Skip top navigation

2020 - 2021 Academic Catalog

Entertainment Media Minor

The Entertainment Media  minor consists of six courses.

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
COM101 Understanding Mass Media 3
COM216 Entertainment Media 3
COM225 Producing 3
COM307 Understanding Video Games 3
COM332 Television & Film Studies 3
Choose 1 from the following:
COM208 Public Relations 3
COM209 Journalism 3

Credit Requirements for minor: 18 credits.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM216 - Entertainment Media

A focus on the entertainment media industry requires making sense of the material that captures the audience's attention, influences culture, and provides enjoyment to mass media consumers. Course topics include the business of entertainment media, the production and distribution of media content, and multimedia convergence. Students in this course examine the multiple genres for the content of entertainment media, such as drama, comedy, reality TV, and gaming. Students learn how the entertainment industry works, captures the interests of contemporary audiences, and influences our culture and values. Prerequisite: COM 101. Formerly - COM302

COM225 - Producing

Producing introduces students to the basics of TV producing.  Students learn the process of writing a pitch, proposal, treatment, and budget.  They  also learn the fundamentals of basic screenwriting and production scheduling, as well as managing cast, crew and vendor relationships.  The course also explores the roles of the casting director, location manager, production coordinator, and script supervisor.  The course concludes with a preview of the production team and the role of the line producer, unit production manager, production manager and assistant directors involved in managing the physical production process of producing a television show.  This course emphasizes the competency of writing and research.

COM307 - Understanding Video Games

Understanding Video Games introduces students to the foundation, process, and impact of the video game industry.  Students evolve from merely riding the gaming highway to analyzing and deconstructing it.  The course pays particular attention to the history and breakthroughs in the technology, social and political impacts such as the ESRB, sex and violence in games, as well as past, present and future trends of the gaming market.

COM332 - Television & Film Studies

This course will explore this significant question: Should we take film and TV seriously as a form of mass communication? The answer can be found in the ways that film and TV produce meanings for the audience and our culture as a dominant form of entertainment over that past 60 plus years in post WWII America. As such, film and TV demand our scrutiny. Throughout thecourse, we will look at such topics as how film and TV entertainment narrative is structured, how sets are designed, how sound interacts with image, how commercials persuade and how these structures can emphasize certain meanings (and de-emphasize others) and transmit values to viewers. Current trends in technological shifts have forced changes in the delivery of film and TV programming, for example to audio and video files streaming on computers, such as tablets, the decline of movie going and network TV and the rise of hundreds of cable channels and streaming. However, all of these new technologies demand more film and TV entertainment content, not less. This course uses two avenues of inquiry: one exploring the mass communication basis for studying the content delivered through mediums of film and TV; and another outlining an analysis of film and TV content which illustrates the transmission of cultural values (primarily American) to the audience. Prerequisites: COM 101

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM101

COM209 - Journalism

Journalism is a fast changing industry and this course prepares students for the change. Students learn to report and produce a variety of news and feature pieces, for print and multi-media platforms, including Q and A interviews, news and feature stories, opinion pieces, reviews, photo galleries, social media campaigns and more. Assignments can be produced on sports, fashion, entertainment, arts and culture, business, politics and more. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in The 1851 Chronicle newspaper and website. Prerequisite: WRT102