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2021 - 2022 Academic Catalog

Health Science

The Lasell University Bachelor of Science in Health Science degree program provides students with the opportunity to pursue a pre-professional education that provides preparation for careers in medicine, nursing, biomedical research, or healthcare management. The multi-disciplinary approach is built upon a strong foundation in the biological sciences combined with coursework in the humanities and social sciences. In addition, students are presented with meaningful educational experiences based on the knowledge perspectives of the Lasell University core curriculum: creativity and aesthetics, scientific inquiry and problem solving, individuals and society, and global and historical perspectives.

The connected learning philosophy of the college is emphasized by a semester off-campus field experience that will provide professional interaction and training in a student's chosen area of career focus within the health sciences. 

Academic standards for the Health Science program include grades of "C" or better in all BIO, CHEM, EXSC & PHYS courses.

The Double Laser Program offers students the opportunity to earn an accelerated Master's degree in as little as one year after graduation, while also saving up to 30% on graduate school tuition.


Goals and Outcomes
The following goals and learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Health Science:

Goal 1: Communication
Upon completion of the major program of study in Health Science Program, students will be able to:  

1.     Interpret, develop, produce and disseminate disciplinary research
2.     Understand and create discipline specific written work
3.     Deliver professional oral presentations
4.     Interact professionally and educate clients, patients, peers, colleagues and medical/athletic personnel  

Goal 2: Professional Behaviors
Upon completion of the major program of study in Health Science, students will be able to:  

1.     Identify ethical issues 
2.     Model professional conduct and behavior
3.     Respect the role and responsibilities of each professional member of a multidisciplinary team
4.     Advance knowledge through the use of evidence-based practice and professional development  

Goal 3: Knowledge and Skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Health Science, students will be able to:  

1.     Demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of biology
2.     Demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of chemistry
3.     Demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of physics
4.     Demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of human performance and body function
5.     Demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the laboratory skills and techniques for successful scientific communication

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
BIO101 Principles of Biology I (KP) 4
BIO102 Principles of Biology II (KP) 4
BIO104 Foundations in the Health Professions 3
BIO205 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO206 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
BIO211 Microbiology 4
BIO301 Pathophysiology 3
BIO340 Research Methods 3
BIO420 Field Experience in Health Science 3
BIO430 Health Science Capstone 3
CHEM203 General Chemistry I (KP) 4
CHEM204 General Chemistry II 4
CHEM301 Biochemistry 3
EXSC107 Healthy Lifestyles and Human Behavior 3
EXSC209 Performance Nutrition 3
EXSC302 Exercise Physiology 4
MATH203 Precalculus 3
MATH208 Statistics 3
PHYS111 General Physics I (KP) 4
PHYS112 General Physics II (KP) 4
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives (KP) 3
Choose 1 from the following:
PSYC221 Child Development 3
PSYC223 Adolescent Psychology 3

Major Requirements: 76 credits

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.


The following courses may require additional coursework depending upon Math placement:
MATH203: Pre-calculus
MATH208: Statistics

BIO101 - Principles of Biology

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Corequisite: BIO 101L.

BIO102 - Diversity of Living Organisms

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

BIO107 - Topics In Biology

Preliminaries of the molecules of life and cell structures are investigated in this course. Topics from cell biology, nutrition, energy production, respiratory and circulatory systems, genetics, reproduction, evolutionary thought, and ecosystems are also explored.

BIO110 - Nutrition

This course focuses on the function of nutrients and their requirements throughout the life cycle. The course reviews current nutrition issues as they relate to personal health. Topics include disease prevention, weight and fitness management, fad diets and nutritional trends.

BIO111X - Contemporary Issues in Biology & Health

This interdisciplinary course promotes student understanding of the interrelated contemporary issues of biology, scientific principles, health and society. The course will first analyze specific current issues in biology by building a sound scientific foundation of biological information and scientific thinking. Next, students will explore the health, social, ethical and political implications of the issue by formulating discussions and alternative positions. Some of the timely issues that will be discussed are embryonic stem cells, the Human Genome Project, gene therapy and personalized medicine, diet, drug and obesity issues, cancer treatment dilemmas, HIV / AIDS, evolution, drug addiction, drugs and mental health, and menopause and hormone replacement therapy. This class should enable students to discuss and make judgments on issues in biology and science that impact on their daily lives and on society.

BIO112 - Human Biology

This is a one semester lab course focusing on the functions of the human body in health and disease. The structure and function of the major body systems are emphasized. Systems discussed include: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, excretory, reproductive, nervous and endocrine. Corequisite: BIO 112L.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Corequisite: BIO 206L.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH 104. Corequisite: CHEM 203L.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubiity equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: CHEM 203. Corequisite: CHEM 204L.

EXSC101 - Essentials of Musculoskeletal Anatomy

This course provides students with foundational concepts associated with the healthcare and fitness industry. Through connected learning projects, emphasis is placed on understanding musculoskeletal anatomy and medical nomenclature Formerly - AHLT101

EXSC104 - Principles & Problems of Coaching

This course provides students with an introduction to the profession of coaching. Students develop a base of knowledge through the study of principles and concepts from the areas of coaching philosophy, sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology, and sports management. Upon successful completion of the course, students have a thorough understanding and appreciation of possible solutions for those problems that are most frequently encountered in coaching, as well as the ability to apply principles of coaching to individual athletes and/or a team.

EXSC107 - Lifestyles & Human Behavior

This course focuses on the benefits of a healthy lifestyle and the interactive principles of human behavior across the lifespan from adolescence through adult development. Topics include exercise adherence and maintenance, weight management, smoking cessation, and stress management. Formerly - AHLT107

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC211 - Personal Fitness

This course prepares students for national certification exams as personal trainers. Each class addresses pertinent topics of the health fitness professional. These topics include health screening and assessment and comprehensive program design for multiple populations. The course empowers students with the skills necessary to become qualified fitness professionals.

EXSC213 - Coaching Practicum

This course provides students the opportunity to apply the principles and practices of coaching in a junior high, high school, or collegiate environment. Students participate actively in practical coaching experiences under the guidance and supervision of a qualified coach. Prerequisite: EXSC 104.

EXSC222 - Kinesiology

This course examines the anatomical and mechanical concepts required for critical assessment, description, and qualitative analysis of human motion. The laboratory component includes analysis of human motion. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206, PHYS 111.

EXSC302 - Exercise Physiology

This course explores the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the structure and function of the body with an emphasis on the acute responses of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neuromuscular systems. Various concepts related to physical fitness such as body composition, skill related fitness, and cardiovascular fitness are introduced. The practical applications of major principles are demonstrated in a laboratory setting. Students are advised that the capability to exercise moderately and maximally may be required and that documentation of a medical examination indicating cardiopulmonary status and exercise capacity may be requested by the instructor. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC304 - Exercise Testing & Prescription

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to engage in the application of physiological principles and development of practical skills for fitness evaluation and exercise prescription. Course content will emphasis: pre-test screening and assessment and prescription fundamentals for cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness, body composition, and flexibility. Prerequisite EXSC 302.

EXSC305 - Strength Training & Conditioning

Lecture and practical sessions include principles of weight training and conditioning, orientation to different modalities, including free weights, weight machines (i.e., Nautilus), and circuit training and development of individual and group exercise programs. Students may be required to obtain medical clearance prior to participation. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EXSC307 - Advanced Sports Performance

This course is designed to provide students advanced concepts in strength and conditioning. Emphasis is placed on the application of principles and theories covered in the Strength and Conditioning class. Students focus on the development of sports specific programs for the purpose of improving athletic performance. Prerequisite: EXSC 305.

EXSC340 - Research Concepts

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industy including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

EXSC401 - Exercise Science Seminar II

This course provides students with the skills needed to prepare for entrance into the workforce or graduate school. Emphasis is placed on cover letters and resume writing, interview skills, the graduate school application process, professionalism, and ethical decision making. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Co-requisite - EXSC 340

EXSC403 - Exercise for Special Populations

This course provides the exercise physiologist with an in-depth knowledge of application of exercise principles for patients participating in adult fitness programs. It includes client characteristics, screening, and program supervision. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: EXSC 304

EXSC405 - Organization & Healthcare Administration

This course presents the principles of managing physical education, intramural and athletic programs, and sport and fitness businesses. Course topics include facility management, human relations, legal issues, scheduling, drug testing, staffing, and related duties of facility managers. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

EXSC406 - Advanced Topics in Exercise Physiology

This course explores and evaluates current concepts in the understanding of physiological function and effects of exercise. Particular emphasis is placed on the physiological function and effects of exercise across the lifespan and in-depth examination of current literature in advanced exercise science topics. Pre-requisite: EXSC 302.

EXSC410 - Exercise Science Field Experience I

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 150 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC 302, EXSC 305 and Permission of Department Chair.

EXSC420 - Exercise Science Field Experience II

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic,corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 300 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC 302, EXSC 305 and Permission of Department Chair.

EXSC430 - Exercise Science Capstone

The capstone course synthesizes theories and practices of exercise physiology into one culminating and progressive exercise program for a client. Students serve as subjects, technicians, and administrators. The primary goal is to better prepare students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for exercise program design and undergraduate research, with three course design option; development of original case study research, with focus on adhering to written and oral presentation standards within the field; development of an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis; or development of an understanding of the research process, with focus on review of the literature, defining the research question, and study methodology. Prerequisite: EXSC 340

MATH103 - Introductory Algebra

This is an introduction to algebra beginning with a brief review of operations with real numbers. Topics include: algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, rules for exponents, operations with polynomials, factoring techniques, quadratic equations, graphing linear equations, solving systems of equations. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed another mathematics course.

MATH104 - Intermediate Algebra

This course is intended to strengthen students’ ability in algebra. The course begins with such introductory topics as linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations, and systems of equations. This course also includes an introduction to rational expressions, radicals, and rational exponents. Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed any 200 or higher level mathematics course (with the exception that students may take 104 currently with or after 204).

MATH106X - Algebraic Operations

This course is intended to strengthen students’ ability in algebra. The course begins with such introductory topics as operations with real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations, and systems of equations. This course also includes an introduction to rational expressions, radicals, and rational exponents.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids, and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last one-hundred years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics, and probability. The course can be used as a prerequisite for MATH 208-Introduction to Statistics, but will not serve as a prerequisite for MATH 203-Precalculus or MATH 205-Calculus. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 104 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I, covering integration, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, maxmin problems, derivatives and integrals of trigonometric functions and differential equations with applications to business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 104, MATH 109, or MATH 204 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH304X - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vectors and vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations, solutions of systems of differential equations using the theory of matrices, and determinants. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants and computer methods, as well as applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, archaeology, economics, communications, demography, weather prediction, connectivity of networks, graph theory, and fractals. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH328 - Mathematics Applied to Management

This course explores the art of mathematical modeling of managerial decision problems and the science of developing the solution techniques for these models. Topics include management science techniques used in today’s businesses, e.g., break-even analysis, presentation models, linear programming, transportation and assignments problems, decision theory, forecasting and inventory models, Markov analysis, and solution of nonlinear models in business using calculus-based optimization. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH333X - Applied Statistics

This course explores statistical methods for describing and analyzing multivariate data. Topics include data transformations, analysis of variance, regression, and factor analysis. Data sets will be analyzed with statistical software. MATH307, MATH325, or concurrent enrolment in MATH212 recommended. Prerequisites: MATH206 and MATH208. (4 credits)

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Mathematical Applications

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

PHYS111 - General Physics I

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS 111L.

PHYS112 - General Physics II

This is a continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS 112L.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC104X - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive.This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well being.This course will satisfy the Psychological and Societal Area of Inquiry and can be used as a substitute for PSYC101 (Introduction to Psychology) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class. In addition, since the content is different from PSYC101, students who have taken PSYC101 but are interested in an additional Psychology elective, one that focuses on growth and well-being, are encouraged to take this class.

PSYC111 - Aging in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC201 - Psychology of Drugs & Behavior

The course examines the relationship between drugs and behavior, including evidence about the effects of drugs on the brain. Several classes of drugs, including chemically or psychologically addictive substances, psychoactive and therapeutic agents, as well as recreational drugs, are examined. Drug use is related to psychological variables such as personality structure and interpersonal relationships, and theories of addictive processes and factors influencing drug use are examined, as are treatment strategies. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC203X - Persuading People, Preserving Planet

This Connected Learning Experience is designed to continue students’ development along the Core Curriculum by demonstrating in an inquiry-based way the nature of integrative learning. As such, this team-taught, multidisciplinary course will develop the ability to foster behavior change within the places they live and work as they study how to create a more sustainable planet. Students will explore the environmental challenges created by our use of energy, consumption of water, use of transportation, production of waste, and practices in agriculture. These challenges include climate change, air pollution, water quality, and biodiversity loss. Students will also investigate the behaviors that drive these environmental challenges. Students will select behaviors to study on campus and use the tools of science to collect informing data. They will then study strategies to change behavior from the field of psychology. Applying these strategies, students will develop programs to foster sustainable behaviors on campus. Although this course is a pilot for the proposed Core Curriculum, it will satisfy the following Areas of Inquiry in our current general education curriculum: Psychological/Societal and Scientific. (Co-requisite is that students must register for a lab section on M, W, or F 10-10:50am)

PSYC205 - Human Sexuality

This course is designed to introduce factual information about gender identity and gender role theories, sexual preference and sexual orientation, and psychosexual development. The course examines issues related to research on human sexuality and behavior, as well as sexual education, sexual disorders, and societal impacts on sexuality. Students are challenged to think critically about many issues surrounding human sexuality and all of its manifestations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC206 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC209X - Psyc of the Black American Experience

This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Blacks in the United States, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. Connections between Africa, the Caribbean, and Black America will be examined with respect to culture, belief systems, and values. At the same time, we will also explore the many differences in history, culture, and experience within numerous groups and individuals of African-descent in the U. S. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC213 - Ethics Across Generations

A growing interest in ethics across different generations has emerged with dramatic changes in the age demographics of our society. This course examines a range of ethical dilemmas both unique to and common across different generations. Intervening factors such as generational identity, personal attitudes, and social forces are explored to understanding how individuals approach and behave in these situations.

PSYC218 - Dynamics of Small Groups

This class examines the basic theory and application necessary to understand and facilitate small groups. Topics may include group types, formation, roles and stages; group process; cultural awareness; group interventions and ethics within the field of psychology and human service; therapeutic value of groups; and the family, classroom, and peers as small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC222 - Social Psychology in Film

This course uses film to examine social psychological concepts and research and provides an opportunity for students to explore how people influence and are influenced by their social relationships, communities, and larger society. Films illustrate a range of social encounters that are examined from a social psychological perspective. Topics include conflict, love, personal and group behavior, prejudice, roles, privilege, and oppression. NOTE: This course meets the social psychology requirement for Social Sciences majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course examines the adolescent period of life as one of multiple simultaneous changes in the mind and body that set the stage for adult life. Particular attention is paid to gender differentiated experiences in adolescence; how males and females differ in their experience of the changes that occur during adolescence. The role of culture in determining the adolescent experience is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 112 or BIO 205.

PSYC306 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC307 - Forensic Psychology

This course deals with the application of psychological knowledge to the judicial process and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include effects of defendant, juror and case characteristics on verdicts, variables affecting eyewitness accuracy, identification and testimony, and the role of forensic psychologists in competency and criminal responsibility assessments as well as criminal profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or PSYC 101.

PSYC314 - Adult Development & Aging

This course examines the psychological development that occurs during the adult years. It begins with the transition years of the young adult and concludes with bereavement and death. Topics include formation of various forms of adult identities, the establishment of both family and casual social relationships, and the strategies used to deal with the physical, social, and cognitive transformations during the adult years, including aging processes. The course also examines theoretical accounts of aging and adaptation to extended life spans, characteristic of contemporary industrial societies. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223.

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

PSYC318 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. Both traditional and contemporary theories of psychopathology are reviewed. Emphasis is also placed on the tools, techniques, and process of both the diagnosis and the treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 202 or PSYC 220.

PSYC319 - Behavior Change

This course reviews the principles of human behavior based upon behavior therapy, social learning theory, and operant conditioning techniques. The course includes the study of positive control, aversive control, modeling behavior, token economy systems, and extinction procedures used to produce change in human behavior. Attention is paid to the ethical implications of controlling human behavior in educational, mental health, and medical settings. The material is relevant to those who are or will be working in organizations that serve people with developmental disabilities, children, adolescents and the elderly. Prerequisite: any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC322 - Abnormal Child Development

This course examines common psychological disorders that affect children and adolescents. Students review factors that contribute to emotional, behavioral, cognitive and social problems in children and adolescents, as well as specific diagnostic criteria of psychological disorders. In addition, treatment of childhood disorders is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 221.

PSYC323 - Brain Function & Dysfunction

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: BIO 101, BIO 112, or BIO 205.

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC331 - Experimental Design in Psychology

This laboratory course covers concepts of the scientific method in psychology including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. As part of the lab, students carry out an experiment and learn to use SPSS to create a database and perform statistical analyses. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC333 - Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and Permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

PSYC340X - Community Psychology

Community psychologists work with individuals and communities to effect broad changes to support well-being. In this class, we will explore the relationships between individuals, their communities, and society, applying knowledge from all of the social science disciplines. Health promotion, prevention of social problems, and social action are key methods in community psychology. We will work to create social justice, liberation, and well-being in our classroom and beyond. Through exercises addressing current issues in community life (e.g., immigration, poverty, ableism, mental health systems, racism, HIV/AIDS, climate change…) and through work with a Boston community agency, we will learn how to create interventions that help communities grow and support their members. This course will have a participatory action research component, and is open to students with some research experience such as a research class or an individual research project. Pre-requisites: PSYC331 or SOC331 or COM315 or permission of the instructor

PSYC345 - Assessment of Individual Differences

This course studies a wide variety of tests and measurements used to assess intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality in clinical and counseling psychology, in education, and in business. Consideration of the history and theory of these tests is complemented by discussion of practical concerns related to their selection, their administration, and their interpretation in specific settings. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and PSYC 101.

PSYC406 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

Cristina Haverty

Dean, School of Health Sciences; Associate Professor of Athletic Training

Office: Science and Technology Center

Kimberly Farah

Professor of Chemistry

Office: STC 306

Neil Hatem

Professor of Mathematics

Office: Science and Technology Center

Joanna Kosakowski

Professor Emerita

Ron Laham

Assistant Professor of Exercise Science

Office: Science and Technology Center

Stephen Sarikas

Professor of Biology

Office: Science and Technology Center

BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Co-requisites: BIO101L.

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This lecture and laboratory course is the second semester of a year-long introductory biology sequence which explores the scientific study of life. Topics include introductions to Darwinian evolution, principles of inheritance, evolution & immunity, and a survey of human body systems & homeostatic mechanisms. The laboratory provides an environment for active learning to support understanding of concepts presented in the course. Prerequisite: BIO101 with a C or better. Corequisite: BIO102L.

BIO104 - Foundations in the Health Professions

This course provides a description of the various health care professions including educational and licensing requirements. The concepts of professionalism, health care teams, and current health care policies will be covered. Students will increase their knowledge of the various health care professions through job shadowing.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO205 with a C or better. Corequisite: BIO206L.

BIO211 - Microbiology

This lecture and laboratory introduces the microbial world and the laboratory techniques required for its study. Topics include the basic characteristics of fungi, algae, bacteria, and viruses. Topics and applications that relate to humans are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO211L

BIO301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course introduces students to medical terminology, and describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO205, BIO206 or by permission

BIO340 - Research Methods

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industry including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208

BIO420 - Field Experience in Health Science

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 200 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 340 and Permission of Program Chair.

BIO430 - Health Science Capstone

The capstone course prepares students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for undergraduate research. Students will develop an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 340 with a C or better.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH203 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM203L and CHEM203R.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubility equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 with a grade of C or better & CHEM203. Corequisite: CHEM204L and CHEM204R.

CHEM301 - Biochemistry

This course is an in-depth study of biochemical substances and their reaction in the body with major emphasis placed on metabolism at the cellular level and examined in the tissues of the various organs where these reactions occur. Correlation of biochemical processes underlying pathologic conditions are made whenever practical. Prerequisite: CHEM 204

EXSC107 - Healthy Lifestyles and Human Behavior

This course focuses on evaluating and implementing healthy lifestyles and human behavior for longevity of lifespan from adolescence through adult development. Focus will be placed upon cultivating a holistic approach to health and wellness that is rooted within strategies for implementing healthy lifestyle changes, as well as "living through prevention": a description relating to methods of preventing long term disease and disability.

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC302 - Exercise Physiology

This course explores the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the structure and function of the body with an emphasis on the metabolic cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neuromuscular systems. Also discussed are the effects of environmental factors and ergogenic aids on exercise performance. The objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding and working knowledge of how the body responds to exercise so that they may apply this knowledge to their chosen field. The practical applications of the major principles are demonstrated in a laboratory setting (EXSC 302L). Students are advised that the capability to exercise moderately and maximally may be required and documentation if a medical examination indicating cardiopulmonary status and exercise capacity may be requested by the instructor. Prerequisite BIO 205/BIO 206. Corequisite EXSC 302L

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS111L, PHYS111R.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111 with a C or better. Corequisite: PHYS112L, PHYS112R.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course will provide you with an introduction to central concepts/issues related to the developmental phase of adolescence from historical, psychological, social, and cultural perspectives. The course will also focus on major problems and challenges facing adolescents in modern society. Prerequisite PSYC101