2019 - 2020 Academic Catalog

Graphic Design

The Graphic Design major is a comprehensive and balanced program that illuminates the basic principles of effective visual communication. Students develop professional skills and a personal aesthetic that form a foundation for a successful design career. Practical studio experience rooted in theoretical knowledge in illustration, motion graphics, photography, typography, and design for the Web and mobile devices is at the core of the major.

Reflective of Lasell's connected learning philosophy, students learn essential business practices, become fluent in the necessary terminology, address a client's needs through conceptual drawings and mock-ups, and bring the project through to a successful solution. Students use the latest and most powerful digital hardware and software. For a capstone experience, each student develops an online portfolio that showcases the strongest examples of work created during the course of the program and presents a practicum project at the end of the senior year. All students also complete a required internship. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design.

By planning early in consultation with an academic advisor, students may be able to reduce the time it takes to complete a bachelor’s degree in Graphic Design to 3 or 3½ years. 

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Graphic Design:

Goal 1: Creative Thinking Skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Graphic Design, students will be able to:

  1. produce multiple creative solutions for any single design challenge, applying a creative process on-demand
  2. effectively employ imagination with refined technique

Goal 2: Strong Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving Skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Graphic Design, students will be able to:

  1. critique quality and effectiveness of visual media objects
  2. use multiple appropriate resources to solve problems and develop skills
  3. craft effective solutions for visual problems

Goal 3: Strong Design and Fine Arts Skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Graphic Design, students will be able to:

  1. demonstrate currency with technical media tools
  2. effectively craft and author visual communications

Goal 4: Visual Articulation and Literacy
Upon completion of the major program of study in Graphic Design, students will be able to:

  1. demonstrate their own personal aesthetic
  2. explain the influences of media in society
  3. recognize context and legacy of visual media objects

Goal 5: Effective Verbal Communication Skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Graphic Design, students will be able to:

  1. articulate their thoughts clearly in written form
  2. write in the style demanded of their chosen profession
  3. articulate their thoughts clearly in classroom discussions and professional presentations

Program Fee
Each Graphic Design student is charged a program fee for each semester. This program fee is used to pay for hardware, software, guest speaker honoraria, and miscellaneous materials/supplies that are necessary to maximize student learning.

Course Code Course Title Credits
Major Courses
ARTH107 Special Topics in Art (KP) 3
ARTS101 Studio Drawing I 3
ARTS126 Fundamentals of Visual Art (KP) 3
ARTS201 Studio Drawing II 3
ARTS219 Digital Photography I 3
ARTS319 Digital Photography II 3
GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials 3
GRAP201 Imaging for Graphic Design 3
GRAP204 Graphic Design I 3
GRAP205 Graphic Design II 3
GRAP207 Web Design & Development 3
GRAP208 Graphic Design History 3
GRAP301 Typography I 3
GRAP302 Typography II 3
GRAP307 Motion Graphics 3
GRAP308 Interactive & UX Design 3
GRAP309 Graphic Design for the Marketplace 3
GRAP311 Digital 3D Design 3
GRAP322 Photography for Design 3
GRAP399 Internship Seminar 1
GRAP400 Field Experience 4
GRAP401 Publication Design 3
GRAP403 Senior Portfolio Development 3
GRAP404 Senior Thesis Assignment 4
GRAP406 Senior Practicum Project 4
MATH107 College Geometry 3

Major Requirements: 79 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.



ARTH107 - Special Topics in Art (KP)

This course introduces students to the study of art history by focusing on one theme, one artist, or one form of art. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints and drawings may be considered. Stylistic, cultural, and historic elements are components of the course.

ARTS101 - Studio Drawing I

This course introduces students to a variety of drawing tools and media. Drawing from life, line, tonality, illusional space, and perspective are explored. Creativity and individual expression are stressed.

ARTS103 - Printmaking

This course provides an introduction to printmaking with an emphasis on the translation and development of images into a printed media, as well as the design and organization of space. Types of printmaking to be explored include relief, monotype, and drypoint.

ARTS106 - Museum Discovery (KP)

This course introduces students to the world of art museums, galleries, auction houses, and various other art institutions, through a series of site visits and some involvement in actual gallery work. By exploring venues and the communities they serve, students will address the question, "What is an art museum or gallery, and why is it a part of our society?"

ARTS107 - Figure Drawing

The purpose of this course is to help students obtain the basic skill of drawing the human form, including anatomy, observation of the human form and fundamental exercises in gesture, contour, outline, and tonal modeling. $50 Student fee for the models.

ARTS110 - Traditions & Methods of Art Photography

This course focuses on photography as an art form, introducing students to the history of the practice, its most significant practitioners and their work, as well as techniques and methodologies of art photography. The course will combine both survey and studio teaching approaches so that students have the opportunity to immediately put into practice newly acquired knowledge and skills.

ARTS111 - Intro to Ceramics

This course will teach the fundamentals of working with the potters wheel, forming bowls and cylinders, texturing and coloring, surface decoration, glazing and firing in our renovated kilns. Students also learn theories and best practices of working with ceramics—studying ancient traditions and more modern approaches in a hands-on exploration of form and function.

ARTS113 - Clay figure Sculpting

Using water-based clay, the class will create small-scale figure studies, sculpt individual parts of the face and end with one life-size portrait bust. With an emphasis on realism, the course is designed to cover structure, form, proportion and anatomy, as tools for self-expression. No prior art experience is necessary.

ARTS120 - Three-D Design

This course introduces students to the notion of creating within three-dimensional space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive perspectives. Students construct various models and/or maquettes. Problem solving and individual expression are emphasized. NOTE: Graphic Design majors should seek out the majors-only section when enrolling.

ARTS126 - Fundamentals of Visual Art (KP)

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and strategies for visual art-making and art appreciation, with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one's life and as a way to complement one's aesthetic needs. This is a lecture course with studio art-making modules designed to complement visual material, critical essays, museum/gallery trips and impart basic skills in visual communication.

ARTS130 - Watercolor

This is an introductory course on watercolor painting that incorporates various techniques such as glazing, wet on wet, graduated tone, and negative painting. Students acquire an understanding of basic color theory and composition. They experiment with the different relationships of wet paper, dry paper, and pigments.

ARTS201 - Studio Drawing II

This course offers the experienced drawing student a chance to continue building life drawing, human figure, still lifes and landscape skills. In addition to studio work, students learn what is necessary to advance their knowledge of design by studying the masters. Periodic class discussions help students learn visual analysis and a general approach to the criticism of art. Prerequisite: ARTS101 Studio Drawing I or permission of instructor.

ARTS203 - Painting

This course introduces students to a variety of styles and techniques used in oil and/or acrylic painting. Canvas stretching and priming, color mixing, and brush selection are addressed. Prerequisite: ARTS 101 or permission of instructor.

ARTS205 - Art for Educators (KP)

The arts process allows students to call on many talents simultaneously, including perceiving, responding, understanding, creating, self-evaluation, and development of related skills. This course exposes education students to new ideas and art forms, and ideas, tools, and processes from arts disciplines. Students work with a variety of art forms including drawing, painting & 3D.

ARTS207 - Figure Drawing

The purpose of this course is to help students obtain the basic skill of drawing the human form, including anatomy, observation of the human form and fundamental exercises in gesture, contour, outline, and tonal modeling. $50 Student Fee for the models.

ARTS219 - Digital Photography I

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to Photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

ARTS301 - Studio Drawing III

This course is for students who wish to advance their drawing skills to a higher level. In addition to refining techniques with various drawing media, such as ink, graphite, and mixed media, students address perceptual and aesthetic issues in relation to their own work within contemporary and historical contexts. The expressive character of lines, tones, and marks are studied as inseparable from fundamental concepts and content of drawing. Developing a unique and personal vision is a primary consideration. Prerequisite: ARTS201 Studio Drawing II or permission of instructor.

ARTS302 - Studio Painting II

This course is designed for students who wish to advance their painting skills to a higher level. In addition to refining painting techniques, students address perceptual and aesthetic issues in relation to their own work within contemporary and historical contexts. Merging inquiry and intuition, students are expected to commit to discovering individual creative expression. Prerequisite: ARTS203 Painting or permission of instructor.

ARTS304 - These Walls can Talk: Mural Painting

These Walls can Talk: Mural Painting

ARTS319 - Digital Photography II

This course involves the study of the graphic image and how visual messages are used in a diverse media. This is an advanced photography course with an emphasis on technical methods. Hands-on studio projects give the student skills that contribute to thoughtful and effective communication. Prerequisite: ARTS219 Digital Photography I.

ARTS399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter and resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Junior standing is required.

ARTS400 - Internship

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing.

GRAP105 - Digital Design Essentials

This course offers an introduction to three of the most important software applications in the Adobe Creative Cloud for a student who is interested in Graphic Design:  Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Students learn image generation and editing in both pixel-based and vector-based environments as well as digital page composition for print publishing. This is a project-based course that initiates and improves students' skill set for the implementation of computer graphics.

GRAP201 - Imaging for Graphic Design

This illustration course is designed to develop students' compositional and image development skills for the field of Graphic Design. Using a combination of traditional and digital methods of imaging, students expand their visual vocabulary for successful graphic communications. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent (such as FASH205 Digital Design for Apparel or FASH207 Digital Tools for Fashion).

GRAP202 - Adobe InDesign

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for digital page layout. Through a series of publication design projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP204 - Graphic Design I

This is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of graphic design, with an emphasis on developing a working literal and visual vocabulary. Students are challenged with conceptual design exercises that promote the essential values of good research, process, and presentation practices. Prerequisite: GRAP201 Imaging for Graphic Design.

GRAP205 - Graphic Design II

This course builds on the foundational principles that are introduced in Graphic Design I. Students strengthen their design skills through a series of design briefs in the areas of print and electronic media. Reflective writings and research assignments contribute to improved critical thinking and writing skills. Prerequisite: GRAP204.

GRAP206 - Adobe Illustrator

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for vector-based, digital illustration. Through a series of illustration projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP207 - Web Design & Development

This course introduces the student to the most current coding and markup languages that are integral to successful Web site development. It also introduces the student to authoring software, such as Adobe Dreamweaver, that assists designers with the coding demands of Web authorship. Other topics which add to this comprehensive course are: the history of the Internet and World Wide Web Consortium, the power of CSS, and the design and layout principles that contribute to successful Web site development from technical, interactive, and aesthetic viewpoints. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

GRAP208 - Graphic Design History

This course introduces students of design to the origins of the discipline. It emphasizes the Modernist period, during which design rapidly evolved as typography, photography and new printing methods were explored by artists of the Bauhaus and other European schools and movements. The course demonstrates how these innovators influence graphic design as we know it today.

GRAP209 - Adobe Photoshop

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for pixel-based digital imaging and editing. Through a series of projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP301 - Typography I

This course surveys the application of expressive letterforms since the invention of the printing press. With a historical overview that illuminates the terminology used by professional designers, students are encouraged to explore their own means of typographic expression. The fundamentals of structure, spacing, and rhythm are emphasized as they influence form and function. Prerequisites: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials.

GRAP302 - Typography II

In this course, students expand their design practice in the application of typography to a variety of forms and contexts. This is a process-oriented course focused on the advancement of a personal "typographic voice." Students learn to structure informational hierarchies and how to sequence typographic materials across multiple pages. Issues of personal interpretation and legibility are emphasized. Prerequisite: GRAP 301.

GRAP307 - Motion Graphics

In this course, students develop conceptual and visual problem-solving skills as they relate to motion studies and time-based art. Through demonstrations, studio sessions and critiques students create portfolio-quality animation and motion study projects.

GRAP308 - Interactive & UX Design

This course offers a deeper exploration of designing and authoring interactive content on a variety of platforms with an emphasis on user experience (UX), building upon skills and strategies acquired in basic web design and graphic design courses. Students will use designer tools such as Adobe Animate and Adobe XD, which offer designers the opportunity to create code-based interactions with minimal knowledge of programming languages, such as HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript and proprietary app building languages and workflows. Prerequisite: GRAP207 Web Design and Development and GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

GRAP309 - Graphic Design for the Marketplace

This course engages advanced Graphic Design students with a curriculum derived from a collection of prepared design briefs. With established methods of research, conceptualization, innovation and art production, students are offered "real world" challenges for graphic design solutions. This course emphasizes sound business practices and ethical guidelines for a career in commercial art. Prerequisites: GRAP205, GRAP302.

GRAP311 - Digital 3D Design

This is a digital imaging course that introduces students to creating within three-dimensional, virtual space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive geometric process. Students develop design solutions and construct various models that involve texture mapping and placing those models in convincing three-dimensional environments. Problem solving for creative imaging as it applies to commercial graphic projects is emphasized.Prerequisites: GRAP105 and GRAP201

GRAP322 - Photography for Design

This course will emphasize graphic design workflows that use photography as key elements of design. Students will deepen their understanding of shooting for design outcomes, exploring product shot staging and lighting, working with models, props and sets. In turn, they will add to their image editing, compositing and layout skills by working with their photos using a powerful digital toolset. Prerequisites: ARTS219 Digital Photography I and ARTS319 Digital Photography II or instructor approval.

GRAP399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful Internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter and resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Must have Junior standing.

GRAP400 - Field Experience

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing. Prerequisite: ARTS 399

GRAP401 - Publication Design

This course involves Graphic Design students in the theoretical and practical processes of successful publication design through research, conceptual explorations, studio practice, and presentations. This course offers experience in the design of traditional and electronic publications in order to prepare students for a career in graphic design. Prerequisite: GRAP302 Typography II.

GRAP403 - Senior Portfolio Development

This course prepares design students for effective and personalized presentation of their design work. Students are encouraged to create an online portfolio and relevant self-promotional materials (business card, designed resume, artist statement). Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP404 - Senior Thesis Assignment

Students engage in an individual research and writing practice that challenges them to analyze and articulate their personal philosophy of design, while studying designers of the Post-Modern era. This capstone course also provides students an opportunity to clarify their professional goals based on their interests in Graphic Design. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP406 - Senior Practicum Project

The senior practicum provides an opportunity for students in their final semester of the design program to produce a self-directed capstone project that applies the design theory and studio techniques that they have been developing over the last four years. The practicum project is presented in a Senior Show at the end of their final semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH108X - Mathematics of Design

This course explores elements of mathematics within the design field from the incorporation of algebra to concepts of geometry. Students will have the opportunity to integrate numerical fluency, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning and communicating quantitative information through group problem solving and class discussions. Topics include pattern drafting, layouts cutting, revenue, cost, and profit modeling, measurement systems, Euclidean geometry, and spatial reasoning.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH301 - Mathematical Modeling

Mathematical ModelingPrerequisite: C or better in MATH 205, 206, and 208

MATH303X - Problem Solving

This course will be an exploration into the mathematics exemplified in high quality high school and undergraduate mathematics competitions and mathematical research. The emphasis will be placed on building a repertoire of mathematical strategies and tactics, then applying these methods in unfamiliar situations. Topics will include: Combinatorics, Binomial Theorem, Conditional Probability, Roots of Unity, Symmetric Polynomials, Polynomial Interpolation, and topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry. Students will hone their ability to solve mathematical problems through hands-on practice and obtain an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and tools of the problem solver as illustrated by the textbook and the instructor. Strategies and tools for solving problems include, but are not limited to: •Draw a Diagram•Systematic Lists•Eliminate Possibilities•Matrix Logic•Look for a Pattern•Guess and Check•Sub Problems•Unit Analysis•Solve An Easier Related Problem•Physical Representations•Work Backwards•Venn Diagrams•Finite Differences

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vector functions, advanced techniques of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH322X - Special Topics in Mathematics

Special Topics in Mathematics

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants. Applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, economics, connectivity of networks, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Capstone Seminar

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

Deborah Baldizar

Assistant Professor of Art and Graphic Design

Office: Yamawaki

Kenneth Calhoun

Associate Professor of Art and Graphic Design, Program Chair of Graphic Design

Office: Yamawaki

Stephen Fischer

Associate Professor of Graphic Design

Office: Yamawaki

Margo Lemieux

Professor of Art and Graphic Design

Office: Yamawaki

Vladimir Zimakov

Diane Heath Beever ’49 Associate Professor of Art; Director of the Wedeman Gallery

Office: Yamawaki

ARTH107 - Special Topics in Art (KP)

This course introduces students to the study of art history by focusing on one theme, one artist, or one form of art. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints and drawings may be considered. Stylistic, cultural, and historic elements are components of the course.

ARTS101 - Studio Drawing I

This course introduces students to a variety of drawing tools and media. Drawing from life, line, tonality, illusional space, and perspective are explored. Creativity and individual expression are stressed.

ARTS126 - Fundamentals of Visual Art (KP)

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and strategies for visual art-making and art appreciation, with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one's life and as a way to complement one's aesthetic needs. This is a lecture course with studio art-making modules designed to complement visual material, critical essays, museum/gallery trips and impart basic skills in visual communication.

ARTS201 - Studio Drawing II

This course offers the experienced drawing student a chance to continue building life drawing, human figure, still lifes and landscape skills. In addition to studio work, students learn what is necessary to advance their knowledge of design by studying the masters. Periodic class discussions help students learn visual analysis and a general approach to the criticism of art. Prerequisite: ARTS101 Studio Drawing I or permission of instructor.

ARTS219 - Digital Photography I

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to Photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

ARTS319 - Digital Photography II

This course involves the study of the graphic image and how visual messages are used in a diverse media. This is an advanced photography course with an emphasis on technical methods. Hands-on studio projects give the student skills that contribute to thoughtful and effective communication. Prerequisite: ARTS219 Digital Photography I.

GRAP105 - Digital Design Essentials

This course offers an introduction to three of the most important software applications in the Adobe Creative Cloud for a student who is interested in Graphic Design:  Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Students learn image generation and editing in both pixel-based and vector-based environments as well as digital page composition for print publishing. This is a project-based course that initiates and improves students' skill set for the implementation of computer graphics.

GRAP201 - Imaging for Graphic Design

This illustration course is designed to develop students' compositional and image development skills for the field of Graphic Design. Using a combination of traditional and digital methods of imaging, students expand their visual vocabulary for successful graphic communications. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent (such as FASH205 Digital Design for Apparel or FASH207 Digital Tools for Fashion).

GRAP204 - Graphic Design I

This is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of graphic design, with an emphasis on developing a working literal and visual vocabulary. Students are challenged with conceptual design exercises that promote the essential values of good research, process, and presentation practices. Prerequisite: GRAP201 Imaging for Graphic Design.

GRAP205 - Graphic Design II

This course builds on the foundational principles that are introduced in Graphic Design I. Students strengthen their design skills through a series of design briefs in the areas of print and electronic media. Reflective writings and research assignments contribute to improved critical thinking and writing skills. Prerequisite: GRAP204.

GRAP207 - Web Design & Development

This course introduces the student to the most current coding and markup languages that are integral to successful Web site development. It also introduces the student to authoring software, such as Adobe Dreamweaver, that assists designers with the coding demands of Web authorship. Other topics which add to this comprehensive course are: the history of the Internet and World Wide Web Consortium, the power of CSS, and the design and layout principles that contribute to successful Web site development from technical, interactive, and aesthetic viewpoints. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

GRAP208 - Graphic Design History

This course introduces students of design to the origins of the discipline. It emphasizes the Modernist period, during which design rapidly evolved as typography, photography and new printing methods were explored by artists of the Bauhaus and other European schools and movements. The course demonstrates how these innovators influence graphic design as we know it today.

GRAP301 - Typography I

This course surveys the application of expressive letterforms since the invention of the printing press. With a historical overview that illuminates the terminology used by professional designers, students are encouraged to explore their own means of typographic expression. The fundamentals of structure, spacing, and rhythm are emphasized as they influence form and function. Prerequisites: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials.

GRAP302 - Typography II

In this course, students expand their design practice in the application of typography to a variety of forms and contexts. This is a process-oriented course focused on the advancement of a personal "typographic voice." Students learn to structure informational hierarchies and how to sequence typographic materials across multiple pages. Issues of personal interpretation and legibility are emphasized. Prerequisite: GRAP 301.

GRAP307 - Motion Graphics

In this course, students develop conceptual and visual problem-solving skills as they relate to motion studies and time-based art. Through demonstrations, studio sessions and critiques students create portfolio-quality animation and motion study projects.

GRAP308 - Interactive & UX Design

This course offers a deeper exploration of designing and authoring interactive content on a variety of platforms with an emphasis on user experience (UX), building upon skills and strategies acquired in basic web design and graphic design courses. Students will use designer tools such as Adobe Animate and Adobe XD, which offer designers the opportunity to create code-based interactions with minimal knowledge of programming languages, such as HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript and proprietary app building languages and workflows. Prerequisite: GRAP207 Web Design and Development and GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

GRAP309 - Graphic Design for the Marketplace

This course engages advanced Graphic Design students with a curriculum derived from a collection of prepared design briefs. With established methods of research, conceptualization, innovation and art production, students are offered "real world" challenges for graphic design solutions. This course emphasizes sound business practices and ethical guidelines for a career in commercial art. Prerequisites: GRAP205, GRAP302.

GRAP311 - Digital 3D Design

This is a digital imaging course that introduces students to creating within three-dimensional, virtual space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive geometric process. Students develop design solutions and construct various models that involve texture mapping and placing those models in convincing three-dimensional environments. Problem solving for creative imaging as it applies to commercial graphic projects is emphasized.Prerequisites: GRAP105 and GRAP201

GRAP322 - Photography for Design

This course will emphasize graphic design workflows that use photography as key elements of design. Students will deepen their understanding of shooting for design outcomes, exploring product shot staging and lighting, working with models, props and sets. In turn, they will add to their image editing, compositing and layout skills by working with their photos using a powerful digital toolset. Prerequisites: ARTS219 Digital Photography I and ARTS319 Digital Photography II or instructor approval.

GRAP399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful Internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter and resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Must have Junior standing.

GRAP400 - Field Experience

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing. Prerequisite: ARTS 399

GRAP401 - Publication Design

This course involves Graphic Design students in the theoretical and practical processes of successful publication design through research, conceptual explorations, studio practice, and presentations. This course offers experience in the design of traditional and electronic publications in order to prepare students for a career in graphic design. Prerequisite: GRAP302 Typography II.

GRAP403 - Senior Portfolio Development

This course prepares design students for effective and personalized presentation of their design work. Students are encouraged to create an online portfolio and relevant self-promotional materials (business card, designed resume, artist statement). Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP404 - Senior Thesis Assignment

Students engage in an individual research and writing practice that challenges them to analyze and articulate their personal philosophy of design, while studying designers of the Post-Modern era. This capstone course also provides students an opportunity to clarify their professional goals based on their interests in Graphic Design. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP406 - Senior Practicum Project

The senior practicum provides an opportunity for students in their final semester of the design program to produce a self-directed capstone project that applies the design theory and studio techniques that they have been developing over the last four years. The practicum project is presented in a Senior Show at the end of their final semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.