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2020 - 2021 Academic Catalog

Sports Communication

Students in the Sports Communication concentration are introduced to dynamic and diverse communication career opportunities in the sports industry. Students will gain valuable skills and hands-on experience in journalistic reporting about sports, sports public relations campaigns, and social media outreach for sports teams, as well as in working with specialty sports agencies and planning sports events for organizations. Graduates with a concentration in sports communication find employment as Sports Account Executives; Sports Publicists for College, University, and Professional Teams; Community Relations Managers for Sports Organizations; Sports Production Assistants; Sports Editors/Writers; among many others.

By planning early in consultation with an academic advisor, students may be able to reduce the time it takes to complete a bachelor’s degree in Sports Communication to 3 or 3½ years.

The Academic Standard for Communication majors is: Students must earn a grade of C or above in each of the following core courses that are Major Requirements:

COM101 Understanding Mass Media 
COM103 Introduction to Human Communication 
COM105 Writing for the Media 
COM203 Effective Speaking 
COM205 Media Ethics and Society 
COM212 Intercultural Communication 
COM315 Communication Research 
COM399 Internship Seminar 
COM400 Field Experience (capstone course)  
COM418 Media Literacy (capstone course) 

Failure to receive a minimum grade of C in any one of these courses will result in the student having to repeat the course.

The following learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete a major program of study in Communication: 

1.      Write with clarity and accuracy for diverse audiences in styles demanded by media platforms and disciplines  
2.      Formulate academic and applied communication research questions, employ quantitative and qualitative methods to gather, analyze and share findings  
3.      Employ appropriate tools and technology to create effective and aesthetically appealing messages targeted to specific audiences across multiple media platforms 
4.      Critically analyze the content, functions and effects of media in a diverse, global society and identify ethical decisions and issues in the field  
5.      Deliver confidently various types of oral presentations using compelling content and effective non-verbal skills          

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
COM101 Understanding Mass Media 3
COM103 Human Communication (KP) 3
COM105 Writing for The Media 3
COM203 Effective Speaking 3
COM205 Media Ethics & Society 3
COM212 Intercultural Communication 3
COM315 Communication Research 3
COM399 Pre-Internship Seminar 1
COM400 Field Experience I 4
COM418 Media Literacy 3
Concentration Courses
BUSS220 Principles of Marketing 3
COM208 Public Relations 3
COM209 Journalism 3
COM215 Radio Production 3
COM230 Media, Sports & Society 3
COM231 Sports Communication 3
SMGT102 Contemporary Sport Management 3
SMGT302 Sport Marketing 3
SMGT304 Sports Information & Communication 3

Additional Courses
Choose one additional COM or SMGT courses: 3 credits
MATH208 Statistics: 3 credits


Major Requirements: 59 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.


Communication students who have not declared a Concentration must complete all of the courses for the Major Requirements (29 credits), and ten (10) courses selected from the lists of courses under the Concentrations (30 credits).

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM102 - Visual Communication Toolkit

This course introduces a practice-based approach to visual communication design. Through a series of projects, students develop knowledge and techniques for communicating meaning visually using Adobe and other software for digital imaging, publication and web design. They will expand their visual vocabulary while exploring topics including typography, color, photo enhancement and manipulation, and principles of graphic design for print and digital media. By creating visual messages and a digital portfolio website, and critiquing their own and others’ work, students increase their overall visual literacy and understanding of effective visual communication.

COM103 - Human Communication (KP)

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry: one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM101

COM206 - Professional Communication

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the most important communication and career-related formats of professional writing, including power point presentations, memos, business letters, reports, brief speeches, instructions, newsletters and brochures. Special emphasis is given to various writing processes one must complete on a tight deadline for a business audience of peers, customers or employers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM101

COM209 - Journalism

Journalism is a fast changing industry and this course prepares students for the change. Students learn to report and produce a variety of news and feature pieces, for print and multi-media platforms, including Q and A interviews, news and feature stories, opinion pieces, reviews, photo galleries, social media campaigns and more. Assignments can be produced on sports, fashion, entertainment, arts and culture, business, politics and more. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in The 1851 Chronicle newspaper and website. Prerequisite: WRT102

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM101 or SOC101 or PSYC101

COM213 - Writing for Public Relations

This course serves as a workshop in which students apply the fundamental skills of journalism to the different formats commonly used in writing copy for public relations and advertising, including press releases, public service announcements, profiles, brochures, and advertisements. In addition, students continue to sharpen their editing skills by revising their own work and by copyediting and critiquing the work of other students. Central to the objectives of this course is that students improve their ability to write clearly and concisely, avoiding common errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM215 - Radio Production

Radio Production introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell University Radio station. Finally, this course introduces students to the communication competency of speech.

COM216 - Entertainment Media

A focus on the entertainment media industry requires making sense of the material that captures the audience's attention, influences culture, and provides enjoyment to mass media consumers. Course topics include the business of entertainment media, the production and distribution of media content, and multimedia convergence. Students in this course examine the multiple genres for the content of entertainment media, such as drama, comedy, reality TV, and gaming. Students learn how the entertainment industry works, captures the interests of contemporary audiences, and influences our culture and values. Prerequisite: COM 101. Formerly - COM302

COM217 - Video Production

Video Production introduces students to the basics of video production from an EFP (Electronic Field Production) perspective. Students will learn the functionality and art of digital videography and digital editing by completing a roll test, editing project, photojournalism package, and a TV commercial. The course will also examine the business of video production. Finally, this course introduces students to the competency of visual communication.

COM218 - Digital Video Editing

Digital Video Editing teaches students the basics of editing digital media using the popular software program Adobe Premiere Pro. The aesthetics of editing are also discussed and analyzed through screening various types of edited media. Projects for the course include editing TV commercials, news packages, movie scenes, and music videos. It is recommended that students have acquired basic computer skills prior to taking this class. Finally, this course introduces students to the competency of visual communication.

COM219 - Social Media Management

Communication professionals must to be able to utilize different social media platforms to both engage audiences and increase brand impact and influence. This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and practices of managing social media channels. Through case studies, interactive assignments, and a social media project, students will learn necessary skills to managing a social media platform, including conducting a social media audit, developing a strategic social media plan, building an editorial calendar, identifying key metrics and using data analytics to assess and report the impact of social media posts and campaigns. Students will also earn Hubspot Certification in Social Media during the course. Prerequisite: COM101

COM221 - Advertising

This course introduces students to the field of advertising, including the role of promotional elements (advertising, direct mail, promotion, etc.) found in an advertising agency or in the communication program of an organization. In this course, students learn that advertising is more than just ads on television, on a web page or in print. Advertising is a process that starts with research and moves through analysis, planning, action, and evaluation. The development of an effective advertising strategy requires an understanding of overall communication processes and theoretical principles, how organizations organize and brand themselves for advertising and other promotional functions, consumer behavior, and how to set goals and objectives. A cooperative learning project requires students to engage in the kind of strategic thinking, planning and execution that is done by advertisers, researchers, media planners, and copywriters. The course also addresses how the advertising industry is regulated and how key social issues and various consumer constituencies can present problems for advertising professionals. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM223 - Advertising: Copy & Design

This course approaches the design and content of advertising from a variety of creative perspectives —from art to copy to production. The aim is to create eye catching, stand-out advertising —the kind that requires concentration, creativity, and focus. Students don’t have to be skilled graphic artists, but they do need to be able to explain in detail how a storyboard works and what message is intended for the consumer through an emphasis on: visual effects of the design; use of color and placement; and the significance of slogans, copy, and dialogue. This class duplicates as closely as possible the experience of working in a creative group within a real ad agency. Prerequisite: COM 221 or BUSS220

COM224 - Elements of Film

In this introductory level course, students begin to appreciate film as a medium of communication and expression by watching a variety of classic and contemporary works which function as modes of entertainment, art, education, politics and social change. Using a media literacy approach, this course will focus on content analysis of motion pictures by examining elements of cinematic expression including form, narrative structure, editing, sound, acting/performance, and cinematography. Students will be responsible for learning proper terminology to discuss, analyze, and write about films for relevant assignments. Students will identify major trends and ideas important to the history of film as one of the most important forms of mass media; explore messages and themes highlighted by style and content, as well as the various effects of those messages in specific cultural or industry contexts including classical and contemporary Hollywood, European art cinema, Japan, Russia, and West Africa. Prerequisite: COM 101

COM225 - Producing

Producing introduces students to the basics of TV producing.  Students learn the process of writing a pitch, proposal, treatment, and budget.  They  also learn the fundamentals of basic screenwriting and production scheduling, as well as managing cast, crew and vendor relationships.  The course also explores the roles of the casting director, location manager, production coordinator, and script supervisor.  The course concludes with a preview of the production team and the role of the line producer, unit production manager, production manager and assistant directors involved in managing the physical production process of producing a television show.  This course emphasizes the competency of writing and research.

COM227 - Challenging Hollywood

This course focuses on the theme of innovative classic and contemporary films which challenge society and film industry standards. Beginning with the threats to society posed by early cinema and star scandals, leading to a universal censorship code, students will be introduced to how early films affected society and the future of Hollywood. Students will then watch, analyze, and think critically about popular, artistic, and influential American movies including the subversive film noirs of the post-WWII era such as The Maltese Falcon and Double Indemnity, and films from the 1960s and 1970s such as The Graduate, Easy Rider, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, as well as representations of African-American characters during segregation and the “LA Rebellion” and “New Black Cinema” movements which challenged those representations. We will also explore explosions of themes of violence and sex in contemporary Hollywood which further stretch and shape societal conventions in the US, including discussions of films like Bonnie and Clyde, Pulp Fiction, and Natural Born Killers.

COM229 - Photojournalism

This is an introductory course in photojournalism that will touch on basic photography skills (composition, focus, subject, and angle), but is not strictly a photography class. This course will use two methods of learning: one is a hands-on, connected learning where students will tell stories through cameras and video; and another is a survey approach, through reading, discussion, lectures, journals, and multimedia presentations which illustrate photojournalism history and current trends. The class supports the college’s minor in photography as well as the communication’s department concentration in journalism and media writing. In an effort to make the course accessible to students from all departments across campus, the first few weeks of the class will provide readings, lecture, and discussion on the background and history of the journalism field.

COM230 - Media, Sports & Society

This course introduces students to various aspects of the sports-media relationship, including the history of the industries that constitute, the audiences drawn to, and the social issues that arise from the relationship. COM101 is a prerequisite for this course. If you have not taken COM101, then you will be dropped from the class.

COM231 - Sports Communication

This course explores the dynamic organizations and diverse professions reflective of the sports communication field while emphasizing the fundamentals of good public relations and solid journalism. Types of organizational inquiry will include major television, radio and digital networks, leading magazines and newspapers, college athletics and professional sports as well as marketing and advertising firms. Topics covered will span journalism and publishing, community, media and public relations, marketing and advertising as well as digital and social media. In this course, students will learn how to research and write for broadcast, digital and print media; how to define, develop, and deliver effective sports communication campaigns; how to use mass and social media platforms for brands, personalities and teams; and how to manage and mitigate crisis communication. Formerly - COM309

COM232 - Radio Management Practicum

adio Management Practicum is a hands-on, workshop-style experience where students assume the role of Production Manager, Music Director, News Director, Sports Director, Social Media Manager, Booking Director, Graphic Designer/Webmaster, or Secretary/Photographer for one full semester at 102.9FM WLAS. Students complete weekly radio station tasks, attend Board of Director and staff meetings, assist with special events, and report directly to the General Manager. Prerequisite: Instructor permission

COM233X - Sport Broadcasting

This course offers a comprehensive look at the sports broadcasting industry, while teaching how to report, anchor and do play by play of live games. We’ll study the greats from the profession both past and present. Guest speakers will also teach how the business works and what they’ve experienced, throughout their careers.

COM235 - Television Production Practicum

As a connected learning initiative that focuses on 200-level television production work, this directed study allows students to proactively participate in producing community programming through LCTV (Lasell Community Television). Students will learn pre-production planning and participate in a full television crew to produce high quality programming for air. Each officer will assume one of the following roles: On-Air Talent, Production Coordinator, Social Media Manager, Program Editor, Studio Manager/Technician, News/Sports Director, or Field Videographer/Editor.Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

COM237 - Journalism Practicum

Journalism practicum is a hands-on, connected learning experience where student journalists do the work of the field. Students help to put out The 1851 Chronicle student newspaper covering Lasell University, as well as creating content for an active website, (www.The1851Chronicle.org) and three social media platforms. Students assume the roles of all positions on the news media staff, including reporters, photographers, editors, designers, and digital storytellers and social media managers. Students complete weekly tasks in preparation for a monthly publication and 24/7, live website and social media platforms (YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram), attend weekly staff meetings, attend monthly layout and editing sessions, and report directly to the Editor-in-Chief and Faculty Adviser. Prerequisite: Instructor permission and sophomore standing.

COM240X - Health Communication & Behavior Change

There is an increasing recognition of the role communication plays in shaping the health and well-being of individuals. Communication, from the personal to mass and social media, have been demonstrated to have both beneficial and harmful effects on health and well-being. In this course, students will explore the theory and practice of health communication and behavior change. It will cover the role of media and technology, social scientific theories used in health communication and behavior change, as well as how these theories can be applied to the real-world. The course will aim to bridge theoretical knowledge with real-world examples, and is suitable for students with varying interests, especially those who are interested in harnessing the power of communication and health education for improving health and well-being in society.Understanding how and why facets of communication influence health outcomes is essential for students interested in developing effective solutions to improve people’s health and well-being. Some questions we will tackle include: What social, environmental, and media factors are effective in influencing people’s behavior? How should messages and environments be designed and molded? How do stories help people engage in healthier behaviors? How can communication help to foster better health and well-being in society?

COM304 - TV Studio Production

TV Studio Production introduces the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment. Students learn pre-production planning, live-to-tape directing, and participate in full television crew rotations to produce high quality PSAs and their very own TV show to be submitted to local access television.  Throughout the semester, students develop a variety of production skills from hands-on television studio operation.

COM305 - Screenwriting

This course includes writing techniques for series and stand-alone productions in television and film. Students work both independently and collaboratively in order to understand industry procedures. Students experiment with several different genres and then develop a major project. Prerequisite: COM105 or ENG219

COM306 - Broadcast Journalism

This class introduces students to the basic skills in writing for radio and TV news, including beat reporting, writing, interviewing, and editing. Students critically evaluate newscasts and are introduced to the components of producing them. They also examine ethical challenges that arise when manipulation of images and sound can distort reality and compromise journalistic integrity. Prerequisite: COM 209

COM307 - Understanding Video Games

Understanding Video Games introduces students to the foundation, process, and impact of the video game industry.  Students evolve from merely riding the gaming highway to analyzing and deconstructing it.  The course pays particular attention to the history and breakthroughs in the technology, social and political impacts such as the ESRB, sex and violence in games, as well as past, present and future trends of the gaming market.

COM308 - Conflict Resolution & Negotiations

This course helps students to understand the theoretical assumptions, elements, and processes of interpersonal conflict and negotiation, to increase their ability to objectively analyze conflict situations, and to creatively and productively manage conflict. Alternative Dispute Resolution approaches to litigation for resolving conflicts such as mediation, arbitration, and negotiation are examined. Prerequisites: COM 101, LS 101 or BUSS 101; Junior or Senior standing.

COM310 - Political Communication

This course focuses on the complex ideas associated with the role of the press in a democracy. The nature and climate of our political processes, particularly elections, have changed dramatically in the past two generations, due in part to the extensive use and influence of the media. Also, media techniques and strategies used by government and political figures continue to change with the emergence of new technologies and the dominance of global media companies. Students learn how to think critically and analytically about the political press and how journalists and politicians frame public policy issues. This course looks critically at whether or not the American press is truly representative of the civic values of democracy, truth, and responsible citizenship. Prerequisites: COM 101 or POLS 101 or SOC 101.

COM312 - Digital Audio Production

Digital Audio Production brings students with basic radio production skills to a higher level of proficiency.  There is strong emphasis on radio as a digital medium and digital (nonlinear) audio editing with Adobe Audition.  Projects include editing music for radio play, writing and mixing radio commercials, creating a radio interview podcast, and the development of an Air Check radio demo for student portfolios.  Students also develop a deeper understanding of the radio business.  Prerequisite: COM 215.

COM313 - Digital Filmmaking

Digital Filmmaking takes students with basic video production skills to a higher level of expertise.  There is strong emphasis on pre-production planning, teamwork, lighting, sound and special effects.  The aesthetics of video production are also discussed by analyzing various film and video productions.  Projects include a special effects reel, television commercial, short documentary, and a short screenplay adaptation.  Throughout the semester, students develop a deeper understanding of the business of video production. Prerequisite: COM 217.

COM314 - Magazine and Digital Content

The magazine industry is evolving from print only to multi-media and digital. The skills needed to produce this type of content are also changing. This course focuses on producing feature and entertainment-oriented content across platforms, including print, video, digital and social media. Students engage in connected learning projects and produce photo galleries and videos, blogs and podcasts, as well as the creation of an original magazine and a social media campaign to build its brand. Writing is emphasized as students improve their skills across platforms, learn to target audiences, and curate content. Students will write profiles, reviews, and 1st person columns, among other projects. Students will also be encouraged to submit feature work to The 1851 Chronicle website as well as Polished and Tarnished Magazines. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 209.

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM101, MATH208 & Jr Standing

COM316 - Publication Editing

This course is designed as a workshop in which students learn the fundamentals of editing for print and online publications. Students study and participate in various editing roles, including editorial director, articles editor, copy editor, proofreader and fact-checker. Students examine case studies of existing publications. In keeping with Lasell's Connected Learning approach, students propose work for Lasell's two student publications, The 1851 Chronicle and Polished, or other publications. The course focuses on learning to prepare cohesive editorial products with clear, compelling, professional content while avoiding common mistakes in usage, grammar, and style. Prerequisites: COM 105.

COM317 - Media Relations

Managing media relations for public relations professionals is the focus of this course. The course is intended to increase students’ knowledge of the principles and methods of generating publicity and to introduce the basics of planning and writing media relations campaigns. The rapidly changing nature of global companies and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways that communication professionals achieve their goals. Media relations can be a highly competitive and challenging field, where you must prove your productivity, accuracy, and creativity. Students discuss and experiment with successful strategies for gaining coverage in the press for clients, and they plan a comprehensive media relations program. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 208.

COM319 - Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns

This course provides an environment for students to become engaged in a professional style media planning and buying campaign, which is an essential strategic focus of the advertising industry. Students develop a full advertising plan based on the current planning structure of a contemporary advertising agency. Working in teams, students conduct a detailed advertising analysis that allows them to provide strategic and creative solutions to problems they have identified in their research. Student teams construct an advertising plan that positions and promotes a product, a message, a politician, or a brand to a con­sumer audience. Each student team produces a comprehensive media campaign that identifies and targets the appropriate media outlets for advertising placements. The class has a modicum of pressure and intensity that reflects some of the challenges necessary to succeed in the advertising industry. Prerequisite: COM 221 or BUSS220

COM320 - Organizational Communication

This course focuses on both the theoretical understanding and practical knowledge of the context and application of organizational communication. Topics include: leadership, new technologies and their impact on organizations, organizational climate and culture, ethics, formal and informal channels of communication within organizations, management of diversity and conflict, relational communication (with interpersonal and group work), and issues of power and politics within the context of the organizational settings. Prerequisite: COM 103

COM321 - Media & Children

This course examines the uses and effects of mass communication among children and adolescents. By taking a developmental perspective, the course explores how youth at different stages of cognitive development watch, understand, and respond to media content. The first part of the course focuses on children’s uses and processing of media. The second part of the course reviews the effects of various types of content (e.g., advertising, stereotypes, violence). The final part of the course considers the role of interventions (e.g., media literacy, ratings, parental mediation) in preventing media-related outcomes that are harmful and promoting those that are positive. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to critically evaluate the role of media in the lives of children.COM 101 or PSYC 101.

COM324 - Investigative and Beat Reporting

This course requires students to do the work of the field by covering a campus or community beat like a professional reporter. Students learn how to come up with unique and powerful story ideas, how to cultivate sources, and how to tell stories across all platforms, such as print, digital, video and social media. This class also teaches students how to do the work of an investigative journalist, as portrayed in the Oscar winning “Spotlight” film. Students work in teams to research important campus issues to uncover the truth and produce multi-media packages to tell their stories. The course also examines global journalism trends. Prerequisite: COM209

COM327 - Digital Storytelling

This project-based course introduces students to the practice of digital storytelling to engage, inform and persuade audiences. Students will explore narrative structure and aesthetics of different storytelling media, with emphasis on micro, short form and episodic audio and video for social and online platforms. Students will develop story ideas, use desktop and mobile tools to acquire content in a variety of settings, and edit and repurpose content to maximize its usefulness. Through creation and analysis of their own and others’ digital stories, students will increase their understanding of effective digital storytelling. Prerequisite: COM101

COM328 - Video Games & Culture

Video Games & Culture brings students on a virtual tour around the globe for a look at the video game industry through the perspectives of numerous cultures.  Students will investigate subjects such as video game piracy in Italy & China, professional gaming in Korea, video game censorship in Australia & the Middle East, and much more.  The course also compares the North American market with other continents such as Asia, Europe, and South America.  The interplay between video games and culture will be discussed, and students will be given hands-on opportunities to sample video games from other countries that were never released in the US.  The course emphasizes the competency of ‘knowledge of the media’ and reinforces the competencies of writing, research, visual communication, and speech. 

COM329X - Marketing Communications for Non Profits

Non-profit organizations differ from for-profit enterprises across a wide range of areas. This is evident in the practice of marketing communications. In this course students will use integrated marketing communications (IMC) to research and plan a communication campaign for a nonprofit organization. Through the application of industry standards, students will develop a professional communication plan for the organization.

COM330 - Strategic Campaigns

This course integrates the knowledge students have acquired in previous courses in the field of marketing communications. Students will develop a strategic communication campaign that is grounded on both an organization’s objectives and a thorough understanding of a target audience. Students will work with a client (real or fictitious), on an actual campaign that includes marketing and communication objectives, primary and secondary consumer research, a target-centered strategy, tactical recommendations, execution of the creative brief, and an evaluation plan. Special emphasis will be placed on the strategic work that goes into developing, planning, and executing the campaign within industry standards. COM 221 OR BUSS220

COM331 - Media Literacy & Ethics

Mass media have become the primary and predominant?storytellers of our time, and their messages can influence the way we see ourselves and?the world around us. However, because messages are shaped by the corporate interests that?control media organizations, their impact may not always be in the best interests of the public.?It is the responsibility of audiences, therefore, to understand and to think?critically about mass media messages. This course provides students with a framework to explore such media content critically. Students study the role mass media plays in communicating cultural values and its impact on society, by emphasizing how media companies shape public discourse. The course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations, are also explored. Special emphasis is placed on the diverse theoretical approaches through which ethical questions of media literacy can be explored. Prerequisite: COM101

COM332 - Television & Film Studies

This course will explore this significant question: Should we take film and TV seriously as a form of mass communication? The answer can be found in the ways that film and TV produce meanings for the audience and our culture as a dominant form of entertainment over that past 60 plus years in post WWII America. As such, film and TV demand our scrutiny. Throughout thecourse, we will look at such topics as how film and TV entertainment narrative is structured, how sets are designed, how sound interacts with image, how commercials persuade and how these structures can emphasize certain meanings (and de-emphasize others) and transmit values to viewers. Current trends in technological shifts have forced changes in the delivery of film and TV programming, for example to audio and video files streaming on computers, such as tablets, the decline of movie going and network TV and the rise of hundreds of cable channels and streaming. However, all of these new technologies demand more film and TV entertainment content, not less. This course uses two avenues of inquiry: one exploring the mass communication basis for studying the content delivered through mediums of film and TV; and another outlining an analysis of film and TV content which illustrates the transmission of cultural values (primarily American) to the audience. Prerequisites: COM 101

COM334 - Comparing Cultures Through Film

By examining films from Iraq, Cuba, India, Native Americans, Mexico, Nigeria, China, South Africa, and Chad, students will gain exposure to various social, cultural, political, and economic systems, leading to discussion and exploration of other cultures as well as reflection about American culture. Students will engage in an interdisciplinary approach which adopts terminology and theories from film studies and criticism, sociology, and cultural anthropology, in order to study other cultures and cultural methods of visual storytelling. Ultimately, goals include increased intercultural competence and sensitivity accompanied by an empathy for the “other” and an increased awareness and raised consciousness of past and contemporary global issues. Prerequisite: COM 101

COM335 - Corporate and Nonprofit Public Relations

This course builds on students’ existing knowledge of Public Relations (PR) and is intended to further develop their skills. The focus is on the distinct differences between the practice of PR in corporate and non-profit settings. Special emphasis will be placed on the centrality of PR as a management function, while also expanding students’ use and understanding of tools and techniques used by PR professionals. This course includes a theoretical and an applied component, providing students with the opportunity to develop PR plans for prospective clients. Subjects covered include corporate PR, non-profit PR, media relations and press agentry, crisis communication, community relations, and cause-related marketing. Prerequisite: COM208 Public Relations.

COM336X - Analytics for Com Professionals

This course introduces students to principles, tools and methods for data-driven strategic communications. Through case studies and real-world projects, students will learn to use analytics tools to monitor, measure and evaluate communication efforts, and leverage their insights for improved media planning and campaigns. Students will emerge with a better understanding of how to use big data in public relations, advertising and other communication fields

COM399 - Pre-Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop professional objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. In this seminar students identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will develop effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students apply search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. The internship course is comprised of a minimum of 150 hours in the field, the weekly seminar, and its assignments, including an oral presentation. Students also write weekly reflections on their experience, complete written assignments, and do an oral presentation to a group of their peers. The field supervisor contributes to the student’s learning through guidance, feedback and evaluation of the students work.

COM402 - Field Experience II

COM 402 follows COM 400, in which students learned how to apply theory to practice in a work environment. This course will take those skills one step further and enhance the students understanding of the Communication discipline, the skills required to succeed in the job market, and how to conduct the necessary research to find a job and a career which is a good fit and will lead the student to professional success. Projects will include facilitating a workshop, conducting a focus group, developing a marketing strategy, creating a hard portfolio, a leave-behind piece, and an e-portfolio. Students should complete the internship in a different organization than the placement for COM 400.

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: COM315 and Senior standing.

COM495 - Capstone Project Production & Portfolio

In this capstone course, students will review and refine their digital portfolios to demonstrate knowledge and skills acquired through their studies. They will also apply their learning to produce a capstone project based on their area of specialization and career goals. These projects will involve research into the project topic, as well as integration of relevant communication theory, ethical issues and professional practices. Students will iterate projects from draft to final deliverable(s) based on presentation and critique of their work throughout the term. The course culminates with students exhibiting their projects and portfolios to program faculty. Prerequisite: COM315.

SMGT102 - Contemporary Sport Management

This course provides an overview of general principles and practices of the sport industry, covering all facets of sport management, including leadership, sociology, marketing, legal aspects, finance, and governance, in both professional and amateur sports setting. Students learn and understand those unique aspects of sport management that distinguish it from other management fields. Students gain an increased awareness of various career opportunities in the sport industry.

SMGT201 - Legal Aspects of Sports

This course is an exploration of the relationship of the law to organized secondary school, collegiate, and professional sports. It provides an overview of a wide range of legal principles that relate to the sport management field. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SMGT 102 or LS101

SMGT202 - Ethics in Sport

This course examines theories of ethics as well as personal moral development as applied to sports. It explores the importance of personal ethics and organizational responsibility and the role of professional ethics in sport management. Prerequisite: SMGT102

SMGT203X - Intro to Parks Recreation & Tourism

This course provides students with a broad understanding of the evolution of leisure values, behaviors, and services as well contemporary issues and trends. Students will learn about the history and philosophy of recreation, leisure and tourism in an international context, and the role of organized leisure in American communities, as well as the changing social, economic, political and environmental context for these leisure based activities and their ties to the maturing fields of sport tourism and Parks and Recreation.

SMGT205 - Pre-Practicum I

This course is designed for students to complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and approval of Instructor.

SMGT206 - Sports Administration

This course studies the basic concepts, theories and organizations of administration as applied to sport. Areas covered include budgeting, human resources management, facilities, and legal issues.Prerequisite: SMGT102

SMGT207 - Special Topics in History of Sport

This course explores various aspects of sports and their historical development. The integration of gender, ethnic, religious, and other factors are discussed. The role that each area of sport plays within our society is examined.

SMGT208 - Sport Governance

This course focuses on the important role that governance plays within the sport industry. Students study the governance structures of various sports and sports governing bodies, including professional sports leagues, players’ associations, intercollegiate athletics, and Olympic sports, both within the United States and internationally. Prerequisite: SMGT102 or permission of the Program Director

SMGT209X - NCAA Compliance & Rules Admin

NCAA Compliance and Rules Administration is designed for students to gain an understanding of the enforcement policies, practices, and procedures, as well and the complexity of the rules and regulations governing NCAA and intercollegiate athletics. Student will review compliance cases, NCAA enforcement guidelines, and historical and contemporary compliance and rules administration cases.

SMGT211 - Sport & Society

This course is organized around the theme “Sport in Society.” The purpose of this course is to invoke a sociological perspective in understanding sport as a societal institution. We will examine socialization themes as well as the increasing organization, commercialization, and globalization of sports.

SMGT212X - Careers in Sport Management

This course discusses the meaning of sport management in terms of its scope, principles, issues and future trends. In addition, the course examines the job responsibilities and competencies required of sport managers in a variety of sports or sports-related organizations in a hope to have the student become acquainted with the role of sport administrators as well as the career opportunities within the industry. Finally, this course provides the student with an overview of the different issues sports managers will be faced with such as: consumer behavior, public relations, budgeting and facility management.

SMGT215 - Pre-Practicum

This course is designed for students to complete 60 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and approval of Instructor.

SMGT301 - Sport Facility & Event Management

This course explores the roles and functions of facility and events managers. It examines a variety of public assembly and privately managed sport facilities; the steps and skills required to effectively plan, organize, lead, and evaluate an event, and facilities to meet the needs of sports organizations. The course also examines resource allocation, strategic planning, and risk management and facility maintenance requirements. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and a 200 level Sport Management course or HEM 301.

SMGT302 - Sport Marketing

This course explores sport as a product, its consumer markets, and sports products markets. It examines the processes of sport marketing, research, information management, identification of target markets, and the development of a sport marketing mix and strategies. Prerequisites: SMGT 102, BUSS 220.

SMGT303 - Sport Finance

This course is a study of the financial challenges faced by sport administrators and those working within the sports industry. Topics include economic impact analysis, ticket operations, concessions, public-private partnerships, sport sponsorships, and fundraising. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 & ECON101 or ECON102

SMGT304 - Sports Information & Communication

This course examines the fundamentals in sport information, publicity, and promotions. Preparation of news releases, local features, publications of programs and brochures, statistical breakdowns, dealing with the press, and the promotion of specific events, teams, and individuals are included. Prerequisite: ENG 102 & SMGT102

SMGT305 - Pre-Practicum II

This course is designed for the students to complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisite: SMGT 205.

SMGT306 - Sport Leadership

This course teaches concepts, principles, and skills of leadership for managers in the sports industry. Styles of successful sport coaches and managers are examined and analyzed in the context of their times and their settings. Prerequisite: SMGT102 & SMGT206 or Permission of instructor

SMGT307 - Sport Sponsorship

This course provides an examination of the relationship between sport and corporate sponsorship, and strategies for selling sponsorship packages. Topics covered include the theoretical rationale for sponsorship, strategic communication through sponsorship, determining the value of a sponsorship, evaluation of sponsorship activities, and techniques used to sell sponsorship packages. Perspectives from the event holder (i.e., property) offering a sponsorship and from the organization functioning as the sponsor are considered. Prerequisite:SMGT102 or Permission of Dept Chiar

SMGT308X - The Business of Sports

Multiple industries now makeup the overall “business of sports”. Amateur sports, professional sports, youth sports, athletic performance gear and fashion apparel, fantasy sports, memorabilia & sports media are each multibillion dollar industries in their own right. This course will explore the social and economic challenges faces by managers in various sectors of the sports industry as they attempt to address the ever increasing competition for fans, sponsors, broadcast viewership, media exposure, public financing and athletic talent.Students will learn what it is like to work in various divisions of the sports industry. Industry practitioners will walk the students through the day to day operations of these departments and explain successful strategies for obtaining these jobs. Students will go beyond wins and losses on the field to examine the fundamental business challenges that sports managers’ confront in a variety of industry sectors prerequisite: SMGT102 or permission of Dept Chair

SMGT310 - 30 for 30:Sport through Documentary

30 for 30 is the umbrella title for a series of documentary films highlighting interesting people and events in sports history. 30 for 30 has evolved into a series that has both revitalized and revolutionized the art of the sports documentary through a diverse range of filmmakers telling specific stories that touch on larger themes beyond sports. With each documentary, the filmmakers have brought their passion and personal approach to the screen, detailing the issues, trends, athletes, teams, rivalries, games and moments that have transformed the sports landscape.

SMGT313X - Parks & Recreation Management

Parks & Recreation Management

SMGT396 - Research in Sport Industry

Using Research in the Sport Industry is designed for students to gain an understanding of the principles, procedures, processes, and types of writing and reports used to answer problems in the Sport Industry. Students will learn to identify, describe, analyze, and report on an issue or problem at their own workplace by drawing on the relevant sport and related literature. Prerequisite: SMGT102, SMGT206 and Junior/Senior standing.

SMGT400X - Major League Lacrosse Internship

Major League Lacrosse Internship

SMGT401 - Special Topics in Sport Management

This course explores special segments and contemporary trends in the sport management industry. Topics may include sports medicine, health promotion, intercollegiate athletics, campus recreation, sport tourism, and international sport.

SMGT403X - Managing Diversity in Sport Org

Managing Diversity in Sport Organizations offers an overview of various diversity and inclusion theories and examines the applications of these theories to sport organizations. Students will study the impact and interconnectedness of diversity issues, social responsiveness, and the financial impact of these issues on professional, intercollegiate, interscholastic, and Olympic sport organizations. Students will also discuss and practice strategies to resolve diversity and inclusion related problems commonly faced by the sport and business manager. In conjunction with Lasell College Connected Learning philosophy, an emphasis will be placed on connecting diversity and concepts and initiatives to the sport and business industries.

SMGT405X - Leisure Theories in Practice

Leisure Theories in Practice

SMGT407 - Sport Management Internship I

The internship provides students with administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisites: SMGT 205 and SMGT 305 . 

SMGT408 - Sport Management Internship II

The internship provides students with additional administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisite: SMGT 407. 

SMGT412 - Sport Analytics

Analytical techniques and quantitative methods are on the rise in many areas of business. They have increasingly made their way into the sports realm. Skills such as critical thinking, mathematical modeling, statistical analysis using Microsoft excel, predictive analytics and optimization are crucial in the data-centric realm. The class seeks to develop and refine these skills in the business application area of sports.Prerequisite: SMGT102 & MATH208

SMGT496 - Sport Management Capstone

This course is a culminating experience designed to provide the student with an opportunity to demonstrate synthesis of knowledge, practice, and skills developed throughout the program of study. Capstone assignments reflect the integration of research methodology, theory, and advanced knowledge in an area of specialization. Students develop a web-portfolio to showcase their work in the Sport Management program. Students incorporate aspects of past course assignments into a reflective thesis paper. Students also participate in a required service learning activity. To be completed in either the fall or spring semester of the final academic year of the student's program. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SMGT396

Janice Barrett

Professor of Communication, Graduate Program Coordinator for Communication

Office: Donahue

Marie Campagna Franklin

Associate Professor of Journalism

Office: Donahue

Meryl Perlson

Interim Dean of the School of Communication & the Arts, Professor of Communication, Program Chair of Communication

Office: Donahue

Erin Vicente

Associate Professor of Communication

Office: Donahue

Brian Wardyga

Professor of Communication; General Manager, 109.2FM WLAS & LCTV

Office: Brennan Library

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM103 - Human Communication (KP)

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry: one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM101

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM101 or SOC101 or PSYC101

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM101, MATH208 & Jr Standing

COM399 - Pre-Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop professional objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. In this seminar students identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will develop effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students apply search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. The internship course is comprised of a minimum of 150 hours in the field, the weekly seminar, and its assignments, including an oral presentation. Students also write weekly reflections on their experience, complete written assignments, and do an oral presentation to a group of their peers. The field supervisor contributes to the student’s learning through guidance, feedback and evaluation of the students work.

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: COM315 and Senior standing.

BUSS220 - Principles of Marketing

In this course, the fundamentals of marketing are explored for practical application in today's business environment. The process of creating value for customers by utilizing the tools of marketing -- market segmentation, targeting and positioning, marketing research and communications, product development, channels of distribution, and pricing -- are explored with a project-based, interactive approach. Additionally, there is a service learning component included in this course that enables students to further apply the course concepts while working to advance a participating non-profit organization. Prerequisites: BUSS101, COM101, HEM101, HEM102, FASH101, or SMGT102 AND ENG102 OR WRT102.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM101

COM209 - Journalism

Journalism is a fast changing industry and this course prepares students for the change. Students learn to report and produce a variety of news and feature pieces, for print and multi-media platforms, including Q and A interviews, news and feature stories, opinion pieces, reviews, photo galleries, social media campaigns and more. Assignments can be produced on sports, fashion, entertainment, arts and culture, business, politics and more. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in The 1851 Chronicle newspaper and website. Prerequisite: WRT102

COM215 - Radio Production

Radio Production introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell University Radio station. Finally, this course introduces students to the communication competency of speech.

COM230 - Media, Sports & Society

This course introduces students to various aspects of the sports-media relationship, including the history of the industries that constitute, the audiences drawn to, and the social issues that arise from the relationship. COM101 is a prerequisite for this course. If you have not taken COM101, then you will be dropped from the class.

COM231 - Sports Communication

This course explores the dynamic organizations and diverse professions reflective of the sports communication field while emphasizing the fundamentals of good public relations and solid journalism. Types of organizational inquiry will include major television, radio and digital networks, leading magazines and newspapers, college athletics and professional sports as well as marketing and advertising firms. Topics covered will span journalism and publishing, community, media and public relations, marketing and advertising as well as digital and social media. In this course, students will learn how to research and write for broadcast, digital and print media; how to define, develop, and deliver effective sports communication campaigns; how to use mass and social media platforms for brands, personalities and teams; and how to manage and mitigate crisis communication. Formerly - COM309

SMGT102 - Contemporary Sport Management

This course provides an overview of general principles and practices of the sport industry, covering all facets of sport management, including leadership, sociology, marketing, legal aspects, finance, and governance, in both professional and amateur sports setting. Students learn and understand those unique aspects of sport management that distinguish it from other management fields. Students gain an increased awareness of various career opportunities in the sport industry.

SMGT302 - Sport Marketing

This course explores sport as a product, its consumer markets, and sports products markets. It examines the processes of sport marketing, research, information management, identification of target markets, and the development of a sport marketing mix and strategies. Prerequisites: SMGT 102, BUSS 220.

SMGT304 - Sports Information & Communication

This course examines the fundamentals in sport information, publicity, and promotions. Preparation of news releases, local features, publications of programs and brochures, statistical breakdowns, dealing with the press, and the promotion of specific events, teams, and individuals are included. Prerequisite: ENG 102 & SMGT102