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2021 - 2022 Academic Catalog

Journalism

The Journalism program prepares media literate, digitally adept graduates to pursue a broad range of careers in news organizations, social media, corporate communication, digital content creation and more. By blending theoretical perspectives with hands-on learning, the program immerses students in writing and editing, research, interviewing, objective reporting and multi-media storytelling. Students benefit from a mix of journalism, digital media and communication courses, as well as opportunities to apply their knowledge in student media outlets including the 1851 Chronicle print and digital newspaper, Lasell Community Television (LCTV) and WLAS radio. The program culminates with students completing at least one required internship and a capstone experience in which they develop a digital portfolio to showcase their undergraduate projects and skills. 

By planning early in consultation with an academic advisor, students may be able to reduce the time it takes to complete a bachelor’s degree in Journalism to 3 or 3½ years.

 The Double Laser Program offers students the opportunity to earn an accelerated Master's degree in as little as one year after graduation, while also saving up to 30% on graduate school tuition

The following learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete a major program of study in Journalism:

1. Communicate clearly and effectively with diverse audiences through writing, oral and non-verbal methods in styles demanded by platform and discipline.

2. Critically analyze the content, functions, effects and ethics of media in a diverse, global society.

3. Formulate applied communication research questions and employ quantitative or qualitative methods to gather, analyze, and share findings.

4. Employ tools and technology within industry standards to produce accurate, engaging, news and feature content for print, broadcast and digital platforms.

5. Identify and articulate one’s skills, strengths and experiences relative to journalism career goals, and identify areas necessary for professional growth.

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
COM101 Understanding Mass Media 3
COM102 Visual Media Toolkit 3
COM103 Human Communication (KP) 3
COM105 Writing for The Media 3
COM203 Effective Speaking 3
COM212 Intercultural Communication 3
COM219 Social Media Management 3
COM315 Communication Research 3
COM327 Digital Storytelling 3
COM331 Media Literacy & Ethics 3
COM399 Pre-Internship Seminar 1
COM400 Field Experience I 4
COM495 Capstone Project & Portfolio 3
Concentration Courses
ARTS219 Digital Photography I 3
COM208 Public Relations 3
COM209 Journalism 3
COM306 Broadcast Journalism 3
COM314 Magazine and Digital Content 3
COM324 Investigative and Beat Reporting 3
Choose 1 from the following:
COM215 Radio Production 3
COM217 Video Production 3
COM218 Digital Video Editing 3
COM304 TV Studio Production 3
Choose 1 from the following
LS214 Communication Law 3

Additional Major Requirements:
Majors must earn a "C" or better in all Major Core courses. Failure to receive a minimum grade of C will result in the student having to repeat the course.

Math Requirement: MATH208

Major Requirements: 65 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.

ARTS101 - Studio Drawing I

This course introduces students to a variety of drawing tools and media. Drawing from life, line, tonality, illusional space, and perspective are explored. Creativity and individual expression are stressed.

ARTS103 - Printmaking

This course provides an introduction to printmaking with an emphasis on the translation and development of images into a printed media, as well as the design and organization of space. Types of printmaking to be explored include relief, monotype, and drypoint.

ARTS106 - Museum Discovery

This course introduces students to the world of art museums, galleries, auction houses, and various other art institutions, through a series of site visits and some involvement in actual gallery work. By exploring venues and the communities they serve, students will address the question, "What is an art museum or gallery, and why is it a part of our society?"

ARTS108 - Fundamentals of Art Management

This course exposes students to a variety of leadership and managerial roles in the context of an arts organization. Topics include strategic planning, budgeting, program development, fundraising and grant writing, as well as an examination of the differences between non-profit and for-profit arts management.

ARTS120 - Three-D Design

This course introduces students to the notion of creating within three-dimensional space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive perspectives. Students construct various models and/or maquettes. Problem solving and individual expression are emphasized.

ARTS126 - Principles of Design & Color

This course is an introduction to the theories and concepts of design and color with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one’s life and as a way to complement one’s aesthetic needs. This is a lecture/discussion/critique course with visual material, critical essays, individual expression, and museum/gallery trips. NOTE: First year Graphic Design majors should seek out the majors-only section when enrollling.

ARTS130 - Watercolor

This is an introductory course on watercolor painting that incorporates various techniques such as glazing, wet on wet, graduated tone, and negative painting. Students acquire an understanding of basic color theory and composition. They experiment with the different relationships of wet paper, dry paper, and pigments.

ARTS201 - Studio Drawing II

This course offers the experienced drawing student a chance to continue building life drawing, human figure, still lifes and landscape skills. In addition to studio work, students learn what is necessary to advance their knowledge of design by studying the masters. Periodic class discussions help students learn visual analysis and a general approach to the criticism of art. Prerequisite: ARTS 101 or permission of instructor.

ARTS203 - Painting

This course introduces students to a variety of styles and techniques used in oil and/or acrylic painting. Canvas stretching and priming, color mixing, and brush selection are addressed. Prerequisite: ARTS 101 or permission of instructor.

ARTS205 - Art for Educators

The arts process allows students to call on many talents simultaneously, including perceiving, responding, understanding, creating, self-evaluation, and development of related skills. This course exposes education students to new ideas and art forms, and ideas, tools, and processes from arts disciplines. Students work with a variety of art forms including drawing, painting & 3D.

ARTS207X - Figure Drawing

The purpose of this course is to help students obtain the basic skill of drawing the human form, including anatomy, observation of the human form and fundamental exercises in gesture, contour, outline, and tonal modeling. $50 Student Fee for the models; Prerequisite: ARTS 101 or Permission of instructor.

ARTS219 - Digital Photography

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

ARTS301 - Studio Drawing III

This course is for students who wish to advance their drawing skills to a higher level. In addition to refining techniques with various drawing media, such as ink, graphite, and mixed media, students address perceptual and aesthetic issues in relation to their own work within contemporary and historical contexts. The expressive character of lines, tones, and marks are studied as inseparable from fundamental concepts and content of drawing. Developing a unique and personal vision is a primary consideration. Prerequisite: ARTS 201 or permission of instructor.

ARTS302 - Studio Painting II

This course is designed for students who wish to advance their painting skills to a higher level. In addition to refining painting techniques, students address perceptual and aesthetic issues in relation to their own work within contemporary and historical contexts. Merging inquiry and intuition, students are expected to commit to discovering individual creative expression. Prerequisite: ARTS 203 or permission of instructor.

ARTS399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful Internshipexperience is finding an appropriate placement.In this seminar students will identify their personalwork style and strengths, will identify a goodcareer match, will create an effective cover letter& resume, will explore effective networking,interviewing, and negotiation skills. This coursewill help students identify search tools for findinginternships. A goal of this course is to securean internship for the following semester. Must beJunior standing.

ARTS400 - Internship

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing.

ARTS404 - Senior Thesis I

Students engage in an individual research and writing practice that challenges them to analyze and articulate their personal philosophy of design. This capstone course also provides students an opportunity to clarify their professional goals based on their interests in arts management. Prerequisite:Senior standing.

ARTS406 - Senior Practicum

The senior practicum provides an opportunity for students in the final semester of their program to produce a self-directed capstone project that applies the theories and techniquesthat they have been developing over thelast four years. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM103 - Human Communication

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM107LX - Wrt for Media Lab

Wrt for Media Lab

COM107X - Writing for the Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.Formerly COM105

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM206 - Professional Communication

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the most important communication and career-related formats of professional writing, including power point presentations, memos, business letters, reports, brief speeches, instructions, newsletters and brochures. Special emphasis is given to various writing processes one must complete on a tight deadline for a business audience of peers, customers or employers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles. Assignments may include politics, sports, entertainment, and interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, and graphic designers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast; and on what page to display them or in which order to broadcast them. The various reporting specialties covered in journalism – Health, Education, Business, Arts, Sports, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Travel - are explored. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM210X - Surveying Film Communication

In this introductory level course, students begin to appreciate film as a medium of expression by watching a variety of classic and contemporary works which highlight the various functions of film as a mode of entertainment, art, education, politics and social change. Students will learn the basic concepts of film and terms related to how the medium of film communicates ideas with visuals, storytelling, sound, and other techniques, and how filmmakers have traditionally communicated through cinema and video. Students will analyze elements of film expression, including form, narrative structure, editing, sound and cinematography, and will identify major trends and ideas important to the history of film as one of the most important forms of mass media.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

COM213 - Writing for Public Relations

This course serves as a workshop in which students apply the fundamental skills of journalism to the different formats commonly used in writing copy for public relations and advertising, including press releases, public service announcements, profiles, brochures, and advertisements. In addition, students continue to sharpen their editing skills by revising their own work and by copyediting and critiquing the work of other students. Central to the objectives of this course is that students improve their ability to write clearly and concisely, avoiding common errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM215 - Radio Production

This course introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell College Radio station.

COM217 - Video Production

This course introduces students to the basics of video production. Students learn basic videography techniques using professional video cameras such as the SONY HVR-HD1000U. In addition to videography, students learn the basics of digital video editing using industry-standard Avid nonlinear editing programs. Video projects include a video camera roll test, Avid editing assignment, news package, and a short movie where students shoot, direct, and edit their own creative narrative.

COM218 - Digital Video Editing

This course teaches students the basics of editing digital media using the popular software program Adobe Premiere Pro. The aesthetics of editing are also discussed and analyzed through screening various types of edited media. Projects for the course include editing TV commercials, news packages, movie scenes, and music videos. It is recommended that students have acquired basic computer skills prior to taking this class.

COM219 - Social Media

This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and practices of writing for weblogs and the use of social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter for reputation management in PR, journaling, and networking. Students learn about social media uses by studying successful blogs, reading assigned articles on the subject, contributing to regular discussions held on an online forum, and completing a personal blog entry each week. Students form small groups around topics of interest and work together in order to publish and promote their work on the web. Each student contributes to a class-made blog by writing, creating/finding art, copyediting, and assisting with podcast and video blog production. Students have a great deal of real-world experience with a live, constantly updated blog, and a solid understanding of the fundamentals of writing for the web and using social media for promotional purposes. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM221 - Advertising

This course introduces students to the field of advertising, including the role of promotional elements (advertising, direct mail, promotion, etc.) found in an advertising agency or in the communication program of an organization. In this course, students learn that advertising is more than just ads on television, on a web page or in print. Advertising is a process that starts with research and moves through analysis, planning, action, and evaluation. The development of an effective advertising strategy requires an understanding of overall communication processes and theoretical principles, how organizations organize and brand themselves for advertising and other promotional functions, consumer behavior, and how to set goals and objectives. A cooperative learning project requires students to engage in the kind of strategic thinking, planning and execution that is done by advertisers, researchers, media planners, and copywriters. The course also addresses how the advertising industry is regulated and how key social issues and various consumer constituencies can present problems for advertising professionals. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM222 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

COM223 - Advertising: Copy & Design

This course approaches the design and content of advertising from a variety of creative perspectives —from art to copy to production. The aim is to create eye catching, stand-out advertising —the kind that requires concentration, creativity, and focus. Students don’t have to be skilled graphic artists, but they do need to be able to explain in detail how a storyboard works and what message is intended for the consumer through an emphasis on: visual effects of the design; use of color and placement; and the significance of slogans, copy, and dialogue. This class duplicates as closely as possible the experience of working in a creative group within a real ad agency. Prerequisite: COM 221.

COM225 - TV I: Producing

Part I of this two-part course introduces students to the basics of TV producing. Students learn the process of writing a pitch, proposal, treatment, and budget. They also learn the fundamentals of basic screenwriting and production scheduling, as well as managing cast, crew and vendor relationships. The course also explores the roles of the casting director, location manager, production coordinator, and script supervisor. The course concludes with a preview of the production team and the role of the line producer, unit production manager, production manager and assistant directors involved in managing the physical production process of producing a television show.

COM226 - TV II: Production

Part II of this two-part course introduces students to the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment. Throughout the semester, students participate in a television crew to produce a high quality “Lasell TV” program to be aired on local access television. Students develop a genuine understanding of real-life television studio operation by rotating through the various positions in both control room and TV studio environments. Roles the students experience during the semester include: director, technical director, assistant director, computer graphics technician, audio technician, teleprompter operator, camera operator, and floor director. Prerequisite: COM 225 or Permission of Instructor

COM302 - Entertainment Media

A focus on the entertainment media industry requires making sense of the material that captures the audience's attention, influences culture, and provides enjoyment to mass media consumers. Course topics include the business of entertainment media, the production and distribution of media content, and multimedia convergence. Students in this course examine the multiple genres for the content of entertainment media, such as drama, comedy, reality TV, and gaming. Students learn how the entertainment industry works, captures the interests of contemporary audiences, and influences our culture and values. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM303 - Nonprofit Public Relations

This course invites students to explore "nonprofit public relations" as it is seen today and as experts suggest it will be seen in the future. Students have the opportunity to work with a "real world" nonprofit client by creating, preparing, and producing a complete public relations plan for that organization. Prerequisite: COM 213.

COM304 - TV Studio Production

This course introduces the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment at NewTV - Newton's own public access television studios. Students learn pre-production planning, live-to-tape directing, and participate in full television crew rotations to produce high quality PSAs and their very own TV show to be aired on local access television. Throughout the semester, students develop a variety of production skills from hands-on television studio operation.

COM305 - Screenwriting

This course includes writing techniques for series and stand alone productions in television and film. Students work both independently and collaboratively in order to understand industry procedures. Students experiment with several different genres and then develop a major project. Prerequisite: COM 105.

COM306 - Broadcast Journalism

This class introduces students to the basic skills in writing for radio and TV news, including beat reporting, writing, interviewing, and editing. Students critically evaluate newscasts and are introduced to the components of producing them. They also examine ethical challenges that arise when manipulation of images and sound can distort reality and compromise journalistic integrity.

COM307 - Understanding Video Games

This course introduces students to the foundation, process, and impact of the video game industry. Students evolve from merely riding the gaming highway to analyzing and deconstructing it. The course pays particular attention to the history and breakthroughs in the technology, social and political impacts such as the ESRB, sex and violence in games, as well as past, present and future trends of the gaming market.

COM308 - Conflict Resolution & Negotiations

This course helps students to understand the theoretical assumptions, elements, and processes of interpersonal conflict and negotiation, to increase their ability to objectively analyze conflict situations, and to creatively and productively manage conflict. Alternative Dispute Resolution approaches to litigation for resolving conflicts such as mediation, arbitration, and negotiation are examined. Prerequisites: COM 101, LS 101 or BUSS 101; Junior or Senior standing.

COM309 - Sports Communication

This course explores the unique writing and research style of sportswriters, while emphasizing the fundamentals of good journalism. Students learn how to write advance, follow-up, feature, and human-interest stories and columns. This course stresses the practical necessity of the fundamentals of reporting, research, interviewing, and ethics, and then demonstrates, through examples and experiences, how to turn information into accurate, readable stories. This course offers students the tools needed to be able to write sports stories worthy of publication, with one potential vehicle being The 1851 Chronicle student newspaper. Students learn about writing for newspapers, broadcast media, and magazines.

COM310 - Political Communication

This course focuses on the complex ideas associated with the role of the press in a democracy. The nature and climate of our political processes, particularly elections, have changed dramatically in the past two generations, due in part to the extensive use and influence of the media. Also, media techniques and strategies used by government and political figures continue to change with the emergence of new technologies and the dominance of global media companies. Students learn how to think critically and analytically about the political press and how journalists and politicians frame public policy issues. This course looks critically at whether or not the American press is truly representative of the civic values of democracy, truth, and responsible citizenship. Prerequisites: COM 101 or POLS 101 or SOC 101.

COM312 - Radio Production II

This course brings students with basic radio production skills to a higher level of proficiency. There is strong emphasis on radio as a digital medium and digital (nonlinear) audio editing with Adobe Audition. Projects include editing music for radio play, writing and mixing radio commercials, creating a radio interview podcast, and the development of an Air Check radio demo for student portfolios. Students also develop a deeper understanding of the radio business. Prerequisite: COM 215.

COM313 - Video Production II

This course takes students with basic video production skills to a higher level of expertise. There is strong emphasis on pre-production planning, teamwork, lighting, sound and special effects. The aesthetics of video production are also discussed by analyzing various film and video productions. Projects include a special effects reel, television commercial, short documentary, and a short screenplay adaptation. Throughout the semester, students develop a deeper understanding of the business of video production. Prerequisite: COM 217.

COM314 - Magazine & Feature Writing

This course is focused on the longer pieces of magazine writing, such as feature articles and interview profiles, and other forms of narrative, nonfiction journalistic writing. The course includes reading, analyzing, and modeling well-written newspaper and magazine articles that entertain as well as inform readers. Students have the opportunity to provide editorial support for and submit feature articles for publication to Polished, a Lasell College produced magazine. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 209.

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM316 - Publication Editing

This course is designed as a workshop in which students learn the fundamentals of editing for print and online publications. Students study and participate in various editing roles, including editorial director, articles editor, copy editor, proofreader and fact-checker. Students examine case studies of existing publications. In keeping with Lasell's Connected Learning approach, students propose work for Lasell's two student publications, The 1851 Chronicle and Polished, or other publications. The course focuses on learning to prepare cohesive editorial products with clear, compelling, professional content while avoiding common mistakes in usage, grammar, and style. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 105.

COM317 - Media Relations

Managing media relations for public relations professionals is the focus of this course. The course is intended to increase students’ knowledge of the principles and methods of generating publicity and to introduce the basics of planning and writing media relations campaigns. The rapidly changing nature of global companies and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways that communication professionals achieve their goals. Media relations can be a highly competitive and challenging field, where you must prove your productivity, accuracy, and creativity. Students discuss and experiment with successful strategies for gaining coverage in the press for clients, and they plan a comprehensive media relations program. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 208.

COM318 - Internet & the World Wide Web

This course teaches students how to design and publish an original web site using the latest version of HTML. Students learn to code text and tables, as well as incorporate graphics and links based on World Wide Web Consortium guidelines. Throughout the course, students explore the Internet's major historical events, current trends, and other web-related issues such as communication protocol, security/privacy, and e-commerce.

COM319 - Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns

This course provides an environment for students to become engaged in a professional style media planning and buying campaign, which is an essential strategic focus of the advertising industry. Students develop a full advertising plan based on the current planning structure of a contemporary advertising agency. Working in teams, students conduct a detailed advertising analysis that allows them to provide strategic and creative solutions to problems they have identified in their research. Student teams construct an advertising plan that positions and promotes a product, a message, a politician, or a brand to a con­sumer audience. Each student team produces a comprehensive media campaign that identifies and targets the appropriate media outlets for advertising placements. The class has a modicum of pressure and intensity that reflects some of the challenges necessary to succeed in the advertising industry. Prerequisite: COM 221.

COM320 - Organizational Communication

This course focuses on both the theoretical understanding and practical knowledge of the context and application of organizational communication. Topics include: leadership, new technologies and their impact on organizations, organizational climate and culture, ethics, formal and informal channels of communication within organizations, management of diversity and conflict, relational communication (with interpersonal and group work), and issues of power and politics within the context of the organizational settings. Prerequisite: COM 103

COM321 - Media & Children

This course examines the uses and effects of mass communication among children and adolescents. By taking a developmental perspective, the course explores how youth at different stages of cognitive development watch, understand, and respond to media content. The first part of the course focuses on children’s uses and processing of media. The second part of the course reviews the effects of various types of content (e.g., advertising, stereotypes, violence). The final part of the course considers the role of interventions (e.g., media literacy, ratings, parental mediation) in preventing media-related outcomes that are harmful and promoting those that are positive. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to critically evaluate the role of media in the lives of children. Prerequisites: COM 101 or PSYC 101.

COM322 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

COM323 - Corporate Communications

This course is designed to present students with an overview of corporate communication in contemporary society. The rapidly changing nature of global markets and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways in which communication professionals achieve their goals. The course explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental issues, investor relations, issues of multinationals, ethics, and governmental relations. Prerequisite: COM 213.

COM324 - Journalism II

This course, which is writing intensive, requires students to advance their writing and reporting (research) skills by covering a campus or community beat. This connected learning approach to journalism challenges students to do the work of the field as they report on student organizations, academic departments, or athletic teams, or local politics, sports, fashion, or culture. Assignments encourage students to take learning beyond the walls of the classroom while practicing journalism in the field. While encouraging students to deepen the basic skills of storytelling for print, the class also emphasizes new media platforms such as photo galleries, and video and audio news content. Students have the opportunity to contribute to the college newspaper and its website. Prerequisites: COM 105 and COM 209.

COM325 - Global Media

This course introduces students to the global media landscape. Students are exposed to a number of topics including: the power of language in media, recent global media controversies, the economics of global media & ownership, the politics of global media, and the coverage of international events in U.S. media. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 212

COM326 - Effective Speaking II

This advanced public speaking course builds on the foundation of Effective Speaking I to further a student’s development as a public speaker in a variety of settings. This is achieved through a combination of speaking, writing, and reading assignments. Specifically, students outline, develop, and deliver extemporaneous speeches incorporating relevant sources. Students learn how to develop and deliver messages that are appropriate and effective for the audience, purpose, and context using logical arguments within an ethical framework. Prerequisite: COM 203

COM399 - Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. Topics include the application of communication course work to a professional career and the development of skills necessary to locate an internship. The final goal of this course is to secure an internship. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. Students also keep a journal reflecting on their experiences and complete mid-and end-of-semester self-evaluations. The internship itself for 150 plus hours per week, the weekly seminar, and its assignments constitute the principle of the course.

COM402 - Field Experience II

This course builds on the skills and knowledge developed in COM 400, Internship Field Experience I. In today’s competitive job market, many employers are requiring that students complete more than one internship for credit and many students desire an exploration of more than one company, industry or job title. In this second-tier internship class, students can take advantage of a peer-learning group, as well as guided instruction on building a portfolio and perfecting interview skills and self-marketing skills. This course is offered spring semester only. Students must complete their internship in this course at a different organization than their first internship. Prerequisites: COM 399, COM 400, and senior standing.

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

COM422 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

LS101 - Foundations of American Legal System

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the law. Students are introduced to the basics of the legal system in the United States including its organization and operation. The course covers major areas of legal practice and the legal principles that apply. Legal concepts are explained and legal terminology defined.

LS202 - Legal Research & Analysis

This course serves as an introduction to American constitutional interpretation. Topics to be covered include legal precedent, legal issues surrounding the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the role of the Supreme Court as a political institution, and the Court’s interpretations of issues dealing with the Bill of Rights. Prerequisite: LS 101.

LS203 - Justice, Law & the Constitution

This course serves as an introduction to American constitutional interpretation. Topics to be covered include legal precedent, legal issues surrounding the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the role of the Supreme Court as a political institution, and the Court’s interpretations of issues dealing with the Bill of Rights.

LS204 - Criminal Law

This course examines the history and contemporary practice of criminal law. Topics include the purposes of the law, categories and general features of crime, elements of criminal offenses for prosecution, and categories of defenses. Prerequisite: LS 101 or CJ 101.

LS209X - The Mock Trial Experience

The Mock Trial Experience

LS210 - Special Topics in Legal Studies

This course provides specialized offerings in Legal Studies in order to satisfy interests of both faculty and students. Examples of topics are: Property or Real Estate Law. Cyberlaw, or Law and Education.

LS212X - Mock Trial Competition

Mock Trial Competition

LS214 - Communication Law

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the law and governmental regulations that apply to communication practitioners. Course topics include the First Amendment, defamation and libel, invasion of privacy law, copyright, advertising regulation, obscenity, pornography, internet law, protecting “news sources” for journalists, FCC regulation of broadcasting, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. Prerequisite: COM 101 or LS 101.

LS214 - Communication Law

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the law and governmental regulations that apply to communication practitioners. Course topics include the First Amendment, defamation and libel, invasion of privacy law, copyright, advertising regulation, obscenity, pornography, internet law, protecting “news sources” for journalists, FCC regulation of broadcasting, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. Prerequisite: COM 101 or LS 101

LS301 - Legal Writing & Reasoning

This course focuses on the development of fundamental skills necessary for successful legal writing that could assist in employment in a law office, such as drafting correspondence, developing various documents, and preparing legal memoranda. It looks at legal research, writing, and reasoning as a continuum, since the results of nearly all legal research must be submitted in written form. Legal writing is examined as a three step process. The steps consist of identifying the document’s purpose, audience, and constraints; developing a structure and draft; and editing and rewriting. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: LS 101 and LS 202.

LS304 - Litigation Practice

This course is designed to provide instruction pertaining to key areas of litigation. These areas include interviewing, document handling, preparing evidence, interacting with clients, preparing motions, legal arguments and trials. Prerequisite: LS101 of Permission of Dept Chair.

LS305 - Comparative Law & Legal Systems

This course introduces students to the complex issues involved in comparing various laws and legal systems around the contemporary world. The course focuses on the main legal systems in terms of the structure and sources of their laws and against the historical and political background in which these laws were formed. Prerequisite: LS 101.

LS307 - Tort & Personal Injury Law

This course is designed to give the student a basic overview of concepts in tort and personal injury law. Topics to be covered include: defamation, negligence, intentional torts, and general personal injury law. Prerequisite: LS 101.

LS311 - The American Court System

This course provides students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the criminal courts. In addition, the course explores the rules of criminal procedure, including their underlying assumptions, how they evolved, and the goals they hope to achieve. Students learn how the dynamics of the courtroom and the criminal justice system itself affect the actual application of the law. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or LS101

LS314X - This Year in the US Supreme Court

The Supreme Court of the United States is the most mysterious, least talked about, and arguably the most influential branch of our federal government. Come explore its origins, history, inner workings, and traditions. Examine some of the personalities and decisions that have altered the course of American history. When someone says, "I'll fight this all the way to the Supreme Court," can his/her case actually get there, and if so, how? Meet the powerful men and women currently on the bench, learn how they got there, and become familiar with their widely divergent views about the Constitution. Last but not least, explore the issues the Court will confront in some of the important cases to be decided this term.

LS320 - Philosophy of Law

This course explores selected philosophical issues in law. Topics include human and civil rights, personal autonomy and the right of the state to regulate conduct, the extent to which an individual’s rights should be sacrificed for the common good, and other concepts of justice.

LS325 - Evidence

This course provides a detailed examination of the law of evidence. Topics include types of evidence, principles of exclusion, evaluation and examination of evidence, competency of witnesses, and the rule against hearsay evidence and the exceptions to this rule. Prerequisite: LS 101 or CJ 101.

LS401 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar

This course provides an opportunity for participants to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 12 hours per week in a professional work setting related to the student's interest. Each student is monitored during the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Senior standing and Permission of Dept Chair.

LS402 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law

This upper-level course is designed to identify and discuss issues of justice in society today, including but not limited to issues of gender, race, and other relevant historical and contemporary political issues and movements. It is the capstone course for the Legal Studies major. Limited to Legal Studies majors. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior Standing.

LS441 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law I

This fall portion of the Capstone course is designed to identify and discuss various legal and political issues in society today, including but not limited to issues of gender, race, and other relevant historical and contemporary political topics and movements. This first semester develops the student’s ability to research, write and debate current issues. This is a writing intensive and speaking across the curriculum course. Limited to Legal Studies and Law and Public Affairs majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

LS442 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law II

The spring semester of the Capstone course focuses on the process of producing a final legal research paper on one of the topics of the first semester. Students hone their research and writing skills culminating in the presentation of a final capstone project presentation. This is a writing intensive and speaking across the curriculum intensive course. Prerequisites: LS 441 and Senior standing.

LS443 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar I

This course provides an opportunity for students to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours in the fall semester in a professional work setting related to their interest. Each student is monitored during the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

LS444 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar II

This course provides an opportunity for students to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours in the fall semester in a professional work setting related to their interest. Each student is monitored during the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Prerequisites: LS/CJ 443 and Senior standing

Janice Barrett

Professor of Communication; Chair, Graduate Communication Program

Office: Donahue 108

Marie Campagna Franklin

Professor Emerita

Meryl Perlson

Interim Dean of the School of Communication & the Arts, Professor of Communication, Program Chair of Communication

Office: Donahue 107

Brian Wardyga

Professor of Communication; General Manager, 109.2FM WLAS & LCTV

Office: Brennan Library, G04F

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM102 - Visual Media Toolkit

This course introduces?a practice-based?approach to visual communication design.?Through a series of projects, students develop?knowledge and techniques for communicating meaning visually using Adobe and other software for digital imaging, publication and web design.?They will expand their visual vocabulary while exploring topics including?typography, color,?photo enhancement and manipulation, and principles of graphic design for?print and digital media. By creating visual messages and a digital portfolio website, and?critiquing?their own and?others’?work,?students increase their?overall?visual literacy and understanding of effective visual communication.

COM103 - Human Communication (KP)

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM101 or SOC101 or PSYC101

COM219 - Social Media Management

Communication professionals must to be able to utilize different social media platforms to both engage audiences and increase brand impact and influence. This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and practices of managing social media channels. Through case studies, interactive assignments, and a social media project, students will learn necessary skills to managing a social media platform, including conducting a social media audit, developing a strategic social media plan, building an editorial calendar, identifying key metrics and using data analytics to assess and report the impact of social media posts and campaigns. Students will also earn Hubspot Certification in Social Media during the course. Prerequisite: Sophomore status.

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM101, MATH208 & Jr Standing

COM327 - Digital Storytelling

This project-based course introduces students to the practice of digital storytelling to engage, inform and persuade audiences. Students will explore narrative structure and aesthetics of different storytelling media, with emphasis on micro, short form and episodic audio and video for social and online platforms. Students will develop story ideas, use desktop and mobile tools to acquire content in a variety of settings, and edit and repurpose content to maximize its usefulness. Through creation and analysis of their own and others’ digital stories, students will increase their understanding of effective digital storytelling. Prerequisite: COM101

COM331 - Media Literacy & Ethics

Mass media have become the primary and predominant storytellers of our time, and their messages can influence the way we see ourselves and the world around us. However, because messages are shaped by the corporate interests that control media organizations, their impact may not always be in the best interests of the public. It is the responsibility of audiences, therefore, to understand and to think critically about mass media messages. This course provides students with a framework to explore such media content critically. Students study the role mass media plays in communicating cultural values and its impact on society, by emphasizing how media companies shape public discourse. The course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations, are also explored. Special emphasis is placed on the diverse theoretical approaches through which ethical questions of media literacy can be explored. Prerequisite: COM101 and Junior standing.

COM399 - Pre-Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop professional objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. In this seminar students identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will develop effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students apply search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. The internship course is comprised of a minimum of 150 hours in the field, the weekly seminar, and its assignments, including an oral presentation. Students also write weekly reflections on their experience, complete written assignments, and do an oral presentation to a group of their peers. The field supervisor contributes to the student’s learning through guidance, feedback and evaluation of the students work. Prerequisite: COM399 Pre-Internship Seminar

COM495 - Capstone Project & Portfolio

In this capstone course, students will review and refine their digital portfolios to demonstrate knowledge and skills acquired through their studies. They will also apply their learning to produce a capstone project based on their area of specialization and career goals. These projects will involve research into the project topic, as well as integration of relevant communication theory, ethical issues and professional practices. Students will iterate projects from draft to final deliverable(s) based on presentation and critique of their work throughout the term. The course culminates with students exhibiting their projects and portfolios to program faculty. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ARTS219 - Digital Photography I

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to Photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM101

COM209 - Journalism

Journalism is a fast changing industry and this course prepares students for the change. Students learn to report and produce a variety of news and feature pieces, for print and multi-media platforms, including Q and A interviews, news and feature stories, opinion pieces, reviews, photo galleries, social media campaigns and more. Assignments can be produced on sports, fashion, entertainment, arts and culture, business, politics and more. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in The 1851 Chronicle newspaper and website. Prerequisite: WRT102

COM306 - Broadcast Journalism

This class introduces students to the basic skills in writing for radio and TV news, including beat reporting, writing, interviewing, and editing. Students critically evaluate newscasts and are introduced to the components of producing them. They also examine ethical challenges that arise when manipulation of images and sound can distort reality and compromise journalistic integrity. Prerequisite: COM 209

COM314 - Magazine and Digital Content

The magazine industry is evolving from print only to multi-media and digital. The skills needed to produce this type of content are also changing. This course focuses on producing feature and entertainment-oriented content across platforms, including print, video, digital and social media. Students engage in connected learning projects and produce photo galleries and videos, blogs and podcasts, as well as the creation of an original magazine and a social media campaign to build its brand. Writing is emphasized as students improve their skills across platforms, learn to target audiences, and curate content. Students will write profiles, reviews, and 1st person columns, among other projects. Students will also be encouraged to submit feature work to The 1851 Chronicle website as well as Polished and Tarnished Magazines. Prerequisite: COM209.

COM324 - Investigative and Beat Reporting

This course requires students to do the work of the field by covering a campus or community beat like a professional reporter. Students learn how to come up with unique and powerful story ideas, how to cultivate sources, and how to tell stories across all platforms, such as print, digital, video and social media. This class also teaches students how to do the work of an investigative journalist, as portrayed in the Oscar winning “Spotlight” film. Students work in teams to research important campus issues to uncover the truth and produce multi-media packages to tell their stories. The course also examines global journalism trends. Prerequisite: COM209

COM215 - Radio Production

Radio Production introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell University Radio station. Finally, this course introduces students to the communication competency of speech.

COM217 - Video Production

Video Production introduces students to the basics of video production from an EFP (Electronic Field Production) perspective. Students will learn the functionality and art of digital videography and digital editing by completing a roll test, editing project, photojournalism package, and a TV commercial. The course will also examine the business of video production. Finally, this course introduces students to the competency of visual communication.

COM218 - Digital Video Editing

Digital Video Editing teaches students the basics of editing digital media using the popular software program Adobe Premiere Pro. The aesthetics of editing are also discussed and analyzed through screening various types of edited media. Projects for the course include editing TV commercials, news packages, movie scenes, and music videos. It is recommended that students have acquired basic computer skills prior to taking this class. Finally, this course introduces students to the competency of visual communication.

COM304 - TV Studio Production

TV Studio Production introduces the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment. Students learn pre-production planning, live-to-tape directing, and participate in full television crew rotations to produce high quality PSAs and their very own TV show to be submitted to local access television.  Throughout the semester, students develop a variety of production skills from hands-on television studio operation.

LS214 - Communication Law

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the law and governmental regulations that apply to communication practitioners. Course topics include the First Amendment, defamation and libel, invasion of privacy law, copyright, advertising regulation, obscenity, pornography, internet law, protecting “news sources” for journalists, FCC regulation of broadcasting, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. Prerequisite: COM 101 or LS 101.