2019 - 2020 Academic Catalog

Early Childhood Education (Pre-Kindergarten-Grade 2)

The Early Childhood Education (PreK-Grade 2) major is designed for students who seek licensure in the Early Childhood licensure program (Pre-K-2nd grade).  The major is intended to provide knowledge in various content disciplines as well as understanding of developmentally appropriate practices for teaching and learning in grades pre-kindergarten through 2.  Students complete practicum experiences all four years in suburban and urban school settings through our partner school district sites.  For more information please visit the Education Department home page.

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete a licensure program of study in Education:

Goal 1: Effective teaching
Upon completion of a licensure program of study in Education, students will be able to

  1. write an effective lesson plan
  2. deliver effective instruction
  3. develop a series (three or more) of connected lessons

Goal 2: Accommodating all learners
Upon completion of a licensure program of study in Education, students will be able to

  1. create learning environments to support learners’ diverse needs (e.g., hearing or vision needs, learning styles, multiple intelligences)
  2. demonstrate ability to understand persons from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds
  3. provide opportunities for all students to demonstrate academic ability

Goal 3: Critical reflection
Upon completion of a licensure program of study in Education, students will be able to

  1. use skills of critical reflection to evaluate and modify their own teaching
  2. critique the teaching of others, both peers and experienced teachers
  3. plan and implement their own professional development based on their critical reflections
Course Code Course Title Credits
Early Childhood Education Requirements
ED109 Invitation to Teaching 1
ED110 Teaching & Learning in American Schools 4
ED206 Early Literacy Teaching & Learning 4
ED208 Elem Literacy Teaching & Learning 4
ED219 Supporting Learner Variability 4
ED309 Sheltered English Immersion 3
ED327 Literacy Assessment & Instruction 4
ED335 Teaching Mathematics: PK - 2 4
ED338 Inclusive Education 4
ED342 Teaching Science Concepts: PK - 2 4
ED417 Pre-Practicum: PK - Grade 2 3
ED420 Integrated Instruction: PK - Grade 2 3
ED421 Curriculum Integration 3
ED494 Professional Standards & Ethics 3
ED496 Practicum: Early Childhood 9
ENG208 The Structure of the English Language 3
ENG209 Intro to Literature & Literary Studies 3
MATH107 College Geometry 3
MATH304 Mathematics for Educators 3
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives (KP) 3
PSYC221 Child Development 3
SCI103 Science for Educators I (KP) 3
SCI104 Science for Educators II (KP) 3
Choose 1 from the following:
ENG210 Survey of American Literature (KP) 3
ENG211 Modern Drama 3
ENG218 British Literature (KP) 3
ENG222 Lyric Poetry 3
ENG225 The Short Story (KP) 3
ENG340 Classics of World Literature 3
Choose 1 from the following:
HIST123 American Civilization I 3
HIST124 American Civilization II 3

Education Elective in ECON or ENV or HIS or POLS: 3 credits

Major Requirements: 90 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ECON102 - Principles of Econ-Macro

This course explores basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole and policies designed to affect its performance. Topics include economic scarcity; causes of unemployment and inflation; money and monetary policy; the impact of government taxation and spending; and the federal debt. Some consideration is given to international economic problems and to contrasting economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development.

ECON206 - Global Economic Development

The goal of this course is to introduce the main issues of global economic development. Students will explore the problems facing developing countries of the world as they attempt to industrialize, develop their economies and raise the standards of living of their people. The course will address the following broad questions: What is the meaning of Economic development? Why some countries are rich while others are poor? What would explain the success of such East Asian countries as China? What are the key constrains that prevent poor countries, especially those in the African continent, from achieving progress? What are the strategies that poor countries can adopt to foster development?

ECON207 - Vietnam Immersion

This fall semester course is linked to two weeks of service-learning in Vietnam during the winter break. The course introduces students to the Vietnamese society today. It covers basic elements of Vietnamese politics, economic development, culture, history, language, literature, and arts. The experience in Vietnam includes working for non-profit organizations that deal with social problems. This course fulfills the Multicultural Area of Inquiry. Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Vietnam program director.

ECON301 - International Trade & Finance

This course examines theory, tariffs, and import quotas; adjustment mechanisms, foreign exchange, and exchange controls are also covered. Additional topics include the theory of comparative advantage, the causes and consequences of imbalances in the balance of payments or exchange rates, and the evolution of the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102.

ED109 - Invitation to Teaching

This course explores careers in teaching beginning with the unifying question: Why should I become a teacher? Students examine their motivations to become teachers while they learn about college and state requirements and expectations.

ED110 - Teaching & Learning in American Schools

This course provides students pursuing or considering initial teacher licensure with an overview of the teaching profession. Students study and discuss history and philosophies of education systems, as well as current trends and issues. Massachusetts professional standards and requirements for licensure are explored. This course is a prerequisite for all other ED courses. Twenty-five hours of observation and tutoring in varied school settings are required. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ED206 - Early Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the preschool and early elementary years, including transitions to reading and writing, role of phonemic awareness and phonics in emergent and early literacy, varied informal assessments to measure developing literacy, instructional strategies and materials to support young learners. Minimum 25 pre-practicum hours in a placement assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. This is a writing intensive course. Co-requisite ED 206L

ED208 - Elem Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the elementary years (through grade 6), including reading in content areas, fluency, reading/writing connections, varied assessments to measure literacy development, and instructional strategies and materials to support elementary learners through grade 6. Minimum 25 pre-practicum hours;Prerequisite: ED110 Co-requisite ED 208L

ED210 - Reading & Writing Across the Curriculum

This course emphasizes the processes of reading and the critical nature of reading to learn in the content areas in grades 5-12th. Focus will be on literacy strategies to support teaching in content areas, the influences of diversity, the current methods of instruction, and assessments used to inform instruction. In addition, the current research on reading to learn will be read, discussed, and integrated in all course activities. Requires a pre-practicum of 25 hours minimum. Prerequisite: ED 219.

ED212X - Project Based-Learning for Teachers

This course will introduce you to the concept and practice of project-based learning. Students will brainstorm cross-disciplinary project ideas, driving questions, and culminating products. Using backwards design, you will design projects based on student interests and state curricular requirements. By the end of the course, you will be equipped with the knowledge necessary to plan and implement project-based learning in your classroom to inspire and engage elementary school-age students.

ED214X - Restorative Practices in Schools

Welcome into the world of restorative justice and its place in a democratic society. This course explores the philosophy and goals of restorative justice, examines some of the many rj school programs and best practices, provides a set of lenses for looking at behavior management, and begins to answer pressing societal questions regarding justice versus punishment. We will look at the intersection of many factors – school organization and resources, policing, parenting, classroom environment, community culture, and others. This values-based and discussion-based course will also include simulations and many other hands-on activities such as learning circles and story circles. Students from all majors are invited; students in education, psychology, and criminal justice will find this course closely connected to their majors.

ED219 - Supporting Learner Variability

This course introduces students to characteristics of learners with special needs in classroom and community settings. It focuses on principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in developing appropriate learning environments to meet the variability of all students in Pre-K through high school settings. A required minimum 25-hour pre-practicum provides opportunities to teach and observe in area classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED221X - Mindfulness&Growth Mindset for Educators

The integration of mindfulness and a growth mindset in the classroom environment can have a major impact on student social-emotional developement and academic success. This course will provide students interested in education with the knowledge and tools to help cultivate students' growth and awareness of stress, emotional regulation and improved sustained attention. The course will include current research on mindfulness, growth mindset, and science behind its practice while also providing a method for implementioning it in the classroom. Educators trained in mindfulness and growth mindset report higher levels of student focus, productivity, and engagement in the classroom.

ED222X - Behavior, Culture & Learning

This course is also designed to help students recognize socio-emotional learning (SEL) differences in teaching and learning and how they influence classroom management to meet the needs of all learners. It also addresses the difference between rules and procedures, the roles of both student and teacher in academic accountability, and getting the school year off to a positive start. Well-organized and managed classrooms set the stage for student learning and achievement. Students will explore a range of models and strategies that will serve as a foundation for developing a personal approach to classroom management.

ED224 - Individualized Teaching & Mentoring

This course develops instructional strategies that support mentoring and self-advocacy in Pre-K-16 students. The course offers intensive coaching on practical aspects of cultural responsive teaching, mentoring diverse students, evaluation of teaching practices in education. Students will work with faculty members in the education program to design their own project identifying timeliness, goals, and outcomes.

ED232 - Cultural Competence & Global Classroom

This fall semester course is paired with an international service-learning trip in the Caribbean island nation of Antigua & Barbuda during the winter break. The course provides an opportunity for students to explore the intersection of culture, disability, and teaching in international settings. The service-learning trip includes a school-based experience of 40 hours spent observing, supporting, and teaching students with and without disabilities in the public schools in Antigua & Barbuda. Course activities will focus on reflective intellectual work about intercultural competence in the classroom through written reflections, readings, class discussion, and curriculum development. 

ED308 - Responsive Teaching in Secondary Schools

Students will develop strategies and tools necessary to be responsive secondary. Participants in this course will observe secondary teachers, develop lesson plans, reflect on their teaching philosophy, apply leadership theory to classroom practice, explore current trends and issues that impact secondary classrooms, increase their cultural competence, and expand their toolkit of strategies for differentiating instruction to address the variability of secondary students. A minimum of 25 hours of classroom observation, reflection and teaching is required. Placement in schools is assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. Pre-requisite: ED 219

ED309 - Sheltered English Immersion

This course provides a grounding in current theory and practice related to teaching English Language Learners in Sheltered and bilingual programs. In particular, students learn to effectively shelter their content instruction, so that ELL students can access curriculum, achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy. This course meets Massachusetts DESE standards for the required SEI endorsement. Course includes a minimum 25-hour pre-practicum in license-appropriate classrooms.Placement in schools is assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. Prerequisite: ED110

ED327 - Literacy Assessment & Instruction

This course explores strategies for integrating the language arts and teaching literacy across the curriculum for learners through grade 6, including assessment for planning and evaluation, classroom organization, management, unit and lesson planning, and resources. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ED 208; pass all required MTEL Communication and Literacy Test; Co-requisite 327L

ED330 - Pre-Internship Seminar

Usually taken in spring of the junior year, this seminar helps students identify objectives and research potential sites for the internship. Prerequisites: Junior standing and Education Program Director permission.

ED335 - Teaching Mathematics: PK - 2

This course covers the development of number sense, one to one correspondence, meaning of operations, estimation, graphing, and patterns. The use of developmentally appropriate materials, manipulatives, technology, and children’s literature for the teaching of math are addressed. The course explores a variety of math curricula, assessment techniques, and the use of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for designing instruction. Includes a 25-hour pre-practicum. Prerequisite: Pass all required MTEL.

ED337 - Teaching & Applying Mathematics: 1 - 6

Students use state and national curriculum standards, teaching strategies, and instructional resources for effective mathematics instruction. Through classroom activities and a 25-hour pre-practicum, students demonstrate their ability to solve problems, reason mathematically, and support young learners in their development of mathematics understanding. Prerequisites: MATH 104, 107; pass all required MTEL.

ED338 - Inclusive Education

In this course, students develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to create learning environments appropriate to the full variability of learners in pre-K through grade 6. Through in-class activities and a 25-hour pre-practicum, students expand their understanding and use of strategies and resources including Universal Design for Learning, appropriate instructional technology, and positive behavioral supports. Prerequisites: ED 219, Co-requisite ED 338L

ED340 - Topics in Education

This course explores current issues and policies in education, emphasizing their background, development, varied perspectives, and current relevance for educators. Topics vary each semester, but may include reading comprehension strategies, classroom uses of children’s literature, art and music as educational media in preschool settings, policies related to curriculum content and standards, and appropriate uses of assessments. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics change.

ED342 - Teaching Science Concepts: PK - 2

This course engages students in integrating early childhood science content with state and national curriculum standards and resources, including instructional technology, to develop effective science lessons. The course includes practice in integrating science concepts with early childhood curriculum and requires a 25 hour pre-practicum in local classrooms. Prerequisite: pass all required MTEL. 4 credits

ED344 - Science Concepts & Curriculum: 1-6

This course engages students in integrating elementaryscience content with state and national curriculumstandards and resources, including instructional technology, to develop effective science lessons. The course includes practice in integrating science concepts with elementary curriculum and requires a 25 hour pre-practicum in elementary classrooms. Prerequisite: pass all required MTEL.

ED413 - Prof, Respon, & Ethics in Curr Instr

This capstone course integrates classroom practice, course work, and current developments in curriculum and instruction. The course includes a weekly seminar addressing problem solving in the field placement as well as current professional, ethical, moral, and legal issues facing professionals in education-related fields. Prerequisite: Senior standing or department permission. Co-requisite: ED 427.

ED417 - Pre-Practicum: PK - Grade 2

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours of supervised field experience in classrooms appropriate for their concentration. Students observe, teach, and assist the cooperating teacher with classroom responsibilities. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of pre-practicum-related issues. Prerequisite: ED 330 and permission of the Education Program Director

ED418 - Integrated Instruction: Elementary: 1-6

In this course, students explore research on social studies education as well as the teaching methods and related teaching materials that encourage learning in this discipline among children in an elementary school setting. In addition, students examine a variety of ways to effectively integrate the arts into the elementary curriculum.

ED419 - Pre-Practicum: Elementary (1 - 6)

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours of supervised field experience in classrooms appropriate for their concentration. Students observe, teach, and assist their cooperating teacher with classroom responsibilities. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of pre-practicum related issues. Placement in schools is assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. Prerequisite: Pass of MTELS and permission of the Education Program Director.

ED420 - Integrated Instruction: PK - Grade 2

In this course, students explore research on social studies education as well as the teaching methods and related teaching materials that encourage learning in this discipline among children in the early childhood education setting. In addition, students examine a variety of ways to effectively integrate the arts into the early childhood curriculum.

ED421 - Curriculum Integration

In this capstone course, students integrate theory and previous field experiences with their 150-hour pre-practicum. Research and discussion topics include classroom management and organization, use of various curriculum materials and resources, and ethical issues in educational settings. Students design a classroom-based research project which will be completed during the practicum (ED 496 or 498). Prerequisites: Senior standing, pass all required MTEL, concurrent enrollment in ED433, 435 OR 437

ED426 - Advanced Teaching Seminar

This capstone seminar offers intensive coaching on practical aspects of course development and design, management of class discussion, and selection of class assignments in a college course setting. Students may collaborate with faculty members teaching existing courses, or may design and teach a one-credit seminar (ED 112). Course is offered as needed. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair.

ED427 - Curriculum & Instruction Internship

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours in a supervised educational setting, arranged in ED 330 (Pre-internship seminar) related to their career interest. Prerequisites: Senior Standing, ED330 and permission of the Education Program Director.

ED429 - Adv Internship Curriculum & Instruction

This course is for students who have completed ED 427 (Internship) and desire additional experience to continue preparing for a career area. Student must follow department procedures for locating, designing, and obtaining approval for the internship. Requires 150 clock hours in a supervised setting and in-depth reflection component. Prerequisites: Education Program Director permission; ED 413 and ED 427.

ED433 - Pre-practicum: Secondary English

Through a minimum of 150 hours of observation and reflection in public schools, and regular meetings with school and Lasell faculty, students in this course become familiar with the curriculum and organization of middle and/or high schools and English classrooms in preparation for the practicum. Placement in schools is assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. Prerequisite: Senior standing; passing scores on all required MTEL; permission of Education Program Director. Co-requisite: ED421

ED435 - Pre-practicum: Secondary History

Through a minimum of 150 hours of observation and reflection in public schools, and regular meetings with school and Lasell faculty, students in this course become familiar with the curriculum and organization of middle and/or high schools and history classrooms in preparation for the practicum. Placement in schools is assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. Prerequisite: Senior standing; passing scores on all required MTEL; permission of Education Program Director. Co-requisite: ED421

ED437 - Pre-practicum: Secondary Math

Through a minimum of 150 hours of observation and reflection in public schools, and regular meetings with school and Lasell faculty, students in this course become familiar with the curriculum and organization of middle and/or high schools and mathematics classrooms in preparation for the practicum. Placement in schools is assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. Prerequisite: Senior standing; passing scores on all required MTELs; permission of Education Program Director. Co-requisite ED 421

ED482 - Practicum: Secondary English

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary English classroom. Students will meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors and complete the Comprehensive Assessment of Performance requirement. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Education Program Director is required.

ED484 - Practicum: Secondary History

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary history classroom and meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors to complete the Comprehensive Assessment of Performance state requirement. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Education Program Director. Prerequisite: ED 435; passing scores on all required sections of the MTELs

ED492 - Practicum: Secondary Math

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary mathematics classroom and meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors to complete the Comprehensive Assessment of Performance state requirement. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Education Program Director required. Prerequisite: ED 437; passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL.

ED494 - Professional Standards & Ethics

Taken concurrently with ED 496 or ED 498, this capstone seminar engages students in ethical questions such as student confidentiality, testing, and communicating with various constituencies as well as practical aspects of preparing for an initial teaching position. It includes conducting and reporting on the classroom-based research project that was designed in ED 421. Co-requisite: ED 496 or ED 498.

ED496 - Practicum: Early Childhood

This practicum provides experience in two early childhood education settings. One setting is in Preschool or Kindergarten and the other setting is in grade one or two. Students spend five days a week in the classroom, assuming increasing responsibility that culminates with “take over” weeks and completion of the Comprehensive Assessment of Performance State requirement. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of practicum-related issues. Topics of discussion include the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working with parents. Permission of the Education Program Director is required. Prerequisite: Passing scores on all required sections of the MTELs.

ED498 - Practicum: Elementary (1 -6)

In this course, students are placed in elementary schools for a five day a week placement. Students assume increasing responsibility and end with “take over” weeks in the classroom and completion of the Comprehensive Assessment of Performance State requirement. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of practicum related issues. Topics of discussion include the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working with parents. Permission of the Education Program Director required. Prerequisite: Passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL.

ENG100I - Writing Skills with Lab

This course, designed to prepare the nonnative speaker of English for the Core Writing I - Writing II sequence, addresses the development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening competencies crucial to the successful completion of college coursework. Placed in this course on the basis of the TOEFL score, students work on oral and written English language skills through informal exercises and formal oral and written projects; the lab component of this course provides an opportunity for individual conferencing around written assignments. Students must receive a grade of “C” or higher in order to pass this course.

ENG101 - Writing I

In this course, students gain understanding of and confidence in effective writing. Students write in several different genres such as narrative, analysis, digital writing, annotated bibliography, researched argument and/or collaborative writing. The course emphasizes writing as a process and focuses on the rhetorical choices writers make. Students who choose to take Writing I Workshop are provided with time during class to work on their writing while the instructor and a peer writing consultant are present to provide assistance.

ENG102 - Writing II

This course builds on and refines skills and techniques gained in Writing I. Readings in a variety of genres from across disciplines are included, and students write in multiple genres with a heavy emphasis on research writing. Prerequisite: ENG101 or ENG101 Workshop with a grade of C or better

ENG106X - Writing I Bridge

Writing I Bridge

ENG107 - Oral Communication & Presentation Skills

This course is designed to help international students develop confidence in their oral English skills, so that they can participate freely in classroom discussions and present comfortably in the classroom context. Students work at their English listening and speaking skills in order to improve their English fluency and comprehensibility, benefiting from the regular practice and from instructor feedback; coursework focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary, and English usage conventions. Course activities include speaking opportunities, vocabulary building exercises, group discussions, and a series of presentations scheduled during the semester.

ENG201 - Eng Lit/Themes & Writers

This course offers a special thematic approach to the study of English literature. Various authors, such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Shaw, and Yeats, are studied within such contexts as convention and revolt, the hero and the heroine, or evil and decadence. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG206X - Web Series Design Workshop

The web series is a new story-telling medium created for the internet. In this course, students develop the first season of a dramatic or comedic web series. Students pitch, outline, and write an eight-episode series; as a final project, they premiere its debut in rough draft.

ENG208 - The Structure of the English Language

This course focuses on essential elements of the structure of the English language: its phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), and syntax (sentence structure). Students draw on their own knowledge of language as they examine spoken English; they then study the relationship between spoken and written language. As students discuss issues pertinent to teachers and to writers, the relevance of linguistic analysis both to written language development and to writing practice is considered.

ENG209 - Intro to Literature & Literary Studies

This is a foundations course required for the major and the minor in English. The course provides an introduction to a variety of forms and styles in poetry, drama, short story, fiction, memoir, and essay; European, North American, and world literatures are considered. The focus is on interpreting texts; students are introduced to various schools of interpretation and to standards for supporting an interpretation. Students become familiar with the conventional elements of each genre and with the terminology of critical interpretation. The course introduces print and database tools for research on literature.

ENG210 - Survey of American Literature (KP)

This course surveys representative periods, authors, or genres in American literature from beginnings in Native American oral literatures through contemporary works. Individual sections organize study of classic and contemporary texts around particular themes, such as Queering American Literatures, American Migrations, Hemispheric American Literature, or Americans on the Edge: "Frontiers" in the American Imagination. Individual sections also trace twentieth- or twenty-first-century movements to their roots in or resistance to earlier movements or forms. This is a writing-intensive course.

ENG211 - Modern Drama

This survey course introduces students to great modern works of drama, considering the late nineteenth century through the present. Plays are considered in terms of performance as well as in literary terms, with a focus on the ways in which the philosophies and sensibilities of modernism and postmodernism are reflected both on the page and on the stage. Readings include modern classics by such writers as Ibsen, O'Neill, Brecht, and Beckett, as well as more recent works.

ENG212 - Literature for Young Adults

This course surveys current literature for adolescent and teen readers. It prepares students to evaluate young adult books in terms of literary quality, reader interest, and social and political perspectives. Strategies for use in the classroom are explored; various genres are examined. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG214 - Special Topics in Literature

This course concentrates on an interdisciplinary approach to literature. The focus is on one theme, one author, one period, or one genre. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in analysis, criticism, and/or research.

ENG216 - The Mystery Novel

This course examines the history of one type of genre fiction, the mystery, beginning with texts from the late nineteenth century and ending with contemporary novels. Emphasis is on the development of the form, the social context of the texts including historical background, changes in popular taste, and analysis of the popularity of the genre.

ENG217 - Contemporary Global Literature (KP)

In this course, we consider contemporary literature in its global context. Viewing literature as the expression of individual national/cultural traditions and as a rendering of the universally human condition, we examine both national literatures and texts written for a global readership. Topics such as global citizenship, diaspora, postcolonial aesthetics, modernism, postmodernism, and cultural/literary redefinition may be addressed.

ENG218 - British Literature (KP)

This course surveys British writing in poetry, fiction, and drama, with a focus on key periods in the development of British literature. Emphasis is on representative writers in each period. Periods and movements surveyed include Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary or Postmodern. This is a writing-intensive course.

ENG219 - Creative Writing

In this course, students explore various types of creative writing including fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students do a wide range of in-class and out-of-class writing assignments, and they have the opportunity to select one form for a major project.

ENG222 - Lyric Poetry

This course considers the lyric poem in global contexts, with attention to poetic voice, composition, sense, and sound. Form and content are examined in medieval to modern meditative and lyric poems.

ENG223 - Ethics & Morality in Literature

This course focuses on the role that ethics and morality play in a variety of literary texts. Emphasis is on analysis of characters' decisions and choices that relate to ethical issues as well as to the formation of their ethical codes. Characters' positions relating to ethical systems and the prevailing morality of their society are considered. Literature is selected from diverse genres and traditions. The focus of the course changes each semester. Possible topics include Literature of Human Rights, Prison Writing, Literature and the Environment, and Literature of War.

ENG224 - Film & Literature

In this course, the nature of narrative in literature and film is explored; focus is on analysis of literature that has been made into movies. Students consider the types of changes involved in the transformation from one form to another, as well as the complex reasons for variations. Prerequisite: ENG102.

ENG225 - The Short Story (KP)

In this course, students study the development of the short story as a twentieth-century form; critical and creative approaches are offered. Selections are taken from such authors as Edith Wharton, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Joyce Carol Oates, Doris Lessing, and Alice Walker.

ENG235 - From Sounds to Sentences

This course considers the acquisition of human language as a biologically based and species-specific communication system. The interaction, from infancy through early and later childhood, between biological preparedness and environmental influence is studied, as is the development of phonology (sound system), lexicon (vocabulary), syntax (sentence structure), and pragmatics (language use). The developmental phases through which a young learner passes as the language systems develop are also studied in this course. Bilingualism, dialect, language disorder, and early written language development are considered.

ENG237X - Becoming Ourselves in Society

How are we influenced by our group and our society? What attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs do we develop in our social contexts? These questions have been addressed through the lens of social psychology; in addition, creative writers have been moved to explore them. In this course, we consider the individual’s interface with social groups from psychological and literary perspectives. This is a four-credit interdisciplinary course. Prerequisites: ENG102, PSYC101 or SOC101.

ENG303X - Afro-Futurism

Afro-Futurism

ENG304 - Stories of Origin

This course considers both written and oral traditional texts. Texts originating in expressions of faith, devotion, cultural origin or expression, and ethnic identity are examined, with attention to narration, characterization, sacred mystery, moral /ethical content, and interpretation. Readings include selections from ancient Greek and Roman literature, the Bible and/or the Qur’an, and world myths and folktales.

ENG307 - Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

In this course, students study the literary genre of creative nonfiction by exploring a variety of personal essays and memoirs and by engaging in writing practice. Work by class members is read and discussed, as are textbook readings that illuminate the use of craft tools such as description, imagery, diction, syntax, text structure, and metaphor in the development of personal essays and memoirs. Reading assignments involve the close examination of essays and memoirs; written assignments involve in-class work, reflections on craft essays, annotations on creative reading, and one 10-page text of original creative nonfiction.

ENG308 - Fiction Writing Workshop

Do you have an idea for a novel, play, or screenplay? Would you benefit from a focused and committed group of peers to inspire and challenge you? If so, then this course is for you. Join us as we participate in the NaNoWriMo Challenge to write a novel (or fiction manuscript of your choice) during National Novel Writing Month. Utilizing tools from the NaNoWriMo online community, we will plan and plot our stories in the beginning of the semester and draft them during the latter portion. You do not need to finish the manuscript to do well in the course. The main objective is to inspire good, daily writing habits.

ENG310 - Poetry Writing Workshop

In this course, we consider English verse by exploring lyric poetry and engaging in its practice. Work by class members is read and discussed, as are other example poems whose study illuminates the use of tools such as imagery, diction, sound device, structure, lineation, and figurative language in the construction of poetic meaning. Reading assignments involve the close examination of poems; written assignments include short poetry annotations/exercises and the creation of a portfolio of original poetry.

ENG312 - Literature of Postcolonial World

In this course, students consider issues, movements, or traditions in literatures that respond to a history of colonization and/or imperialism. Latin American, African, and Asian cultures or traditions are emphasized in English or in English translations; issues addressed might include matters of publication and criticism, myths about the "third world," nationalism, fundamentalism, human rights, technology, and cultural resistance. Example topics include The Novel in India, Caribbean Dub Poetry, Prison Writing, Major South African Writers, Magic Realism. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ENG313 - American Multiethnic Literature

This course focuses on the history, variety, and aesthetic conventions of one or more racial-ethnic traditions in American writing. Individual courses might focus on key forms or authors; distinct traditions such as African-American, Latino, Asian-American, or Native American literature; or a survey across several traditions. Examples include Barack Obama and the African-American Tradition, Contemporary Latino Literatures, or Haiti and the US in Haitian-American Writing. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ENG340 - Classics of World Literature

This course explores representative fiction, poetry, or drama by major figures in world literature, centering on topics such as love, tragedy, comedy, immortality, madness, wasteland, quest for knowledge, voyages, or exploration. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

ENG402 - Advanced Writing Workshop

This is the capstone course for creative writing majors and minors. Working with a faculty mentor, each student develops and completes a major writing project that focuses on the student’s writing interests. Review, critique, and drafting are crucial course components. The course includes reading assignments that relate to the writing projects. This one-semester course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG307, ENG308, or ENG310.

ENV101 - Intro to Environmental Studies (KP)

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

ENV102 - Environmental Ethics & Society

This course explores issues and problems arising out of ethical considerations related to the general environment and specific ecosystems. Also considered are the moral aspects of population control and resource use. The foundations for beliefs and worldviews regarding nature and the human relationship to it are explored. In addition, the variety of philosophical perspectives and pragmatic choices and actions people take related to environmental ethics are studied.

ENV201 - Environmental Law & Policy

This course examines the role of law and politics in the management of natural resources and the environment. The course first reviews the major US environmental protection legislation and then explores the process of developing and establishing environmental policy related to water, air, energy, and land resources. Historical and contemporary circumstances that influence public policy decisions, the influence of science and technology, social and economic paradigms, and ethics and values are discussed. Even though the emphasis is on domestic U.S. policies and institutions, international issues are addressed, including how US domestic environmental policies influence and are influenced by global forces. This is a writing intensive course.

ENV202 - Gardening for Sustainability(KP)

Autumn is a critical time for the sustainable garden. It is a time of harvest and preparation. In this course, students will research and establish the rhythms of the late season garden by participating in the next stages of development in the campus community garden. Together, we will harvest, save seeds, start special fall plantings, and put the garden to bed. Projects will include teaming up with kids from The Barn and members of the Village.The course will also look at gardening and its role in the local food system, as a form of both self-sufficiency and community support. We will study and practice different methods of propagation and seed banking, and research the garden as its own ecological system. We’ll also look at recent innovation in garden design and small-scale agriculture, including vertical and rotating greenhouse systems, with an eye towards futuristic sustainable design.

ENV204 - Environmental Economics

This course explores economic problems associated with environmental issues. The course introduces modeling and analytical tools used in the field. The course first examines the problem of market failure in the presence of externalities and public goods, and considers public policy responses to these market failures, including command-and-control regulations, tax and subsidy incentives, and marketable pollution permits. The course then addresses the methods to measure the costs and benefits of environmental improvements and how these types of analysis are used in public policy decisions. These decisions are analyzed in the context of problems such as air pollution, ozone depletion and global warming, threats to biodiversity, and development. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ECON101

ENV205 - Green Business

All businesses, from oil companies to computer manufacturers want to be "green." Being "green" is not only good for a business' marketing and publicity, but it also helps the bottom line. This course examines what it means to be a "green" business. Topics include the Triple Bottom Line, sourcing materials, energy management and recycling.

ENV206 - Gardening for Sustainability

From wartime Victory Gardens to today’s community gardens, we are experiencing a resurgence in the popularity of gardening as a means of expanding personal sustainability. This course will explore topics in organic gardening, biodynamics and permaculture. We will study garden planning and design, including selection of heirloom varieties, designing with available space, and innovation in small-­-scale agriculture. The course will have an applied focus on participating in the next stages of development for the campus community garden, including seed selection, seed starting and early season planting.

ENV207 - Chemistry for a Sustainable Future

This course will engage students in thinking about environmental problems through the context of chemistry. The relevance of chemistry to such topics as air pollution, climate change, and water management will be explored. Students will be challenged to consider the application of chemistry to help address many of these problems.

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell College on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

ENV220 - World Geography (KP)

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

ENV302 - Natural Resource Management/GIS

This course surveys natural resource issues from global to local scales through the use of geographic information systems (GIS). GIS, remotely sensed images, and global positioning systems are used as tools in managing community natural resources. Students map natural resources and community features to explore management strategies. Students work with town commissions, state agencies, and environmental organizations to obtain spatial data for analysis.

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

ENV304 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV305 - Energy: Moving on from Fossil Fuel

Our economic prosperity relies on burning fossil fuels to power everything from our trucks to our office computers. As fossil fuels become more scarce, it is necessary to find other sources of energy. This course introduces students to our energy grid and to alternative sources of energy like wind, solar and geothermal. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 211

ENV400 - Internship

This internship is scheduled to take place during the junior year and introduces students to challenges faced by companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies. Placement is tailored to meet the student’s career goals and interests in the environmental field. Students work 150 hours over the course of the semester alongside professionals in the field. Written reflections are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship as well as regular meetings with the internship supervisor. The internship supervisor monitors each student’s performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 102, ENV 201, ENV 211.

ENV420 - Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

This course is a capstone course in Environmental Studies that focuses on current issues and trends in the environmental field. Students complete an applied thesis or practicum project in an area related to their particular interest and present it to the class and/or at symposium. Environmental career opportunities are discussed along with resume development, networking, interviewing techniques, and other career development skills. Prerequisites: ENV 400, Senior standing.

HIST103 - World Civilization I

Beginning with prehistory, this course explores early civilizations and then follows developments in a global context, showing interconnections between Asia, Africa, and Europe. Emphasis is placed on cultural, social, economic, religious, and political developments.

HIST104 - World Civilization II (KP)

This Knowledge Perspective course will provide students with the opportunity to interpret and analyze the complex interrelationships and inequities in human societies in a global historical context. Emphasizing the interrelatedness and mutuality of influence between East and West, we examine questions of exclusiveness, intolerance, and cooperation. Prerequisite: ENG101 with a C or better

HIST105 - History of Human Rights

This course surveys the complicated history of human rights from its origins to the modern era. Emphasis is on the historical forces, movements, and events, especially in the last three centuries, that have moved this concept from the realm of intellectual theory and conjecture to practical implementation and application. This course may also touch on some of the major philosophical, ethical, and moral questions intertwined with human rights.

HIST123 - American Civilization I

This course examines the chief political, social, and cultural features of American society as they have developed through the period of Reconstruction. Emphasis is on Colonial America, the War of Independence, the Constitution, and the emergence of the Republic through the Civil War.

HIST124 - American Civilization II

This course is a continuation of HIST 123 from the period of Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is on reconstruction, industrialization, immigration, constitutional issues, and the emergence of American foreign policy. There is some examination of American political life in the nuclear age.

HIST203 - The History of Women in U.S.

This course explores the social history of women in the United States, beginning in the colonial period and ending with an examination of twentieth-century issues. Emphasis is on the image of women held during these periods, in contrast to actual conditions. Contributions of women to social change and the growth of women’s movements are also analyzed. This is a presentation-intensive course.

HIST204 - Recent American History

This course focuses on the presidencies from the Kennedy era to the present. Work is divided roughly into three areas: foreign affairs; domestic politics; and economic, social, and cultural needs. Topics range from the Vietnam War to the Iraq War, the weakening of Congress and the expansion of the presidency, the women's movement, changes in popular culture, and domestic economic developments.

HIST207 - African American History

This course explores the history of African Americans in the United States from their African beginnings to the present. It traces the lives and status of African Americans, enslaved and emancipated, as they confronted the barriers of legal, institutional, and cultural prejudices; it examines the socioeconomic and political experiences of blacks in America and investigates strategies of accommodation, resistance, and protest in the struggle of African Americans to gain human and first-class citizenship rights. This is a writing-intensive course.

HIST208 - Sub-Saharan Africa after 1800

This survey of sub-Saharan African history explores the ongoing story of African political, social, and economic developments from the post-transatlantic slave trade period to the present. The course considers the impact of European merchants, missionaries, and adventurers on Africa from the time immediately preceding imperialism and colonialism up through the emergence of nationalism and the decolonization and liberation movements. The new nation-states, their postcolonial economies, and their developing systems of justice, education, and rule are investigated. Finally, topics such as soil erosion, disease, conservation, famine, and Africa’s relationships with the wider world are discussed.

HIST209 - China from 1600 to Present

This course is a survey of modern Chinese history from the founding of the Qing Dynasty in the seventeenth century to Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms of the 1990s. Special attention will be paid to modernization, Western and Japanese imperialism in China, and the rise of Communism under Mao Zedong. In addition to learning about important milestones in Chinese history, students will be introduced to aspects of Chinese art, culture, and women's issues through primary sources translated into English. This is a writing-intensive course.

HIST210 - Latin Amer Colonial Period to Present

This survey looks at Latin American history from pre-Colombian to contemporary times. Emphasis is on native cultures, the “discovery” of the New World, European presence, colonialism, imperialism, the creation of the peasantry, wars of independence, the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, slavery and racism, development and underdevelopment, the Catholic Church, liberation theology, poverty, and revolution. Major emphasis in South America is on Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Chile, Venezuela, and the Portuguese-speaking nation of Brazil. The course also examines foreign intervention and inner instability in Mexico, including struggles for democracy, economic rights, and social justice. In the Hispanic Caribbean and Central America, especially with regard to Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama, land and labor systems, gender relations, race and ethnicity, and varied forms of rule are discussed. This is a writing-intensive course.

HIST211 - Middle East & Islamic World Since 1800

This course looks at the Middle East and its relations with the wider world, from the appearance of Napoleon to the present. Topics include attempts at reform and modernization in the Ottoman Empire; the impact of Western imperialism on the region as a whole; and twentieth-century developments in the area, including nationalism, pan-Arabism, pan-Islamism, the cult of the personality, coup, revolution, Zionism, and the Palestinian-Israeli confrontation. The economic and social impact of oil, the influence of fundamentalism, and the Great Power rivalry down through the position of the United States toward the area are investigated. The efforts of Iran to gain acceptance in/by the contemporary world are examined, as is the shifting attitude of Egypt toward modernity. Finally, connections between the region and the rest of the Islamic world are explored. This is a writing-intensive course.

HIST212 - Mod Japan: Culture & History

This course is a survey of Japan's modernization from the fall of the warring states period to the economic bubble of the 1980s. Special attention will be paid to the contributions of the early modern Tokugawa Shogunate, the Meiji period of cultural borrowing from the West, and the cultural nationalism of the Japanese empire until 1945. In addition to learning about important milestones in Japanese history, students will be introduced to aspects of Japanese art and culture through a variety of primary and secondary sources and film clips. This is a writing-intensive course.

HIST218 - Global History of Childhood

This course introduces students to the ways in which cultural ideas about childhood and childrearing have changed over time. Using Western history as a departure point, the course will compare and contrast key topics of childhood, such as child labor and child rights, in various cultures. This is primarily a discussion seminar, in which students present and discuss a variety of academic readings. There is also a service-learning component. This is a presentation-intensive course.

HIST223 - Special Topics in History

In this course, a single topic in history is explored for the entire semester. Possible topics include Islamic civilization, India in the twentieth century, nationalism and imperialism in the last two centuries, United States and the world in the twentieth century, and the African American in the development of the United States. This course may be repeated for credit, as different special topics are offered.

HIST231 - Revolutions & Revolutionary Thought

This course provides an analysis of many types, facets, and styles of revolution, including political, cultural, and scientific meanings of the concept. The readings are taken from literature as well as from history and the social sciences.

HIST323 - Special Topics in History

In this course, a single topic in history is explored at a level appropriate for the serious and experienced history student. Possible topics in this advanced course include microhistory, gender in African history, and European intellectual history. This course may be repeated for credit, as different special topics are offered. Prerequisite: A 200-level history course or instructor permission.

HIST325 - The Intellectual Origins of Western Civ

This seminar traces the roots of modern Western thought from ancient Greece through the Enlightenment by discussing and analyzing selections from the writings of major European thinkers. The seminar focuses on dominant figures representative of an historical epoch and examines their ideas in light of existing and future political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. Prerequisite: a 200-level history course or permission of instructor.

HIST352 - Nature & Meaning of History

The first half of this course examines selective theories of history from Herodotus through Braudel. The second part investigates the historiography of a single topic according to student interest. Readings are selected to introduce the student to interpretive issues surrounding the selected topic. The perspectives of several practicing historians are considered. Students write a research paper. This course is intended for history majors and as a capstone course for history minors; it is open to others who have successfully completed at least three history courses and have the permission of the instructor. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 200-level history course and permission of instructor.

HIST400 - Individual Seminar in Reading & Research

This course will serve as the first semester of a two-semester individualized history capstone sequence. Students will work closely on an individual basis with a full-time faculty member, meeting weekly to define a topic for in-depth examination through reading, research, and writing. Reading and research will begin during HIST 400 and will continue during the following semester in HIST 401. Students must complete HIST 400 before enrolling in HIST 401. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and HIST 352 (can be taken concurrently).

HIST401 - Tutorial in History

This capstone course focuses on research methodology and practice in history. The student must gain the written agreement of the faculty member who oversees the project. Each student defines a topic by the end of the first week of the semester. Subsequent weekly meetings address progress and problems encountered in research of the topic. The finished product is a substantial paper (ca. 30 pages) with full scholarly apparatus. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, HIST 352, and HIST 400.

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH108X - Mathematics of Design

This course explores elements of mathematics within the design field from the incorporation of algebra to concepts of geometry. Students will have the opportunity to integrate numerical fluency, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning and communicating quantitative information through group problem solving and class discussions. Topics include pattern drafting, layouts cutting, revenue, cost, and profit modeling, measurement systems, Euclidean geometry, and spatial reasoning.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH301 - Mathematical Modeling

Mathematical ModelingPrerequisite: C or better in MATH 205, 206, and 208

MATH303X - Problem Solving

This course will be an exploration into the mathematics exemplified in high quality high school and undergraduate mathematics competitions and mathematical research. The emphasis will be placed on building a repertoire of mathematical strategies and tactics, then applying these methods in unfamiliar situations. Topics will include: Combinatorics, Binomial Theorem, Conditional Probability, Roots of Unity, Symmetric Polynomials, Polynomial Interpolation, and topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry. Students will hone their ability to solve mathematical problems through hands-on practice and obtain an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and tools of the problem solver as illustrated by the textbook and the instructor. Strategies and tools for solving problems include, but are not limited to: •Draw a Diagram•Systematic Lists•Eliminate Possibilities•Matrix Logic•Look for a Pattern•Guess and Check•Sub Problems•Unit Analysis•Solve An Easier Related Problem•Physical Representations•Work Backwards•Venn Diagrams•Finite Differences

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vector functions, advanced techniques of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH322X - Special Topics in Mathematics

Special Topics in Mathematics

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants. Applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, economics, connectivity of networks, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Capstone Seminar

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

POLS101 - American Government

This is an examination of the basic principles that form the foundation for the structure and practice of American government. The impact of the political system on the citizen is explored along with the central assumptions and concepts that serve as the basis for the field of political science.

POLS201 - State & Local Government

This course begins with the constitutional and legal basis for state and local government. The functions of the executive and legislative branches are examined. Governmental bureaucracy and budgetary processes are studied as well as political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and political reporting in the press.

POLS202 - Issues in Contemporary Political Thought

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to selected contemporary American political issues. The course is designed to create a deeper understanding and interest in these issues and develop students' capacities as citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future. Its topics change frequently to keep up with the latest developments in the field. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

POLS208 - Contemporary International Relations

Basic concepts and major contemporary problems of international relations are examined in this course. Topics include the Middle East, East-West relations, deterrence versus disarmament, human rights, and developing countries. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

POLS210 - Political Theory

In this course, central questions in political theory are addressed. What is justice? What is freedom? What is the state? What makes a government legitimate? Is there any general obligation to obey the state? The course also focuses on theories of modernity and communities, the evolution of liberalism and individualism, and the relationship between politics and economics. Readings range from the Greeks to modern thinkers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

POLS302 - The Conspiracy in American Politics

This basis of this course will be an in- depth examination of various conspiracies in American Politics and Culture, beginning with the Salem Witch trials through the Lincoln Assassination Conspiracy, the Sacco & Vanzetti case and to the present day. More recent conspiracies include an examination of the JFK and RFK Assassinations, the Pentagon Papers case, the Watergate Conspiracy, the Iran/Contra scandal, Whitewater, the "Vast Right Wing Conspiracy," the World Trade Center bombing, the Oklahoma City Bombing, Bush/Gore 2000, Global Warming, and the 9/11 Investigation. The "Obama Birther" controversy will also be covered.

POLS303 - The American Presidency

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the American presidency from both historical and political perspectives. The course will be divided into 4 distinct segments: (1) Legal -foundation of the executive branch of American government; (2) the evolution of presidential power and authority; (3) the presidential election process; and (4) the transfer of power and the transition of administrations. The major focus of the course will be the modern presidency, its power and limitations.

POLS305X - Amer Pol Institutions: Congress vs. Pres

This course will provide an in depth examination of two of the major institutions that are involved in the American policy-making process: the Congress and the President. The student will learn about the Presidential, (as opposed to the parliamentary) model found in the United States. The course will focus on the complex relationship between the President and the Congress and how that relationship affects the public policy process, including the budgetary process. The course will include a discussion of the President's role as Chief Executive, and the implementation of congressional policies.

POLS307X - Campaigns & Elections

This course examines federal and state political campaigns and elections in the United States. Particular attention is given to the principles and practices of modern campaigns, including candidate selection, how campaigns are organized, developing a good strategy, and what is the best way to communicate a theme to the voters. The course will also look at how campaigns are financed and how technology transforms campaigns.Prerequisite: ENG102

POLS320 - Policy Making & the Political Process

This course examines the dynamics of public policy-making in the United States at the national, state, and local levels. The course explores the factors influencing policy formation in a variety of areas: health, education, welfare, and urban planning. An analysis of how policy outcomes are evaluated is also covered.

SCI103 - Science for Educators I (KP)

This course provides education students with an introduction to the scientific principles governing the contemporary technological world. Topics include scientific methodologies, gravity, energy, electricity, magnetism, light, and introductory chemistry. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: ED Majors only

SCI104 - Science for Educators II (KP)

This course provides education students with an introduction to earth science, astronomy, and environmental science. Topics include the weather, solar system, stars, the universe, and global pollution. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lectures. Prerequisite: ED Majors only

SCI105 - Introduction to Astronomy (KP)

Introduction to astronomy for the non-science major with a focus on our place within the universe. Topics include the formation and evolution of stars and planetary systems, our Solar System, the Milky Way Galaxy, and the large scale structure of the universe

SCI106 - How Things Work (KP)

This course explores how things from our everyday lives work according to the rules of nature. The principles that influence how objects fall, cars move, scales weigh, planes fly, stoves heat, copiers copy give insight into the workings of the universe. Connections between our immediate surroundings and the universe at large are illustrated.

SCI107 - Topics in Science (KP)

Topics vary from semester to semester.

SCI114 - Modern Science & Technology (KP)

This course introduces the history of Science from antiquity to the present and demonstrates how the various areas of science work together to develop the technology and the materials we are familiar with in our daily lives.  Topics include role of measurement and experiments and revolutions of modern science (advances in chemistry, biology, astronomy and technology).Students will conduct inquiry-based projects focusing on areas of interest. The goal of this course is to help students develop the practices of science such as asking researchable questions, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing data and other related skills that will enhance their quality of life and professional success.

SCI115 - Science of Sport (KP)

This course will look at how certain basic principles of science govern the major operations of many different sports. Students will conduct inquiry-based projects focusing on areas of interest. The goal of this course is to help students develop the practices of science such as asking researchable questions, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing data and other related skills that will enhance their quality of life and professional success.

SCI117 - The Primates (KP)

This is an introductory course to the various theoretical approaches to understanding the evolutionary ecology and behavioral biology of primates. Topics include functional anatomy, social behavior, grouping and activity patterns, reproduction, behavioral ecology, locomotion, life history, geographic distribution, evolution and conservation issues. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry-Scientific [AI (S)].

SCI118 - Crime Lab Science (KP)

This is a hands on survey course that will familiarize students with the principles governing the application of science to solve crimes. This course will involve the analysis of actual criminal cases. The students will be introduced to forensic and chemical concepts including gunpowder analysis (Kennedy assassination), trace evidence analysis, fiber analysis (Wayne Williams), drug analysis (Anna Nicole Smith), blood analysis (Jeffrey MacDonald), and DNA profiling (OJ Simpson).

SCI119 - Physical Geology (KP)

This course focuses on teaching the principles of geology and earth history, leading to a fundamental understanding of earth systems and processes. Students will also engage in a semester-long scientific writing project focusing on a National Park of choice that inspires them.

SCI303 - The Primates

This is an introductory course to the various theoretical approaches to understanding the evolutionary ecology and behavioral biology of primates. Topics include functional anatomy, social behavior, grouping and activity patterns, reproduction, behavioral ecology, locomotion, life history, geographic distribution, evolution and conservation issues. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry-Scientific [AI (S)].

WRT100I - Writing Skills: Multilingual Writers

This course, designed to prepare multilingual writers for the core Writing I - Writing II sequence, addresses the development of reading and writing competencies crucial to the successful completion of college coursework. Students work on their writing skills through multiple drafts and revisions of essays from different genres. Students are provided with time during the second half of class to work on their writing while the instructor and a tutor are present to provide assistance. Students must receive a grade of "C" or higher in order to pass this course.

WRT101 - Writing I

In this course, students gain understanding of and confidence in strategies for effective writing by composing and reading in a variety of genres. The course emphasizes writing as a process and focuses on the rhetorical choices writers make. Students engage critically with sources by examining how genre, context, purpose, credibility, and bias work together to create meaning and impact audiences. Students who choose to take Writing I Workshop are provided with time during class to work on their writing while the instructor and a writing tutor are present to provide assistance. Students must earn a “C” or higher in order to pass this course

WRT102 - Writing II

This course is a continuation of Writing I and focuses on research and public writing. Theme-based courses provide students with lenses to explore issues of interest and develop their reading, research, and writing skills. Students work with a topic of their choice, broadly based on the course theme. Assignments build upon each other, lead up to a researched position paper, and culminate in a public piece. Students who choose to take Writing II Workshop are provided with time during class to work on their writing while the instructor and a writing tutor are present to provide assistance. Students must earn a grade of “C” or higher in order to pass this course. Prerequisite: WRT 101

WRT106 - Writing I Bridge

This course is designed for students who completed WRT 101 Writing I or Writing I Workshop and earned a grade between a C- and D-. Students will finish meeting the course objectives of WRT 101 through intensive daily writing, the redevelopment of two major writing assignments from WRT 101, peer review, virtual meetings with the instructor, and the creation of a final metacognitive essay.

WRT107 - OralCommunication & Presentations Skills

This course is designed to help international students develop confidence in their oral English skills, so that they can participate freely in classroom discussions and present comfortably in the classroom context. Students work at their English listening and speaking skills in order to improve their English fluency and comprehensibility, benefiting from the regular practice and from instructor feedback; coursework focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary, and English usage conventions. Course activities include speaking opportunities, vocabulary building exercises, group discussions, and a series of presentations scheduled during the semester.

Elizabeth Hartmann

Associate Professor of Education

Office: Brennan Library

Amy Maynard

Associate Professor of Education

Office: Brennan Library

Claudia Rinaldi

Associate Professor of Education, Program Chair of Education, Graduate Program Coordinator

Office: Brennan Library

Catherine Zeek

Dean of Curricular and Faculty Innovation; Professor Emerita

Office: Klingbeil

ED109 - Invitation to Teaching

This course explores careers in teaching beginning with the unifying question: Why should I become a teacher? Students examine their motivations to become teachers while they learn about college and state requirements and expectations.

ED110 - Teaching & Learning in American Schools

This course provides students pursuing or considering initial teacher licensure with an overview of the teaching profession. Students study and discuss history and philosophies of education systems, as well as current trends and issues. Massachusetts professional standards and requirements for licensure are explored. This course is a prerequisite for all other ED courses. Twenty-five hours of observation and tutoring in varied school settings are required. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ED206 - Early Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the preschool and early elementary years, including transitions to reading and writing, role of phonemic awareness and phonics in emergent and early literacy, varied informal assessments to measure developing literacy, instructional strategies and materials to support young learners. Minimum 25 pre-practicum hours in a placement assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. This is a writing intensive course. Co-requisite ED 206L

ED208 - Elem Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the elementary years (through grade 6), including reading in content areas, fluency, reading/writing connections, varied assessments to measure literacy development, and instructional strategies and materials to support elementary learners through grade 6. Minimum 25 pre-practicum hours;Prerequisite: ED110 Co-requisite ED 208L

ED219 - Supporting Learner Variability

This course introduces students to characteristics of learners with special needs in classroom and community settings. It focuses on principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in developing appropriate learning environments to meet the variability of all students in Pre-K through high school settings. A required minimum 25-hour pre-practicum provides opportunities to teach and observe in area classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED309 - Sheltered English Immersion

This course provides a grounding in current theory and practice related to teaching English Language Learners in Sheltered and bilingual programs. In particular, students learn to effectively shelter their content instruction, so that ELL students can access curriculum, achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy. This course meets Massachusetts DESE standards for the required SEI endorsement. Course includes a minimum 25-hour pre-practicum in license-appropriate classrooms.Placement in schools is assigned by the Education Program Placement Coordinator or the Program Director. Prerequisite: ED110

ED327 - Literacy Assessment & Instruction

This course explores strategies for integrating the language arts and teaching literacy across the curriculum for learners through grade 6, including assessment for planning and evaluation, classroom organization, management, unit and lesson planning, and resources. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ED 208; pass all required MTEL Communication and Literacy Test; Co-requisite 327L

ED335 - Teaching Mathematics: PK - 2

This course covers the development of number sense, one to one correspondence, meaning of operations, estimation, graphing, and patterns. The use of developmentally appropriate materials, manipulatives, technology, and children’s literature for the teaching of math are addressed. The course explores a variety of math curricula, assessment techniques, and the use of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for designing instruction. Includes a 25-hour pre-practicum. Prerequisite: Pass all required MTEL.

ED338 - Inclusive Education

In this course, students develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to create learning environments appropriate to the full variability of learners in pre-K through grade 6. Through in-class activities and a 25-hour pre-practicum, students expand their understanding and use of strategies and resources including Universal Design for Learning, appropriate instructional technology, and positive behavioral supports. Prerequisites: ED 219, Co-requisite ED 338L

ED342 - Teaching Science Concepts: PK - 2

This course engages students in integrating early childhood science content with state and national curriculum standards and resources, including instructional technology, to develop effective science lessons. The course includes practice in integrating science concepts with early childhood curriculum and requires a 25 hour pre-practicum in local classrooms. Prerequisite: pass all required MTEL. 4 credits

ED417 - Pre-Practicum: PK - Grade 2

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours of supervised field experience in classrooms appropriate for their concentration. Students observe, teach, and assist the cooperating teacher with classroom responsibilities. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of pre-practicum-related issues. Prerequisite: ED 330 and permission of the Education Program Director

ED420 - Integrated Instruction: PK - Grade 2

In this course, students explore research on social studies education as well as the teaching methods and related teaching materials that encourage learning in this discipline among children in the early childhood education setting. In addition, students examine a variety of ways to effectively integrate the arts into the early childhood curriculum.

ED421 - Curriculum Integration

In this capstone course, students integrate theory and previous field experiences with their 150-hour pre-practicum. Research and discussion topics include classroom management and organization, use of various curriculum materials and resources, and ethical issues in educational settings. Students design a classroom-based research project which will be completed during the practicum (ED 496 or 498). Prerequisites: Senior standing, pass all required MTEL, concurrent enrollment in ED433, 435 OR 437

ED494 - Professional Standards & Ethics

Taken concurrently with ED 496 or ED 498, this capstone seminar engages students in ethical questions such as student confidentiality, testing, and communicating with various constituencies as well as practical aspects of preparing for an initial teaching position. It includes conducting and reporting on the classroom-based research project that was designed in ED 421. Co-requisite: ED 496 or ED 498.

ED496 - Practicum: Early Childhood

This practicum provides experience in two early childhood education settings. One setting is in Preschool or Kindergarten and the other setting is in grade one or two. Students spend five days a week in the classroom, assuming increasing responsibility that culminates with “take over” weeks and completion of the Comprehensive Assessment of Performance State requirement. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of practicum-related issues. Topics of discussion include the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working with parents. Permission of the Education Program Director is required. Prerequisite: Passing scores on all required sections of the MTELs.

ENG208 - The Structure of the English Language

This course focuses on essential elements of the structure of the English language: its phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), and syntax (sentence structure). Students draw on their own knowledge of language as they examine spoken English; they then study the relationship between spoken and written language. As students discuss issues pertinent to teachers and to writers, the relevance of linguistic analysis both to written language development and to writing practice is considered.

ENG209 - Intro to Literature & Literary Studies

This is a foundations course required for the major and the minor in English. The course provides an introduction to a variety of forms and styles in poetry, drama, short story, fiction, memoir, and essay; European, North American, and world literatures are considered. The focus is on interpreting texts; students are introduced to various schools of interpretation and to standards for supporting an interpretation. Students become familiar with the conventional elements of each genre and with the terminology of critical interpretation. The course introduces print and database tools for research on literature.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

SCI103 - Science for Educators I (KP)

This course provides education students with an introduction to the scientific principles governing the contemporary technological world. Topics include scientific methodologies, gravity, energy, electricity, magnetism, light, and introductory chemistry. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: ED Majors only

SCI104 - Science for Educators II (KP)

This course provides education students with an introduction to earth science, astronomy, and environmental science. Topics include the weather, solar system, stars, the universe, and global pollution. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lectures. Prerequisite: ED Majors only

ENG210 - Survey of American Literature (KP)

This course surveys representative periods, authors, or genres in American literature from beginnings in Native American oral literatures through contemporary works. Individual sections organize study of classic and contemporary texts around particular themes, such as Queering American Literatures, American Migrations, Hemispheric American Literature, or Americans on the Edge: "Frontiers" in the American Imagination. Individual sections also trace twentieth- or twenty-first-century movements to their roots in or resistance to earlier movements or forms. This is a writing-intensive course.

ENG211 - Modern Drama

This survey course introduces students to great modern works of drama, considering the late nineteenth century through the present. Plays are considered in terms of performance as well as in literary terms, with a focus on the ways in which the philosophies and sensibilities of modernism and postmodernism are reflected both on the page and on the stage. Readings include modern classics by such writers as Ibsen, O'Neill, Brecht, and Beckett, as well as more recent works.

ENG218 - British Literature (KP)

This course surveys British writing in poetry, fiction, and drama, with a focus on key periods in the development of British literature. Emphasis is on representative writers in each period. Periods and movements surveyed include Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary or Postmodern. This is a writing-intensive course.

ENG222 - Lyric Poetry

This course considers the lyric poem in global contexts, with attention to poetic voice, composition, sense, and sound. Form and content are examined in medieval to modern meditative and lyric poems.

ENG225 - The Short Story (KP)

In this course, students study the development of the short story as a twentieth-century form; critical and creative approaches are offered. Selections are taken from such authors as Edith Wharton, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Joyce Carol Oates, Doris Lessing, and Alice Walker.

ENG340 - Classics of World Literature

This course explores representative fiction, poetry, or drama by major figures in world literature, centering on topics such as love, tragedy, comedy, immortality, madness, wasteland, quest for knowledge, voyages, or exploration. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

HIST123 - American Civilization I

This course examines the chief political, social, and cultural features of American society as they have developed through the period of Reconstruction. Emphasis is on Colonial America, the War of Independence, the Constitution, and the emergence of the Republic through the Civil War.

HIST124 - American Civilization II

This course is a continuation of HIST 123 from the period of Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is on reconstruction, industrialization, immigration, constitutional issues, and the emergence of American foreign policy. There is some examination of American political life in the nuclear age.