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2020 - 2021 Academic Catalog

Event Management

The Lasell University Event Management program is designed to prepare students for management and executive level positions, as well as for entrepreneurial opportunities within this complex and challenging field. Through a multidisciplinary approach, students majoring in Event Management gain the expertise, commitment, and skills for management positions in this expanding industry through a comprehensive background in the business world including social event management, meeting & convention sales & planning, accounting, human resources, organizational behavior, technology and marketing. They learn about the inner workings of the hospitality and events industry including food and beverage, legal and ethical issues, and event operations, as well as about the individual segments of the industry like conventions, trade shows, social events, weddings, corporate events, non- profit events, concerts and sporting events, among others. Throughout the core of their coursework, students learn about service quality and the operations of diverse organizations such as convention centers, private clubs, stadiums, arenas, resorts, performing arts centers, concert halls and cruise lines.

Students gain valuable connected learning experience both on campus and at site visits throughout New England (MGM Grand, Encore Boston , Ritz-Carlton, TD Garden, Woodland Country Club, Fenway Park, Hynes Convention Center, Foxwoods , Mohegan Sun are just a few examples).

In addition, students are required to complete two Field Experiences and one full internship so that they build a resume with both academic accomplishments and real-world experiences by the time that they graduate, to mention a few our interns & graduates are employed by major event management companies like Corinthian Events, Rafanelli Events, Tyger Productions, Liz Page & Associates & Groove Boston.

The program is also embedded with globally recognized prestigious professional hospitality & event industry certifications & designations that students earn, these certifications increases the marketability of students for internships & full time careers.  

Students in the hospitality management programs are also given many additional opportunities to make connections, gain experience, and prepare themselves for successful careers upon graduation. They gain networking and job opportunities through our professional Advisory Board, have the opportunity to attend the International Hotel Experience Show in New York City, meet one-on-one with successful business owners and directors in their respective field, and create marketing and business plans for local business owners. Hospitality Management students are strongly encouraged to study abroad, considering the diverse and global nature of their field of study, Lasell University has partnerships with leading hospitality universities in Switzerland, Italy, Spain & Australia.

Double majoring is not allowed among the three hospitality majors (Hospitality Management, Event Management, and Resort and Casino Management). Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Event Management.

By planning early, in consultation with an academic advisor, students may be able to reduce the time it takes to complete a bachelor's degree in Event Management to 3 or 3½ years.

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Event Management:      

Goal 1: Application of Principles of Event Management Upon completion of the major program of study in Event Management students will be able to

1.       demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of organizational behavior
2.       demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of human resource management
3.       demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of information technology
4.       demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of the global economy
5.       demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the areas of food and beverage management, budgeting, meeting sales & planning and special events
6.       demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of service quality and event operations strategies within the greater hospitality industry 7.       demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in all sectors of the events industry including management & leadership

Goal 2: Application of Business Information Upon completion of the major program of study in Event Management students will be able to

1.       Apply quantitative and qualitative research methods to various challenges faced by organizations  within the events industry
2.       Integrate business information into effective decision-making skills  

Goal 3: Legal and Ethical Decision-making Upon completion of the major program of study in Event Management students will be able to

1.       identify legal and ethical issues implicit in all aspects of the greater hospitality industry
2.       evaluate and decide among alternative solutions to ethical problems
3.       understand the underpinning issues behind laws and regulations related to the greater hospitality industry

Goal 4: Professional skills Upon completion of the major program of study in Event Management students will be able to

1.       communicate effectively in both professional and technical writing for the events industry work effectively in teams
2.       communicate effectively in both large presentation and face-to-face situations
3.       effectively utilize their education and experience to successfully gain relevant employment and succeed within their respective fields

Course Code Course Title Credits
School of Business Core
BUSS104X Professional Development in Business 3
BUSS105 Excel for Business 3
BUSS205 Business Law 3
BUSS220 Principles of Marketing 3
BUSS227 Managerial Accounting 3
BUSS440 Business Capstone 3
BUSS497 Business Internship Seminar 4
DSCI202 Business Analytics 3
ECON101 Principles of Econ-Micro 3
MATH209 Business Statistics 3
Concentration Courses
HEM101 Hospitality Management 3
HEM102 Fundamentals of Event Management 3
HEM208 Human Resources in Hospitality 3
HEM215 Meeting & Convention Sales & Planning 3
HEM299 Field Experience I 3
HEM301 Social Event Management 3
HEM303 Law & Ethics in Hospitality 3
HEM321 Revenue Management & Technology 3
HEM401 Managing Quality in Hospitality 3
HEM403 Food & Beverage Management 3
Choose 2 from the following:
BUSS231 Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation 3
BUSS332 Cross Cultural Management 3
BUSS334 Nonprofit Management 3
BUSS499C Business Internship & Seminar II 4
COM208 Public Relations 3
ENV205 Green Business 3
HEM103 Economic Development & Mgmt in Tourism 3
HEM205 Private Club Management 3
HEM206 Lodging Management 3
HEM207 Resort & Casino Management 3
HEM214 Ecotourism 3
HEM399 Field Experience II 3
MATH202 Applied Mathematics for Business 3
PSYC104 Positive Psychology 3
SMGT301 Sport Facility & Event Management 3
SPAN111 Elementary Spanish I 4
SPAN112 Elementary Spanish II 4

Major Requirements: 63-67 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.


BUSS101 - Fund of Bus in a Global Environment

This course is designed to familiarize students with various aspects of the business world. Areas covered include: private enterprise, forms of ownership, legal aspects, management practices in a diverse and global business environment, marketing, human resources, global operations management, labor relations, and finance. In addition, students become aware of how business functions are integrated into an organization to achieve specific goals both locally and internationally.

BUSS104X - Professional Development in Business

For freshman only. This is a comprehensive course that introduces students to the skills they need to develop themselves professionally. It cultivates and hones the skills necessary for students to communicate effectively and professionally in a business environment. This course provides students with the skills necessary to engage in field experience, internship and post-graduate employment searches as well as for the general business world around them. Using myriad methods, students will develop the necessary professional skills for professional presentation, professional communication, negotiation, personal branding, networking and team building. Students will also be introduced to the concept of emotional intelligence and its impact on overall career and academic outcomes. Students will complete a minimum of three professional presentations as part of this course.Prerequisites: None

BUSS105 - Excel for Business

This course introduces students to basic Microsoft Excel skills. Excel is an electronic spreadsheet program used for storing, organizing and manipulating data. It is critical to the business world today as the volume data generated has exploded. This introductory course will provide students with information and skills needed to create basic workbooks and worksheets, create simple formulas, copy and move data, format data and cells, work in large spreadsheets and with data series, create pivot tables, and more. As part of this course, all students will have the opportunity to become certified in Microsoft Excel through the professional certification called Microsoft Office Specialist: Excel 2016 – Core Data Analysis, Manipulation, and Presentation. The certification also comes with an electronic badge. Students are also introduced to Income Statements, Balance Sheets, Statement of Cash Flows, Ratios, and the Basic Accounting Cycle

BUSS107X - eSport Management

Intro to Esports Management starts with an introduction to the history of competitive gaming and continues with an exploration of its emerging ecosystem. Students will learn the complexities involved in understanding the dynamics of the esports industry and all of its stakeholders from gamers to billion-dollar media companies. We will dive into each element of this value chain and provide you with insight on the inter-operations of all companies included in the landscape of esports. Students will learn to navigate the structure of esports leagues, teams, players, gaming publishers, tournament operators, media and affiliate organizations. Relevant projects, market analysis and critical thinking will be utilized to understand management approaches that have succeeded and failed with recent esports ventures. Students will also learn baseline skills in esports streaming, broadcasting, marketing, public relations and written communication

BUSS201 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with the fundamentals of accounting processes and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements and how to become intelligent users of financial information.

BUSS202 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions.

BUSS203 - Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of finance. Various techniques of analysis that reveal the relationships of risk, return, and value are demonstrated. Topics include: financial reporting; long- and short-term forecasting; managing working capital; capital budgeting; and the nature of corporate securities and debt-equity mix. Prerequisites: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better & ECON 102.

BUSS205 - Business Law

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to both business and personal needs. The primary focus is on contract law and property law. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major.

BUSS208 - Financial Statement Analysis

In this course, students will examine financial statements and other financial reports with a view towards using accounting information in making investing, lending, and other potential management decisions. Students explore methods of constructing, comparing, and analyzing these statements and reports and the various uses of such analyses. Prerequisite: BUSS202 with a grade of C or higher

BUSS210 - Federal Income Taxes

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, businesses, and not-for-profit, taxable entities. Students will explore a broad range of tax topics, emphasizing the role of taxation in business decision-making process, tax research, and tax planning. -Prerequsite: BUSS201 with a grade C or better

BUSS211 - Fundamentals of Financial Modeling

In this course, students will build applications and models in Excel to support financial analysis and decision-making. Students will begin by building financial documents using basic Excel applications and functions. They will then move into more advanced skills that include time value of money and statistical functions, text and date usage, regression, conditionals, data tables and random number generation. All techniques will be applied to the most common financial applications and models including present value, cost of capital, financial statement forecasting, and valuation. Also included are the preparation of charts and graphs for use in professional presentations and reports. Problem-solving cases will serve as the foundation for the course. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a “C” or better.

BUSS212 - Management Information Systems

This course takes a managerial approach to information technology concepts and applications. Given the pervasiveness of technology in today's world, professionals in various fields of endeavor often have a major responsibility for determining an organization's information needs and for designing and implementing information systems that support those needs. Students study concepts and issues related to information technology with the goal of understanding how it can be effectively used to improve an organization's over­all effectiveness and increase it's level of success. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, SMGT102, or FASH101.

BUSS218X - Business Operations Simulation

This one-credit course utilizes the exciting business simulation program GoVenture CEO. It is a revolutionary business simulation where students manage companies on their own or in teams. Choosing from dozens of ready-to-play industries, students will engage in a simulation that models current events, historical successes or failures, and targets specific challenges or learning outcomes. Students manage their own strategies while monitoring competitive positioning, actions, and other market forces that arise. This simulation is appropriate for any major and any business student who wants a hands-on business management experience.Prerequisite: BUSS 101 or HEM 101

BUSS220 - Principles of Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, COM101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102 AND ENG102 OR WRT102.

BUSS224 - Org Behavior in the Global Workplace

In this course, students study individuals and their interactions within group settings as they affect efficiencies in diverse business organizations. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior on a global scale. Areas covered include structure, leadership, and change as they affect a multitude of cultures. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course.

BUSS225X - Supply Chain Mgmt 1:Log & Forecasting

This course provides a broad overview of the planning and execution of customer demand. It is divided into two parts: Logistics and Planning. In the first segment, we cover the three major building blocks of logistics networks: transportation, warehousing, and inventory. After completing this course, students will be able to differentiate the advantages and disadvantages of different modes of transportation. Students will also understand what goes into designing and setting up a warehousing facility. Finally, students will be able to discuss the development of logistics networks that minimize costs and deliver top customer service. In the second half, planning and forecasting will be covered. Matching supply and demand requires planning. Students will master different forecasting techniques essential for building a sales and operations plan. At the completion of this course, you will have the tools and techniques to analyze demand data, construct different forecasting techniques, and discuss the most suitable one for projecting future demand. In addition, you will be exposed to planning software such as Oracle and SAP, which weave complicated networks of distribution and shipping together in one easy platform and dashboard. This is an introductory course designed to provide you with a start on your learning journey in Logistics and Planning.

BUSS226 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with the fundamentals of accounting processes and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements and how to become intelligent users of financial information. Prerequisite: BUSS105

BUSS227 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions.

BUSS228 - Federal Income Taxes

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, businesses, and not-for-profit, taxable entities. Students will explore a broad range of tax topics, emphasizing the role of taxation in business decision-making process, tax research, and tax planning. -Prerequsite: BUSS201 with a grade C or better

BUSS229X - Supply Chain Mgmt II:Sourcing/Operations

This course provides an overview of Sourcing and Operations, and is divided into two parts. In the first part, students will learn the key components of sourcing: supplier selection, pricing constraints, supplier segmentation, make vs buy decisions and supplier relationships. In the second part, students will learn both the Lean Inventory business model, ISO900, issues surrounding quality control, and Six Sigma methodology. This will offer students an overview of sourcing logistics, choices surrounding those logistics and the parameters in place to ensure quality and production efficiencies. Students will have the opportunity to apply this knowledge to various product categories in a number of industries. Lastly, the course will be supplemented by guest lecturers, relevant videos, white papers and journal research to supplement their engagement with the course. About the Lasell/RIZE Supply Chain Management: This is the second course in a three-course track designed by Rutgers Supply Chain Management Professor Rudolph Leuschner along-side faculty from Lasell University. As global networks have continued to expand in the age of the internet, Supply Chain Management has become one of the most critical areas for companies with a global presence to create value. The goal of these courses is to deliver students a full skill set in supply chain management, one of the fastest-growing job segments at Fortune 500 companies across the country. Prerequisites: BUSS225X

BUSS231 - Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation

Entrepreneurship drives global innovation and economic growth. This course exposes business students to the study of entrepreneurship and the venture creation process. Topics include analyzing new business opportunities, developing business propositions, new venture planning and financing, marketing activities, financial controls, and other topics relevant to the entrepreneurial process. Students interact with faculty, local entrepreneurs, and small business owners/managers. As a culmination activity of this course, students are responsible for the development and presentation of a business plan. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101 or SMGT102

BUSS232 - Global Operation Strategies

This course examines how operations can be used as sources of competitive advantage in international business. The class will focus on understanding the need to formulate an operational strategy (long-term plan) and making strategic operational decisions. The old view of operations management as the task of maintaining a comparatively static production or service facility has given way to one characterized by a need for renewed flexibility, relentless improvement, and the development of new capabilities at the operating unit level. As a result of this changing environment, the skills required of operations managers across the globe have changed as well. This course is based primarily on case studies supported by conceptual frameworks.

BUSS233 - American Enterprise Experience

This course examines the American enterprise experience from colonial times until the present. The course touches upon the business component of the American experience beginning with the individual artisan-merchant through the great innovators and organizers of the 19th and 20th centuries and beyond. The historical events, cultural changes, social upheavals, and political shifts that have influenced the development of the American business environment are the core of the study. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, FASH101, or SMGT102

BUSS235 - Ethics in Business

This course analyzes ethical issues that arise in a wide range of contemporary business practices, both domestically and globally. It is designed to stimulate critical thinking on ethical issues, corporate social responsibility, and professional challenges encountered in business. The course material enables students to recognize and manage ethical issues and to develop their own standards of integrity and professionalism as applied to the business world. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102

BUSS237 - Global Leadership

In this course, students analyze what it means to be a global leader in the 21st century and identify the skills necessary to be successful in an increasingly global business climate. Students explore this question personally, collectively, and globally in a creative and collaborative atmosphere. Students examine classic as well as contemporary theories of leadership and how they apply to the dynamic global business culture. The course provides students with the opportunity to acquire perspectives and skills essential to successful management in the emerging markets that are increasingly becoming key contenders in world commercial enterprise. Prerequisite BUSS 224.

BUSS301 - Intermediate Accounting I

This course builds on concepts developed in Financial Accounting. Concentration is on the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to the preparation of financial statements with an in-depth review of cash, receivables, inventories, and plant assets. The course also covers the concept of the time value of money and the application of present value techniques to accounting valuations. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS302 - Intermediate Accounting II

This course is designed to continue the concepts of financial accounting and present a more thorough analysis of the requirements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Included in this course are earnings per share calculations, lease accounting, and pension accounting. The cash flow statement is also studied. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a grade C or better.

BUSS304 - Working Capital Management

This course explores working capital management, credit management, working capital funding, and the major sources of financing debt and equity. Students undertake financial analyses of theoretical models and real-world firms and organizations, recommend financing strategies, and present their findings by using management reporting methods. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade C or Better

BUSS306 - Accounting Information Systems

The course teaches conceptual, analytic and technical skills necessary to work efficiently and productively as an accountant or auditor in an automated environment. The course focuses on today’s typical business that is heavily dependent on information and how the business entity collects enormous volumes of data, stores that data and when needed, transforms that data into usable business information. The course involve hands on use of Microsoft Excel spreadsheet skills and will further develop these skills to use Excel's more advanced functions suitable for data storage and analysis. Hands on use of Microsoft Access is also utilized to teach data modelling skills. Prerequisite: BUSS202 with a C or better.

BUSS307 - International Finance

This course explores the ways and means to reduce financial risk involved in international financial management. The course deals with the interrelationship between the international monetary environment and financial planning for corporations with overseas operations. Students will analyze the effects on international financial planning of such factors as exchange rate fluctuations, currency restrictions, and tax regulations. Students will examine financial aspects of multinational businesses including foreign investment, trade, and transfer of funds. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade C or Better

BUSS308 - Government & Not-for-Profit Accounting

This course introduces financial accounting and reporting issues related to state and local government and non-profit organizations, including universities and health care facilities. Prerequisite: BUSS201 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS309 - Fraud Examination

This course covers techniques for identification and detection of asset misappropriation schemes and fraudulent financial statements, who commits fraud and why, and controls to prevent and detect problems. Prerequisite: BUSS201 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS310 - Advanced Financial Management

This course builds on the concepts introduced in BUSS203 and focuses on financial decisions made within corporate environments. Financial risk and return, capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure, working capital management, and distribution policy are emphasized. Current topics in financial management will also be included. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade of or better.

BUSS311 - Investments

This course explores the fundamentals of investing. The strategies used to create money from financial capital are thoroughly examined. Financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, futures, options, and commodities are explored. The measurement tools used to assign risk and rate of return, performance, and value are covered. Students learn how to develop, analyze, and maintain a portfolio. Regulatory and ethical issues are examined and considered in the decision-making process. Prerequisite: BUSS201 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS312 - Risk Management

The basics of risk management are covered in this course. Problems of liability and personal loss exposures of a business are examined. Private insurance programs such as health and life insurance, and employee benefit plans are examined and assessed. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS313 - Business Negotiations

This course examines various negotiating tactics and techniques as they relate to different situations and environments. Particular attention is paid to buyer-seller communications, including negotiations of contracts and agreements. Students study the strengths and weaknesses of strategies used by both buyers and sellers. Prerequisites: BUSS 201, BUSS 220 and MATH 104.

BUSS315 - Emerging Global Markets

This course focuses on developing skills, strategies and insights crucial to conducting successful business operations in the emerging markets of Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Africa, including the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for unprecedented economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and incomes, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. In this course, students study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors (such as the government and NGOs); analyze opportunities and risks presented by emerging markets; and analyze the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets. Prerequisite: BUSS101

BUSS319 - Cost Accounting

This course focuses on a typical firm’s cost data and how that data can transformed into information for business analysis and decision making. Topics include how to identify fixed versus variable cost, cost volume profit analysis, flexible budgeting, Activity Based Costing, and standard cost systems with detail variance analysis. Process and job order costing systems are examined in terms of how these systems are used to accumulate cost to determine accurate product or service costs and why this is necessary in setting product/service selling prices to maximize profits. Other topics include the numerous cost allocation processes that take place in the typical manufacturing and service industries, and transfer pricing within companies that are doing business internationally. Prerequisite: BUSS202 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS320 - Consumer Behavior

This course examines the behavior of individuals and markets in relation to the purchase decision, including post-purchase evaluation and con­sumption. A behavioral science approach is taken. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS322 - Marketing Communications

This course focuses on a broad view of advertising dealing with planning, creation, and execution in relation to the marketing cycle. Topics include: organization and operation of the advertising agency; publicity; public relations; behavioral sciences as applied to advertising; budgeting; and planning. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS324 - E-Business

This course explores, in detail, how the Internet affects the buying and selling of goods and services in the marketplace. Topics include Internet and mobile business models, electronic commerce infrastructure issues, designing effective web sites, payment and security issues, and the legal and ethical challenges of electronic commerce. The course will culminate in the development of an e-business plan and webpage. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101 or SMGT102

BUSS325 - Sales Principles

Students in this course will analyze salesmanship in modern business with emphasis placed on the principles and techniques of individual selling styles in both retail and wholesale markets. Topics covered include: dramatization of the sale presentation; the selling role; buyer characteristics and motivations; modern sales practices; corporate sales planning; sales-force policies; time and territory management; forecasting, budgeting; and expense control. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS327 - Life, Health, and Disability Insurance

This course studies the financial implications of death, disability and retirement, and multiple types of life insurance and annuity contracts and their uses. Regulations of life and health insurers, insurer operations and functions, legal aspects, group and individual life and health insurance products including medical, disability income and long-term care policies are covered. Prerequsite: BUSS203 with a grade C or better

BUSS328 - Entertainment Marketing

This course will provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of several major sectors within the entertainment industry. Students will compare and contrast successful entertainment marketing strategies with traditional product-based companies. Entertainment Marketing surveys the strategy, techniques and communication media employed to market the range of entertainment available to the American audience. The course examines the organizations and people who conceive, create and distribute video, film, print, interactive and new technology within the framework of the entertainment promotion landscape. The course demonstrates how advertising, publicity, promotion, research and overall marketing campaigns are created and the impact on the creative and business operations of entertainment companies.The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of the marketing issues faced by entertainment companies, highlighting the experiential nature of the products and the fast-pace of change within the industry. Prerequisite: COM216 or COM302

BUSS329 - New Product Development

New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. A major goal of this course is to help students learn to use an analytic decision-making approach in developing and marketing new products and services that meet customer needs in the consumer, industrial, and service settings. At the end of the course, the student should understand the role of decision models in analytic marketing decision-making; be able to follow the basic steps in opportunity identification, design, testing, and implementation; and know how to read and interpret new product and service market research. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS330 - Managing Change in a Global Marketplace

This course examines the unique problems associated with managing organizations, including those who compete in markets outside of the U.S., during mergers, reorganizations, and other times of significant change. Strategies to cope with change, as well as induce it across cultures, are examined

BUSS331 - Money and Capital Markets

The course offers an extensive examination of the money and capital markets and their importance to the US and global economy. This course will provide students with analytic tools to assess risks faced by investors and savers interacting through financial institutions and financial markets, as well as strategies for assessing and controlling these risks. The course places a heavy emphasis on the study of interest rates due to its importance in all capital markets and as one of the key determinants of the price of any financial asset. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade of C or better

BUSS332 - Cross Cultural Management

In this course, students will explore the process of cross-cultural management and the challenges of working internationally. The course focuses on international organizational behavior, human resource issues and practices in global organizations. The course is divided into three parts: The first focuses on understanding the cultural roots of behavior in organizations; the second on the Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management issues that are relevant to international managers; and the third seeks to prepare students for international assignments. Prerequisite: BUSS224

BUSS333 - Estate Planning and Trust

This course provides students with the knowledge base and analytical skills needed for effective financial planning and administration. Topics include wills, lifetime transfers, trusts, gifts, estate reduction techniques, tax implications in estate planning, business and inter-family transfers, dealing with incompetency, post mortem techniques, and the role of fiduciaries. Prerequsite: BUSS210 with a grade of C or better and BUSS207 with a grade of C or better

BUSS334 - Nonprofit Management

In this course students explore businesses that do not intend to maximize profit and retain it for future expenditures. Managers for nonprofit operations must operate under more regulated conditions and must be well prepared to interact within the public sector. Not-for-profit managers must be well versed in public policy and other regulations that affect them. Students will engage in real projects with non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102.

BUSS336 - Human Resource Management

In this course, students will examine the staffing function of management including planning, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, appraisal, compensation, labor laws, and organizational development. The course also addresses current issues affecting the human resource manager, including the changing work force and need to increase productivity, as well as changes in the area of unions and affirmative action. Both class discussions and case studies are used to prepare students for the personnel and related tasks involved in a management position. Prerequisite: BUSS224

BUSS337 - Managing the Growing Company

This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities of managing a growing entrepreneurial venture. Using practical management techniques, students address the management of rapidly growing entrepreneurial firms. Through a variety of learning activities, including case studies, reading, and visiting entrepreneurs, students examine companies, often family-run, during dynamic transition. The course specifically addresses the challenges faced by companies in various stages of growth and the exceptional challenges of rapid growth. Prerequisites: BUSS 201 & BUSS 231.

BUSS341 - Social Media Marketing

This course takes an in-depth look at social networks, social media platforms and online advertising to offer students an advantage in many positions involving marketing, consulting and brand management, both on the buyer and seller side of social media. Students with an interest in entrepreneurship will also find the course useful as new businesses often rely on social media marketing. The course covers a number of topics including the differences and interaction between traditional and social media; two-sided markets and social media platforms (including verticals such as gaming, shopping and entertainment); basic theory of social networks online and offline (graph theory, sociology, information diffusion); consumer behavior and digital media; social media analytics and monitoring; brand strategies on social media; best marketing practices for paid and unpaid social media; and B2B marketing and social media. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to become Hubspot certified. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS349 - Cost Accounting

This course focuses on a typical firm’s cost data and how that data can transformed into information for business analysis and decision making. Topics include how to identify fixed versus variable cost, cost volume profit analysis, flexible budgeting, Activity Based Costing, and standard cost systems with detail variance analysis. Process and job order costing systems are examined in terms of how these systems are used to accumulate cost to determine accurate product or service costs and why this is necessary in setting product/service selling prices to maximize profits. Other topics include the numerous cost allocation processes that take place in the typical manufacturing and service industries, and transfer pricing within companies that are doing business internationally. Prerequisite: BUSS202 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS403 - Advanced Accounting

This course examines specialized topics in financial accounting. Problems associated with the partnership form of business organization, including partnership formation, division of income and losses, changes in ownership, and partnership liquidation are reviewed. Topics also include the subject of business combinations with emphasis on consolidated financial statements of parents and subsidiaries and elimination of intercompany transactions, accounting for foreign operations, and fund accounting as it relates to municipalities. Prerequsite: BUSS302 with grade of C or better and Senior Standing

BUSS406 - Financial Strategy

This is a capstone course utilizing lecture, discussion, and case analysis to define the process of financial management. The course of study presents the concepts of the advanced capital budget centering on decision-making concerning capital structure, dividend policy, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, reorganization, and international finance and exchange rates. Prerequisite: BUSS203 with a grade of C or better & Senior Standing

BUSS407 - Digital Branding

The art of good branding requires a meaningful promise, strong values and a consistent experience. As business is driven from traditional to digitally-driven models, brands must adapt and consider how they best respond without abandoning core principles. Students in Digital Branding will learn best practices on how companies translate brand tenets to a digitally-driven world, focusing on the online experience, social media and mobile platforms. In a team, project-based approach, students will also have the opportunity to apply best practices to develop digital branding strategies for those companies who may be falling behind. Prerequisite: BUSS220, COM221 or FASH310

BUSS408 - Auditing

This courses examines the impact of auditing on constituencies external and internal to organizations, especially stockholders and management. Students examine the role of both the independent public accountant and the internal auditor, and study various control and reporting techniques involved in auditing. Prerequisites: BUSS302 with a grade of C or better and Senior Standing

BUSS410 - Auditing

This courses examines the impact of auditing on constituencies external and internal to organizations, especially stockholders and management. Students examine the role of both the independent public accountant and the internal auditor, and study various control and reporting techniques involved in auditing. Prerequisites: BUSS302 with a grade of C or better and Senior Standing

BUSS413 - Advanced Accounting

This course examines specialized topics in financial accounting. Problems associated with the partnership form of business organization, including partnership formation, division of income and losses, changes in ownership, and partnership liquidation are reviewed. Topics also include the subject of business combinations with emphasis on consolidated financial statements of parents and subsidiaries and elimination of intercompany transactions, accounting for foreign operations, and fund accounting as it relates to municipalities. Prerequsite: BUSS302 with grade of C or better and Senior Standing

BUSS420 - Marketing Research

Students in this course will examine the process and tools involved in collecting, coding, and analyzing data. The course further integrates the application of computer software in compiling and interpreting statistical data in relation to marketing decisions, such as those related to market segmentation and distribution. Prerequisites: BUSS220 and MATH208

BUSS422 - Global Marketing

The complexity of operating in the global marketplace makes many demands on the marketer. The globalization of marketing takes place after the company has international experience in multiple markets. The three fundamental areas of corporate globalization are covered in this course: (1) integrate sourcing, production, and marketing; (2) allocate resources to achieve a balanced portfolio and growth; and (3) coordinate marketing activities across countries and regions. Importing, exporting, and licensing considerations are also explored. Prerequisite: BUSS220 with a grade of C or better.

BUSS425 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

This seminar offers an in-depth exploration of advanced entrepreneurship topics of current interest and importance. Using case studies and actual entrepreneurial ventures, students explore entrepreneurship with a focus on leadership, marketing, development, management, and growth of new business ventures. Students learn the practical skills needed to succeed as an entrepreneur and how to apply best practices for planning, initiating, and growing new companies. The course also emphasizes the analysis and evaluation of actual entrepreneurial ventures. Subjects vary from semester to semester. Prerequisites: BUSS 337

BUSS431X - Branding Strategy

The purpose of this course is to create an understanding of the role of branding in driving business growth and the larger role of brands in popular culture. Students will study examples of both for profit and non-profit brands from the 20th and 21st centuries to see what constitutes success and how brands stay relevant in terms of social, cultural, and technological trends. Students will learn the key processes entailed in developing a brand strategy and the elements that drive brand admiration. Students will apply these principles utilizing a project-based approach for a brand in development or an established brand in need of repositioning. Prerequisite: BUSS220

BUSS432 - Marketing Strategy

This course is designed to facilitate the formulation and implementation of marketing strategy. The course builds upon topics and concepts covered in more junior marketing courses. As part of the learning experience, students will engage in a simulation program with teams taking charge of a company within a competitive environment. Prerequisite: BUSS220 with a grade of C or better

BUSS440 - Business Capstone

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. This is a writing intensive course. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Prerequisite: Senior standing, Major within the School of Business

BUSS497 - Business Internship Seminar

This internship for students within the School of Business is scheduled to take place during the student's senior year (juniors are permitted with permission). Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours in a position related to their field of study. The hours are completed concurrently with weekly class meetings and course work. Detailed reports, reflective exercises, weekly journal entries, a final comprehensive project, and other written requirements are completed throughout the internship process. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major. Prerequisite: Senior Standing, Major within the School of Business

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ECON102 - Principles of Econ-Macro

This course explores basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole and policies designed to affect its performance. Topics include economic scarcity; causes of unemployment and inflation; money and monetary policy; the impact of government taxation and spending; and the federal debt. Some consideration is given to international economic problems and to contrasting economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development.

ECON206 - Global Economic Development

The goal of this course is to introduce the main issues of global economic development. Students will explore the problems facing developing countries of the world as they attempt to industrialize, develop their economies and raise the standards of living of their people. The course will address the following broad questions: What is the meaning of Economic development? Why some countries are rich while others are poor? What would explain the success of such East Asian countries as China? What are the key constrains that prevent poor countries, especially those in the African continent, from achieving progress? What are the strategies that poor countries can adopt to foster development?

ECON207 - Vietnam Immersion

This fall semester course is linked to two weeks of service-learning in Vietnam during the winter break. The course introduces students to the Vietnamese society today. It covers basic elements of Vietnamese politics, economic development, culture, history, language, literature, and arts. The experience in Vietnam includes working for non-profit organizations that deal with social problems. This course fulfills the Multicultural Area of Inquiry. Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Vietnam program director.

ECON301 - International Trade & Finance

This course examines theory, tariffs, and import quotas; adjustment mechanisms, foreign exchange, and exchange controls are also covered. Additional topics include the theory of comparative advantage, the causes and consequences of imbalances in the balance of payments or exchange rates, and the evolution of the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102.

ENV101 - Intro to Environmental Studies (KP)

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

ENV102 - Environmental Ethics & Society

This course explores issues and problems arising out of ethical considerations related to the general environment and specific ecosystems. Also considered are the moral aspects of population control and resource use. The foundations for beliefs and worldviews regarding nature and the human relationship to it are explored. In addition, the variety of philosophical perspectives and pragmatic choices and actions people take related to environmental ethics are studied.

ENV201 - Environmental Law & Policy

This course examines the role of law and politics in the management of natural resources and the environment. The course first reviews the major US environmental protection legislation and then explores the process of developing and establishing environmental policy related to water, air, energy, and land resources. Historical and contemporary circumstances that influence public policy decisions, the influence of science and technology, social and economic paradigms, and ethics and values are discussed. Even though the emphasis is on domestic U.S. policies and institutions, international issues are addressed, including how US domestic environmental policies influence and are influenced by global forces. This is a writing intensive course.

ENV202 - Gardening for Sustainability(KP)

Autumn is a critical time for the sustainable garden. It is a time of harvest and preparation. In this course, students will research and establish the rhythms of the late season garden by participating in the next stages of development in the campus community garden. Together, we will harvest, save seeds, start special fall plantings, and put the garden to bed. Projects will include teaming up with kids from The Barn and members of the Village.The course will also look at gardening and its role in the local food system, as a form of both self-sufficiency and community support. We will study and practice different methods of propagation and seed banking, and research the garden as its own ecological system. We’ll also look at recent innovation in garden design and small-scale agriculture, including vertical and rotating greenhouse systems, with an eye towards futuristic sustainable design.

ENV204 - Environmental Economics

This course explores economic problems associated with environmental issues. The course introduces modeling and analytical tools used in the field. The course first examines the problem of market failure in the presence of externalities and public goods, and considers public policy responses to these market failures, including command-and-control regulations, tax and subsidy incentives, and marketable pollution permits. The course then addresses the methods to measure the costs and benefits of environmental improvements and how these types of analysis are used in public policy decisions. These decisions are analyzed in the context of problems such as air pollution, ozone depletion and global warming, threats to biodiversity, and development. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ECON101

ENV205 - Green Business

All businesses, from oil companies to computer manufacturers want to be "green." Being "green" is not only good for a business' marketing and publicity, but it also helps the bottom line. This course examines what it means to be a "green" business. Topics include the Triple Bottom Line, sourcing materials, energy management and recycling.

ENV206 - Gardening for Sustainability

From wartime Victory Gardens to today’s community gardens, we are experiencing a resurgence in the popularity of gardening as a means of expanding personal sustainability. This course will explore topics in organic gardening, biodynamics and permaculture. We will study garden planning and design, including selection of heirloom varieties, designing with available space, and innovation in small-­-scale agriculture. The course will have an applied focus on participating in the next stages of development for the campus community garden, including seed selection, seed starting and early season planting.

ENV207 - Chemistry for a Sustainable Future

This course will engage students in thinking about environmental problems through the context of chemistry. The relevance of chemistry to such topics as air pollution, climate change, and water management will be explored. Students will be challenged to consider the application of chemistry to help address many of these problems.

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell University on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

ENV220 - World Geography (KP)

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

ENV302 - Natural Resource Management/GIS

This course surveys natural resource issues from global to local scales through the use of geographic information systems (GIS). GIS, remotely sensed images, and global positioning systems are used as tools in managing community natural resources. Students map natural resources and community features to explore management strategies. Students work with town commissions, state agencies, and environmental organizations to obtain spatial data for analysis.

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

ENV304 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV305 - Energy: Moving on from Fossil Fuel

Our economic prosperity relies on burning fossil fuels to power everything from our trucks to our office computers. As fossil fuels become more scarce, it is necessary to find other sources of energy. This course introduces students to our energy grid and to alternative sources of energy like wind, solar and geothermal. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 211

ENV400 - Internship

This internship is scheduled to take place during the junior year and introduces students to challenges faced by companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies. Placement is tailored to meet the student’s career goals and interests in the environmental field. Students work 150 hours over the course of the semester alongside professionals in the field. Written reflections are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship as well as regular meetings with the internship supervisor. The internship supervisor monitors each student’s performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 102, ENV 201, ENV 211.

ENV420 - Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

This course is a capstone course in Environmental Studies that focuses on current issues and trends in the environmental field. Students complete an applied thesis or practicum project in an area related to their particular interest and present it to the class and/or at symposium. Environmental career opportunities are discussed along with resume development, networking, interviewing techniques, and other career development skills. Prerequisites: ENV 400, Senior standing.

HEM101 - Hospitality Management

This course examines the Hospitality and Tourism industry with emphasis on individual sectors of the industry and their business functions. The infrastructure and interrelationships of lodging, tourism, food service, events, and entertainment organizations are examined. Career opportunities, current operational issues, and emerging trends in the hospitality industry are also explored. Students will have the opportunity to become Certified Guest Service Providers (CGSP) as part of the course.

HEM102 - Fundamentals of Event Management

Orders (BEO's), client management, vendor management and contract negotiations are introduced. This course is hands-on, allowing the student to apply basic skills and techniques for negotiating with suppliers and service contractors. This is a project driven course and includes industry certifications. Students will have the opportunity to become certified in Delphi event planning software, CVENT software and Social Tables event diagramming software as part of the course.

HEM103 - Economic Development & Mgmt in Tourism

This course offers a survey of trends and developments in the hospitality and tourism industry, including a total approach to lodging operations, events management, global tourism, and foodservice establishments. It offers an introduction to the broad fields of travel and tourism. Among the topics covered are cultural tourism, eco-tourism, sociology of tourism, tourism development, the economic role of tourism demand and tourism marketing. Prerequisite: HEM101

HEM108 - Distinguished Hospitality Speaker Series

Open to all students. This course offers a series of guest lectures by high-level hospitality industry executives covering all phases of hospitality and event management including strategy, marketing, brand management, operations, and finance across all sectors of the industry. Students are given the opportunity to learn about each distinguished speaker’s views of the current and future challenges and opportunities of the hospitality industry; the strategies their organizations will follow to meet these challenges; the career paths followed by these executives; and job opportunities available for hospitality program interns and graduates. Students complete assignments based on each week's speakers, their company backgrounds, opportunities available and the current industry climate.

HEM199 - Field Exp Prep & Prof Development in HEM

This course introduces students to field experience, internship and career planning, and highlights how students can be more entrepreneurial and business focused as they look to the future. This course is designed to prepare students for the process of acquiring an internship and developing their long-term career goals. Students assess their personal background; practice finding career opportunities through the job search process; develop a cover letter, resume, practice networking and begin developing a portfolio; Additionally, students will participate in mock interviews and demonstrate how to deal with interpersonal situations found in the workplace. This course also focuses on workplace interactions including employee communication, management and leadership, the art of self-marketing, team building, conflict management, problem solving in the workplace and strategies for effective negotiation. Visits with potential employers and participation in networking sessions are a vital component of this course. Prerequisite: HEM 101 or HEM 102 with a C or better

HEM205 - Private Club Management

This course explores many areas vital to the success of club management, including business, finance, food, beverage, facilities, sales, operations, and multiple recreational activities while stressing the supreme importance of customer service quality. By taking this course, students will explore a field that covers all aspects of the hospitality industry. We are privileged to be in a great location, close to many of the area’s most notable private clubs, which provides students with employment experience and internship opportunities. Prerequisite: HEM 101

HEM206 - Lodging Management

This course provides an in-depth view of the various aspects and departments that fall under what is commonly known as Lodging Management or Lodging Operations. Some of the specific departments this course explores are - Front Office, Housekeeping, Human Resources, Security, Engineering, Maintenance, Food and Beverage, Recreation, and Accounting and Finance. Aside from the various operational procedures utilized, the course also addresses service philosophies, best practices, revenue management, and technology. Prerequisite: HEM 101 with a grade of C or better

HEM207 - Resort & Casino Management

This course provides students with an introduction to the hospitality management specialization of Resort and Casino Management. Subjects covered include operational infrastructures of resorts and casinos, organizational structures, service in resort and casino environments, securities, technologies, and revenue management and tourism. This course includes guest speakers and site visits. Prerequisite: HEM101 with a grade of C or better

HEM208 - Human Resources in Hospitality

This course examines management considerations for the successful operation of a major hospitality organization. Emphases is placed on the various departments and how each contributes to the recreation, ancillary and lodging areas including service experiences. This includes recreation development, risk management, visitor education, rental and retail operations, lodging, guest services, and human resources management. Students will learn how each of these departments function, along with the many skills required to address the issues and challenges faced in everyday operations. Course assignments focus on human resources operations, industry regulations and certification, risk management, guest service, and dealing with seasonality. These particular areas are studied in relation to resorts of different sizes and scales from all over the world so that comparisons can be made regarding different management and operational procedures, regulations, and guest expectations. Prerequisite: BUSS224.

HEM209 - Exploration of the Global Casino Market

Students in this course will study materials and case studies related to specific components of major casino markets as well as take part in both a day-long visit to the limited casino market in Connecticut and a 4-5 day site visit to Las Vegas during the college’s spring recess. The course will provide students who are interested specifically in the resort and casino segment of the hospitality industry direct exposure to the industry in the country’s largest casino market. Focus will be placed on current issues and events affecting the industry and, in particular, the companies that will be visited during the site visits. Students will study and meet with executives from different resort and casino departments at major resort/casino operations including Slots and Table Games Operations, Human Resources, Marketing, Security, Surveillance, Food and Beverage, and more. Prerequisite: HEM207 with a grade of C or better

HEM213 - Global Issues in Hospitality

In this course, students will examine the position of hospitality in the global market place. The course explores factors influencing the global environment and the contemporary struggle for economic/political power between world regions and the impact on the hospitality industry. The role and significance of hospitality multinationals in light of the current trend of sustainability is analyzed. In addition, the global drivers and industry strategies affecting multinationals are explored. Finally, students will analyze the role of culture and its impact on different management styles in an international industry. Prerequisite: HEM101 or HEM102 with a grade of C or better

HEM214 - Ecotourism

Ecotourism promotes cultural and environmental awareness and has local, environmental and economic benefits. This course introduces students to the history, principles, marketing, and management of ecotourism activities and development. The course takes a holistic approach to planning and tourism development and standard industry practices and processes are discussed. Students enrolled in this course participate in an educational trip to Belize to view, research, and participate in a newly developing ecotourism system. Students must apply and be selected and may only register with the permission of the Ecotourism Program Director.

HEM215 - Meeting & Convention Sales & Planning

This course provides an overview of conference planning and group coordination as it relates to the sale and final contract. Students become familiar with Meetings, Expositions, Events, and Conventions (MEEC), destination specialists, negotiating with suppliers and service contractors, meeting budgets, travel planners, and their place of importance within the industry. Site evaluations are analyzed as they relate to group needs. Emphasis is placed on the development of a group resume agendas, analyses of service options, and contractual and legal liability issues. Prerequisite: HEM 102 with a C or better.

HEM299 - Field Experience I

This course provides a supervised work experience in the hospitality or event management industry as a complement to academic coursework. Students earn 150 hours in the field, gain practical skills in a business environment, and begin to view the workplace from a management perspective. During the course of the field experience, students keep a personal reflective journal of critical incidents. In addition, they complete a detailed profile of the management systems and policies at their workplace for submission at the end of the field experience. Students participate in weekly discussion groups during the course of the semester to evaluate and compare their experiences. No Prerequisite.

HEM301 - Social Event Management

This course explores the complex area of special and social event planning, including non-profit, community, corporate, wedding, religious, holiday, and other major social events. The course provides students with a basis for using research as a tool to plan and organize special events. The class works toward understanding, practicing, and executing the elements of successful event planning such as budgeting, site-selection, food and beverage management, promotions, and site logistics. This is a project-based course and requires the execution of a successful event. Prerequisite: HEM 102 with a C or better.

HEM302 - Casino Regulation & Security

This course is designed to give an in-depth overview of the regulatory, legal, and security aspects of the casino industry including federal and local gaming laws and regulations, difficulties and liabilities surrounding those regulations, casino cage operations, surveillance operations, and security technologies. Prerequisite: HEM207 with a grade of C or better

HEM303 - Law & Ethics in Hospitality

This course provides a study of the nature and function of both legal and ethical issues as applied to the hospitality industry. Topics include operator relationships, contract law, torts, civil rights, wage and labor laws, gaming laws, property law, and insurable risks. This course also examines ethical issues in the hospitality industry. Prerequisites: HEM101 with a grade of C or better and HEM208 or BUSS336

HEM305 - Resort Management & Development

This course examines management considerations for the successful operation of a major resort. Emphases is placed on the various departments and how each contributes to the recreation, ancillary and lodging areas including service experiences. This includes recreation development, risk management, visitor education, rental and retail operations, lodging, guest services, and human resources management. Students will learn how each of these departments function, along with the many skills required to address the issues and challenges faced in everyday operations. Course assignments focus on human resources operations, industry regulations and certification, risk management, guest service, and dealing with seasonality. These particular areas are studied in relation to resorts of different sizes and scales from all over the world so that comparisons can be made regarding different management and operational procedures, regulations, and guest expectations. Prerequisite: HEM207 with a grade of C or better

HEM307 - Tech for Resort & Casino Management

This course explores principles of executive casino operations as they relate to technology. The course also provides hands-on opportunities for students to both observe and work within real programs including, but not limited to, casino operations business assessments, casino floor operations financial integrations, pit and floor statistics analysis, casino credit authorizer development, cage operations management software, casino accounting programs, table games accounting audits, currency transaction reporting, and surveillance technology. Students must be 21 years of age by April 1st of the year the course is running in order to enroll. Prerequisite: HEM207 with a grade of C or better and Permission of the Instructor.

HEM321 - Revenue Management & Technology

This course provides an advanced overview of the revenue management function in the hospitality industry. Revenue management is a method for managing capacity profitability. This course offers an integrated approach to maximizing revenue that includes capacity analysis, demand forecasting, differential pricing, and distribution technology. The objective of this course is to help students learn how to apply the principles of revenue management to maximize profitability in the hospitality industry. Topics to be covered include demand forecasting, competitive analysis, overbooking, distribution channels, reservations systems, information technology, process design, differential pricing, inventory control, performance measurement and related management and marketing issues. An academic certificate of completion in Revenue Management from American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute is also embedded in this course. Students learn to distinguish between tactical and strategic revenue management, addresses the proper use and importance of revenue management in hospitality operations, and describes a wide range of elements that must be considered in order to use revenue management effectively. Prerequisite BUSS201

HEM399 - Field Experience II

This course provides an additional supervised work experience in the hospitality or event management industry as a complement to academic coursework. Students earn 150 hours in the field, gain practical skills in a business environment, and begin to view the workplace from a management perspective. During the course of the field experience, students keep a personal reflective journal of critical incidents. In addition, students complete a detailed profile of the management systems and policies at their workplace for submission at the end of the field experience. Students participate in weekly discussion groups during the course of the semester to evaluate and compare their experiences. Students must have the company and position approved by the course instructor. Prerequisite HEM299

HEM401 - Managing Quality in Hospitality

This course explores the application of customer service quality as well as management theories and techniques in the hospitality industry with a focus on organizational effectiveness. Case studies and major projects with real hospitality companies facilitate students’ synthesis of previous knowledge with the principles of service quality and excellence. This is a research project driven course. Prerequisites: BUSS 224 & MATH 208.

HEM402 - Casino & Gaming Operations

This course provides students with an advanced look into the hospitality management specialization of Resort and Casino Management. Students learn advanced strategic management skills and theory as they relate to both resorts and casinos. Key topics include how to responsibly overcome common challenges in the industry, managerial and human resource challenges, marketing strategies, labor laws and disputes, operations strategies, and resort realestate development and planning. The goal of this course is to aid students in developing decision-making, financial, and strategic management skills appropriate for careers in the casino and resort industries. Students develop an advanced understanding of the stakeholders and industry practices necessary for success in managerial and executive positions. Prerequisite: HEM207 with a grade of C or better

HEM403 - Food & Beverage Management

This course examines the details of food and beverage management, with an emphasis on running a profitable operation and understanding basic menu and beverage detail. It examines the impact of menu planning, purchasing, receiving, inventory control, production, pairing and service to the guest. Students apply commonly-used formulas and strategies for calculating appropriate selling prices and evaluating actual cost percentages. Special attention is paid to the use of management systems and tools to help minimize food, beverage and labor costs, to ensure collection of revenue, and ultimately to maximize profits. Topics include purchasing, safe-serving, receiving, storage, production, beverage management and appreciation, beverage service and cost control. The course also explores basic culinary and beverage menu building and appreciation topics. Case studies are incorporated into class discussions. Students must be 21 years of age prior to April 1st of the course year to register. Prerequisites: HEM101 or HEM102 with a grade of C or better and Permission of the Instructor

HEM405 - Hotel Franchising & Brand Management

This course overs an in-depth study of Hotel Franchising & Brand Management, particularly focusing of key advantages & disadvantage of franchising, evaluation of hotel brands & their fees, growth strategies, entry into new global markets, importance of franchisor & franchisee relationships, franchise & management contracts, & key insights of brand management in the hotel industry. Prerequisite: HEM206 with a grade of C or better

HEM408 - Senior Hospitality Leadership Seminar

Open to all senior Hospitality Management, Event Management, and Resort and Casino Management majors and Event Management minors. This course is designed to allow a limited number of students to interact directly with several high-level hospitality leaders in an informal, intimate setting. The course offers a unique networking opportunity between students and high-level industry executives, including the opportunity to listen to seminars covering all phases of management including strategy, marketing, brand management, operations and finance across all sectors of the hospitality and event management industry. Students are given the opportunity to learn about the distinguished speaker’s views of the current and future challenges and opportunities of the hospitality industry; the strategies their organizations will follow to meet these challenges; the career paths followed by these executives; and job opportunities available for hospitality program interns and graduates. Students will interview industry executives one-on-one, host roundtable discussions with speakers, and complete a major research project based on these interactions, their background research, and their own career goals. Additional assignments given are based on the week's speakers, their company backgrounds, opportunities available and the current industry climate. Prerequisite: Senior Standing HM, EM or RCM majors or EM minors only

HEM496 - Hospitality Operations Capstone

This is a capstone course in Hospitality and Event Management that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific hospitality focus, current trends in the industry and career interests. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing & HEM401

HEM499 - Internship

: This course provides a supervised work experience in the hospitality or event management industry as a complement to academic coursework. Students earn 250 contact hours in the field, gain practical skills in a business environment, and begin to view the workplace from a management perspective. During the course of the field experience, students keep a personal reflective journal of critical incidents. In addition, they complete a detailed profile of the management systems and policies at their workplace for submission at the end of the field experience. Students participate in weekly discussion groups during the course of the semester to evaluate and compare their experiences. Students must have completed a minimum of 30 hours’ academic credit and have permission of the program chair. An academic certificate of completion in Leadership & Management in the Hospitality & Event Industry from American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute is also embedded in this course. Students will learn how to improve their leadership abilities and develop an understanding of high-performance teams and employee empowerment in the hospitality industry. It will also provide an understanding of diversity and cultural change. Practical information prepares leaders to put management tools into action to enhance service and boost business. Prerequisite HEM299

INTC102 - Introduction to Computer Science

This introduction to computer science, developed by Google and their university partners, emphasizes problem solving and data analysis skills along with computer programming skills. Using Python, students learn design, implementation, testing, and analysis of algorithms and programs. And within the context of programming, they will learn to formulate problems, think creatively about solutions, and express those solutions clearly and accurately. Problems will be chosen from real-world examples such as graphics, image processing, cryptography, data analysis, astronomy, video games, and environmental simulation. Students get instruction from a world-class computer science professor, delivered remotely through video and interactive media and attend class for collaborative team projects to solve real-life problems, similar to those a team at Google might face. As part of the course, students also hear from Google engineers about their careers in the tech industry and learn how they can prepare for similar careers. Prior programming experience is not a requirement for this course.

INTC103 - IT Fundamentals

This course provides students with the fundamental skills and concepts required to maintain, support, and work efficiently with personal computers. It will assist students in preparing for the Digital Transformation.The course is organized around the five important uses of technology in business – IT concepts, Infrastructure, Applications and Software Development, Database fundamentals, and Security and Cloud Computing.

INTC105 - Data Warehouse & Business Intelligence

This course begins with an introduction of a data warehouse. Students will learn the concepts, tools, and application of Data Warehouse for business reporting and Online Analytical Processing. The course will also teach students how to create visualizations and dashboards and Descriptive Analytics. Core tools used in this course are Microsoft Excel and SAS Visual Analytics. Excel will be used to teach the basics of Visualizations – like Bar charts and Line charts. in order to increase student expertise in SAS Visual Analytics. SAS Visual Analytics will be used as a tool to introduce students to Data Warehousing and building basic visualizations. Students will also be exposed to Facts and Dimensions.

INTC201X - Analytics using SAS Visual Analytics

This course focuses on building and enhancing skills from the Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence course. Students will expand their concepts of Business Intelligence, Visualizations, Dashboards, and Descriptive Analytics. The core tool used in this course is SAS Visual Analytics. Students will create visualizations, dashboards, and export reports to be able to present to the class. Prerequisite: INTC104X

INTC202 - Data Analytics 

This course provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various aspects of Big Data Analytics. The purpose is to help students acquire foundation skills in Big Data – which can be used to further their specialization in a niche within Big Data. Upon completion of the course students should be able to:•Understand what is Big Data, Cloud Computing and NoSQL Databases.•Various components and architecture of Big Data Analytics.•Different types of Analytics: Text, Descriptive, Predictive and Prescriptive.•How Big Data Analytics is used in different contexts.•Using Analytics and Dashboards to present Actionable Insights.Prerequisite: MATH208

INTC203 - OS + Algorithms

This course serves as an introduction to the theory and structure of modern operating systems including hardware abstraction, process management, memory management, system performance and security. Specific attention is payed to multi-threaded processing, semaphores, locking and interprocess communication.

INTC204 - How to Think Like a Data Scientist

How to Think Like a Data Scientist introduces students to the importance of gathering, cleaning, normalizing, visualizing and analyzing data to drive informed decision-making, no matter the field of study. Students will learn to use a combination of tools and techniques, including spreadsheets, SQL and Python to work on real-world datasets using a combination of procedural and basic machine learning algorithms. They will also learn to ask good, exploratory questions and develop metrics to come up with a well thought-out analysis. Presenting and discussing an analysis of datasets chosen by the students will be an important part of the course. Like INTC 102, this course will be "flipped," with content learned outside of class and classroom time focused on hands-on, collaborative projects. This course is delivered in partnership with Google. As part of the course, students also hear from Google engineers about their careers in the tech industry and learn how they can prepare for similar careers. Prerequisite: INTC 102.

INTC205 - Data Communication & Networks

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of computer networks and data communication including a survey of major protocols, standards, and architectures. Students use concepts and terminology of data communications effectively in describing how software applications and network services communicate with one another. Students read and analyze network traces to monitor communications, diagnose issues, and evaluate protocols. Prereq: INTC102 & INTC103

INTC207 - Cryptology

A course that covers fundamental mathematical concepts from modern algebra, number theory, and other areas of mathematics. Provides a foundation for the understanding of classical encryption systems and modern encryption methods. Emphasis on the mathematical underpinnings germane to cryptoloty. Prepares students for advanced study of modern cryptography. Experience implementing encryption, decryption and cryptanalytic methods on a variety of systems. Prereq: MATH208 & INTC102

INTC301X - Big Data Analytics

This course provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various aspects of Big Data Analytics. The purpose is to help students acquire foundation skills in Big Data – which can be used to further their specialization in a niche within Big Data. Upon completion of the course students should be able to understand: What Big Data, Cloud Computing and NoSQL Databases are; Various components and architecture of Big Data Analytics; Different types of Analytics including Text, Descriptive, Predictive and Prescriptive; and how Big Data Analytics is used in different contexts. Students should also be able to use Analytics and Dashboards to present actionable Insights. This course will use SAS Visual Analytics as one of the tools for illustrating the volume of Big Data, and how it can be used to harness actionable insights. Students will use datasets to create visualizations and actionable insights.

INTC302 - IT Security & Risk Management

This course focuses on the concepts, terminology and practice of network security. Topics include the fundamental goals of network security and practical applications of wired and wireless network security techniques such as applications of cryptology in network protocols, authentication, access control, network security devices such as firewalls and intrusion detection and prevention systems, incident response, log analysis, honeypots and honeynets. Prereq: INTC205

INTC303 - Machine Learning

Machine learning is a type of artificial intelligence (AI) that provides computers with the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. This area is also concerned with issues both theoretical and practical.In this course, we will present algorithms and approaches in such a way that grounds them in larger systems as you learn about a variety of topics, including:statistical supervised and unsupervised learning methods, randomized search algorithms, reinforcement learning: Prereq: INTC102 & INTC202

INTC304 - Marketing Analytics

The course provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various marketing metrics and research methods. The purpose of the course is to allow students to acquire practical marketing skills in Data Analysis via hands-on experience. Prereq: BSS220 & INTC202

INTC305 - Information Assurance & Management

This course focuses on management of the information assurance process. Topics include human factors in reducing security breaches, security incident detection and response, remediation, management's role in information assurance, and other considerations in framing and implementing information assurance policies. Prereq: INTC102 & INTC103

INTC306 - Advanced Python Programming

This course provides students with the opportunity to write useful Python applications in the ETL, web, and data analysis domains and knowledge of industry-standard tools and techniques for working within a development team. The course goes further into Python’s powerful advanced features, such as user-defined classes, object-oriented design, decorators, and generators. Students will learn to employ the most widely used algorithms and libraries to solve common problems in the field and gain a working familiarity with statistical analysis and visualization using Pandas, NumPy, and Matplotlib. . Query and parse HTML, XML, and JSON are used.. Students will learn to apply industry-standard tools and techniques for working within a development team, such as Git for versioning and code review. The course concludes with a discussion of common interview questions and pathways for gaining experience and eventually securing a position in the field.Prereq: INTC102 & INTC202

INTC308 - Predictive & Prescriptive Analytics

In this course, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of the art and science of Predictive Analytics as it relates to improving business performance. This hands-on course covers the key concepts necessary to extract stored data elements, understand what they mean from a business point of view, transform their formats, and derive new relationships among them to produce a dataset suitable for analytical modeling. At the end of the course, participants will be tasked with using these skills to produce a fully processed data set compatible for building powerful predictive models that can be deployed to increase profitability. Prereq: INTC303

INTC310 - Cyberlaw & Cybercrime

This course includes extensive discussion of the legal constraints, both civil and criminal, that underlie acceptable behavior using computers and networks today. Prereq: BUSS205 & INTC103

INTC402 - Analytics with R

This course introduces students to R, a widely used statistical programming language. Students will learn to manipulate data objects, produce graphics, analyse data using common statistical methods, and generate reproducible statistical reports. They will also gain experience in applying these acquired skills in various public policy areas. Prereq: INTC102 & INTC202

INTC403 - Advanced Predictive Analytics

Acquire in-depth knowledge on advanced predictive analytics topics and apply those to real-world situations. These scenarios illustrate the significant role that predictive analytics plays. You pay particular attention to developing your ability to effectively interpret the outcomes of statistical models. You also focus on time series data analysis and survival analysis using the SAS system. Prereq: INTC308

INTC405 - Computer Forensics

This course provides student with the opportunity to perform basic forensic techniques and use appropriate media analysis software. Basics of security, structure and protocols of network operating systems and devices are covered as students will work to gather evidence in a networked environment and to image and restore evidence properly without destroying value. Students will practice gaining evidence from a computer system while maintaining its integrity and a solid chain of custody. Within the laboratory, students will gain hands-on experience in the use of current investigative tools.Prereq: INTC205 & INTC310

INTC409 - Project & Program Management

This course allows students to develop the competencies and skills for planning and controlling projects and understanding interpersonal issues that drive successful project outcomes. Focusing on the introduction of new products and processes, students will examine the project management life cycle, define project parameters, matrix management challenges, effective project management tools and techniques, and take on the role of a project manager. This course is designed to guide students through the fundamental project management tools and behavioral skills necessary to successfully launch, lead, and realize benefits from projects in both for-profit and non-profit organizations. Prereq: Internship & INTC103

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application-based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH108X - Mathematics of Design

This course explores elements of mathematics within the design field from the incorporation of algebra to concepts of geometry. Students will have the opportunity to integrate numerical fluency, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning and communicating quantitative information through group problem solving and class discussions. Topics include pattern drafting, layouts cutting, revenue, cost, and profit modeling, measurement systems, Euclidean geometry, and spatial reasoning.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH110X - Introduction to Logic

An introduction to symbolic logic, including sentential and predicate logic. Its purpose is to familiarize you with certain formal methods for representing and evaluating arguments and reasoning. These methods can be used for any subject matter. The focus is on translating English statements into symbolic notation, and evaluating arguments for validity using formal proof techniques.This course is recommended for data science students, math majors, students who are contemplating graduate school admissions tests, and for general knowledge and application (so, for instance, all computer programming is based on fundamental logic rules and applications). s

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH202 - Applied Mathematics for Business

This course will be a “Choose Option across Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Event Management, Hospitality Management, Accounting and Resort and Casino Management Majors. This course will introduce a variety of mathematical principles and techniques that emphasize applications in business and economics. Topics covered include: systems of linear equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear programming, as well as the development and applications of rates of change. Prerequisite: MATH106

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real-world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH205

MATH301 - Mathematical Modeling

Mathematical Modeling. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205, 206, and 208

MATH303X - Problem Solving

This course will be an exploration into the mathematics exemplified in high quality high school and undergraduate mathematics competitions and mathematical research. The emphasis will be placed on building a repertoire of mathematical strategies and tactics, then applying these methods in unfamiliar situations. Topics will include: Combinatorics, Binomial Theorem, Conditional Probability, Roots of Unity, Symmetric Polynomials, Polynomial Interpolation, and topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry. Students will hone their ability to solve mathematical problems through hands-on practice and obtain an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and tools of the problem solver as illustrated by the textbook and the instructor. Strategies and tools for solving problems include, but are not limited to: •Draw a Diagram•Systematic Lists•Eliminate Possibilities•Matrix Logic•Look for a Pattern•Guess and Check•Sub Problems•Unit Analysis•Solve An Easier Related Problem•Physical Representations•Work Backwards•Venn Diagrams•Finite Differences

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem-solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure.

MATH305X - Advanced Statistics

Quantitative statistical tools for modern data analysis are used across a range of disciplines and industries to guide organizational, societal and scientific advances. Using data sets from across a variety of fields, the focus will be on applications and analysis. Topics include two sample confidence intervals, Chi Square tests, multiple regression analysis, ANOVA, non- parametric tests, sampling, and simulation. Prerequisite: Math 208 or Math 209

MATH306X - Mathematical Content Knowledge for Ed

This course engages students in hands-on, in-depth, practical applications of the mathematical reasoning and computational techniques taught in MATH 304. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Prerequisite: Permission of Education Program Director

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vector functions, advanced techniques of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH322X - Special Topics in Mathematics

Special Topics in Mathematics

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants. Applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, economics, connectivity of networks, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Capstone Seminar

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

MATH706X - Mathematical Content Knowledge for Ed

This course engages students in hands-on, in-depth, practical applications of the mathematical reasoning and computational techniques for teachers. This course is for students seeking elementary or moderate disabilities licensure.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC104 - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive. This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well-being. This course would substitute for PSYC101 (Psychological Perspectives) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class but can be taken in addition to PSYC101.

PSYC111 - Generations in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC201 - Psychology of Drugs & Behavior

The course examines the relationship between drugs and behavior, including evidence about the effects of drugs on the brain. Several classes of drugs, including chemically or psychologically addictive substances, psychoactive and therapeutic agents, as well as recreational drugs, are examined. Drug use is related to psychological variables such as personality structure and interpersonal relationships, and theories of addictive processes and factors influencing drug use are examined, as are treatment strategies. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC205 - Human Sexuality

This course is designed to introduce factual information about gender identity and gender role theories, sexual preference and sexual orientation, and psychosexual development. The course examines issues related to research on human sexuality and behavior, as well as sexual education, sexual disorders, and societal impacts on sexuality. Students are challenged to think critically about many issues surrounding human sexuality and all of its manifestations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC209X - Psyc of the Black American Experience

This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Blacks in the United States, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. Connections between Africa, the Caribbean, and Black America will be examined with respect to culture, belief systems, and values. At the same time, we will also explore the many differences in history, culture, and experience within numerous groups and individuals of African-descent in the U. S. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC218 - Dynamics of Small Groups

This class examines the basic theory and application necessary to understand and facilitate small groups. Topics may include group types, formation, roles and stages; group process; cultural awareness; group interventions and ethics within the field of psychology and human service; therapeutic value of groups; and the family, classroom, and peers as small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC222 - Social Psychology in Film

This course uses film to examine social psychological concepts and research and provides an opportunity for students to explore how people influence and are influenced by their social relationships, communities, and larger society. Films illustrate a range of social encounters that are examined from a social psychological perspective. Topics include conflict, love, personal and group behavior, prejudice, roles, privilege, and oppression. NOTE: This course meets the social psychology requirement for Social Sciences majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescence Psychology

This course will provide you with an introduction to central concepts/issues related to the developmental phase of adolescence from historical, psychological, social, and cultural perspectives. The course will also focus on major problems and challenges facing adolescents in modern society. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC226 - Living & Learning with Dementia

Living & Learning with Dementia

PSYC229X - Addictions

Addictions

PSYC231 - Stress and Trauma

This course provides an overview of stress and trauma including physical, psychological and sociocultural implications. Emphasis is made on the stress-trauma response including the neurobiology of information and memory processing and attachment theory. Evidence-based prevention and intervention strategies are explored in consideration of mind-body research on stress and stress related disorders.

PSYC232X - Death & Dying

Death & Dying

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC242X - Health Psychology

This course is a comprehensive study of the relationship between behavior and health including psychological factors in the development of and coping with disease. Students will learn about the biological, psychological, and social context of health and illness with a focus on maintenance of physical and emotional wellness. Topics covered may include stress, addictions, nutrition, eating disorders, adjustment, pain, pediatric health, aging and/or the psychological impact of specific diseases.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC304 - Sensation & Perception

It is estimated that our five senses take in 11,000,000 bits of information per second, yet we weed out much of this information. Our unique ability to sense but selectively perceive allows us to survive and live our life without being bombarded by information. In this class, students will experience and examine how humans sense and perceive the world. Topics covered will include the sensory pathways, perceptual processing, and how we create meaning from our senses. We will discuss the orienting senses, skin senses (such as touch and pain), chemical senses (such as smell), hearing, vision, and the perception of time. Perceptual processes will include physiological, psychophysical, ecological, motivational, and computational. Pre-requisite: PSYC101

PSYC307 - Forensic Psychology

This course deals with the application of psychological knowledge to the judicial process and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include effects of defendant, juror and case characteristics on verdicts, variables affecting eyewitness accuracy, identification and testimony, and the role of forensic psychologists in competency and criminal responsibility assessments as well as criminal profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or PSYC 101.

PSYC308X - Black Psychology

This course is designed to introduce the varied psychological experiences of Black individuals, including the cultural, sociohistorical, and political influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. The course will examine the experiences of Black individuals living in the United States, but will also draw strong connections to the experiences of Black individuals throughout the African Diaspora including Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and Western Europe. Several topics will be explored within the Black psychology paradigm including racial identity, racism and discrimination, kinship and family, religion and spirituality, and achievement and schooling. Throughout the course, a central objective will be to consider how knowledge of such topics can be used to promote mental health and wellness among these populations. Students will be strongly encouraged to discuss current topics and controversies as they relate to the Black psychology paradigm, and to use course material to design a service learning project for the neighboring community. PSYC308X substitutes for PSYC316/SOC301 for Psychology, Sociology, and Human Services majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of instructor

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

PSYC318 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. Both traditional and contemporary theories of psychopathology are reviewed. Emphasis is also placed on the tools, techniques, and process of both the diagnosis and the treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 202 or PSYC 220.

PSYC322 - Abnormal Child Development

This course examines common psychological disorders that affect children and adolescents. Students review factors that contribute to emotional, behavioral, cognitive and social problems in children and adolescents, as well as specific diagnostic criteria of psychological disorders. In addition, treatment of childhood disorders is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 221.

PSYC323 - Brain Function & Dysfunction

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 & MATH 208

PSYC331 - Experimental Design in Psychology

This laboratory course covers concepts of the scientific method in psychology including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. As part of the lab, students carry out an experiment and learn to use SPSS to create a database and perform statistical analyses. Prerequisites: MATH208 and either PSYC101 or SOC101 or approval of Program Chair.

PSYC333 - Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and Permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

PSYC345 - Assessment of Individual Differences

This course studies a wide variety of tests and measurements used to assess intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality in clinical and counseling psychology, in education, and in business. Consideration of the history and theory of these tests is complemented by discussion of practical concerns related to their selection, their administration, and their interpretation in specific settings. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and PSYC 101.

PSYC714 - Psyc of Sport, Injury & Rehabilitation

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the theory and application of psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation. Topics covered include cognitive appraisal, emotional response, behavioral response, motivation, mental skills training and use, psychological antecedents of injury, adherence to rehabilitation/exercise, sociocultural factors and psychology of injury, and research methods related to the psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation.

SMGT102 - Contemporary Sport Management

This course provides an overview of general principles and practices of the sport industry, covering all facets of sport management, including leadership, sociology, marketing, legal aspects, finance, and governance, in both professional and amateur sports setting. Students learn and understand those unique aspects of sport management that distinguish it from other management fields. Students gain an increased awareness of various career opportunities in the sport industry.

SMGT201 - Legal Aspects of Sports

This course is an exploration of the relationship of the law to organized secondary school, collegiate, and professional sports. It provides an overview of a wide range of legal principles that relate to the sport management field. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SMGT 102 or LS101

SMGT202 - Ethics in Sport

This course examines theories of ethics as well as personal moral development as applied to sports. It explores the importance of personal ethics and organizational responsibility and the role of professional ethics in sport management. Prerequisite: SMGT102

SMGT203X - Intro to Parks Recreation & Tourism

This course provides students with a broad understanding of the evolution of leisure values, behaviors, and services as well contemporary issues and trends. Students will learn about the history and philosophy of recreation, leisure and tourism in an international context, and the role of organized leisure in American communities, as well as the changing social, economic, political and environmental context for these leisure based activities and their ties to the maturing fields of sport tourism and Parks and Recreation.

SMGT205 - Pre-Practicum I

This course is designed for students to complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and approval of Instructor.

SMGT206 - Sports Administration

This course studies the basic concepts, theories and organizations of administration as applied to sport. Areas covered include budgeting, human resources management, facilities, and legal issues.Prerequisite: SMGT102

SMGT207 - Special Topics in History of Sport

This course explores various aspects of sports and their historical development. The integration of gender, ethnic, religious, and other factors are discussed. The role that each area of sport plays within our society is examined.

SMGT208 - Sport Governance

This course focuses on the important role that governance plays within the sport industry. Students study the governance structures of various sports and sports governing bodies, including professional sports leagues, players’ associations, intercollegiate athletics, and Olympic sports, both within the United States and internationally. Prerequisite: SMGT102 or permission of the Program Director

SMGT209X - NCAA Compliance & Rules Admin

NCAA Compliance and Rules Administration is designed for students to gain an understanding of the enforcement policies, practices, and procedures, as well and the complexity of the rules and regulations governing NCAA and intercollegiate athletics. Student will review compliance cases, NCAA enforcement guidelines, and historical and contemporary compliance and rules administration cases.

SMGT211 - Sport & Society

This course is organized around the theme “Sport in Society.” The purpose of this course is to invoke a sociological perspective in understanding sport as a societal institution. We will examine socialization themes as well as the increasing organization, commercialization, and globalization of sports.

SMGT212X - Careers in Sport Management

This course discusses the meaning of sport management in terms of its scope, principles, issues and future trends. In addition, the course examines the job responsibilities and competencies required of sport managers in a variety of sports or sports-related organizations in a hope to have the student become acquainted with the role of sport administrators as well as the career opportunities within the industry. Finally, this course provides the student with an overview of the different issues sports managers will be faced with such as: consumer behavior, public relations, budgeting and facility management.

SMGT215 - Pre-Practicum

This course is designed for students to complete 60 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and approval of Instructor.

SMGT301 - Sport Facility & Event Management

This course explores the roles and functions of facility and events managers. It examines a variety of public assembly and privately managed sport facilities; the steps and skills required to effectively plan, organize, lead, and evaluate an event, and facilities to meet the needs of sports organizations. The course also examines resource allocation, strategic planning, and risk management and facility maintenance requirements. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and a 200 level Sport Management course or HEM 301.

SMGT302 - Sport Marketing

This course explores sport as a product, its consumer markets, and sports products markets. It examines the processes of sport marketing, research, information management, identification of target markets, and the development of a sport marketing mix and strategies. Prerequisites: SMGT 102, BUSS 220.

SMGT303 - Sport Finance

This course is a study of the financial challenges faced by sport administrators and those working within the sports industry. Topics include economic impact analysis, ticket operations, concessions, public-private partnerships, sport sponsorships, and fundraising. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 & ECON101 or ECON102

SMGT304 - Sports Information & Communication

This course examines the fundamentals in sport information, publicity, and promotions. Preparation of news releases, local features, publications of programs and brochures, statistical breakdowns, dealing with the press, and the promotion of specific events, teams, and individuals are included. Prerequisite: ENG 102 & SMGT102

SMGT305 - Pre-Practicum II

This course is designed for the students to complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisite: SMGT 205.

SMGT306 - Sport Leadership

This course teaches concepts, principles, and skills of leadership for managers in the sports industry. Styles of successful sport coaches and managers are examined and analyzed in the context of their times and their settings. Prerequisite: SMGT102 & SMGT206 or Permission of instructor

SMGT307 - Sport Sponsorship

This course provides an examination of the relationship between sport and corporate sponsorship, and strategies for selling sponsorship packages. Topics covered include the theoretical rationale for sponsorship, strategic communication through sponsorship, determining the value of a sponsorship, evaluation of sponsorship activities, and techniques used to sell sponsorship packages. Perspectives from the event holder (i.e., property) offering a sponsorship and from the organization functioning as the sponsor are considered. Prerequisite:SMGT102 or Permission of Dept Chiar

SMGT308X - The Business of Sports

Multiple industries now makeup the overall “business of sports”. Amateur sports, professional sports, youth sports, athletic performance gear and fashion apparel, fantasy sports, memorabilia & sports media are each multibillion dollar industries in their own right. This course will explore the social and economic challenges faces by managers in various sectors of the sports industry as they attempt to address the ever increasing competition for fans, sponsors, broadcast viewership, media exposure, public financing and athletic talent.Students will learn what it is like to work in various divisions of the sports industry. Industry practitioners will walk the students through the day to day operations of these departments and explain successful strategies for obtaining these jobs. Students will go beyond wins and losses on the field to examine the fundamental business challenges that sports managers’ confront in a variety of industry sectors prerequisite: SMGT102 or permission of Dept Chair

SMGT310 - 30 for 30:Sport through Documentary

30 for 30 is the umbrella title for a series of documentary films highlighting interesting people and events in sports history. 30 for 30 has evolved into a series that has both revitalized and revolutionized the art of the sports documentary through a diverse range of filmmakers telling specific stories that touch on larger themes beyond sports. With each documentary, the filmmakers have brought their passion and personal approach to the screen, detailing the issues, trends, athletes, teams, rivalries, games and moments that have transformed the sports landscape.

SMGT313X - Parks & Recreation Management

Parks & Recreation Management

SMGT396 - Research in Sport Industry

Using Research in the Sport Industry is designed for students to gain an understanding of the principles, procedures, processes, and types of writing and reports used to answer problems in the Sport Industry. Students will learn to identify, describe, analyze, and report on an issue or problem at their own workplace by drawing on the relevant sport and related literature. Prerequisite: SMGT102, SMGT206 and Junior/Senior standing.

SMGT400X - Major League Lacrosse Internship

Major League Lacrosse Internship

SMGT401 - Special Topics in Sport Management

This course explores special segments and contemporary trends in the sport management industry. Topics may include sports medicine, health promotion, intercollegiate athletics, campus recreation, sport tourism, and international sport.

SMGT403X - Managing Diversity in Sport Org

Managing Diversity in Sport Organizations offers an overview of various diversity and inclusion theories and examines the applications of these theories to sport organizations. Students will study the impact and interconnectedness of diversity issues, social responsiveness, and the financial impact of these issues on professional, intercollegiate, interscholastic, and Olympic sport organizations. Students will also discuss and practice strategies to resolve diversity and inclusion related problems commonly faced by the sport and business manager. In conjunction with Lasell College Connected Learning philosophy, an emphasis will be placed on connecting diversity and concepts and initiatives to the sport and business industries.

SMGT405X - Leisure Theories in Practice

Leisure Theories in Practice

SMGT407 - Sport Management Internship I

The internship provides students with administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisites: SMGT 205 and SMGT 305 . 

SMGT408 - Sport Management Internship II

The internship provides students with additional administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisite: SMGT 407. 

SMGT412 - Sport Analytics

Analytical techniques and quantitative methods are on the rise in many areas of business. They have increasingly made their way into the sports realm. Skills such as critical thinking, mathematical modeling, statistical analysis using Microsoft excel, predictive analytics and optimization are crucial in the data-centric realm. The class seeks to develop and refine these skills in the business application area of sports.Prerequisite: SMGT102 & MATH208

SMGT496 - Sport Management Capstone

This course is a culminating experience designed to provide the student with an opportunity to demonstrate synthesis of knowledge, practice, and skills developed throughout the program of study. Capstone assignments reflect the integration of research methodology, theory, and advanced knowledge in an area of specialization. Students develop a web-portfolio to showcase their work in the Sport Management program. Students incorporate aspects of past course assignments into a reflective thesis paper. Students also participate in a required service learning activity. To be completed in either the fall or spring semester of the final academic year of the student's program. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SMGT396

SPAN111 - Elementary Spanish I

This course introduces students to the elements of Spanish through the multiple skills of understanding, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. It is open to students who are beginning their postsecondary Spanish language study and have not had more than two years of secondary school Spanish.

SPAN112 - Elementary Spanish II

This course is a continuation of SPAN 111, with continued focus on understanding, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or 111 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN125X - SPT Spanish

SPT Spanish

SPAN211 - Intermediate Spanish I

This course reviews and reinforces prior grammar knowledge through speaking, listening, reading, and writing; more advanced grammar constructs are introduced to support written and spoken language growth. Texts and discussion focus on Hispanic culture, art, and society. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or 112 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN212 - Intermediate Spanish II

In this course, students continue to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through the analysis and discussion of cultural and literary texts. The course includes a review of advanced grammatical structures. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or 211 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN225X - SPT Spanish

SPT Spanish

SPAN311 - Advanced Spanish I

Students in this course study composition and conversation, with emphasis on the Hispanic cultures and their contribution to world civilizations. Geography, history, and the artistic evolution of Spain and Latin America are presented through readings, literary texts, and visual materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 212 or SPAN 202 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN312 - Advanced Spanish II

Students in this course engage in textual and cultural analysis through writing. Students learn to read and interpret complex literary texts and visual materials, to discuss them analytically in class, and to write about them in formal and informal writing assignments. By the end of this course, students should be able to approach a text (narrative, poetry, drama, or film) with a series of critical questions and write interpretively about the work. Students also acquire a general understanding of literary and cultural movements in Hispanic cultures. Grammar points are reviewed as needed. Prerequisite: SPAN 311 or SPAN 301 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN314 - Cinemundo

This course is designed as an advanced seminar in Spanish. Discussions focus on films, historical writings, and literary texts, as four general categories are explored: memory and oblivion, immigration and exile, identities marginalized, and the Hispanic in the globalizing world. Native speakers are welcome, and the course offers a special opportunity for Honors students to complete an Honors component. Prerequisite: SPAN201or SPAN211 (with C or better) or permission of instructor.

SPAN325X - SPT in Spanish

In this SPT course, students working in Spanish at an advanced level have the opportunity to focus on one subject, one writer, or one period. Engaging in analysis, criticism, and/or research, students complete substantial written and oral work on a special topic around which the course is developed. This course may be repeated for credit, as different special topics are offered. Prerequisite: SPAN311 or permission of instructor.

Jeffrey Corcoran

Associate Professor of Management

Office: DeArment House

Janet Huetteman

Associate Professor of Marketing, Graduate Program Coordinator for Business

Office: 26 Maple

Bruce McKinnon

Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship

Office: 26 Maple

Siddharth Mobar

Assistant Professor-Hospitality & Event Management

Office: DeArment

Donna Scipione

Assistant Professor of Accounting

Office: DeArment

Dina Tanvuia

Program Chair of Hospitality and Event Management, Associate Professor of Hospitality and Event Management

Office: DeArment

Anh Le Tran

Professor of Economics and Management

Office: DeArment

Nancy Waldron

Program Chair of Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship and International Business

Office: DeArment

Martin Walsh

Associate Professor of Management

Office: DeArment

Robert Zuar

Visiting Assistant Professor of Accounting

Office: DeArment

BUSS104X - Professional Development in Business

For freshman only. This is a comprehensive course that introduces students to the skills they need to develop themselves professionally. It cultivates and hones the skills necessary for students to communicate effectively and professionally in a business environment. This course provides students with the skills necessary to engage in field experience, internship and post-graduate employment searches as well as for the general business world around them. Using myriad methods, students will develop the necessary professional skills for professional presentation, professional communication, negotiation, personal branding, networking and team building. Students will also be introduced to the concept of emotional intelligence and its impact on overall career and academic outcomes. Students will complete a minimum of three professional presentations as part of this course.Prerequisites: None

BUSS105 - Excel for Business

This course introduces students to basic Microsoft Excel skills. Excel is an electronic spreadsheet program used for storing, organizing and manipulating data. It is critical to the business world today as the volume data generated has exploded. This introductory course will provide students with information and skills needed to create basic workbooks and worksheets, create simple formulas, copy and move data, format data and cells, work in large spreadsheets and with data series, create pivot tables, and more. As part of this course, all students will have the opportunity to become certified in Microsoft Excel through the professional certification called Microsoft Office Specialist: Excel 2016 – Core Data Analysis, Manipulation, and Presentation. The certification also comes with an electronic badge. Students are also introduced to Income Statements, Balance Sheets, Statement of Cash Flows, Ratios, and the Basic Accounting Cycle

BUSS205 - Business Law

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to both business and personal needs. The primary focus is on contract law and property law. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major.

BUSS220 - Principles of Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, COM101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102 AND ENG102 OR WRT102.

BUSS227 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions.

BUSS440 - Business Capstone

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. This is a writing intensive course. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Prerequisite: Senior standing, Major within the School of Business

BUSS497 - Business Internship Seminar

This internship for students within the School of Business is scheduled to take place during the student's senior year (juniors are permitted with permission). Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours in a position related to their field of study. The hours are completed concurrently with weekly class meetings and course work. Detailed reports, reflective exercises, weekly journal entries, a final comprehensive project, and other written requirements are completed throughout the internship process. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Different sections offered are specific to majors and/or interests (Section A – General Business, Section B – Sport Management, Section C – Hospitality Management). Students can choose any section that they prefer, regardless of major. Prerequisite: Senior Standing, Major within the School of Business

DSCI202 - Business Analytics

This course provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various aspects of Data Analytics. The purpose is to prepare students with foundation skills in Big Data, a skill widely needed and valued across the business world. The course will expose students to the data analytics practices executed in the business world and explores key areas of the analytical process, how data is created, stored, accessed, and how organizations work with data and creates the environment in which analytics can flourish. This course will provide students with a strong foundation in all the areas that support analytics and will help them to better position themselves for success within any organization.This course provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various aspects of Big Data Analytics, including cloud computing, NoSQL Databases, predictive and prescriptive analytics.Prerequisite: MATH208 or MATH209

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

HEM101 - Hospitality Management

This course examines the Hospitality and Tourism industry with emphasis on individual sectors of the industry and their business functions. The infrastructure and interrelationships of lodging, tourism, food service, events, and entertainment organizations are examined. Career opportunities, current operational issues, and emerging trends in the hospitality industry are also explored. Students will have the opportunity to become Certified Guest Service Providers (CGSP) as part of the course.

HEM102 - Fundamentals of Event Management

Orders (BEO's), client management, vendor management and contract negotiations are introduced. This course is hands-on, allowing the student to apply basic skills and techniques for negotiating with suppliers and service contractors. This is a project driven course and includes industry certifications. Students will have the opportunity to become certified in Delphi event planning software, CVENT software and Social Tables event diagramming software as part of the course.

HEM208 - Human Resources in Hospitality

This course examines management considerations for the successful operation of a major hospitality organization. Emphases is placed on the various departments and how each contributes to the recreation, ancillary and lodging areas including service experiences. This includes recreation development, risk management, visitor education, rental and retail operations, lodging, guest services, and human resources management. Students will learn how each of these departments function, along with the many skills required to address the issues and challenges faced in everyday operations. Course assignments focus on human resources operations, industry regulations and certification, risk management, guest service, and dealing with seasonality. These particular areas are studied in relation to resorts of different sizes and scales from all over the world so that comparisons can be made regarding different management and operational procedures, regulations, and guest expectations. Prerequisite: BUSS224.

HEM215 - Meeting & Convention Sales & Planning

This course provides an overview of conference planning and group coordination as it relates to the sale and final contract. Students become familiar with Meetings, Expositions, Events, and Conventions (MEEC), destination specialists, negotiating with suppliers and service contractors, meeting budgets, travel planners, and their place of importance within the industry. Site evaluations are analyzed as they relate to group needs. Emphasis is placed on the development of a group resume agendas, analyses of service options, and contractual and legal liability issues. Prerequisite: HEM 102 with a C or better.

HEM299 - Field Experience I

This course provides a supervised work experience in the hospitality or event management industry as a complement to academic coursework. Students earn 150 hours in the field, gain practical skills in a business environment, and begin to view the workplace from a management perspective. During the course of the field experience, students keep a personal reflective journal of critical incidents. In addition, they complete a detailed profile of the management systems and policies at their workplace for submission at the end of the field experience. Students participate in weekly discussion groups during the course of the semester to evaluate and compare their experiences. No Prerequisite.

HEM301 - Social Event Management

This course explores the complex area of special and social event planning, including non-profit, community, corporate, wedding, religious, holiday, and other major social events. The course provides students with a basis for using research as a tool to plan and organize special events. The class works toward understanding, practicing, and executing the elements of successful event planning such as budgeting, site-selection, food and beverage management, promotions, and site logistics. This is a project-based course and requires the execution of a successful event. Prerequisite: HEM 102 with a C or better.

HEM303 - Law & Ethics in Hospitality

This course provides a study of the nature and function of both legal and ethical issues as applied to the hospitality industry. Topics include operator relationships, contract law, torts, civil rights, wage and labor laws, gaming laws, property law, and insurable risks. This course also examines ethical issues in the hospitality industry. Prerequisites: HEM101 with a grade of C or better and HEM208 or BUSS336

HEM321 - Revenue Management & Technology

This course provides an advanced overview of the revenue management function in the hospitality industry. Revenue management is a method for managing capacity profitability. This course offers an integrated approach to maximizing revenue that includes capacity analysis, demand forecasting, differential pricing, and distribution technology. The objective of this course is to help students learn how to apply the principles of revenue management to maximize profitability in the hospitality industry. Topics to be covered include demand forecasting, competitive analysis, overbooking, distribution channels, reservations systems, information technology, process design, differential pricing, inventory control, performance measurement and related management and marketing issues. An academic certificate of completion in Revenue Management from American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute is also embedded in this course. Students learn to distinguish between tactical and strategic revenue management, addresses the proper use and importance of revenue management in hospitality operations, and describes a wide range of elements that must be considered in order to use revenue management effectively. Prerequisite BUSS201

HEM401 - Managing Quality in Hospitality

This course explores the application of customer service quality as well as management theories and techniques in the hospitality industry with a focus on organizational effectiveness. Case studies and major projects with real hospitality companies facilitate students’ synthesis of previous knowledge with the principles of service quality and excellence. This is a research project driven course. Prerequisites: BUSS 224 & MATH 208.

HEM403 - Food & Beverage Management

This course examines the details of food and beverage management, with an emphasis on running a profitable operation and understanding basic menu and beverage detail. It examines the impact of menu planning, purchasing, receiving, inventory control, production, pairing and service to the guest. Students apply commonly-used formulas and strategies for calculating appropriate selling prices and evaluating actual cost percentages. Special attention is paid to the use of management systems and tools to help minimize food, beverage and labor costs, to ensure collection of revenue, and ultimately to maximize profits. Topics include purchasing, safe-serving, receiving, storage, production, beverage management and appreciation, beverage service and cost control. The course also explores basic culinary and beverage menu building and appreciation topics. Case studies are incorporated into class discussions. Students must be 21 years of age prior to April 1st of the course year to register. Prerequisites: HEM101 or HEM102 with a grade of C or better and Permission of the Instructor

BUSS231 - Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation

Entrepreneurship drives global innovation and economic growth. This course exposes business students to the study of entrepreneurship and the venture creation process. Topics include analyzing new business opportunities, developing business propositions, new venture planning and financing, marketing activities, financial controls, and other topics relevant to the entrepreneurial process. Students interact with faculty, local entrepreneurs, and small business owners/managers. As a culmination activity of this course, students are responsible for the development and presentation of a business plan. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101 or SMGT102

BUSS332 - Cross Cultural Management

In this course, students will explore the process of cross-cultural management and the challenges of working internationally. The course focuses on international organizational behavior, human resource issues and practices in global organizations. The course is divided into three parts: The first focuses on understanding the cultural roots of behavior in organizations; the second on the Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management issues that are relevant to international managers; and the third seeks to prepare students for international assignments. Prerequisite: BUSS224

BUSS334 - Nonprofit Management

In this course students explore businesses that do not intend to maximize profit and retain it for future expenditures. Managers for nonprofit operations must operate under more regulated conditions and must be well prepared to interact within the public sector. Not-for-profit managers must be well versed in public policy and other regulations that affect them. Students will engage in real projects with non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSS101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102.

BUSS499C - Business Internship & Seminar II

This second internship for students within the School of Business should take place during the student's senior year. Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours in a position related to their field of study. The hours are completed concurrently with weekly class meetings and course work. Detailed reports, reflective exercises, weekly journal entries, a final comprehensive portfolio project, and other written requirements are completed throughout the internship process. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. The concepts and assignment expectations from BUSS497 Business Internship are expanded upon and addressed with more depth in this internship course, taking a deeper dive into student’s ultimate career aspirations and goals.Prerequisite: Senior Standing, Major within the School of Business

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM101

ENV205 - Green Business

All businesses, from oil companies to computer manufacturers want to be "green." Being "green" is not only good for a business' marketing and publicity, but it also helps the bottom line. This course examines what it means to be a "green" business. Topics include the Triple Bottom Line, sourcing materials, energy management and recycling.

HEM103 - Economic Development & Mgmt in Tourism

This course offers a survey of trends and developments in the hospitality and tourism industry, including a total approach to lodging operations, events management, global tourism, and foodservice establishments. It offers an introduction to the broad fields of travel and tourism. Among the topics covered are cultural tourism, eco-tourism, sociology of tourism, tourism development, the economic role of tourism demand and tourism marketing. Prerequisite: HEM101

HEM205 - Private Club Management

This course explores many areas vital to the success of club management, including business, finance, food, beverage, facilities, sales, operations, and multiple recreational activities while stressing the supreme importance of customer service quality. By taking this course, students will explore a field that covers all aspects of the hospitality industry. We are privileged to be in a great location, close to many of the area’s most notable private clubs, which provides students with employment experience and internship opportunities. Prerequisite: HEM 101

HEM206 - Lodging Management

This course provides an in-depth view of the various aspects and departments that fall under what is commonly known as Lodging Management or Lodging Operations. Some of the specific departments this course explores are - Front Office, Housekeeping, Human Resources, Security, Engineering, Maintenance, Food and Beverage, Recreation, and Accounting and Finance. Aside from the various operational procedures utilized, the course also addresses service philosophies, best practices, revenue management, and technology. Prerequisite: HEM 101 with a grade of C or better

HEM207 - Resort & Casino Management

This course provides students with an introduction to the hospitality management specialization of Resort and Casino Management. Subjects covered include operational infrastructures of resorts and casinos, organizational structures, service in resort and casino environments, securities, technologies, and revenue management and tourism. This course includes guest speakers and site visits. Prerequisite: HEM101 with a grade of C or better

HEM214 - Ecotourism

Ecotourism promotes cultural and environmental awareness and has local, environmental and economic benefits. This course introduces students to the history, principles, marketing, and management of ecotourism activities and development. The course takes a holistic approach to planning and tourism development and standard industry practices and processes are discussed. Students enrolled in this course participate in an educational trip to Belize to view, research, and participate in a newly developing ecotourism system. Students must apply and be selected and may only register with the permission of the Ecotourism Program Director.

HEM399 - Field Experience II

This course provides an additional supervised work experience in the hospitality or event management industry as a complement to academic coursework. Students earn 150 hours in the field, gain practical skills in a business environment, and begin to view the workplace from a management perspective. During the course of the field experience, students keep a personal reflective journal of critical incidents. In addition, students complete a detailed profile of the management systems and policies at their workplace for submission at the end of the field experience. Students participate in weekly discussion groups during the course of the semester to evaluate and compare their experiences. Students must have the company and position approved by the course instructor. Prerequisite HEM299

MATH202 - Applied Mathematics for Business

This course will be a “Choose Option across Management, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Event Management, Hospitality Management, Accounting and Resort and Casino Management Majors. This course will introduce a variety of mathematical principles and techniques that emphasize applications in business and economics. Topics covered include: systems of linear equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear programming, as well as the development and applications of rates of change. Prerequisite: MATH106

PSYC104 - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive. This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well-being. This course would substitute for PSYC101 (Psychological Perspectives) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class but can be taken in addition to PSYC101.

SMGT301 - Sport Facility & Event Management

This course explores the roles and functions of facility and events managers. It examines a variety of public assembly and privately managed sport facilities; the steps and skills required to effectively plan, organize, lead, and evaluate an event, and facilities to meet the needs of sports organizations. The course also examines resource allocation, strategic planning, and risk management and facility maintenance requirements. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and a 200 level Sport Management course or HEM 301.

SPAN111 - Elementary Spanish I

This course introduces students to the elements of Spanish through the multiple skills of understanding, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. It is open to students who are beginning their postsecondary Spanish language study and have not had more than two years of secondary school Spanish.

SPAN112 - Elementary Spanish II

This course is a continuation of SPAN 111, with continued focus on understanding, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or 111 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.