2019 - 2020 Academic Catalog

Fashion Media and Marketing

Through application of Lasell's Connected Learning philosophy, Fashion students have ongoing opportunities to apply theoretical concepts through industry-oriented assignments and by working in the field with recognized leaders in the fashion industry. The upper-level professional courses are oriented toward a critical thinking and decision-making environment that graduates will face when making the transition from college to middle and upper-management positions. Students learn how to plan strategically, organize for profitability, and cultivate creativity. These elements of learning are carefully woven together, and additionally include student engagement in community service-learning projects and a focus on social responsibility.

Fashion Media and Marketing students are equipped with a comprehensive understanding of the fashion industry's application of various forms of communication through multi-media platforms and related technologies. The Senior capstone course connects the knowledge accumulated throughout the program with an actual industry challenge, working directly with a leading fashion company. Through industry internships, the students' knowledge becomes grounded in best practices and valuable networking opportunities. Fashion Media and Marketing graduates are well-positioned for leadership in careers as social media coordinators, branding and consumer engagement specialists, stylists, e-commerce content developers, journalists, bloggers, public relations professionals, and visual merchandisers for a variety of product categories and companies. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Fashion Media and Marketing .

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete a major program of study in Fashion:

Goal 1: Professional Attitudes and Skills 
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to: 
1.     exhibit professional engagement and behavior.  
2.     develop and implement a path toward a professional career.  
3.     utilize collaborative skills in a diverse marketplace. 
4.     exercise leadership capabilities in multi-role scenarios. 
5.     demonstrate the ability to constructively critique and self-reflect.  

 Goal 2: Application of Business Practices Relevant to the Contemporary Global Fashion Industry 
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to: 
1.     demonstrate a readiness to build upon discipline-specific technology.  
2.     apply theoretical concepts for effective planning and problem solving. 
3.     interpret visual elements of design demonstrating aesthetic literacy. 
4.     research the historical and contemporary industry drivers as they pertain to the global business landscape.   

Goal 3: Social Awareness 
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to: 
1.     apply appropriate strategies regarding teamwork to create goodwill and trust.   
2.     evaluate and employ sustainable environmental, social, and economic practices in the global environment. 
3.     implement moral and ethical business practices. 
4.     identify and interpret historical and contemporary zeitgeist in relationship to global fashion.     

Goal 4: Effective Communication 
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to: 
1.     utilize professional interpersonal communication skills effectively toward networking and relationship-building.   
2.     employ applicable research strategies to develop informed oral and written communication. 
3.     demonstrate proficiency in the application of appropriate visual communication skills to project criteria and goals.  
4.     Apply technology skillfully to present innovative ideas and concepts.   

Goal 5: Critical Thinking
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to: 
1.     raise vital questions and problems, formulating them clearly and precisely. 
2.     gather and assess relevant information. 
3.     come to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions. 
4.     think open-mindedly within alternative systems of thought. 
5.     communicate effectively with others in finding solutions to complex problems.       

Course Code Course Title Credits
Major Courses
ARTS126 Fundamentals of Visual Art (KP) 3
BUSS220 Principles of Marketing 3
COM101 Understanding Mass Media 3
COM208 Public Relations 3
COM209 Journalism 3
FASH101 The Business of Fashion 3
FASH102 The Fashion Consumer 3
FASH105 Excel for the Industry 1
FASH200 Fash Hist I:Imperial Societies to Indust 3
FASH207 Digital Tools for Fashion 3
FASH210 Textiles 3
FASH219 Fash Industry Professional Development 1
FASH307 Fashion Brand Management 3
FASH308 Fashion Show Production 3
FASH315 Trend Forecasting 3
FASH415 Internship 4
FASH427 Fash Com & Merchandising Capstone 3
FASM218 Fashion Content Development 3
FASM306 Fashion Styling & Photography 3
FASM310 Digital Marketing 3
FASM411 Social and Mobile Strategies 3
FASM412 Editorial Fashion Production 3
GRAP308 Interactive & UX Design 3
MATH116 Merchandising and Financial Mathematics 3
MATH208 Statistics 3
Choose 1 from the following:
BUSS341 Social Media Marketing 3
FASH407 Digital Commerce & Analytics 3

Major Requirements: 75 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.



ARTS101 - Studio Drawing I

This course introduces students to a variety of drawing tools and media. Drawing from life, line, tonality, illusional space, and perspective are explored. Creativity and individual expression are stressed.

ARTS103 - Printmaking

This course provides an introduction to printmaking with an emphasis on the translation and development of images into a printed media, as well as the design and organization of space. Types of printmaking to be explored include relief, monotype, and drypoint.

ARTS106 - Museum Discovery (KP)

This course introduces students to the world of art museums, galleries, auction houses, and various other art institutions, through a series of site visits and some involvement in actual gallery work. By exploring venues and the communities they serve, students will address the question, "What is an art museum or gallery, and why is it a part of our society?"

ARTS107 - Figure Drawing

The purpose of this course is to help students obtain the basic skill of drawing the human form, including anatomy, observation of the human form and fundamental exercises in gesture, contour, outline, and tonal modeling. $50 Student fee for the models.

ARTS110 - Traditions & Methods of Art Photography

This course focuses on photography as an art form, introducing students to the history of the practice, its most significant practitioners and their work, as well as techniques and methodologies of art photography. The course will combine both survey and studio teaching approaches so that students have the opportunity to immediately put into practice newly acquired knowledge and skills.

ARTS111 - Intro to Ceramics

This course will teach the fundamentals of working with the potters wheel, forming bowls and cylinders, texturing and coloring, surface decoration, glazing and firing in our renovated kilns. Students also learn theories and best practices of working with ceramics—studying ancient traditions and more modern approaches in a hands-on exploration of form and function.

ARTS113 - Clay figure Sculpting

Using water-based clay, the class will create small-scale figure studies, sculpt individual parts of the face and end with one life-size portrait bust. With an emphasis on realism, the course is designed to cover structure, form, proportion and anatomy, as tools for self-expression. No prior art experience is necessary.

ARTS120 - Three-D Design

This course introduces students to the notion of creating within three-dimensional space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive perspectives. Students construct various models and/or maquettes. Problem solving and individual expression are emphasized. NOTE: Graphic Design majors should seek out the majors-only section when enrolling.

ARTS126 - Fundamentals of Visual Art (KP)

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and strategies for visual art-making and art appreciation, with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one's life and as a way to complement one's aesthetic needs. This is a lecture course with studio art-making modules designed to complement visual material, critical essays, museum/gallery trips and impart basic skills in visual communication.

ARTS130 - Watercolor

This is an introductory course on watercolor painting that incorporates various techniques such as glazing, wet on wet, graduated tone, and negative painting. Students acquire an understanding of basic color theory and composition. They experiment with the different relationships of wet paper, dry paper, and pigments.

ARTS201 - Studio Drawing II

This course offers the experienced drawing student a chance to continue building life drawing, human figure, still lifes and landscape skills. In addition to studio work, students learn what is necessary to advance their knowledge of design by studying the masters. Periodic class discussions help students learn visual analysis and a general approach to the criticism of art. Prerequisite: ARTS101 Studio Drawing I or permission of instructor.

ARTS203 - Painting

This course introduces students to a variety of styles and techniques used in oil and/or acrylic painting. Canvas stretching and priming, color mixing, and brush selection are addressed. Prerequisite: ARTS 101 or permission of instructor.

ARTS205 - Art for Educators (KP)

The arts process allows students to call on many talents simultaneously, including perceiving, responding, understanding, creating, self-evaluation, and development of related skills. This course exposes education students to new ideas and art forms, and ideas, tools, and processes from arts disciplines. Students work with a variety of art forms including drawing, painting & 3D.

ARTS207 - Figure Drawing

The purpose of this course is to help students obtain the basic skill of drawing the human form, including anatomy, observation of the human form and fundamental exercises in gesture, contour, outline, and tonal modeling. $50 Student Fee for the models.

ARTS219 - Digital Photography I

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to Photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

ARTS301 - Studio Drawing III

This course is for students who wish to advance their drawing skills to a higher level. In addition to refining techniques with various drawing media, such as ink, graphite, and mixed media, students address perceptual and aesthetic issues in relation to their own work within contemporary and historical contexts. The expressive character of lines, tones, and marks are studied as inseparable from fundamental concepts and content of drawing. Developing a unique and personal vision is a primary consideration. Prerequisite: ARTS201 Studio Drawing II or permission of instructor.

ARTS302 - Studio Painting II

This course is designed for students who wish to advance their painting skills to a higher level. In addition to refining painting techniques, students address perceptual and aesthetic issues in relation to their own work within contemporary and historical contexts. Merging inquiry and intuition, students are expected to commit to discovering individual creative expression. Prerequisite: ARTS203 Painting or permission of instructor.

ARTS304 - These Walls can Talk: Mural Painting

These Walls can Talk: Mural Painting

ARTS319 - Digital Photography II

This course involves the study of the graphic image and how visual messages are used in a diverse media. This is an advanced photography course with an emphasis on technical methods. Hands-on studio projects give the student skills that contribute to thoughtful and effective communication. Prerequisite: ARTS219 Digital Photography I.

ARTS399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter and resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Junior standing is required.

ARTS400 - Internship

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM103 - Human Communication (KP)

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM206 - Professional Communication

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the most important communication and career-related formats of professional writing, including power point presentations, memos, business letters, reports, brief speeches, instructions, newsletters and brochures. Special emphasis is given to various writing processes one must complete on a tight deadline for a business audience of peers, customers or employers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles and multi-media stories. Assignments may include politics, sports, fashion, and entertainment based interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, graphic designers and digital content producers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle or on the 1851 Chroncile website. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

COM213 - Writing for Public Relations

This course serves as a workshop in which students apply the fundamental skills of journalism to the different formats commonly used in writing copy for public relations and advertising, including press releases, public service announcements, profiles, brochures, and advertisements. In addition, students continue to sharpen their editing skills by revising their own work and by copyediting and critiquing the work of other students. Central to the objectives of this course is that students improve their ability to write clearly and concisely, avoiding common errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM215 - Radio Production

Radio Production introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell College Radio station. Finally, this course introduces students to the communication competency of speech.

COM216 - Entertainment Media

A focus on the entertainment media industry requires making sense of the material that captures the audience's attention, influences culture, and provides enjoyment to mass media consumers. Course topics include the business of entertainment media, the production and distribution of media content, and multimedia convergence. Students in this course examine the multiple genres for the content of entertainment media, such as drama, comedy, reality TV, and gaming. Students learn how the entertainment industry works, captures the interests of contemporary audiences, and influences our culture and values. Prerequisite: COM 101. Formerly - COM302

COM217 - Video Production

Video Production introduces students to the basics of video production from an EFP (Electronic Field Production) perspective. Students will learn the functionality and art of digital videography and digital editing by completing a roll test, editing project, photojournalism package, and a TV commercial. The course will also examine the business of video production. Finally, this course introduces students to the competency of visual communication.

COM218 - Digital Video Editing

Digital Video Editing teaches students the basics of editing digital media using the popular software program Adobe Premiere Pro. The aesthetics of editing are also discussed and analyzed through screening various types of edited media. Projects for the course include editing TV commercials, news packages, movie scenes, and music videos. It is recommended that students have acquired basic computer skills prior to taking this class. Finally, this course introduces students to the competency of visual communication.

COM219 - Social Media

This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and practices of writing for weblogs and the use of social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter for reputation management in PR, journaling, and networking. Students learn about social media uses by studying successful blogs, reading assigned articles on the subject, contributing to regular discussions held on an online forum, and completing a personal blog entry each week. Students form small groups around topics of interest and work together in order to publish and promote their work on the web. Each student contributes to a class-made blog by writing, creating/finding art, copyediting, and assisting with podcast and video blog production. Students have a great deal of real-world experience with a live, constantly updated blog, and a solid understanding of the fundamentals of writing for the web and using social media for promotional purposes. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM221 - Advertising

This course introduces students to the field of advertising, including the role of promotional elements (advertising, direct mail, promotion, etc.) found in an advertising agency or in the communication program of an organization. In this course, students learn that advertising is more than just ads on television, on a web page or in print. Advertising is a process that starts with research and moves through analysis, planning, action, and evaluation. The development of an effective advertising strategy requires an understanding of overall communication processes and theoretical principles, how organizations organize and brand themselves for advertising and other promotional functions, consumer behavior, and how to set goals and objectives. A cooperative learning project requires students to engage in the kind of strategic thinking, planning and execution that is done by advertisers, researchers, media planners, and copywriters. The course also addresses how the advertising industry is regulated and how key social issues and various consumer constituencies can present problems for advertising professionals. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM223 - Advertising: Copy & Design

This course approaches the design and content of advertising from a variety of creative perspectives —from art to copy to production. The aim is to create eye catching, stand-out advertising —the kind that requires concentration, creativity, and focus. Students don’t have to be skilled graphic artists, but they do need to be able to explain in detail how a storyboard works and what message is intended for the consumer through an emphasis on: visual effects of the design; use of color and placement; and the significance of slogans, copy, and dialogue. This class duplicates as closely as possible the experience of working in a creative group within a real ad agency. Prerequisite: COM 221 or BUSS220

COM224 - Elements of Film

In this introductory level course, students begin to appreciate film as a medium of communication and expression by watching a variety of classic and contemporary works which function as modes of entertainment, art, education, politics and social change. Using a media literacy approach, this course will focus on content analysis of motion pictures by examining elements of cinematic expression including form, narrative structure, editing, sound, acting/performance, and cinematography. Students will be responsible for learning proper terminology to discuss, analyze, and write about films for relevant assignments. Students will identify major trends and ideas important to the history of film as one of the most important forms of mass media; explore messages and themes highlighted by style and content, as well as the various effects of those messages in specific cultural or industry contexts including classical and contemporary Hollywood, European art cinema, Japan, Russia, and West Africa. Prerequisite: COM 101

COM225 - Producing

Producing introduces students to the basics of TV producing.  Students learn the process of writing a pitch, proposal, treatment, and budget.  They  also learn the fundamentals of basic screenwriting and production scheduling, as well as managing cast, crew and vendor relationships.  The course also explores the roles of the casting director, location manager, production coordinator, and script supervisor.  The course concludes with a preview of the production team and the role of the line producer, unit production manager, production manager and assistant directors involved in managing the physical production process of producing a television show.  This course emphasizes the competency of writing and research.

COM227 - Challenging Hollywood

This course focuses on the theme of innovative classic and contemporary films which challenge society and film industry standards. Beginning with the threats to society posed by early cinema and star scandals, leading to a universal censorship code, students will be introduced to how early films affected society and the future of Hollywood. Students will then watch, analyze, and think critically about popular, artistic, and influential American movies including the subversive film noirs of the post-WWII era such as The Maltese Falcon and Double Indemnity, and films from the 1960s and 1970s such as The Graduate, Easy Rider, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, as well as representations of African-American characters during segregation and the “LA Rebellion” and “New Black Cinema” movements which challenged those representations. We will also explore explosions of themes of violence and sex in contemporary Hollywood which further stretch and shape societal conventions in the US, including discussions of films like Bonnie and Clyde, Pulp Fiction, and Natural Born Killers.

COM229 - Photojournalism

This is an introductory course in photojournalism that will touch on basic photography skills (composition, focus, subject, and angle), but is not strictly a photography class. This course will use two methods of learning: one is a hands-on, connected learning where students will tell stories through cameras and video; and another is a survey approach, through reading, discussion, lectures, journals, and multimedia presentations which illustrate photojournalism history and current trends. The class supports the college’s minor in photography as well as the communication’s department concentration in journalism and media writing. In an effort to make the course accessible to students from all departments across campus, the first few weeks of the class will provide readings, lecture, and discussion on the background and history of the journalism field.

COM230 - Media, Sports & Society

This course introduces students to various aspects of the sports-media relationship, including the history of, the industries that constitute, the audiences drawn to, and the social issues that arise from the relationship. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM231 - Sports Communication

This course explores the dynamic organizations and diverse professions reflective of the sports communication field while emphasizing the fundamentals of good public relations and solid journalism. Types of organizational inquiry will include major television, radio and digital networks, leading magazines and newspapers, college athletics and professional sports as well as marketing and advertising firms. Topics covered will span journalism and publishing, community, media and public relations, marketing and advertising as well as digital and social media. In this course, students will learn how to research and write for broadcast, digital and print media; how to define, develop, and deliver effective sports communication campaigns; how to use mass and social media platforms for brands, personalities and teams; and how to manage and mitigate crisis communication.Formerly - COM309

COM232X - Radio Management Practicum

Radio Management Practicum is a hands-on, workshop-style experience where students assume the role of Production Manager, Music Director, News Director, Sports Director, Social Media Manager, Booking Director, Graphic Designer/Webmaster, or Secretary/Photographer for one full semester at 102.9FM WLAS. Students complete weekly radio station tasks, attend Board of Director and staff meetings, assist with special events, and report directly to the General Manager. Prerequisite: Instructor permission

COM303 - Nonprofit Public Relations

This course invites students to explore "nonprofit public relations" as it is seen today and as experts suggest it will be seen in the future. Students have the opportunity to work with a "real world" nonprofit client by creating, preparing, and producing a complete public relations plan for that organization. Prerequisite: COM 213.

COM304 - TV Studio Production

TV Studio Production introduces the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment. Students learn pre-production planning, live-to-tape directing, and participate in full television crew rotations to produce high quality PSAs and their very own TV show to be submitted to local access television.  Throughout the semester, students develop a variety of production skills from hands-on television studio operation.

COM305 - Screenwriting

This course includes writing techniques for series and stand alone productions in television and film. Students work both independently and collaboratively in order to understand industry procedures. Students experiment with several different genres and then develop a major project. Prerequisite: COM 105 or ENG219

COM306 - Broadcast Journalism

This class introduces students to the basic skills in writing for radio and TV news, including beat reporting, writing, interviewing, and editing. Students critically evaluate newscasts and are introduced to the components of producing them. They also examine ethical challenges that arise when manipulation of images and sound can distort reality and compromise journalistic integrity. Prerequisite: COM 209

COM307 - Understanding Video Games

Understanding Video Games introduces students to the foundation, process, and impact of the video game industry.  Students evolve from merely riding the gaming highway to analyzing and deconstructing it.  The course pays particular attention to the history and breakthroughs in the technology, social and political impacts such as the ESRB, sex and violence in games, as well as past, present and future trends of the gaming market.

COM308 - Conflict Resolution & Negotiations

This course helps students to understand the theoretical assumptions, elements, and processes of interpersonal conflict and negotiation, to increase their ability to objectively analyze conflict situations, and to creatively and productively manage conflict. Alternative Dispute Resolution approaches to litigation for resolving conflicts such as mediation, arbitration, and negotiation are examined. Prerequisites: COM 101, LS 101 or BUSS 101; Junior or Senior standing.

COM310 - Political Communication

This course focuses on the complex ideas associated with the role of the press in a democracy. The nature and climate of our political processes, particularly elections, have changed dramatically in the past two generations, due in part to the extensive use and influence of the media. Also, media techniques and strategies used by government and political figures continue to change with the emergence of new technologies and the dominance of global media companies. Students learn how to think critically and analytically about the political press and how journalists and politicians frame public policy issues. This course looks critically at whether or not the American press is truly representative of the civic values of democracy, truth, and responsible citizenship. Prerequisites: COM 101 or POLS 101 or SOC 101.

COM312 - Radio Production II

Radio Production II brings students with basic radio production skills to a higher level of proficiency.  There is strong emphasis on radio as a digital medium and digital (nonlinear) audio editing with Adobe Audition.  Projects include editing music for radio play, writing and mixing radio commercials, creating a radio interview podcast, and the development of an Air Check radio demo for student portfolios.  Students also develop a deeper understanding of the radio business.  Prerequisite: COM 215.

COM313 - Video Production II

Video Production II takes students with basic video production skills to a higher level of expertise.  There is strong emphasis on pre-production planning, teamwork, lighting, sound and special effects.  The aesthetics of video production are also discussed by analyzing various film and video productions.  Projects include a special effects reel, television commercial, short documentary, and a short screenplay adaptation.  Throughout the semester, students develop a deeper understanding of the business of video production. Prerequisite: COM 217.

COM314 - Magazine & Feature Writing

This course is focused on the longer pieces of magazine writing, such as feature articles and interview profiles, and other forms of narrative, nonfiction journalistic writing. The course includes reading, analyzing, and modeling well-written newspaper and magazine articles that entertain as well as inform readers. Students have the opportunity to provide editorial support for and submit feature articles for publication to Polished, a Lasell College produced magazine and to The 1851 Chronicle, the student newspaper and website. Students also create, write for, and design their own magazine based on a topic of their choosing. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 209.

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM316 - Publication Editing

This course is designed as a workshop in which students learn the fundamentals of editing for print and online publications. Students study and participate in various editing roles, including editorial director, articles editor, copy editor, proofreader and fact-checker. Students examine case studies of existing publications. In keeping with Lasell's Connected Learning approach, students propose work for Lasell's two student publications, The 1851 Chronicle and Polished, or other publications. The course focuses on learning to prepare cohesive editorial products with clear, compelling, professional content while avoiding common mistakes in usage, grammar, and style. Prerequisites: COM 105.

COM317 - Media Relations

Managing media relations for public relations professionals is the focus of this course. The course is intended to increase students’ knowledge of the principles and methods of generating publicity and to introduce the basics of planning and writing media relations campaigns. The rapidly changing nature of global companies and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways that communication professionals achieve their goals. Media relations can be a highly competitive and challenging field, where you must prove your productivity, accuracy, and creativity. Students discuss and experiment with successful strategies for gaining coverage in the press for clients, and they plan a comprehensive media relations program. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 208.

COM319 - Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns

This course provides an environment for students to become engaged in a professional style media planning and buying campaign, which is an essential strategic focus of the advertising industry. Students develop a full advertising plan based on the current planning structure of a contemporary advertising agency. Working in teams, students conduct a detailed advertising analysis that allows them to provide strategic and creative solutions to problems they have identified in their research. Student teams construct an advertising plan that positions and promotes a product, a message, a politician, or a brand to a con­sumer audience. Each student team produces a comprehensive media campaign that identifies and targets the appropriate media outlets for advertising placements. The class has a modicum of pressure and intensity that reflects some of the challenges necessary to succeed in the advertising industry. Prerequisite: COM 221 or BUSS220

COM320 - Organizational Communication

This course focuses on both the theoretical understanding and practical knowledge of the context and application of organizational communication. Topics include: leadership, new technologies and their impact on organizations, organizational climate and culture, ethics, formal and informal channels of communication within organizations, management of diversity and conflict, relational communication (with interpersonal and group work), and issues of power and politics within the context of the organizational settings. Prerequisite: COM 103

COM321 - Media & Children

This course examines the uses and effects of mass communication among children and adolescents. By taking a developmental perspective, the course explores how youth at different stages of cognitive development watch, understand, and respond to media content. The first part of the course focuses on children’s uses and processing of media. The second part of the course reviews the effects of various types of content (e.g., advertising, stereotypes, violence). The final part of the course considers the role of interventions (e.g., media literacy, ratings, parental mediation) in preventing media-related outcomes that are harmful and promoting those that are positive. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to critically evaluate the role of media in the lives of children.COM 101 or PSYC 101.

COM323 - Corporate Communications

This course is designed to present students with an overview of corporate communication in contemporary society. The rapidly changing nature of global markets and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways in which communication professionals achieve their goals. The course explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental issues, investor relations, issues of multinationals, ethics, and governmental relations. Prerequisite: COM 213.

COM324 - Journalism II

This is an advanced, connected-learning focused course in which student journalists do the work of the field. Students with basic reporting and editing experience are challenged to demonstrate their news and feature writing skills to a new level of competence. This course requires student to cover a campus or community beat as they report on a student organization, department, team, or local politics, sports, fashion or culture. Projects will focus on new media platforms such as photo galleries and video and audio news content and producing news media packages for print. Students will be encouraged to submit their work to the 1851 Chronicle and the1851chronicle.org. Prerequisite: COM209

COM325 - Global Media

This course introduces students to the global media landscape. Students are exposed to a number of topics including: the power of language in media, recent global media controversies, the economics of global media & ownership, the politics of global media, and the coverage of international events in U.S. media. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 212

COM326 - Effective Speaking II

This advanced public speaking course builds on the foundation of Effective Speaking I to further a student’s development as a public speaker in a variety of settings. This is achieved through a combination of speaking, writing, and reading assignments. Specifically, students outline, develop, and deliver extemporaneous speeches incorporating relevant sources. Students learn how to develop and deliver messages that are appropriate and effective for the audience, purpose, and context using logical arguments within an ethical framework. Prerequisite: COM 203

COM327X - Digital Storytelling

In today’s media environment, the ability to communicate effectively with words, images, sounds and video on digital platforms is increasingly important. This hands-on course introduces students to the theory and practice of digital storytelling to engage, inform and persuade target audiences. Students will learn to use multimedia production tools to plan and create their own digital stories while exploring narrative techniques and new story forms. Students will emerge with new skills to create original stories in multiple modalities, as well a deeper understanding of the expressive possibilities of digital storytelling to achieve communication objectives.

COM328 - Video Games & Culture

Video Games & Culture brings students on a virtual tour around the globe for a look at the video game industry through the perspectives of numerous cultures.  Students will investigate subjects such as video game piracy in Italy & China, professional gaming in Korea, video game censorship in Australia & the Middle East, and much more.  The course also compares the North American market with other continents such as Asia, Europe, and South America.  The interplay between video games and culture will be discussed, and students will be given hands-on opportunities to sample video games from other countries that were never released in the US.  The course emphasizes the competency of ‘knowledge of the media’ and reinforces the competencies of writing, research, visual communication, and speech. 

COM330 - Advertising Strategy

This course introduces students to the development of effective advertising strategies. Over the past twenty years, account planning has evolved into a critical element of advertising campaign strategy and execution. The course will explore: 1) The origin and fundamentals of account planning; 2) The role of the account planner in an agency structure; 3) The influence of account planning on the process and role of advertising research and strategic development; 4) Practical implications for account planning in advertising campaign development. Topics include; consumer behavior, attitude development, persuasion tactics, targeting, advertising segmentation, advertising analysis and designing advertising strategies to support a brand. Prerequisite: COM 221 OR buss220

COM332 - Television Studies

This course will explore this significant question: Should we take TV seriously as a form of mass communication? The answer can be found in the ways that TV produces meanings for the audience and our culture as a dominant form of entertainment over that past 60 plus years in post WWII America. As such, TV demands our scrutiny. Throughout the course, we will look at such topics as how TV entertainment narrative is structured, how sets are designed, how sound interacts with image, how commercials persuade and how these structures can emphasize certain meanings (and de-emphasize others) and transmit values to viewers. Current trends in technological shifts have forced changes in the delivery of TV programming, for example to audio and video files streaming on computers, such as tablets, the decline of network TV and the rise of hundreds of cable channels. However, all of these new technologies demand more TV entertainment content, not less.This course uses two avenues of inquiry: one exploring the mass communication basis for studying the content delivered through medium of TV; and another outlining an analysis of TV content which illustrates the transmission of cultural values (primarily American) to the audience. Prerequisites: COM 101

COM334 - Comparing Cultures Through Film

By examining films from Iraq, Cuba, India, Native Americans, Mexico, Nigeria, China, South Africa, and Chad, students will gain exposure to various social, cultural, political, and economic systems, leading to discussion and exploration of other cultures as well as reflection about American culture. Students will engage in an interdisciplinary approach which adopts terminology and theories from film studies and criticism, sociology, and cultural anthropology, in order to study other cultures and cultural methods of visual storytelling. Ultimately, goals include increased intercultural competence and sensitivity accompanied by an empathy for the “other” and an increased awareness and raised consciousness of past and contemporary global issues. Prerequisite: COM 101

COM336X - Analytics for CommunicationProfessionals

This course introduces students to principles, tools and methods for data-driven strategic communications. Through case studies and real world projects, students will learn to use analytics tools to monitor, measure and evaluate communication efforts, and leverage their insights for improved media planning and campaigns. Students will emerge with a better understanding of how to use big data in public relations, advertising and other communication fields

COM399 - Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop professional objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. In this seminar students identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will develop effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students apply search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. The internship course is comprised of a minimum of 150 hours in the field, the weekly seminar, and its assignments, including an oral presentation. Students also write weekly reflections on their experience, complete written assignments, and do an oral presentation to a group of their peers. The field supervisor contributes to the student’s learning through guidance, feedback and evaluation of the students work.

COM402 - Field Experience II

COM 402 follows COM 400, in which students learned how to apply theory to practice in a work environment. This course will take those skills one step further and enhance the students understanding of the Communication discipline, the skills required to succeed in the job market, and how to conduct the necessary research to find a job and a career which is a good fit and will lead the student to professional success. Projects will include facilitating a workshop, conducting a focus group, developing a marketing strategy, creating a hard portfolio, a leave-behind piece, and an e-portfolio. Students should complete the internship in a different organization than the placement for COM 400.

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: COM315 and Senior standing.

FASH101 - The Business of Fashion

This survey course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historic, economic, and contemporary influences, giving students a basic understanding of the terms and concepts associated with the fashion and retail industries. The concepts and practices developed are equally applicable to the many career paths possible within the Fashion Industry. Topics include: technological applications, environmental influences on fashion; the fashion cycle; trend forecasting; fashion marketing; women's, men's, and children's apparel; supply chain management; product development, foreign and domestic market centers; and retail merchandising on multiple platforms.

FASH102 - The Fashion Consumer

This course examines the psychological and sociological variables that shape the fashion consumer’s decision-making process. The wants and needs of consumers will be explored through an understanding of attitudes, and purchase motivation. Students will consider internal and external influencing factors, including the influence of social media and technology, the potential impact of government regulation, the consumer’s perception of self, and their perceived social and ethical responsibilities. The goal of building a strategy towards a satisfied and loyal customer will be at the heart of the conversation.

FASH105 - Excel for the Industry

Microsoft Excel is the foundation of business analytical software and has become the number one required skill for industry professionals. This course will introduce basic spreadsheet functions such as; formatting, data entry, pivot tables and analytical graphical display. Projects will directly reflect best industry practices. Students will apply developed skills to projects throughout the fashion curriculum.

FASH200 - Fash Hist I:Imperial Societies to Indust

This course surveys the history of prevailing dress from Ancient Egypt into the nineteenth century, expanding upon a general understanding of shifting modes to examine the symbolism of fashion from extensive perspectives. Students will develop a context for fashion and its relation to aesthetic expression and function within various societies over time. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students will examine a range of scholarly resources that pertain to the field, including The Lasell Fashion Collection. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102/WRT102, or permission of instructor.

FASH201 - Merchandise Planning & Control

This course provides an understanding of business strategies related to assortment planning, buying, and allocating inventory. Building upon retail math and excel fundamentals, students create stock and sales plans in accordance with the goals and objectives of a given seasonal sales strategy, including methods of figuring markups, sales projections, turnover, average stock, stock-to-sales ratios, open-to-buy, markdowns, and gross margin. Negotiation skills related to terms of sale, shipping and pricing strategies are explored within the wholesale/retail business relationship. Both manual and computer-based calculations are explored through the use of Excel.. Prerequisite: FASH 101, FASH105 & MATH116

FASH204 - Fashion Research Abroad

This course brings fashion communication, design and merchandising fashion students together in an international setting to offer exposure to and research of the ever changing global fashion industry. Course structure focuses on the host country’s culture and fashion industry, setting the stage for an intensive study abroad experience. While abroad, students will experience a combination of lecture and field practice. In addition to Lasell faculty, professionals from the host country’s fashion industry lecture on a variety of topics. Hands-on workshops play an important role in exploring content. Cultural immersion includes a community service project that engages students in reflecting on the evolving social consciousness in the global fashion market place. Prerequisite: By application, Permission of instructor.

FASH206 - Sustainability in the Fashion Industry

This course explores issues surrounding the concept of sustainability in relation to the fashion industry. The history and contemporary status of sustainability in a global fashion context will be explored, including the influence of social, cultural, and economic factors. Guest speakers include specialists in sustainable fashion design & production, the greening of the supply chain, merchandising, and promoting the sustainable product.

FASH207 - Digital Tools for Fashion

Technical skills are becoming more and more a required proficiency in all capacities of the fashion industry. This course introduces Fashion & Retail Merchandising and Fashion Communication & Promotion students to software prominently used for apparel manufacturing, retail and media. With a focus on methods of visual communication, projects include technical drawing, colorization, editing, and integration and manipulation of photographic images.

FASH210 - Textiles

This course introduces the study of textiles through exploration of the production of fibers and methods of creating fabrics. Students learn to identify fiber content, properties and various types of weaving and knitting applications. Other topics include the study of fiber characteristics, quality and care of fabric finishes, and a practical assessment of fabrics in relationship to particular end uses.

FASH211 - Retail Management and Operations

The course will review ways in which both brick and mortar and e-commerce channels are managed in terms of strategic planning, store operations and logistics, merchandise promotion, employee management and development, inventory control, and growth strategies. Using industry based case studies and forum discussions, students will survey various types of innovative retail formats and merchandising techniques within Omnichannel platforms as well as various consumer dynamics. The course will also evaluate levels of technology used by retailers within their ecosystems.Prerequisite: FASH101 & ECON101

FASH212 - Visual Merchandising

This course builds a foundation to communicate design concepts and create visual solutions for promoting merchandise or ideas. Observation and critiques foster understanding of visual merchandising as a promotional tool. Hands-on projects require research, synthesis of technical, aesthetic and conceptual knowledge to create effective solutions through use of color theories and design principles. Students become familiar with journalistic reporting and written analysis through various media applications. Prerequisite: ARTS126 & FASH101

FASH216 - Digital Marketing for Fashion

The fashion and retail industry has changed radically with shifts into new digital channels. Omni-channel selling and communication models continue to be an opportunity for business growth and expansion. The rise of social media and the expanding proliferation of digital devices, platforms, and applications make digital marketing a necessity for corporate survival. Through a combination of case studies and exploration of innovative technology students learn how the elements of digital strategy work together with traditional media to attract prospective customers. This course will explore inventive kinds of marketing strategies where the new selling floor is the virtual world. Prerequisite: FASH 101

FASH218 - Fashion Communication

This course examines communication strategies in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different facets of communication including maintaining consistency with integrated and content marketing, navigating the global landscape, messaging through digital and various media channels, and managing emerging trends in social marketing. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Prerequisites: ENG 102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASH219 - Fash Industry Professional Development

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through researching career opportunities and identifying the qualifications necessary to be competitive. Students reflect on personal abilities and characteristics, which will help them to be successful and create a plan to acquire skills they may not already have. They will design a personal digital portfolio including resume, cover letter, and biographical statement, and will begin to build a professional network through LinkedIn. The course also explores career development and professional strategies, designed to prepare students for their required internship in senior year. Prerequisites: FASH102

FASH301 - Fashion Promotion

This course integrates fashion industry promotional activities centered around the "promotion mix." Through the creative integration of topics such as advertising, public relations, marketing, social media, direct marketing, sales promotions, personal selling, visual merchandising and special events, students create and execute multidimensional promotional campaigns. The class explores the concept of integrated marketing communications linking various external and internal factors that stimulate consumption of a product or service. Students participate in group projects that replicate industry scenarios, both creatively and logistically. Exploration of contemporary methods to measure consumer behavior are also considered. Prerequisite: FASH 211 or FASH 218

FASH302 - Retail Operations

This course builds on the concepts learned in FASH 201 Merchandise Planning & Control and FASH 211 Retail Management extending into retail store planning, trading area and site analysis, financial management, omnichannel retailing and performance metrics. All phases of merchandising and sales management, including merchandise logistics, enabling technology, distribution channels, retail assortment planning and labor administration are incorporated into a comprehensive study of retail operations. Technological applications that are industry specific are utilized throughout this course. Prerequisite: FASH 211

FASH303 - Fash Hist II:Modernity to Globalization

This course picks up the history of fashion as it moves from the nineteenth century into a new era, examining the aesthetic and sociocultural forces that have influenced the development of styles from modernity to globalization. Students will use their skills in critical thinking to understand fashion as an art form, a commodity, and a symbol of cultural and personal expression. Students will also explore how contemporary designers draw from and reinterpret fashions from across the twentieth century. Prerequisites: ENG 102

FASH306 - Fashion Styling for Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation.

FASH307 - Fashion Brand Management

This course introduces concepts related to fashion branding and brand recognition achieved by engagement of brand management theory; essentially the notion that perceived value or equity of a fashion brand can be increased through advertising, marketing, thematic control and integrated marketing communications. This creates a promise of style, perceived value and product quality that translates into brand loyalty. The course considers influences such as social media, iconic brand ambassadors, cultural branding and Omni-channel communications. The course also builds skills, which lead to creation of brand strategy, ethos and the ability to re-tool a brand when it saturates the marketplace. The brand management process will be discussed from inception to consumption and analyzed through contemporary case studies. Prerequisites: BUSS220 & Jr Standing

FASH308 - Fashion Show Production

This course focuses on development of a working knowledge of planning, management, and organizational skills required to produce successful fashion shows. Hands-on experiences throughout the semester address the importance of teamwork, communication, and professionalism demanded in the fashion industry. Students plan, organize, and produce the annual fashion show as final project. Prerequisite: FASH 211 or FASM218

FASH309 - Apparel Product Development

Exploring the global product development matrix, students in this course work together in teams to explore the product lifecycle in terms of sourcing and production. Class sessions combine lectures and cases with hands-on exercises to reinforce key concepts. This survey course covers topics including supply chain management, design calendars, apparel product price points, brand differentiation, product distribution channels, trend forecasting services, color management, specification and technical package development, sizing, quality control, ethics, and evaluation of the global production environment. Pre-requisite: FASH211

FASH310 - Digital Marketing

Digital Marketing is a comprehensive course that concentrates on marketing within the virtual world. With a strong focus on the operational and functional aspects of this dynamic subject, the course will review tactical advice and real life examples. The course will cover key topics such as search engine optimization and marketing, retargeting, social media marketing, email marketing, lead generation and calls to action, online experiential marketing and consumer behavior in the virtual world. Students will also be introduced to the history of the internet and fundamentals of an effective digital presence. Students will discuss digital business models and learn the basics of app and website functionality and cross channel promotions. Developing strategies to create apps, websites, and virtual or augmented reality customer experiences will offer a contemporary and visionary opportunity. Integrating skills obtained in FASH207- Digital Tools, students will be fully immersed in the creation of their own fashion digital shopping channels. Prerequisite:FASH105,FASH207 & FASH211 or FASH218

FASH315 - Trend Forecasting

This course introduces students to theories and framework used to explain and predict fashion change. Course includes field trips to trade shows, museum visits , and presentations by industry professionals to help students understand the relationship of economic, artistic, technological, social and cultural influences to fashion change.Students apply creative ,research, and analytical skills to plan and develop a trend forecast. Prerequisite: FASH200

FASH317 - Ethics in the Fashion Industry

This course integrates ethical, moral and legal issues regarding the fashion industry from design and manufacturing through distribution, promotion and sales. Grounded in theories of consumption, students will explore operating procedures for various aspects of the apparel business such as; responsible advertising, consumer privacy, compliance with sustainable practices, fair labor and working conditions, design with a focus on gender identity or age appropriateness, and recognizing fashion’s influence on body image and eating disorders. Students will address topics through in depth discussions using group models and by exploring and mastering decision-making frameworks to generate solutions. Prerequisite: ENG102

FASH325 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH342 - Fashion & Culture

This course evaluates the concept of fashion in the cultural context and its impact on human behavior as non-verbal communication, including the expression of national identity. Through a historical and contemporary study of the connection between fashion and society, the relationships between clothing, culture, ethnicity, social and political events, economic status, and geographical location are examined. Students explore the symbolic aspects of clothing from the personal and consumer standpoints. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

FASH401 - Fash Industry Professional Development

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through simulated business activities, case studies, and meetings with faculty and industry experts. The course explores career development and professional strategies, each of which is designed to prepare students for FASH 415 Internship. Prerequisites: FASH211 or FASH218, & JR status

FASH405 - Fashion Retail & Merchandising Capstone

This course offers the student an opportunity to reflect and directly apply industry methods and practices acquired over the course of their degree studies. Students design and execute an in-depth project that engages them in research and experimentation, applying merchandising theories to a variety of situations. Prerequisite: FASH 415. Can be concurrent.

FASH406 - Global Retailing

This course is a concentrated exploration of the challenges of serving international retail dynamics and trends. The focus will be to provide students global perspectives regarding retailing through different channels within a variety of geographies. With an emphasis on increasing demand for product, marketing, merchandising and supply chain analysis, this course enables the student to interpret a worldwide perspective when planning for retail execution across regions with different seasonality, retail models and supply chain dynamics. Topics will include; competitive threat from online retailing, the challenge of cybersecurity, similarities and differences of international retail business models, distribution and supply chain practices and the fragmentation of the consumer market. FASH302 or permission of instructor.

FASH407 - Digital Commerce & Analytics

Digital Commerce is today’s fastest growing business model in the retail industry. This course will prepare students to understand the underpinnings of both the front and back end of e-commerce website and app development, the digital consumer and their behaviors, UX design (user experience) and the end-to-end shopping journey from home page to shopping cart. Students will analyze the impact of e-commerce on business models and strategy as well as the infrastructure of these operations. The course will also review retail analytics with an emphasis on both qualitative and quantitative analysis used to track behavior and conversion. Students will apply critical thinking skills to assess web and app functionality, ease of navigation, and ways to engage the consumer in the virtual world. Prerequisite: MATH208, FASH211 & FASH105

FASH409 - Studio1851 POP UP Management

This course continues to manage all aspects of running a POP Up Store, which will be the test market for our future student run, on campus store and website. This retail store would eventually become the subject of a future course within the fashion department. In addition to being a Connected Learning Experience for the Fashion Department and beyond, the store would be a venue for show casing the artistic abilities of faculty, students and all Lasell Community members. Students will continue a research and planning project started in SP17, evolving the ideas and building on progress made towards a professional, and operationally sound business plan, and putting all phases of POP Up shops and website management into action. Students will work as an executive team on the different aspects of planning and executing a minimum of 3 Pop Up’s during the fall semester. Students will be responsible for all promotion-both physical and digital, and website design and management. Students will be responsible for inventory management and control, including the procurement of merchandise through re-orders of sweatshirts, working with both the Graphic Design League and Fashion Design students to create t-shirt designs, and visiting trade shows in NYC and Marlborough, Massachusetts for product that fits within the STUDIO1851 mission.Prerequisite: FASH302

FASH410 - Fashion Supply Chain Management

This course will enable the student to learn the elements of the global supply chain. Students will review in detail supply chain from raw materials to the consumer. Content will also include organizational logistics, sourcing and production, inventory and information systems. The course focuses on the apparel and textile industry and discusses Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as global factors that impact the supply chain. Students will gain an understanding of how the fashion industry supply chain relates to various roles in a fashion company from designer to merchandiser so that value can be created for the consumer. Pre-requisite: FASH309 & MATH208

FASH412 - Merchandise Planning and Control II

This senior level course utilizes fundamental business math formulas, business strategies and excel functions used in FASH201 Merchandise Planning and Control 1, to build a greater understanding of the Merchandising function. This course will offer a deeper dive into analyzing reports and making product decisions in terms of profitability, assortment, allocation, sourcing opportunities, and pricing strategy. There will be hands on opportunity to put a buy together for different volume doors. Private label development, ecommerce inventory integration, onlineLasell College | School of Fashion | FCP & FRM Curricula Changes Proposal | Page | 11merchandising strategies, and current industry software will be discussed. This course will consist of lecture, in class assignments, projects, case studies and tests.Pre-requisites: FASH201, FASH315, FASH309

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Collaborative experience affords students capability to maximize opportunities and explore career path options while receiving four academic credits Prerequisites: FASH219 & FASH207 or FASD220

FASH420 - Collection Research and Management

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH425 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH427 - Fash Com & Merchandising Capstone

enior merchandising and fashion communication students will formulate a comprehensive strategic plan for a “live company” with the end result as a presentation to a senior industry executive within the company. The project will involve the study of market conditions and trend analysis, a promotional strategy, product suggestions, the proposal of strategic options for launch on the new initiative and benchmarks to measure feasibility and success. This course will utilize critical thinking and analytical skills, together with technological insight and professional judgement gained thoughout the program to collaborate in a corporate setting.Prerquisite: FASH415, may be taken concurrently

FASM218 - Fashion Content Development

This course examines common communication strategies used in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different channels of holistic and brand centered communication. This includes maintaining consistency through various marketing venues, messaging through traditional and new media channels such as social media. Students will develop creative plans in all areas of content including a basic understanding of video use. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Students will also leave the course with industry certification from Hubspot Academy. Prerequisites: WRT102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASM306 - Fashion Styling & Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation. Prerequisite: FASH207 or FASD205

FASM310 - Digital Marketing

Digital Marketing is a comprehensive course that concentrates on marketing within the virtual world. With a strong focus on the operational and functional aspects of this dynamic subject, the course will review tactical advice and real life examples. The course will cover key topics such as search engine optimization and marketing, retargeting, social media marketing, email marketing, lead generation and calls to action, online experiential marketing and consumer behavior in the virtual world. Students will also be introduced to the history of the internet and fundamentals of an effective digital presence. Students will discuss digital business models and learn the basics of app and website functionality and cross channel promotions. Developing strategies to create apps, websites, and virtual or augmented reality customer experiences will offer a contemporary and visionary opportunity. Integrating skills obtained in FASH207- Digital Tools, students will be fully immersed in the creation of their own fashion digital shopping channels. Prerequisite: FASH105, FASH207 & FASM218

FASM411 - Social and Mobile Strategies

This course is in response to feedback from the SOF advisory board and industry contacts in fashion journalism regarding the need for brand promoters to report digital content from the field, using video and written content generated using mobile applications. Prerequisite: FASM310

FASM412 - Editorial Fashion Production

This course prepares students to produce editorial fashion content within the current media ecosystem. With a focus on fashion media; including art direction, layout, copy editing, and video development. Students will also explore crafting content for both hardcopy and online as well as translating that into multi-platform marketing (Youtube, Instagram, etc.).Outcomes-Art direction, layouts, copyediting, layout, 3d visuals, video development and editing samples suitable for the student’s e-portfolioPrerequisite: FASH315

GRAP105 - Digital Design Essentials

This course offers an introduction to three of the most important software applications in the Adobe Creative Cloud for a student who is interested in Graphic Design:  Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Students learn image generation and editing in both pixel-based and vector-based environments as well as digital page composition for print publishing. This is a project-based course that initiates and improves students' skill set for the implementation of computer graphics.

GRAP201 - Imaging for Graphic Design

This illustration course is designed to develop students' compositional and image development skills for the field of Graphic Design. Using a combination of traditional and digital methods of imaging, students expand their visual vocabulary for successful graphic communications. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent (such as FASH205 Digital Design for Apparel or FASH207 Digital Tools for Fashion).

GRAP202 - Adobe InDesign

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for digital page layout. Through a series of publication design projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP204 - Graphic Design I

This is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of graphic design, with an emphasis on developing a working literal and visual vocabulary. Students are challenged with conceptual design exercises that promote the essential values of good research, process, and presentation practices. Prerequisite: GRAP201 Imaging for Graphic Design.

GRAP205 - Graphic Design II

This course builds on the foundational principles that are introduced in Graphic Design I. Students strengthen their design skills through a series of design briefs in the areas of print and electronic media. Reflective writings and research assignments contribute to improved critical thinking and writing skills. Prerequisite: GRAP204.

GRAP206 - Adobe Illustrator

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for vector-based, digital illustration. Through a series of illustration projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP207 - Web Design & Development

This course introduces the student to the most current coding and markup languages that are integral to successful Web site development. It also introduces the student to authoring software, such as Adobe Dreamweaver, that assists designers with the coding demands of Web authorship. Other topics which add to this comprehensive course are: the history of the Internet and World Wide Web Consortium, the power of CSS, and the design and layout principles that contribute to successful Web site development from technical, interactive, and aesthetic viewpoints. Prerequisite: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

GRAP208 - Graphic Design History

This course introduces students of design to the origins of the discipline. It emphasizes the Modernist period, during which design rapidly evolved as typography, photography and new printing methods were explored by artists of the Bauhaus and other European schools and movements. The course demonstrates how these innovators influence graphic design as we know it today.

GRAP209 - Adobe Photoshop

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for pixel-based digital imaging and editing. Through a series of projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP301 - Typography I

This course surveys the application of expressive letterforms since the invention of the printing press. With a historical overview that illuminates the terminology used by professional designers, students are encouraged to explore their own means of typographic expression. The fundamentals of structure, spacing, and rhythm are emphasized as they influence form and function. Prerequisites: GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials.

GRAP302 - Typography II

In this course, students expand their design practice in the application of typography to a variety of forms and contexts. This is a process-oriented course focused on the advancement of a personal "typographic voice." Students learn to structure informational hierarchies and how to sequence typographic materials across multiple pages. Issues of personal interpretation and legibility are emphasized. Prerequisite: GRAP 301.

GRAP307 - Motion Graphics

In this course, students develop conceptual and visual problem-solving skills as they relate to motion studies and time-based art. Through demonstrations, studio sessions and critiques students create portfolio-quality animation and motion study projects.

GRAP308 - Interactive & UX Design

This course offers a deeper exploration of designing and authoring interactive content on a variety of platforms with an emphasis on user experience (UX), building upon skills and strategies acquired in basic web design and graphic design courses. Students will use designer tools such as Adobe Animate and Adobe XD, which offer designers the opportunity to create code-based interactions with minimal knowledge of programming languages, such as HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript and proprietary app building languages and workflows. Prerequisite: GRAP207 Web Design and Development and GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

GRAP309 - Graphic Design for the Marketplace

This course engages advanced Graphic Design students with a curriculum derived from a collection of prepared design briefs. With established methods of research, conceptualization, innovation and art production, students are offered "real world" challenges for graphic design solutions. This course emphasizes sound business practices and ethical guidelines for a career in commercial art. Prerequisites: GRAP205, GRAP302.

GRAP311 - Digital 3D Design

This is a digital imaging course that introduces students to creating within three-dimensional, virtual space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive geometric process. Students develop design solutions and construct various models that involve texture mapping and placing those models in convincing three-dimensional environments. Problem solving for creative imaging as it applies to commercial graphic projects is emphasized.Prerequisites: GRAP105 and GRAP201

GRAP322 - Photography for Design

This course will emphasize graphic design workflows that use photography as key elements of design. Students will deepen their understanding of shooting for design outcomes, exploring product shot staging and lighting, working with models, props and sets. In turn, they will add to their image editing, compositing and layout skills by working with their photos using a powerful digital toolset. Prerequisites: ARTS219 Digital Photography I and ARTS319 Digital Photography II or instructor approval.

GRAP399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful Internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter and resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Must have Junior standing.

GRAP400 - Field Experience

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing. Prerequisite: ARTS 399

GRAP401 - Publication Design

This course involves Graphic Design students in the theoretical and practical processes of successful publication design through research, conceptual explorations, studio practice, and presentations. This course offers experience in the design of traditional and electronic publications in order to prepare students for a career in graphic design. Prerequisite: GRAP302 Typography II.

GRAP403 - Senior Portfolio Development

This course prepares design students for effective and personalized presentation of their design work. Students are encouraged to create an online portfolio and relevant self-promotional materials (business card, designed resume, artist statement). Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP404 - Senior Thesis Assignment

Students engage in an individual research and writing practice that challenges them to analyze and articulate their personal philosophy of design, while studying designers of the Post-Modern era. This capstone course also provides students an opportunity to clarify their professional goals based on their interests in Graphic Design. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP406 - Senior Practicum Project

The senior practicum provides an opportunity for students in their final semester of the design program to produce a self-directed capstone project that applies the design theory and studio techniques that they have been developing over the last four years. The practicum project is presented in a Senior Show at the end of their final semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH108X - Mathematics of Design

This course explores elements of mathematics within the design field from the incorporation of algebra to concepts of geometry. Students will have the opportunity to integrate numerical fluency, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning and communicating quantitative information through group problem solving and class discussions. Topics include pattern drafting, layouts cutting, revenue, cost, and profit modeling, measurement systems, Euclidean geometry, and spatial reasoning.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH301 - Mathematical Modeling

Mathematical ModelingPrerequisite: C or better in MATH 205, 206, and 208

MATH303X - Problem Solving

This course will be an exploration into the mathematics exemplified in high quality high school and undergraduate mathematics competitions and mathematical research. The emphasis will be placed on building a repertoire of mathematical strategies and tactics, then applying these methods in unfamiliar situations. Topics will include: Combinatorics, Binomial Theorem, Conditional Probability, Roots of Unity, Symmetric Polynomials, Polynomial Interpolation, and topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry. Students will hone their ability to solve mathematical problems through hands-on practice and obtain an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and tools of the problem solver as illustrated by the textbook and the instructor. Strategies and tools for solving problems include, but are not limited to: •Draw a Diagram•Systematic Lists•Eliminate Possibilities•Matrix Logic•Look for a Pattern•Guess and Check•Sub Problems•Unit Analysis•Solve An Easier Related Problem•Physical Representations•Work Backwards•Venn Diagrams•Finite Differences

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vector functions, advanced techniques of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH322X - Special Topics in Mathematics

Special Topics in Mathematics

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants. Applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, economics, connectivity of networks, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Capstone Seminar

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

Anne Bernays Trevenen

Dean, School of Fashion; Associate Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue

Richard Bath

Professor Emeritus

Office: Donahue

Lynn Blake

Professor of Fashion, Program Chair of Fashion

Office: Donahue

Jill Carey

Professor of Fashion, Curator of the Lasell Fashion Collection

Office: Donahue

Maritza Farrell

Associate Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue

Kristin Kinsky

Assistant Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue

Luis Lopez-Preciado

Associate Profesor of Communication

Office: Donahue

Catharine Weiss

Associate Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue

ARTS126 - Fundamentals of Visual Art (KP)

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and strategies for visual art-making and art appreciation, with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one's life and as a way to complement one's aesthetic needs. This is a lecture course with studio art-making modules designed to complement visual material, critical essays, museum/gallery trips and impart basic skills in visual communication.

BUSS220 - Principles of Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102 AND ENG102 OR WRT102.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles and multi-media stories. Assignments may include politics, sports, fashion, and entertainment based interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, graphic designers and digital content producers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle or on the 1851 Chroncile website. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

FASH101 - The Business of Fashion

This survey course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historic, economic, and contemporary influences, giving students a basic understanding of the terms and concepts associated with the fashion and retail industries. The concepts and practices developed are equally applicable to the many career paths possible within the Fashion Industry. Topics include: technological applications, environmental influences on fashion; the fashion cycle; trend forecasting; fashion marketing; women's, men's, and children's apparel; supply chain management; product development, foreign and domestic market centers; and retail merchandising on multiple platforms.

FASH102 - The Fashion Consumer

This course examines the psychological and sociological variables that shape the fashion consumer’s decision-making process. The wants and needs of consumers will be explored through an understanding of attitudes, and purchase motivation. Students will consider internal and external influencing factors, including the influence of social media and technology, the potential impact of government regulation, the consumer’s perception of self, and their perceived social and ethical responsibilities. The goal of building a strategy towards a satisfied and loyal customer will be at the heart of the conversation.

FASH105 - Excel for the Industry

Microsoft Excel is the foundation of business analytical software and has become the number one required skill for industry professionals. This course will introduce basic spreadsheet functions such as; formatting, data entry, pivot tables and analytical graphical display. Projects will directly reflect best industry practices. Students will apply developed skills to projects throughout the fashion curriculum.

FASH200 - Fash Hist I:Imperial Societies to Indust

This course surveys the history of prevailing dress from Ancient Egypt into the nineteenth century, expanding upon a general understanding of shifting modes to examine the symbolism of fashion from extensive perspectives. Students will develop a context for fashion and its relation to aesthetic expression and function within various societies over time. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students will examine a range of scholarly resources that pertain to the field, including The Lasell Fashion Collection. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102/WRT102, or permission of instructor.

FASH207 - Digital Tools for Fashion

Technical skills are becoming more and more a required proficiency in all capacities of the fashion industry. This course introduces Fashion & Retail Merchandising and Fashion Communication & Promotion students to software prominently used for apparel manufacturing, retail and media. With a focus on methods of visual communication, projects include technical drawing, colorization, editing, and integration and manipulation of photographic images.

FASH210 - Textiles

This course introduces the study of textiles through exploration of the production of fibers and methods of creating fabrics. Students learn to identify fiber content, properties and various types of weaving and knitting applications. Other topics include the study of fiber characteristics, quality and care of fabric finishes, and a practical assessment of fabrics in relationship to particular end uses.

FASH219 - Fash Industry Professional Development

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through researching career opportunities and identifying the qualifications necessary to be competitive. Students reflect on personal abilities and characteristics, which will help them to be successful and create a plan to acquire skills they may not already have. They will design a personal digital portfolio including resume, cover letter, and biographical statement, and will begin to build a professional network through LinkedIn. The course also explores career development and professional strategies, designed to prepare students for their required internship in senior year. Prerequisites: FASH102

FASH307 - Fashion Brand Management

This course introduces concepts related to fashion branding and brand recognition achieved by engagement of brand management theory; essentially the notion that perceived value or equity of a fashion brand can be increased through advertising, marketing, thematic control and integrated marketing communications. This creates a promise of style, perceived value and product quality that translates into brand loyalty. The course considers influences such as social media, iconic brand ambassadors, cultural branding and Omni-channel communications. The course also builds skills, which lead to creation of brand strategy, ethos and the ability to re-tool a brand when it saturates the marketplace. The brand management process will be discussed from inception to consumption and analyzed through contemporary case studies. Prerequisites: BUSS220 & Jr Standing

FASH308 - Fashion Show Production

This course focuses on development of a working knowledge of planning, management, and organizational skills required to produce successful fashion shows. Hands-on experiences throughout the semester address the importance of teamwork, communication, and professionalism demanded in the fashion industry. Students plan, organize, and produce the annual fashion show as final project. Prerequisite: FASH 211 or FASM218

FASH315 - Trend Forecasting

This course introduces students to theories and framework used to explain and predict fashion change. Course includes field trips to trade shows, museum visits , and presentations by industry professionals to help students understand the relationship of economic, artistic, technological, social and cultural influences to fashion change.Students apply creative ,research, and analytical skills to plan and develop a trend forecast. Prerequisite: FASH200

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Collaborative experience affords students capability to maximize opportunities and explore career path options while receiving four academic credits Prerequisites: FASH219 & FASH207 or FASD220

FASH427 - Fash Com & Merchandising Capstone

enior merchandising and fashion communication students will formulate a comprehensive strategic plan for a “live company” with the end result as a presentation to a senior industry executive within the company. The project will involve the study of market conditions and trend analysis, a promotional strategy, product suggestions, the proposal of strategic options for launch on the new initiative and benchmarks to measure feasibility and success. This course will utilize critical thinking and analytical skills, together with technological insight and professional judgement gained thoughout the program to collaborate in a corporate setting.Prerquisite: FASH415, may be taken concurrently

FASM218 - Fashion Content Development

This course examines common communication strategies used in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different channels of holistic and brand centered communication. This includes maintaining consistency through various marketing venues, messaging through traditional and new media channels such as social media. Students will develop creative plans in all areas of content including a basic understanding of video use. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Students will also leave the course with industry certification from Hubspot Academy. Prerequisites: WRT102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASM306 - Fashion Styling & Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation. Prerequisite: FASH207 or FASD205

FASM310 - Digital Marketing

Digital Marketing is a comprehensive course that concentrates on marketing within the virtual world. With a strong focus on the operational and functional aspects of this dynamic subject, the course will review tactical advice and real life examples. The course will cover key topics such as search engine optimization and marketing, retargeting, social media marketing, email marketing, lead generation and calls to action, online experiential marketing and consumer behavior in the virtual world. Students will also be introduced to the history of the internet and fundamentals of an effective digital presence. Students will discuss digital business models and learn the basics of app and website functionality and cross channel promotions. Developing strategies to create apps, websites, and virtual or augmented reality customer experiences will offer a contemporary and visionary opportunity. Integrating skills obtained in FASH207- Digital Tools, students will be fully immersed in the creation of their own fashion digital shopping channels. Prerequisite: FASH105, FASH207 & FASM218

FASM411 - Social and Mobile Strategies

This course is in response to feedback from the SOF advisory board and industry contacts in fashion journalism regarding the need for brand promoters to report digital content from the field, using video and written content generated using mobile applications. Prerequisite: FASM310

FASM412 - Editorial Fashion Production

This course prepares students to produce editorial fashion content within the current media ecosystem. With a focus on fashion media; including art direction, layout, copy editing, and video development. Students will also explore crafting content for both hardcopy and online as well as translating that into multi-platform marketing (Youtube, Instagram, etc.).Outcomes-Art direction, layouts, copyediting, layout, 3d visuals, video development and editing samples suitable for the student’s e-portfolioPrerequisite: FASH315

GRAP308 - Interactive & UX Design

This course offers a deeper exploration of designing and authoring interactive content on a variety of platforms with an emphasis on user experience (UX), building upon skills and strategies acquired in basic web design and graphic design courses. Students will use designer tools such as Adobe Animate and Adobe XD, which offer designers the opportunity to create code-based interactions with minimal knowledge of programming languages, such as HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript and proprietary app building languages and workflows. Prerequisite: GRAP207 Web Design and Development and GRAP105 Digital Design Essentials or equivalent.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

BUSS341 - Social Media Marketing

This course takes an in-depth look at social networks, social media platforms and online advertising to offer students an advantage in many positions involving marketing, consulting and brand management, both on the buyer and seller side of social media. Students with an interest in entrepreneurship will also find the course useful as new businesses often rely on social media marketing. The course covers a number of topics including the differences and interaction between traditional and social media; two-sided markets and social media platforms (including verticals such as gaming, shopping and entertainment); basic theory of social networks online and offline (graph theory, sociology, information diffusion); consumer behavior and digital media; social media analytics and monitoring; brand strategies on social media; best marketing practices for paid and unpaid social media; and B2B marketing and social media. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to become Hubspot certified. Prerequisite: BUSS220

FASH407 - Digital Commerce & Analytics

Digital Commerce is today’s fastest growing business model in the retail industry. This course will prepare students to understand the underpinnings of both the front and back end of e-commerce website and app development, the digital consumer and their behaviors, UX design (user experience) and the end-to-end shopping journey from home page to shopping cart. Students will analyze the impact of e-commerce on business models and strategy as well as the infrastructure of these operations. The course will also review retail analytics with an emphasis on both qualitative and quantitative analysis used to track behavior and conversion. Students will apply critical thinking skills to assess web and app functionality, ease of navigation, and ways to engage the consumer in the virtual world. Prerequisite: MATH208, FASH211 & FASH105