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2020 - 2021 Academic Catalog

Biology

The Lasell University Bachelor of Science in Biology degree program provides students with the opportunity to establish a firm foundation for a career in the biological sciences. The major is centered in biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In addition to this, students are presented with meaningful educational experiences based on the knowledge perspectives of the Lasell University core curriculum: creativity and aesthetics, scientific inquiry and problem solving, individuals and society, and global and historical perspectives.  

The connected learning philosophy of the college is emphasized by a semester off-campus field experience that will provide professional interaction and training in a student's chosen area of career focus within the biological sciences.  

Academic standards for the Biology program include grades of "C" or better in all BIO, CHEM, & PHYS courses.

Goals and Outcomes
The following goals and learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Biology:

Goal 1: Communication
Upon completion of the major program of study in Biology, students will be able to:  

1.     Interpret, develop, produce and disseminate disciplinary research
2.    Understand and create discipline specific written work
3.     Deliver professional oral presentations  

Goal 2: Professional Behaviors
Upon completion of the major program of study in Biology, students will be able to:

1.     Identify ethical issues 
2.     Model professional conduct and behavior
3.     Respect the role and responsibilities of each professional member of a multidisciplinary team
4.     Advance knowledge through the use of evidence based practice and professional development  

Goal 3: Knowledge and Skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Biology, students will be able to: 

1.     Explain and apply the evidence that supports evolution as an explanation for the diversity of life.
2.     Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between structure and function at all levels of life.
3.     Apply the principles governing storage, synthesis and manipulation of genetic information.
4.     Demonstrate an understanding of how the laws of thermodynamics and chemical pathways impact the growth and development of organisms.
5.     Demonstrate proficient performance, comprehension and application of laboratory techniques including but not limited to cell & microorganism culture, polymerase chain reaction, gel electrophoresis, and DNA analysis.

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
BIO101 Principles of Biology I (KP) 4
BIO102 Principles of Biology II (KP) 4
BIO116 Zoology (KP) 3
BIO209 Molecular Biology 4
BIO211 Microbiology 4
BIO303 Plant Biology 4
BIO310 Genetics 4
BIO340 Research Methods 3
BIO406 Evolutionary Biology 3
BIO420 Field Experience in Health Science 3
BIO430 Health Science Capstone 3
CHEM203 General Chemistry I (KP) 4
CHEM204 General Chemistry II 4
CHEM303 Organic Chemistry 4
CHEM304 Organic Chemistry II 4
ENV211 Environmental Science (KP) 3
MATH203 Precalculus 3
MATH205 Calculus I 4
MATH208 Statistics 3
PHYS111 General Physics I (KP) 4
PHYS112 General Physics II (KP) 4
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives (KP) 3

 
Major Requirements: 79  credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.

BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Co-requisites: BIO101L and BIO101R.

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. Prerequisite: BIO101 with a C or better. Corequisite: BIO102L.

BIO104 - Foundations in the Health Professions

This course provides a description of the various health care professions including educational and licensing requirements. The concepts of professionalism, health care teams, and current health care policies will be covered. Students will increase their knowledge of the various health care professions through job shadowing.

BIO107 - Topics In Biology (KP)

Preliminaries of the molecules of life and cell structures are investigated in this course. Topics from cell biology, nutrition, energy production, respiratory and circulatory systems, genetics, reproduction, evolutionary thought, and ecosystems are also explored.

BIO113 - The Dinosaurs (KP)

This is an introductory course to the various theoretical approaches to understanding the evolutionary ecology and behavioral biology of dinosaurs. Topics include functional anatomy, social behavior, grouping and activity patterns, reproduction, behavioral ecology, locomotion, life history, geographic distribution, evolution and conservation issues. Two field trips required.

BIO116 - Zoology (KP)

This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO205 with a C or better. Corequisite: BIO206L.

BIO209 - Molecular Biology

This lecture and laboratory will present the basic principles of molecular biology. Topics include nucleic acid-protein interactions, the Central Dogma, gene regulation, and genetic evolution. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce the methodology and research used in molecular biology, including nucleic acid extraction, PCR, Western Blot, and gel electrophoresis. Prerequisite: BIO101 Corequisite: BIO209L

BIO211 - Microbiology

This lecture and laboratory introduces the microbial world and the laboratory techniques required for its study. Topics include the basic characteristics of fungi, algae, bacteria, and viruses. Topics and applications that relate to humans are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO211L

BIO301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course also describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

BIO303 - Plant Biology

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to plant biology including an overview of major groups of plants, plant cells and cell types, plant anatomy & physiology, and ecology. Prerequisite: BIO101 with C or better

BIO310 - Genetics

This lecture and laboratory will focus on principles related to the inheritance of traits regulated by genes. The chemical and physical nature of chromosomes and genes and gene expression and regulation will be covered. Systems in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms exemplifying Mendelian and modern molecular genetic principles will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO310L

BIO340 - Research Methods

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industry including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208

BIO420 - Field Experience in Health Science

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 200 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 340 and Permission of Program Chair.

BIO430 - Health Science Capstone

The capstone course prepares students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for undergraduate research. Students will develop an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 340 with a C or better.

CHEM105 - Chemistry of Fashion (KP)

This course examines the connections between chemistry and fashion. This course is a lab centered course where students will explore topics such as light and its’ properties; the nature of color; effects of environmental factors such as acids and bases, and oxidation on dyes; synthesis and use of dyes, paints, and pigments. The laboratory procedures apply chemical theory and techniques to learn the chemistry behind materials used in fashion. Students will use spectroscopy and other methods of chemical investigation to examine materials used in art and fashion. Students will conduct inquiry-based projects focusing on areas of interest.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM203L and CHEM203R.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubility equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and CHEM203. Co-requisites: CHEM204L and CHEM204R.

CHEM301 - Biochemistry

This course is an in-depth study of biochemical substances and their reaction in the body with major emphasis placed on metabolism at the cellular level and examined in the tissues of the various organs where these reactions occur. Correlation of biochemical processes underlying pathologic conditions are made whenever practical. Prerequisite: CHEM 204

CHEM303 - Organic Chemistry

This course is focused on the structure and chemistry of organic compounds. Topics include thermodynamics, resonance, reaction mechanisms of organic functional groups and stereochemistry. The course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM204. Corequisite CHEM303L

CHEM304 - Organic Chemistry II

The second half of a two-semester sequence. Topics include synthetic applications of organic reactions, delocalization and aromaticity. Principles and application of instrumental methods for organic structure determination will be studied in the laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM303. Corequisite CHEM304L

ENV101 - Intro to Environmental Studies (KP)

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

ENV102 - Environmental Ethics & Society

This course explores issues and problems arising out of ethical considerations related to the general environment and specific ecosystems. Also considered are the moral aspects of population control and resource use. The foundations for beliefs and worldviews regarding nature and the human relationship to it are explored. In addition, the variety of philosophical perspectives and pragmatic choices and actions people take related to environmental ethics are studied.

ENV201 - Environmental Law & Policy

This course examines the role of law and politics in the management of natural resources and the environment. The course first reviews the major US environmental protection legislation and then explores the process of developing and establishing environmental policy related to water, air, energy, and land resources. Historical and contemporary circumstances that influence public policy decisions, the influence of science and technology, social and economic paradigms, and ethics and values are discussed. Even though the emphasis is on domestic U.S. policies and institutions, international issues are addressed, including how US domestic environmental policies influence and are influenced by global forces. This is a writing intensive course.

ENV202 - Gardening for Sustainability(KP)

Autumn is a critical time for the sustainable garden. It is a time of harvest and preparation. In this course, students will research and establish the rhythms of the late season garden by participating in the next stages of development in the campus community garden. Together, we will harvest, save seeds, start special fall plantings, and put the garden to bed. Projects will include teaming up with kids from The Barn and members of the Village.The course will also look at gardening and its role in the local food system, as a form of both self-sufficiency and community support. We will study and practice different methods of propagation and seed banking, and research the garden as its own ecological system. We’ll also look at recent innovation in garden design and small-scale agriculture, including vertical and rotating greenhouse systems, with an eye towards futuristic sustainable design.

ENV204 - Environmental Economics

This course explores economic problems associated with environmental issues. The course introduces modeling and analytical tools used in the field. The course first examines the problem of market failure in the presence of externalities and public goods, and considers public policy responses to these market failures, including command-and-control regulations, tax and subsidy incentives, and marketable pollution permits. The course then addresses the methods to measure the costs and benefits of environmental improvements and how these types of analysis are used in public policy decisions. These decisions are analyzed in the context of problems such as air pollution, ozone depletion and global warming, threats to biodiversity, and development. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ECON101

ENV205 - Green Business

All businesses, from oil companies to computer manufacturers want to be "green." Being "green" is not only good for a business' marketing and publicity, but it also helps the bottom line. This course examines what it means to be a "green" business. Topics include the Triple Bottom Line, sourcing materials, energy management and recycling.

ENV206 - Gardening for Sustainability

From wartime Victory Gardens to today’s community gardens, we are experiencing a resurgence in the popularity of gardening as a means of expanding personal sustainability. This course will explore topics in organic gardening, biodynamics and permaculture. We will study garden planning and design, including selection of heirloom varieties, designing with available space, and innovation in small-­-scale agriculture. The course will have an applied focus on participating in the next stages of development for the campus community garden, including seed selection, seed starting and early season planting.

ENV207 - Chemistry for a Sustainable Future

This course will engage students in thinking about environmental problems through the context of chemistry. The relevance of chemistry to such topics as air pollution, climate change, and water management will be explored. Students will be challenged to consider the application of chemistry to help address many of these problems.

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell University on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

ENV220 - World Geography (KP)

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

ENV302 - Natural Resource Management/GIS

This course surveys natural resource issues from global to local scales through the use of geographic information systems (GIS). GIS, remotely sensed images, and global positioning systems are used as tools in managing community natural resources. Students map natural resources and community features to explore management strategies. Students work with town commissions, state agencies, and environmental organizations to obtain spatial data for analysis.

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

ENV304 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV305 - Energy: Moving on from Fossil Fuel

Our economic prosperity relies on burning fossil fuels to power everything from our trucks to our office computers. As fossil fuels become more scarce, it is necessary to find other sources of energy. This course introduces students to our energy grid and to alternative sources of energy like wind, solar and geothermal. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 211

ENV400 - Internship

This internship is scheduled to take place during the junior year and introduces students to challenges faced by companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies. Placement is tailored to meet the student’s career goals and interests in the environmental field. Students work 150 hours over the course of the semester alongside professionals in the field. Written reflections are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship as well as regular meetings with the internship supervisor. The internship supervisor monitors each student’s performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 102, ENV 201, ENV 211.

ENV420 - Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

This course is a capstone course in Environmental Studies that focuses on current issues and trends in the environmental field. Students complete an applied thesis or practicum project in an area related to their particular interest and present it to the class and/or at symposium. Environmental career opportunities are discussed along with resume development, networking, interviewing techniques, and other career development skills. Prerequisites: ENV 400, Senior standing.

MATH106 - Mathematical Reasoning

This course is the foundational course for mathematical and quantitative reasoning at Lasell College. Mathematical reasoning is the critical skill that enables a student to solve real-world problems involving quantitative analysis by making use of particular mathematical skills. Through the development of their mathematical reasoning skills, students will recognize the power of mathematics in its own right as well as its relevance in the real world. Students will develop and enhance their mathematical reasoning skills through a project/application-based curriculum supported by readily available current technological tools and topics that will include, but not be limited to, the following: solving systems of equations, linear programming, statistical, and graphical data analysis.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH108X - Mathematics of Design

This course explores elements of mathematics within the design field from the incorporation of algebra to concepts of geometry. Students will have the opportunity to integrate numerical fluency, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning and communicating quantitative information through group problem solving and class discussions. Topics include pattern drafting, layouts cutting, revenue, cost, and profit modeling, measurement systems, Euclidean geometry, and spatial reasoning.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH110X - Introduction to Logic

An introduction to symbolic logic, including sentential and predicate logic. Its purpose is to familiarize you with certain formal methods for representing and evaluating arguments and reasoning. These methods can be used for any subject matter. The focus is on translating English statements into symbolic notation, and evaluating arguments for validity using formal proof techniques.This course is recommended for data science students, math majors, students who are contemplating graduate school admissions tests, and for general knowledge and application (so, for instance, all computer programming is based on fundamental logic rules and applications). s

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH209 - Business Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics focused on applications in business. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, time-series analysis, trend and seasonality analysis, simple and multiple correlation and regression analysis, sales and cost forecasting, probability, expected monetary value, and the Normal distribution. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102. With permission of the instructor only.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real-world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH205

MATH301 - Mathematical Modeling

Mathematical Modeling. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205, 206, and 208

MATH303X - Problem Solving

This course will be an exploration into the mathematics exemplified in high quality high school and undergraduate mathematics competitions and mathematical research. The emphasis will be placed on building a repertoire of mathematical strategies and tactics, then applying these methods in unfamiliar situations. Topics will include: Combinatorics, Binomial Theorem, Conditional Probability, Roots of Unity, Symmetric Polynomials, Polynomial Interpolation, and topics in Euclidean and non-Euclidean Geometry. Students will hone their ability to solve mathematical problems through hands-on practice and obtain an understanding of the strategies, tactics, and tools of the problem solver as illustrated by the textbook and the instructor. Strategies and tools for solving problems include, but are not limited to: •Draw a Diagram•Systematic Lists•Eliminate Possibilities•Matrix Logic•Look for a Pattern•Guess and Check•Sub Problems•Unit Analysis•Solve An Easier Related Problem•Physical Representations•Work Backwards•Venn Diagrams•Finite Differences

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem-solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure.

MATH305X - Advanced Statistics

Quantitative statistical tools for modern data analysis are used across a range of disciplines and industries to guide organizational, societal and scientific advances. Using data sets from across a variety of fields, the focus will be on applications and analysis. Topics include two sample confidence intervals, Chi Square tests, multiple regression analysis, ANOVA, non- parametric tests, sampling, and simulation. Prerequisite: Math 208 or Math 209

MATH306X - Mathematical Content Knowledge for Ed

This course engages students in hands-on, in-depth, practical applications of the mathematical reasoning and computational techniques taught in MATH 304. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Prerequisite: Permission of Education Program Director

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vector functions, advanced techniques of differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH322X - Special Topics in Mathematics

Special Topics in Mathematics

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants. Applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, economics, connectivity of networks, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Capstone Seminar

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

MATH706X - Mathematical Content Knowledge for Ed

This course engages students in hands-on, in-depth, practical applications of the mathematical reasoning and computational techniques for teachers. This course is for students seeking elementary or moderate disabilities licensure.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS111L, PHYS111R.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111 with a C or better. Corequisite: PHYS112L, PHYS112R.

SCI103 - Science for Educators I (KP)

This course provides education students with an introduction to the scientific principles governing the contemporary technological world. Topics include scientific methodologies, gravity, energy, electricity, magnetism, light, and introductory chemistry. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: ED Majors only

SCI104 - Science for Educators II (KP)

This course provides education students with an introduction to earth science, astronomy, and environmental science. Topics include the weather, solar system, stars, the universe, and global pollution. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lectures. Prerequisite: ED Majors only

SCI105 - Introduction to Astronomy (KP)

Introduction to astronomy for the non-science major with a focus on our place within the universe. Topics include the formation and evolution of stars and planetary systems, our Solar System, the Milky Way Galaxy, and the large scale structure of the universe

SCI106 - How Things Work (KP)

This course explores how things from our everyday lives work according to the rules of nature. The principles that influence how objects fall, cars move, scales weigh, planes fly, stoves heat, copiers copy give insight into the workings of the universe. Connections between our immediate surroundings and the universe at large are illustrated.

SCI107 - Topics in Science (KP)

Topics vary from semester to semester.

SCI114 - Modern Science & Technology (KP)

This course introduces the history of Science from antiquity to the present and demonstrates how the various areas of science work together to develop the technology and the materials we are familiar with in our daily lives.  Topics include role of measurement and experiments and revolutions of modern science (advances in chemistry, biology, astronomy and technology).Students will conduct inquiry-based projects focusing on areas of interest. The goal of this course is to help students develop the practices of science such as asking researchable questions, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing data and other related skills that will enhance their quality of life and professional success.

SCI115 - Science of Sport (KP)

This course will look at how certain basic principles of science govern the major operations of many different sports. Students will conduct inquiry-based projects focusing on areas of interest. The goal of this course is to help students develop the practices of science such as asking researchable questions, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing data and other related skills that will enhance their quality of life and professional success.

SCI117 - The Primates (KP)

This is an introductory course to the various theoretical approaches to understanding the evolutionary ecology and behavioral biology of primates. Topics include functional anatomy, social behavior, grouping and activity patterns, reproduction, behavioral ecology, locomotion, life history, geographic distribution, evolution and conservation issues. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry-Scientific [AI (S)].

SCI118 - Crime Lab Science (KP)

This is a hands on survey course that will familiarize students with the principles governing the application of science to solve crimes. This course will involve the analysis of actual criminal cases. The students will be introduced to forensic and chemical concepts including gunpowder analysis (Kennedy assassination), trace evidence analysis, fiber analysis (Wayne Williams), drug analysis (Anna Nicole Smith), blood analysis (Jeffrey MacDonald), and DNA profiling (OJ Simpson).

SCI119 - Physical Geology (KP)

This course focuses on teaching the principles of geology and earth history, leading to a fundamental understanding of earth systems and processes. Students will also engage in a semester-long scientific writing project focusing on a National Park of choice that inspires them.

SCI303 - The Primates

This is an introductory course to the various theoretical approaches to understanding the evolutionary ecology and behavioral biology of primates. Topics include functional anatomy, social behavior, grouping and activity patterns, reproduction, behavioral ecology, locomotion, life history, geographic distribution, evolution and conservation issues. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry-Scientific [AI (S)].

Joseph Aieta III

Professor Emeritus

Stephanie Athey

Professor of Cultural Studies, Director of the Honors Program

Office: Winslow

Steven Bloom

Professor Emeritus, English

Laura Commins

Assistant Professor

Office: Winslow

Dennis Frey Jr

Associate Dean of Curricular Integration, Director of Rosemary B Fuss Teaching and Learning Center, Professor of History

Office: Winslow

Jose Guzman

Associate Professor of Spanish, Coordinator of World Language Program

Office: Winslow

Lizbeth Piel

Assistant Professor of History, Coordinator of History Program

Office: Winslow

Patricia Roy

Assistant Professor of English

Office: Winslow

Thomas Sullivan

Associate Professor of Ethics, Director of Ethics Program

Office: Klingbeil

BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Co-requisites: BIO101L and BIO101R.

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. Prerequisite: BIO101 with a C or better. Corequisite: BIO102L.

BIO116 - Zoology (KP)

This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla.

BIO209 - Molecular Biology

This lecture and laboratory will present the basic principles of molecular biology. Topics include nucleic acid-protein interactions, the Central Dogma, gene regulation, and genetic evolution. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce the methodology and research used in molecular biology, including nucleic acid extraction, PCR, Western Blot, and gel electrophoresis. Prerequisite: BIO101 Corequisite: BIO209L

BIO211 - Microbiology

This lecture and laboratory introduces the microbial world and the laboratory techniques required for its study. Topics include the basic characteristics of fungi, algae, bacteria, and viruses. Topics and applications that relate to humans are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO211L

BIO303 - Plant Biology

This course presents a comprehensive introduction to plant biology including an overview of major groups of plants, plant cells and cell types, plant anatomy & physiology, and ecology. Prerequisite: BIO101 with C or better

BIO310 - Genetics

This lecture and laboratory will focus on principles related to the inheritance of traits regulated by genes. The chemical and physical nature of chromosomes and genes and gene expression and regulation will be covered. Systems in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms exemplifying Mendelian and modern molecular genetic principles will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO310L

BIO340 - Research Methods

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industry including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208

BIO406 - Evolutionary Biology

Evolution is the unifying theory of biology, applicable to all biological organisms including humans. Understanding evolutionary biology is critical for biologists and anyone who seeks an understanding of the natural world. This class employs an analytical approach to explore the pattern and process of evolution in all life forms, from viruses to single celled organisms to plants to Homo sapiens. The importance of evolutionary concepts to all facets of biology will be emphasized, particularly the interplay between evolution and ecology, genetics, development, and medicine.Prerequisite: C or better in BIO310

BIO420 - Field Experience in Health Science

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 200 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 340 and Permission of Program Chair.

BIO430 - Health Science Capstone

The capstone course prepares students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for undergraduate research. Students will develop an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 340 with a C or better.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM203L and CHEM203R.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubility equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and CHEM203. Co-requisites: CHEM204L and CHEM204R.

CHEM303 - Organic Chemistry

This course is focused on the structure and chemistry of organic compounds. Topics include thermodynamics, resonance, reaction mechanisms of organic functional groups and stereochemistry. The course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM204. Corequisite CHEM303L

CHEM304 - Organic Chemistry II

The second half of a two-semester sequence. Topics include synthetic applications of organic reactions, delocalization and aromaticity. Principles and application of instrumental methods for organic structure determination will be studied in the laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM303. Corequisite CHEM304L

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell University on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS111L, PHYS111R.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111 with a C or better. Corequisite: PHYS112L, PHYS112R.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.