I

This course provides an opportunity for participants to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours during the fall semester in a professional work setting related to the student’s interest. Each student is monitored throughout the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Dept Chair approval.

CJ444 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar II

This course provides an opportunity for participants to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours during the spring semester in a professional work setting related to the student’s interest. Each student is monitored throughout the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisites: CJ/LS 443, Senior standing and Dept Chair approval.

CJ702 - Critical Legal Issues in Crim Justice

This course provides the student with current and critical information regarding legal issues in criminal justice with a focus on constitutional criminal procedure. The course explores new perspectives on historical issues and takes into account new appellate cases and events, including current debates over important legal controversies in the criminal justice arena.

CJ706 - Advanced Applied Forensics

This course is designed to provide students with a greater understanding of the principles used in the analysis of physical and biological evidence. The course topics include toxicology, serology, DNA analysis, firearms and mobile device forensics. Scientific integrity of physical evidence and professional standards will also be discussed. Case studies will be used to integrate concepts with practical applications.

CJ709 - Research Methods & Statistical Analysis

This course provides students with the necessary tools for evaluating, designing and implementing applied research in criminal justice. The association between theories and research methods used in the study of criminal justice is explored through a variety of relevant and related data sources. Topics covered include: the principles of research design; issues in measurement; modes of observation; and basic methods of both quantitative and qualitative analysis.

CJ720 - Crisis & Emergency Management

This course is designed to provide graduate level students with core knowledge of emergency management related concepts, theories and principles through an in depth analysis of past and current emergency management policies, practices and events. Students will analyze and discuss national, state and local government structure, responsibilities, authorities and relationships and will analyze cases that provide the framework for applying crisis control principles. The nature of disaster, the complexities of disaster response operations, and the roles and responsibilities of various emergency management personnel will be examined. Students will gain an understanding of common post-disaster problems and how the emergency management community can overcome these challenges.

CJ721 - Risk Management & Planning

Risk management planning provides a general philosophy, description, and use of tools and methods that can be utilized to manage the risk associated with all types of crises. This course will review the crises that can impact a community and the methods for determining the risk and vulnerability due to these perils and discuss ways of preventing and/or mitigating their impact The course will examine the best practices and proper methodologies for regulating and enforcing techniques to lessen the impacts of hazardous events. The course will also provide the tools (operational, statistical and technological) required to mitigate these risks. Another purpose of the course is to examine and critically discuss current and future methods to create best practices for security management planning.

CJ730 - Terrorism & Homeland Security

This course provides a critical analysis of the Department of Homeland Security and the political and organizational factors involved in its structure and administration. Students will explore the evolution of homeland security as a concept and a redirection of national policies and priorities, including any related issues and challenges with implementation. Homeland security is a continuously changing field with close connections to numerous academic disciplines and practitioner communities (i.e. law enforcement, emergency management, public safety, the military). This course is designed to draw on insights from these connections as well as useful insights from other areas, such as business, economics and organizational studies, to examine how homeland security strategy and policy is made.

CJ731 - Transnational Crime

This course addresses the nature and scope of international and transnational crime and the emerging legal framework for its prevention and control. The course will emphasize international aspects of the work of different criminal justice agencies, such as formal and informal police cooperation and the use of mutual assistance and extradition agreements, on the international structures created for crime prevention, punishment and control. The course also explores current issues and controversies of transnational crime, international law, and/or human rights. Possible topics include terrorism, genocide, human trafficking, and immigration issues.

CJ732 - Cybercrime & Data Security

In this class, students analyze methods criminals use on the Internet to commit crimes. The course also covers various methods of computer security, their complexity and adequacy. Students study methods for creating backup information systems and developing means for recovering data in case it is destroyed or stolen. Potential threats to Internet systems and how they could affect the way individuals and companies use and rely on the systems are introduced.This course also examines the political, legal and policy aspects of the use of information technologies by governmental organizations

CJ740 - Theories of Violence & Aggression

This course investigates and analyzes aggression and violence as forms of individual, group, and societal behavior. The course also includes an assessment of anthropological, biological, philosophical, political, and sociological theories on the causes of violence and aggression.

CJ741 - Interpersonal & Relationship Violence

This course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to examining interpersonal violence as a critical and complex social issue. Specific types of interpersonal violence covered include child abuse and neglect, child sexual violence, spousal abuse, elder abuse, date rape and other forms of intimate sexual and physical violence. The course includes a comprehensive examination of theoretical perspectives regarding the nature and origins of interpersonal violence as well as a critical examination of the effectiveness of the mental health, child welfare, and criminal justice system’s approach to interpersonal violence prevention, intervention, and policy.

CJ742 - Violence Prev, Advocacy, & Social Change

This course provides students with an understanding of different models of social change and the various strategies of social movements and campaigns that accomplish social change. The course will examine the strategies, tactics, strengths and weaknesses of other historical contemporary movements such as the civil rights or women’s movement. Students will explore how victims of violence might develop successful public discourses that advocate their cause, transform public policy, and build or reform public institutions such as the justice system. The course will also identify successful modes of public address and tactics of activism that produce changes in public policy and reform institutional practices.

CJ750 - Global Criminal Justice Systems

This course analyzes crime and criminal justice systems in selected countries and cultures. The course also focuses on the ways these different societies define and respond to criminal behavior and specifically addresses how different societies structure their justice systems to meet their goals and reflect their values. The course engages students in comparative issues and research to reveal political, historical, and cultural factors that have influenced criminal justice and law in both the United States and other countries.

CJ751 - Victimology

This course involves a scientific study of crime victims and public policy responses to them. The course will focus on the nature and extent of criminal victimization, the dynamics of victim-offender relationships, theories of victimization, a historical analysis of the victim’s role in the criminal justice process, the restorative justice model, and the contemporary victim rights and victim services’ movements.

CJ752 - Cls, Race, Ethic & Gender Issues in CJ

This course is an examination of how class, race, gender and ethnicity impact the criminal justice system. It will explore these topics in depth, focusing on criminal victimization and patterns of offending and how these concepts affect equal treatment by the police, courts and corrections.

CJ798 - Research Project Capstone

This culminating experience helps students integrate their knowledge of criminological theory and justice policy with research and analytical skills, synthesizing this knowledge with practical skills. Under the supervision of a faculty mentor, students engage in a comprehensive research project enabling the student to demonstrate the mastery of the concepts, ideas, knowledge and insights implicit in the Criminal Justice curriculum. Prerequisite: This course is taken during the student’s final semester & student must have completed at least 27 credits, CJ709 & permission of Program Director

CJ799 - Internship

This culminating experience helps students integrate their knowledge of criminological theory and justice policy with research and analytical skills, synthesizing this knowledge with practical skills. Students engage in an internship and complete 150 hours in organizations that are committed to providing interns a high quality educational experience. As a part of their internship, students engage in meaningful projects, including written reflection and analysis.Prerequisite: This course is taken during the student’s final semester & student must have completed at least 27 credits & permission of Program Director.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ECON102 - Principles of Econ-Macro

This course explores basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole and policies designed to affect its performance. Topics include economic scarcity; causes of unemployment and inflation; money and monetary policy; the impact of government taxation and spending; and the federal debt. Some consideration is given to international economic problems and to contrasting economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development.

ECON206 - Global Economic Development

The goal of this course is to introduce the main issues of global economic development. Students will explore the problems facing developing countries of the world as they attempt to industrialize, develop their economies and raise the standards of living of their people. The course will address the following broad questions: What is the meaning of Economic development? Why some countries are rich while others are poor? What would explain the success of such East Asian countries as China? What are the key constrains that prevent poor countries, especially those in the African continent, from achieving progress? What are the strategies that poor countries can adopt to foster development?

ECON207 - Vietnam Immersion

This fall semester course is linked to two weeks of service-learning in Vietnam during the winter break. The course introduces students to the Vietnamese society today. It covers basic elements of Vietnamese politics, economic development, culture, history, language, literature, and arts. The experience in Vietnam includes working for non-profit organizations that deal with social problems. This course fulfills the Multicultural Area of Inquiry. Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Vietnam program director.

ECON301 - International Trade & Finance

This course examines theory, tariffs, and import quotas; adjustment mechanisms, foreign exchange, and exchange controls are also covered. Additional topics include the theory of comparative advantage, the causes and consequences of imbalances in the balance of payments or exchange rates, and the evolution of the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102.

ENV101 - Intro to Environmental Studies (KP)

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

ENV102 - Environmental Ethics & Society

This course explores issues and problems arising out of ethical considerations related to the general environment and specific ecosystems. Also considered are the moral aspects of population control and resource use. The foundations for beliefs and worldviews regarding nature and the human relationship to it are explored. In addition, the variety of philosophical perspectives and pragmatic choices and actions people take related to environmental ethics are studied.

ENV201 - Environmental Law & Policy

This course examines the role of law and politics in the management of natural resources and the environment. The course first reviews the major US environmental protection legislation and then explores the process of developing and establishing environmental policy related to water, air, energy, and land resources. Historical and contemporary circumstances that influence public policy decisions, the influence of science and technology, social and economic paradigms, and ethics and values are discussed. Even though the emphasis is on domestic U.S. policies and institutions, international issues are addressed, including how US domestic environmental policies influence and are influenced by global forces. This is a writing intensive course.

ENV202 - Gardening for Sustainability(KP)

Autumn is a critical time for the sustainable garden. It is a time of harvest and preparation. In this course, students will research and establish the rhythms of the late season garden by participating in the next stages of development in the campus community garden. Together, we will harvest, save seeds, start special fall plantings, and put the garden to bed. Projects will include teaming up with kids from The Barn and members of the Village.The course will also look at gardening and its role in the local food system, as a form of both self-sufficiency and community support. We will study and practice different methods of propagation and seed banking, and research the garden as its own ecological system. We’ll also look at recent innovation in garden design and small-scale agriculture, including vertical and rotating greenhouse systems, with an eye towards futuristic sustainable design.

ENV204 - Environmental Economics

This course explores economic problems associated with environmental issues. The course introduces modeling and analytical tools used in the field. The course first examines the problem of market failure in the presence of externalities and public goods, and considers public policy responses to these market failures, including command-and-control regulations, tax and subsidy incentives, and marketable pollution permits. The course then addresses the methods to measure the costs and benefits of environmental improvements and how these types of analysis are used in public policy decisions. These decisions are analyzed in the context of problems such as air pollution, ozone depletion and global warming, threats to biodiversity, and development. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ECON101

ENV205 - Green Business

All businesses, from oil companies to computer manufacturers want to be "green." Being "green" is not only good for a business' marketing and publicity, but it also helps the bottom line. This course examines what it means to be a "green" business. Topics include the Triple Bottom Line, sourcing materials, energy management and recycling.

ENV206 - Gardening for Sustainability

From wartime Victory Gardens to today’s community gardens, we are experiencing a resurgence in the popularity of gardening as a means of expanding personal sustainability. This course will explore topics in organic gardening, biodynamics and permaculture. We will study garden planning and design, including selection of heirloom varieties, designing with available space, and innovation in small-­-scale agriculture. The course will have an applied focus on participating in the next stages of development for the campus community garden, including seed selection, seed starting and early season planting.

ENV207 - Chemistry for a Sustainable Future

This course will engage students in thinking about environmental problems through the context of chemistry. The relevance of chemistry to such topics as air pollution, climate change, and water management will be explored. Students will be challenged to consider the application of chemistry to help address many of these problems.

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell College on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

ENV220 - World Geography (KP)

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

ENV302 - Natural Resource Management/GIS

This course surveys natural resource issues from global to local scales through the use of geographic information systems (GIS). GIS, remotely sensed images, and global positioning systems are used as tools in managing community natural resources. Students map natural resources and community features to explore management strategies. Students work with town commissions, state agencies, and environmental organizations to obtain spatial data for analysis.

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

ENV304 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV305 - Energy: Moving on from Fossil Fuel

Our economic prosperity relies on burning fossil fuels to power everything from our trucks to our office computers. As fossil fuels become more scarce, it is necessary to find other sources of energy. This course introduces students to our energy grid and to alternative sources of energy like wind, solar and geothermal. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 211

ENV400 - Internship

This internship is scheduled to take place during the junior year and introduces students to challenges faced by companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies. Placement is tailored to meet the student’s career goals and interests in the environmental field. Students work 150 hours over the course of the semester alongside professionals in the field. Written reflections are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship as well as regular meetings with the internship supervisor. The internship supervisor monitors each student’s performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 102, ENV 201, ENV 211.

ENV420 - Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

This course is a capstone course in Environmental Studies that focuses on current issues and trends in the environmental field. Students complete an applied thesis or practicum project in an area related to their particular interest and present it to the class and/or at symposium. Environmental career opportunities are discussed along with resume development, networking, interviewing techniques, and other career development skills. Prerequisites: ENV 400, Senior standing.

HS101 - Human Services: Systems & Skills

This course encourages an examination of one’s own value system, motivations and interests in relation to the wish to pursue a career working with people. Students are introduced to the history and development of the field: the concept of the social welfare system; resources and services offered by a range of community agencies; a model to understand social and psychological problems; and interventions to address social needs interventions range from individual case management and counseling to community organizing and planning. The course highlights a social justice basis for human service work. A 10-hour service learning requirement enables students to examine their interests and apply the concepts learned in class.

HS210 - Case Management & Counseling

This course introduces students to interviewing skills used by counselors and case managers and to the types of counselor responses that can be effective in human services work. Students learn to assess clients and interventions at the micro, meso and macro levels and explore issues of professional ethics and values. Students also examine cultural contexts as they impact the client, counselor, and client-counselor relationship. Some of the contexts may include race, class, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender, and immigration status. The course relies heavily on in-class exercises. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, HS 101 with a C or better.

HS215 - Foundation Internship

This internship provides human service students the opportunity to experience field work. Training in the skills by which students can offer direct and indirect assistance to the client population is provided. Prerequisites: HS 210 with a grade of C or better; and permission of Internship Coordinator. Corequisite: HS 217.

HS217 - Foundations of Ethical Fieldwork

This seminar is taken concurrently with the Foundation Internship (HS 215). The seminar provides a forum for discussing common human service experiences, including pathways to professional careers and practice related issues, and includes an introduction to ethical issues such as confidentiality and privacy in the context of an examination of ethical dilemmas. It also gives students an opportunity to build skills necessary to offer direct and indirect assistance to clients at internship sites. Students review professional and research literatures in relation to a topic connected to the internship experience. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HS 210 with a grade of C or better; and permission of the Internship Coordinator required. Co-requisite: HS 215.

HS415 - Advanced Internship I

Seniors who have met program requirements spend 125 hours in an approved supervised internship. Prerequisites: HS 215, HS 217, with a grade of C or better; and permission of the Internship Coordinator; Co-requisite: HS 417.

HS417 - Field Intervention Strategies

This seminar is taken concurrently with Advanced Internship I (HS 415). Students integrate theory learned throughout their college career with their fieldwork experience. The seminar further develops professional behaviors such as record keeping, creating and maintaining supervisory relationships, conflict resolution, and job effectiveness. Students are also offered an opportunity to analyze cases and tasks assigned to them in their field placements, providing a theoretical framework for understanding them. There is an intensive examination of the ethical considerations involved in working with clients. Students identify and develop a research topic and conduct an extensive review of current literature on a topic related to their internship. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HS 215, HS 217 with a grade of C or better, and permission of the Internship Coordinator; Co-requisite: HS 415.

HS425 - Advanced Internship II

This seminar is a continuation of HS 415. Students spend 125 hours working in an approved supervised field site. Prerequisite: HS 415 with a grade of C or better; Co-requisite: HS 427.

HS427 - Systems & Organizational Change

This capstone seminar is a continuation of Field Intervention Strategies (HS417) and is taken concurrently with Advanced Internship II (HS425). Building on knowledge and skills gained throughout the Social Sciences program, students continue to integrate theory with practice through seminar discussion and internship-related experiences. There is an increased focus on the delivery of services, examination of ethical dilemmas, and analysis of the broader systems in which services are delivered and policies are formulated. Students also have an opportunity to explore career development issues through examination of the graduate school and employment processes. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course and also has a strong public speaking component. Prerequisites: HS 415, HS 417 with a grade of C or better; and either PSYC 331 or SOC 331. Corequisite: HS 425.

IGS100 - Intergenerational Studies

This course is linked to three or four credit courses across the curriculum. Students in this course complete a project that focuses on an intergenerational (across age or across generation) topic. Students wishing to enroll in an IGS Lined-Credit course must have the permission of the instructor and must submit a proposal to the Director of the Fuss Center for Research on Aging and Intergenerational Studies. Restrictions: Students may enroll for only one IGS Linked-Credit in a give semester; students may complete up to, but not more than, three IGS Linked-Credits towards completion of the bachelor's degree. To receive credit and a grade for an IGS linked option, students must receive a passing grade in the host course. The IGS Linked-Credit cannot be taken pass/fail, and cannot be linked to a course that is taken pass/fail. This credit counts toward an unrestricted elective and there accumulated credits may b e counted toward the elective requirement in the Minor in Aging and Intergenerational Studies. IGS credits do not satisfy other degree requirements unless authorized by an academic department.

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH108X - Mathematics of Design

This course explores elements of mathematics within the design field from the incorporation of algebra to concepts of geometry. Students will have the opportunity to integrate numerical fluency, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning and communicating quantitative information through group problem solving and class discussions. Topics include pattern drafting, layouts cutting, revenue, cost, and profit modeling, measurement systems, Euclidean geometry, and spatial reasoning.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH202 - Applied Mathematics for Busines

This course will be a “Choose Option across Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Event Management, Hospitality Management, Accounting and Resort and Casino Management Majors.Description: This course will introduce a variety of mathematical principles and techniques that emphasize applications in business and economics. Topics covered include: systems of linear equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear programming, as well as the development and applications of rates of change. Prerequisite: MATH 106

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH301 - Mathematical Modeling

Mathematical ModelingPrerequisite: C or better in MATH 205, 206, and 208

MATH303X - Problem Solving

This course will be an exploration into the mathematics exemplified in high quality high school and undergraduate mathematics competitions and mathematical research. The emphasis will be placed on building a repertoire of mathematical strategies and tactics, then applying these methods in unfamiliar situations. Topics will include: Combinatorics, Binomial Theorem, Conditional Probability, Roots of Unity, Symmetric Polynomials, Polynomial Interpolation, and topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry. Students will hone their ability to solve mathematical problems through hands-on practice and obtain an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and tools of the problem solver as illustrated by the textbook and the instructor. Strategies and tools for solving problems include, but are not limited to: •Draw a Diagram•Systematic Lists•Eliminate Possibilities•Matrix Logic•Look for a Pattern•Guess and Check•Sub Problems•Unit Analysis•Solve An Easier Related Problem•Physical Representations•Work Backwards•Venn Diagrams•Finite Differences

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vector functions, advanced techniques of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH322X - Special Topics in Mathematics

Special Topics in Mathematics

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants. Applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, economics, connectivity of networks, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Capstone Seminar

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

MGMT770 - Managerial Economics

Managerial Economics is the application of economic theory and methodology to managerial decision making problems within various organizational settings such as a firm or a government agency. The emphasis in this course will be on demand analysis and estimation, production and cost analysis under different market conditions, forecasting and decision making under uncertainty. The course provides an understanding of the microeconomic forces that influence firm decision making. Topics include competitive markets and market failure, benefit-cost analysis, demand estimation and forecasting, decision making under risk and uncertainty, production and cost estimation, and market structure analysis

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC104 - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive. This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well being. This coursewould substitute for PSYC101 (Psychological Perspectives) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class but can be taken in addition to PSYC101.

PSYC111 - Generations in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC201 - Psychology of Drugs & Behavior

The course examines the relationship between drugs and behavior, including evidence about the effects of drugs on the brain. Several classes of drugs, including chemically or psychologically addictive substances, psychoactive and therapeutic agents, as well as recreational drugs, are examined. Drug use is related to psychological variables such as personality structure and interpersonal relationships, and theories of addictive processes and factors influencing drug use are examined, as are treatment strategies. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC205 - Human Sexuality

This course is designed to introduce factual information about gender identity and gender role theories, sexual preference and sexual orientation, and psychosexual development. The course examines issues related to research on human sexuality and behavior, as well as sexual education, sexual disorders, and societal impacts on sexuality. Students are challenged to think critically about many issues surrounding human sexuality and all of its manifestations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC218 - Dynamics of Small Groups

This class examines the basic theory and application necessary to understand and facilitate small groups. Topics may include group types, formation, roles and stages; group process; cultural awareness; group interventions and ethics within the field of psychology and human service; therapeutic value of groups; and the family, classroom, and peers as small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC222 - Social Psychology in Film

This course uses film to examine social psychological concepts and research and provides an opportunity for students to explore how people influence and are influenced by their social relationships, communities, and larger society. Films illustrate a range of social encounters that are examined from a social psychological perspective. Topics include conflict, love, personal and group behavior, prejudice, roles, privilege, and oppression. NOTE: This course meets the social psychology requirement for Social Sciences majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC226 - Living & Learning with Dementia

Living & Learning with Dementia

PSYC229X - Addictions

Addictions

PSYC231 - Stress and Trauma

This course provides an overview of stress and trauma including physical, psychological and sociocultural implications. Emphasis is made on the stress-trauma response including the neurobiology of information and memory processing and attachment theory. Evidence-based prevention and intervention strategies are explored in consideration of mind-body research on stress and stress related disorders.

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC242X - Health Psychology

This course is a comprehensive study of the relationship between behavior and health including psychological factors in the development of and coping with disease. Students will learn about the biological, psychological, and social context of health and illness with a focus on maintainance of physical and emotional wellness. Topics covered may include stress, addictions, nutrition, eating disorders, adjustment, pain, pediatric health, aging and/or the psycholgocial impact of specific diseases.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC304 - Sensation & Perception

It is estimated that our five senses take in 11,000,000 bits of information per second, yet we weed out much of this information. Our unique ability to sense but selectively perceive allows us to survive and live our life without being bombarded by information. In this class, students will experience and examine how humans sense and perceive the world. Topics covered will include the sensory pathways, perceptual processing, and how we create meaning from our senses. We will discuss the orienting senses, skin senses (such as touch and pain), chemical senses (such as smell), hearing, vision, and the perception of time. Perceptual processes will include physiological, psychophysical, ecological, motivational, and computational. Pre-requisite: PSYC101

PSYC307 - Forensic Psychology

This course deals with the application of psychological knowledge to the judicial process and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include effects of defendant, juror and case characteristics on verdicts, variables affecting eyewitness accuracy, identification and testimony, and the role of forensic psychologists in competency and criminal responsibility assessments as well as criminal profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or PSYC 101.

PSYC308X - Black Psychology

This course is designed to introduce the varied psychological experiences of Black individuals, including the cultural, sociohistorical, and political influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. The course will examine the experiences of Black individuals living in the United States, but will also draw strong connections to the experiences of Black individuals throughout the African Diaspora including Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and Western Europe. Several topics will be explored within the Black psychology paradigm including racial identity, racism and discrimination, kinship and family, religion and spirituality, and achievement and schooling. Throughout the course, a central objective will be to consider how knowledge of such topics can be used to promote mental health and wellness among these populations. Students will be strongly encouraged to discuss current topics and controversies as they relate to the Black psychology paradigm, and to use course material to design a service learning project for the neighboring community. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of instructor

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

PSYC318 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. Both traditional and contemporary theories of psychopathology are reviewed. Emphasis is also placed on the tools, techniques, and process of both the diagnosis and the treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 202 or PSYC 220.

PSYC322 - Abnormal Child Development

This course examines common psychological disorders that affect children and adolescents. Students review factors that contribute to emotional, behavioral, cognitive and social problems in children and adolescents, as well as specific diagnostic criteria of psychological disorders. In addition, treatment of childhood disorders is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 221.

PSYC323 - Brain Function & Dysfunction

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 & MATH 208

PSYC331 - Experimental Design in Psychology

This laboratory course covers concepts of the scientific method in psychology including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. As part of the lab, students carry out an experiment and learn to use SPSS to create a database and perform statistical analyses. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or approval of Dept Chair.

PSYC333 - Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and Permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

PSYC345 - Assessment of Individual Differences

This course studies a wide variety of tests and measurements used to assess intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality in clinical and counseling psychology, in education, and in business. Consideration of the history and theory of these tests is complemented by discussion of practical concerns related to their selection, their administration, and their interpretation in specific settings. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and PSYC 101.

PSYC714 - Psyc of Sport, Injury & Rehabilitation

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the theory and application of psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation. Topics covered include cognitive appraisal, emotional response, behavioral response, motivation, mental skills training and use, psychological antecedents of injury, adherence to rehabilitation/exercise, sociocultural factors and psychology of injury, and research methods related to the psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation.

RAC100 - Research across the Curriculum

This course is linked to three or four credit courses across the curriculum. Students in this course participate in a research project that includes an information literacy and written and/or oral communication component. Students wishing to enroll in a RAC Linked-Credit course must have the permission the instructor and must submit a proposal to the Director of the Fuss Center for Research on Aging and Intergenerational Studies. Research projects involving human subjects as participants must have the approval of the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) before research data can be collected. Restrictions: Students may enroll for only one RAC Linked-Credit  in a given semester; students may complete up to, but not more than, three RAC Linked-Credits towards completion of the bachelor's degree in a the host course. The RAC Linked-Credit cannot be taken pass/fail, and cannot be linked t a course that is taken pass/fail. This credit counts toward an unrestricted elective. It does not satisfy other degree requirements unless authorized by an academic department.

SJA100 - Social Justice Activism

This course is linked to three or four credit course across the curriculum. Students in this course complete a project that involves participation in activities specifically aimed at promoting social justice and which recognizes and describes social justice, analyzes the issues that cause social and economic disparities, and includes action to address issues of justice by raising awareness or advocating for change. Students wishing to enroll in a SJA Linked-Credit course must have the permission of the instructor and must submit a proposal to the Director of the Nancy Lawson Donahue '49 Institute for Diversity, Ethics and Inclusion. Restrictions: Students may enroll for only one SJA Linked-Credit in a given semester; students may complete up to, but not more than, three SJA Linked-Credits towards completion of the bachelor's degree in a the host course. The SJA Linked-Credit cannot be taken pass/fail, and cannot be linked t a course that is taken pass/fail. This credit counts toward an unrestricted elective and could count towards the electives for the minor in Human Rights. SJA credits do not satisfy other degree requirements unless authorized by an academic department.

SJA302X - Promoting Racial Justice

The course will focus on promoting racial justice – something that cannot be achieved without deep attention to gender, sexuality, environment, class, ability and on. Whatever moves you deeply, you will find support, analysis and strategies in this course. The course welcomes students having a tough transition back from study abroad, those who have returned from Shoulder to Shoulder trips in Ecuador, Tanzania, Mexico, Antigua or elsewhere; future teachers, and future professionals of all kinds, and those seeking Honors Components or more experience in this area. It will build your ability and confidence when exploring issues related to inequity and cultural competence – having the attitude, knowledge, and skills to effectively connect and work with people of different cultures, perspectives and levels of advantage. This course will help students foster a sense of self-awareness about various dimensions of social position (e.g., their culture, sexual orientation, sex, gender, ethnicity, race, and religion), and take that awareness to the next level – contributing to positive interaction as well as community action against injustice.

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination (KP)

In this course we explore our awareness of the relationship between our experience and broader society. How are our lives shaped by our social positions in society – our social class, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, and more? How do the members of different groups view each other and interact with each other? Why do inequalities exist and how do these affect us? How does culture shape our behavior, and why do religions, schools, families, and other institutions remain stable but also change over time?

SOC102 - Women and Gender in Social Context(KP)

his course is designed to help students develop a critical framework for examining feminist thought and gender-related social processes. Through the lens of the Sociological Imagination the course examines the ways in which sex and gender are socially constructed, how that shapes group and individual behavior and the ways in which power manifests in inequality and exploitation, as well as the agency of individuals and groups to bring about change.

SOC206 - Food and Culture

In this course, students study "food ways"; that is, how food and eating reflects and impacts social life.   The course examines the beliefs, rituals, norms, and subcultures associated with food choice.   Further, we look at food in the larger contexts of politics, the economy, and cultural survival.  Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSYC 101

SOC207 - Wealth & Poverty

Why are millions of people poor in this rich country? Why are the richest 1% getting so much wealthier? One focus of the course is how the rules of the economy have changed in the last 30 years to favor wealthy individuals and corporations. How can unjust economic policies be changed? The second focus of the course is on the power of the federal government to outlaw some exploitive practices and promote shared prosperity. The US Senate in particular has a powerful influence on economic inequality, for better or for worse. Students will evaluate Senators’ policy positions related to wealth and poverty, and articulate their own opinions about controversial economic policy debates.

SOC212 - Wellness & Society

This course explores the social dimension of health and illness. Both health and illness vary across times and cultures – and this is related to how we define “normal”. Our wellbeing is also closely related to our position in society – socio-economic status, race, gender, class, ethnicity, and physical ability impact life chances, lifestyles, access to care, and attitudes towards health and illness. This course therefore covers the social distribution of illness; health disparities; global comparisons in the health of populations; the social construction of illness; the structure of health care systems and institutions; and various historical and contemporary health care debates.Prerequisite: SOC101 or PSYC101

SOC214 - Family Diversity

This course explores the meaning of "family" in a historical and cross-cultural context - it looks at the way families and households are constructed, and at how these institutions are impacted by social forces including demographic, ideological, and economic changes in societies. Family diversity is discussed in the context of social constructions such as race, class, and gender. Current themes in family sociology that are covered include, amongst others, sexuality, marriage, parenting, violence, divorce and remarriage, and family policy. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC221 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course examines conditions and issues that result in tension and disorder. Examples are drawn primarily from American society include: labeling and social control of deviants, oppression of minorities, poverty, violence, ageism, and ecological concerns. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC223 - Social Movements

You are breathing clean air right now thanks to the environmental movement. Maybe you can vote thanks to the Civil Rights or women’s suffrage movement. And don’t forget the labor movement, the folks who brought you the weekend! What inequities and crises in today's society will social movements address next? In this course, students will study contemporary social problems and the solutions that can be found by people gathering together into movements for change. This course will bring US and global movements to life through videos, photos, stories, interactive exercises, writing and discussion. By the end of the course, students will understand the strategic choices that contribute to movement success or failure in solving social problems.

SOC301 - Race & Ethnicity

This course examines the sociological constructs of race and ethnicity with a primary emphasis on people living in the United States. Topics include: the origins and consequences of racial/ethnic discriminations; immigration policies; movements for integration and separatism; the role of class, religion, and gender on issues of race/ethnicity; the impact of widely differing cultural heritages on our national life: and specific present day problems and trends including relationships betwen people of different racial and ethnic identification. Prerequisite: Any 200 level Social Science course.

SOC307 - Action & Social Justice

How can students make a difference? Small student groups waging brief action campaigns have won victories on racism, climate change, education budget cuts, sexual assault and many other social justice issues . In this hands-on course, students will together pick one injustice, develop achievable goals, and design and carry out a pressure campaign. Working in teams, students will practice persuasive communication with off-campus decision-makers, nonprofit organizations working on the same issue, the media, and the public, as well as with the Lasell community. Students will learn many skills needed for future community engagement: strategizing, meeting facilitation and group decision-making, public relations and social media advocacy, lobbying, coalition-building and event planning. Injustices confronted in this course will vary from semester based on student interest as well as on social justice issues arising in the community. Pre-requisites: PSYC101 or SOC101 or permission by instructor.

SOC310 - Sociological Perspectives

This course introduces classical and contemporary perspectives in sociology. Theories are examined as explanatory tools in the understanding of social structure and social change, and as reflections of the societal conditions from which they emerged. Theories are evaluated in terms of their applicability to contemporary issues in society. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Sociology course and Junior or Senior standing.

SOC331 - Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This laboratory course introduces students to the basic methods used in sociological research. Topics include scientific method, measurement, sampling, experiments, survey research, and qualitative approaches such as content analysis and field studies, and ethical issues in conducting research. As part of the lab, students learn to use SPSS to perform statistical analysis and to access and draw upon large data sets. Students learn to use professional online search procedures and write reports in accepted professional formats. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or approval of Dept Chair.

SOC333 - Sociology Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisite: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

SOC335 - Social Policy

This course examines historical and contemporary factors influencing the making of social policy and introduces the student to processes used to identify and solve social problems. Special attention is given to the relationships of values to social policy and the impact of social policy decisions on the provision of social and human services. Approaches to the analysis of social policy are examined. Prerequisite: Any 200 Level Sociology course or permission by the associate dean.

SOC406 - Selected Topics in the Lives of Women

This capstone course examines topics important to the study of women’s issues. Representative topics that might be covered include violence against women, women in public life, social policy related to women, women and work, and reproductive issues. Prerequisite: one of the following: SOC 102, PSYC 303, or HIST 203.

SVL102X - Doing Democracy

In this course we will learn to talk to each other about difficult social issues that engage us. The class will identify some of the social issues we tackle, explore what they mean and some conditions under which they occur, and deliberate on ways to potentially address them. We welcome diverse points of view, and, in fact, need all these perspectives to open up respectful, dynamic, safe dialogues. The class will incorporate many connected learning and democratic formats, including deliberative dialogue, learning circles, and a service-learning project chosen by the class in collaboration with a community partner. The goals of the class are to create a responsive, impactful, inclusive community of our own; enhance our ability to problem-solve and bridge individual differences; develop our ‘public’ selves; contribute meaningfully to our class as well as a community outside our own; and become more effective civic participants. No particular experience necessary.

SVL104 - Seminar for Writing & Speech Tutors

In this course, students are trained as peer writing and speech tutors. Students spend two hours per week in the Academic Achievement Center observing and tutoring and participate in a weekly seminar course. Assignments include reading, researching, writing, and presenting on the tutoring experience.

SVL108 - SVL: Tax Volunteer

This course consists of study and training in federal income taxation, as well as tax return preparation using IRS software for electronic filing. Students also learn how to file Massachusetts returns electronically and conduct research on selected federal and state income tax issues. After passing a proficiency test at the conclusion of the training, students receive an IRS certificate. The test is provided by the IRS and requires the students to recognize tax status and income issues in the preparation of appropriate tax returns. Upon being certified by the IRS, students can prepare basic tax returns in the program without personal liability. Using computer software, students prepare and electronically file taxpayers’ returns as a community service. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

SVL111X - Service-Learning to Make a Difference

This one-credit intergenerational service course will include residents from Lasell Village as well as students at Lasell College. We will explore a pressing social problem -- such as sustainability/going green, immigration -- or the upcoming national presidential election. The group will decide together on the issue and we will partner with an organization to provide a service to that organization. Class will be held at Lasell Village.

SVL112X - Global Citizens Unit

Global Citizens Unit

SVL115 - Service Learning

This course is linked to three- or four-credit courses across the curriculum. Course content includes both 15 – 20 hours of community service and related written and/ or oral assignments. Students wishing to enroll in an SVL Linked-Credit course must have the permission of the instructor. Restrictions: Students may enroll for only one SVL Linked-Credit in a given semester; students may complete up to, but no more than, three SVL Linked- Credits towards completion of the bachelor’s degree. To receive credit and a grade for an SVL linked option, students must receive a passing grade in the host course. The SVL Linked-Credit cannot be taken pass/fail, and cannot be linked to a course that is taken pass/fail. This credit counts toward an unrestricted elective. It does not satisfy other degree requirements unless authorized by an academic department.

SVL201 - Service Learning Internship

The Service-Learning Internship provides individually arranged participation in a community-based or other non-profit organization in which the student provides 100 hours of meaningful service to that organization. Students may also be placed at a for-profit organization to work on a service project for the community. The primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing the internship, with support of the Center for Community-Based Learning (CCBL). Students meet regularly with the Director of the CCBL to discuss the internship. Evaluation of the internship is based on the students' reflections about that experience, a site visit, and communication with the internship site supervisor. Students may do six credits of service-learning internships. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing and the approval of the Director of the CCBL and the agency representative are required. This internship fulfills unrestricted elective credit; it does not supplant any internship requirement within a major.

SVL202 - Introduction to Community Organizations

This course provides a forum for community service house residents to explore challenging service opportunities. The residents have opportunities to examine past service experience in order to identify more clearly with a cause or find an area about which they wish to learn more. They also have opportunities to research service needs for Greater Boston or for their hometowns, and to challenge themselves to envision events that would meet those needs. The course explores different ways of gaining insight into and knowledge of the service-learning field through discussion, peer-led activities, reflection, learning circles, and guest speakers. The materials and discussion serve to empower the residents to find and/or initiate meaningful service events. Open only to service house residents. Pass/Fail.

SVL203 - Env Service-Learning in Ecuador

This fall semester course is linked to ten days of service-learning and study in Ecuador during January break.  The course is designed to educate students about the history, people, culture, politics, eco-systems, climate, and language of Ecuador.  The experience in Ecuador includes group accommodations in home-stays or lodges, full days of travel, outdoor manual labor and reflective intellectual work. We learn through service alongside community members at foundations, schools, government agencies, and local businesses.  The goal of both the course and the experience is to immerse students in the culture of Ecuador, while exploring the natural environment and the impact humans have over time.  Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Ecuador program director.

SVL207 - Sem for Accounting/Finance Facilitators

In this course, student facilitators are trained to work with the instructor in support of the course objectives and connected learning project. The student facilitators participate in the weekly classes by providing individual and group instruction and supervision. The facilitators also work with students as they complete their project providing the necessary tutoring to enhance the students learning of accounting/finance.

SVL209 - Seminar for Math Tutors

This course is about learning to tutor, and tutoring to understand mathematics in depth. It targets Math Minors (and other students who are strong in math) and trains them as tutors/mentors for peers who need extra math help. Students maintain a journal of their weekly tutoring experience (one hour a week in the Academic Achievement Center) and participate in a weekly MATH SENSE seminar, which is a discussion-based training/coaching class. They are provided with special guidelines, math tutoring tips, problem solving strategies, and communication skills to improve their math knowledge and tutoring skills. Here, they also get the opportunity to share their ideas and experiences from tutoring math. Permission of the instructor required.

SVL212X - Promoting Activism

The class offers students the unique opportunity to profoundly alter the landscape of their own community. The class will explore and develop a grassroots college-based social justice and human rights movement designed to directly impact and improve the experience of their local, city and state communities. Using, by example, the current and very public efforts by students nationwide to enact social change around sexual and domestic violence on college campuses, the students will create and implement their own multi-pronged campaign to inspire a cultural shift on their own campus, the larger Newton community and statewide with respect to domestic and sexual violence. With guidance and support from local and statewide activists and using a human rights lens, the students will innovate programs, community collaborations and other efforts to increase education and prevention with respect to sexual and domestic violence perpetrated on college campuses. Using the power of your voices and your activism, this exciting class will transform the very community in which you live, learn and socialize.

SVL214X - Tanzania: Shoulder to Shoulder

The basic service mission of this trip is to offer two weeks of English as a second language to grades one through seven in a rural Tanzanian school. What we offer, in terms of service, is essentially three things: we provide mentoring in basic English (and some math) skills to all students in a rural Tanzanian elementary school As part of the course we will develop a working ESL-type curriculum to use in the school. Since we also model small group and active learning, we will develop lesson plans and strategies for our mentoring. Our experience in Uganda is that many teachers are quite interested in our techniques and approaches, and often they will adapt them to their classroom teaching. We also provide a relationship which, ideally, we will develop over time – but even in a single visit our students provide role modeling, coaching, and encouragement to students whose exposure to the world beyond their immediate experience is somewhat limited. Much of the rest of the work in this course is an introduction to African, and Tanzanian, culture, history, and issues. Students will be expected to do considerable reading, to help design and deliver the curriculum, and to reflect on their experience in writing (most likely via a journal and a final reflection paper). The majority of the work of the course will take place during the trip itself, from mid-May to early June. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

SVL217X - Civic Engagement Practicum

This course is designed to enable a small group of students (4-8) to work with a community partner and a faculty member to engage in an academically-based investigation that meets an existing need as identified by the community partner. The faculty member designs the academic component, providing readings and at least 1 credit hour of academic content per week. The faculty member also mentors the student(s) through the research and practical process of providing an analysis and/or deliverable to the community partner. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, needs assessment, development of a research proposal and project design, completion of an IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, development of research/marketing/analysis materials, data analysis, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

SVL301 - Service learning Internship

The Service-Learning Internship provides individually arranged participation in a community-based or other non-profit organization in which the student provides 150 hours meaningful service to that organization. Students may also be placed at a for-profit organization to work on a service project for the community. The primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing the internship, with the support of the Center for Community-Based Learning. Students meet regularly with the Director of the CCBL to discuss the internship. Evaluation of the internship is based on the students' reflections about that experience, a site visit, and communication with the internship site supervisor. Students may do six credits of service-learning internships. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and the approval of the Director of the CCBL and the agency representative are required. This internship fulfills unrestricted elective credit; it does not supplant any internship requirement within a major.

Lori Rosenthal

Dean, School of Humanities, Education, Justice & Social Sciences; Associate Professor of Psychology

Office: Plummer

Sarahbeth Golden

Associate Professor of Psychology

Office: Plummer

Betsy Leondar-Wright

Associate Professor of Sociology

Office: Klingbeil

Tessa LeRoux

The Joan Weiler Arnow ’49 Professor; Professor of Sociology; Fellow, RoseMary B. Fuss Center for Research on Aging and Intergenerational Studies

Office: Plummer

Marsha Mirkin

Professor Emerita

Office: Plummer

James Ostrow

Provost, Professor of Sociology

Office: Holway

Jesse Tauriac

Associate Professor of Psychology; Director of the Donahue Institute for Ethics, Diversity, and Inclusion

Office: 70 Maple/IC3

Zane Zheng

Associate Professor of Psychology

Office: Plummer

HS415 - Advanced Internship I

Seniors who have met program requirements spend 125 hours in an approved supervised internship. Prerequisites: HS 215, HS 217, with a grade of C or better; and permission of the Internship Coordinator; Co-requisite: HS 417.

HS417 - Field Intervention Strategies

This seminar is taken concurrently with Advanced Internship I (HS 415). Students integrate theory learned throughout their college career with their fieldwork experience. The seminar further develops professional behaviors such as record keeping, creating and maintaining supervisory relationships, conflict resolution, and job effectiveness. Students are also offered an opportunity to analyze cases and tasks assigned to them in their field placements, providing a theoretical framework for understanding them. There is an intensive examination of the ethical considerations involved in working with clients. Students identify and develop a research topic and conduct an extensive review of current literature on a topic related to their internship. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HS 215, HS 217 with a grade of C or better, and permission of the Internship Coordinator; Co-requisite: HS 415.

HS425 - Advanced Internship II

This seminar is a continuation of HS 415. Students spend 125 hours working in an approved supervised field site. Prerequisite: HS 415 with a grade of C or better; Co-requisite: HS 427.

HS427 - Systems & Organizational Change

This capstone seminar is a continuation of Field Intervention Strategies (HS417) and is taken concurrently with Advanced Internship II (HS425). Building on knowledge and skills gained throughout the Social Sciences program, students continue to integrate theory with practice through seminar discussion and internship-related experiences. There is an increased focus on the delivery of services, examination of ethical dilemmas, and analysis of the broader systems in which services are delivered and policies are formulated. Students also have an opportunity to explore career development issues through examination of the graduate school and employment processes. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course and also has a strong public speaking component. Prerequisites: HS 415, HS 417 with a grade of C or better; and either PSYC 331 or SOC 331. Corequisite: HS 425.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination (KP)

In this course we explore our awareness of the relationship between our experience and broader society. How are our lives shaped by our social positions in society – our social class, race, gender, sexual orientation, age, and more? How do the members of different groups view each other and interact with each other? Why do inequalities exist and how do these affect us? How does culture shape our behavior, and why do religions, schools, families, and other institutions remain stable but also change over time?

SOC221 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course examines conditions and issues that result in tension and disorder. Examples are drawn primarily from American society include: labeling and social control of deviants, oppression of minorities, poverty, violence, ageism, and ecological concerns. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC223 - Social Movements

You are breathing clean air right now thanks to the environmental movement. Maybe you can vote thanks to the Civil Rights or women’s suffrage movement. And don’t forget the labor movement, the folks who brought you the weekend! What inequities and crises in today's society will social movements address next? In this course, students will study contemporary social problems and the solutions that can be found by people gathering together into movements for change. This course will bring US and global movements to life through videos, photos, stories, interactive exercises, writing and discussion. By the end of the course, students will understand the strategic choices that contribute to movement success or failure in solving social problems.

SOC301 - Race & Ethnicity

This course examines the sociological constructs of race and ethnicity with a primary emphasis on people living in the United States. Topics include: the origins and consequences of racial/ethnic discriminations; immigration policies; movements for integration and separatism; the role of class, religion, and gender on issues of race/ethnicity; the impact of widely differing cultural heritages on our national life: and specific present day problems and trends including relationships betwen people of different racial and ethnic identification. Prerequisite: Any 200 level Social Science course.

SOC307 - Action & Social Justice

How can students make a difference? Small student groups waging brief action campaigns have won victories on racism, climate change, education budget cuts, sexual assault and many other social justice issues . In this hands-on course, students will together pick one injustice, develop achievable goals, and design and carry out a pressure campaign. Working in teams, students will practice persuasive communication with off-campus decision-makers, nonprofit organizations working on the same issue, the media, and the public, as well as with the Lasell community. Students will learn many skills needed for future community engagement: strategizing, meeting facilitation and group decision-making, public relations and social media advocacy, lobbying, coalition-building and event planning. Injustices confronted in this course will vary from semester based on student interest as well as on social justice issues arising in the community. Pre-requisites: PSYC101 or SOC101 or permission by instructor.

SOC310 - Sociological Perspectives

This course introduces classical and contemporary perspectives in sociology. Theories are examined as explanatory tools in the understanding of social structure and social change, and as reflections of the societal conditions from which they emerged. Theories are evaluated in terms of their applicability to contemporary issues in society. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Sociology course and Junior or Senior standing.

SOC331 - Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This laboratory course introduces students to the basic methods used in sociological research. Topics include scientific method, measurement, sampling, experiments, survey research, and qualitative approaches such as content analysis and field studies, and ethical issues in conducting research. As part of the lab, students learn to use SPSS to perform statistical analysis and to access and draw upon large data sets. Students learn to use professional online search procedures and write reports in accepted professional formats. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or approval of Dept Chair.

SOC102 - Women and Gender in Social Context(KP)

his course is designed to help students develop a critical framework for examining feminist thought and gender-related social processes. Through the lens of the Sociological Imagination the course examines the ways in which sex and gender are socially constructed, how that shapes group and individual behavior and the ways in which power manifests in inequality and exploitation, as well as the agency of individuals and groups to bring about change.

SOC214 - Family Diversity

This course explores the meaning of "family" in a historical and cross-cultural context - it looks at the way families and households are constructed, and at how these institutions are impacted by social forces including demographic, ideological, and economic changes in societies. Family diversity is discussed in the context of social constructions such as race, class, and gender. Current themes in family sociology that are covered include, amongst others, sexuality, marriage, parenting, violence, divorce and remarriage, and family policy. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development.

SOC207 - Wealth & Poverty

Why are millions of people poor in this rich country? Why are the richest 1% getting so much wealthier? One focus of the course is how the rules of the economy have changed in the last 30 years to favor wealthy individuals and corporations. How can unjust economic policies be changed? The second focus of the course is on the power of the federal government to outlaw some exploitive practices and promote shared prosperity. The US Senate in particular has a powerful influence on economic inequality, for better or for worse. Students will evaluate Senators’ policy positions related to wealth and poverty, and articulate their own opinions about controversial economic policy debates.

CJ303 - Domestic Violence

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of the law relating to domestic violence. In addition the course examines the existence of violence among family members and in relationships in today's society. Topics include child abuse, partner abuse, and elder abuse. Prerequisite: LS 101, CJ 101 or any introductory social science course.

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

SOC212 - Wellness & Society

This course explores the social dimension of health and illness. Both health and illness vary across times and cultures – and this is related to how we define “normal”. Our wellbeing is also closely related to our position in society – socio-economic status, race, gender, class, ethnicity, and physical ability impact life chances, lifestyles, access to care, and attitudes towards health and illness. This course therefore covers the social distribution of illness; health disparities; global comparisons in the health of populations; the social construction of illness; the structure of health care systems and institutions; and various historical and contemporary health care debates.Prerequisite: SOC101 or PSYC101

BUSS224 - Organiz Behavior in a Global Environment

In this course, students study individuals and their interactions within group settings as they affect efficiencies in diverse business organizations. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior on a global scale. Areas covered include structure, leadership, and change as they affect a multitude of cultures. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course.

BUSS334 - Nonprofit Management

In this course students explore businesses that do not intend to maximize profit and retain it for future expenditures. Managers for nonprofit operations must operate under more regulated conditions and must be well prepared to interact within the public sector. Not-for-profit managers must be well versed in public policy and other regulations that affect them. Students will engage in real projects with non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102.