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2021 - 2022 Academic Catalog

Biochemistry

Biochemistry combines aspects of both chemistry and biology into one program. The mission of the Lasell University Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry degree program is to prepare students with the technical skills and education necessary to begin a successful career in research or in industry, or to continue as a graduate student in biochemistry, medicine, molecular biology, and other related fields. Students will take a wide range of courses, beginning with the traditional introductory sciences and continuing with applied coursework in topics such as biochemistry, analytical chemistry, genetics and molecular biology. Our coursework focuses on the use of laboratories and connected learning to reinforce theory and concepts learned in the classroom. In addition, students will be presented with meaningful educational experiences based on the knowledge perspectives of the Lasell University core curriculum: creativity and aesthetics, scientific inquiry and problem solving, individuals and society, and global and historical perspectives. Graduates of this program will be qualified to obtain an entry-level position as a chemist, biologist, engineer, or forensic scientist or for entry into a graduate program.

 

Goals and Outcomes
The following goals and learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve upon completing the major program of study in Biochemistry. These goals are consistent with the mission of Lasell University and reflect the standards of the American Chemical Society.

 

Goal 1: Communication

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

1.    Interpret, develop, produce, and disseminate disciplinary research.

2.    Understand and create discipline specific written work.

3.    Deliver professional oral presentations.

4.    Interact professionally and educate clients, peers, and colleagues.

Goal 2: Professional Behaviors

Upon completion of this program, students will be able to:

1.    Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethical behavior.

2.    Model professional conduct and behavior.

3.    Respect the role and responsibilities of each professional member of a multidisciplinary team.

Goal 3: Knowledge and Skills

Upon completion of this program, students will be able to:

1.    Demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in chemistry and biology.

2.    Demonstrate strong laboratory skills and an understanding of instrumentation commonly used in industry.

3.    Demonstrate techniques used to independently solve challenges in biology and chemistry research.

4.    Demonstrate the ability to apply qualitative and quantitative reasoning skills.

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
BIO101 Principles of Biology I (KP) 4
BIO102 Principles of Biology II (KP) 4
BIO209 Molecular Biology 4
BIO211 Microbiology 4
BIO310 Genetics 4
BIO430 Health Science Capstone 3
CHEM203 General Chemistry I (KP) 4
CHEM204 General Chemistry II 4
CHEM301 Biochemistry 3
CHEM303 Organic Chemistry 4
CHEM304 Organic Chemistry II 4
CHEM305 Analytical Chemistry 3
CHEM405 Physical Chemistry 3
MATH203 Precalculus 3
MATH205 Calculus I 4
MATH206 Calculus II 4
MATH208 Statistics 3
PHYS111 General Physics I (KP) 4
PHYS112 General Physics II (KP) 4

A minimum of 120 credits is required for graduation. This total includes the Core Curriculum Requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog. Some courses required for the major meet Core Curriculum requirements. 
For a complete explanation of graduation requirements, see Graduation Requirements in the Undergraduate Academic Policies section of this catalog.

BIO101 - Principles of Biology

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Corequisite: BIO 101L.

BIO102 - Diversity of Living Organisms

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

BIO107 - Topics In Biology

Preliminaries of the molecules of life and cell structures are investigated in this course. Topics from cell biology, nutrition, energy production, respiratory and circulatory systems, genetics, reproduction, evolutionary thought, and ecosystems are also explored.

BIO110 - Nutrition

This course focuses on the function of nutrients and their requirements throughout the life cycle. The course reviews current nutrition issues as they relate to personal health. Topics include disease prevention, weight and fitness management, fad diets and nutritional trends.

BIO111X - Contemporary Issues in Biology & Health

This interdisciplinary course promotes student understanding of the interrelated contemporary issues of biology, scientific principles, health and society. The course will first analyze specific current issues in biology by building a sound scientific foundation of biological information and scientific thinking. Next, students will explore the health, social, ethical and political implications of the issue by formulating discussions and alternative positions. Some of the timely issues that will be discussed are embryonic stem cells, the Human Genome Project, gene therapy and personalized medicine, diet, drug and obesity issues, cancer treatment dilemmas, HIV / AIDS, evolution, drug addiction, drugs and mental health, and menopause and hormone replacement therapy. This class should enable students to discuss and make judgments on issues in biology and science that impact on their daily lives and on society.

BIO112 - Human Biology

This is a one semester lab course focusing on the functions of the human body in health and disease. The structure and function of the major body systems are emphasized. Systems discussed include: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, excretory, reproductive, nervous and endocrine. Corequisite: BIO 112L.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Corequisite: BIO 206L.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH 104. Corequisite: CHEM 203L.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubiity equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: CHEM 203. Corequisite: CHEM 204L.

MATH103 - Introductory Algebra

This is an introduction to algebra beginning with a brief review of operations with real numbers. Topics include: algebraic expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, rules for exponents, operations with polynomials, factoring techniques, quadratic equations, graphing linear equations, solving systems of equations. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed another mathematics course.

MATH104 - Intermediate Algebra

This course is intended to strengthen students’ ability in algebra. The course begins with such introductory topics as linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations, and systems of equations. This course also includes an introduction to rational expressions, radicals, and rational exponents. Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed any 200 or higher level mathematics course (with the exception that students may take 104 currently with or after 204).

MATH106X - Algebraic Operations

This course is intended to strengthen students’ ability in algebra. The course begins with such introductory topics as operations with real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations, and systems of equations. This course also includes an introduction to rational expressions, radicals, and rational exponents.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids, and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last one-hundred years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics, and probability. The course can be used as a prerequisite for MATH 208-Introduction to Statistics, but will not serve as a prerequisite for MATH 203-Precalculus or MATH 205-Calculus. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 104 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I, covering integration, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, maxmin problems, derivatives and integrals of trigonometric functions and differential equations with applications to business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 104, MATH 109, or MATH 204 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH304X - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vectors and vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations, solutions of systems of differential equations using the theory of matrices, and determinants. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants and computer methods, as well as applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, archaeology, economics, communications, demography, weather prediction, connectivity of networks, graph theory, and fractals. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH328 - Mathematics Applied to Management

This course explores the art of mathematical modeling of managerial decision problems and the science of developing the solution techniques for these models. Topics include management science techniques used in today’s businesses, e.g., break-even analysis, presentation models, linear programming, transportation and assignments problems, decision theory, forecasting and inventory models, Markov analysis, and solution of nonlinear models in business using calculus-based optimization. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH333X - Applied Statistics

This course explores statistical methods for describing and analyzing multivariate data. Topics include data transformations, analysis of variance, regression, and factor analysis. Data sets will be analyzed with statistical software. MATH307, MATH325, or concurrent enrolment in MATH212 recommended. Prerequisites: MATH206 and MATH208. (4 credits)

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Mathematical Applications

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

PHYS111 - General Physics I

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS 111L.

PHYS112 - General Physics II

This is a continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS 112L.

Deirdre Donovan

Associate Professor of Mathematics; Program Chair for Cybersecurity, Data Analytics and Math

Office: Science and Technology Center

Kimberly Farah

Professor of Chemistry

Office: Science and Technology Center

Neil Hatem

Professor of Mathematics

Office: Science and Technology Center

Joanna Kosakowski

Professor Emerita

Ron Laham

Assistant Professor of Exercise Science

Office: Science and Technology Center

Stephen Sarikas

Professor of Biology

Office: Science and Technology Center

BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Co-requisites: BIO101L.

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This lecture and laboratory course is the second semester of a year-long introductory biology sequence which explores the scientific study of life. Topics include introductions to Darwinian evolution, principles of inheritance, evolution & immunity, and a survey of human body systems & homeostatic mechanisms. The laboratory provides an environment for active learning to support understanding of concepts presented in the course. Prerequisite: BIO101 with a C or better. Corequisite: BIO102L.

BIO209 - Molecular Biology

This lecture and laboratory will present the basic principles of molecular biology. Topics include nucleic acid-protein interactions, the Central Dogma, gene regulation, and genetic evolution. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce the methodology and research used in molecular biology, including nucleic acid extraction, PCR, Western Blot, and gel electrophoresis. Prerequisite: BIO101 Corequisite: BIO209L

BIO211 - Microbiology

This lecture and laboratory introduces the microbial world and the laboratory techniques required for its study. Topics include the basic characteristics of fungi, algae, bacteria, and viruses. Topics and applications that relate to humans are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO211L

BIO310 - Genetics

This lecture and laboratory will focus on principles related to the inheritance of traits regulated by genes. The chemical and physical nature of chromosomes and genes and gene expression and regulation will be covered. Systems in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms exemplifying Mendelian and modern molecular genetic principles will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIO101. Corequisite: BIO310L

BIO430 - Health Science Capstone

The capstone course prepares students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for undergraduate research. Students will develop an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 340 with a C or better.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH203 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM203L and CHEM203R.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubility equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH106 with a grade of C or better & CHEM203. Corequisite: CHEM204L and CHEM204R.

CHEM301 - Biochemistry

This course is an in-depth study of biochemical substances and their reaction in the body with major emphasis placed on metabolism at the cellular level and examined in the tissues of the various organs where these reactions occur. Correlation of biochemical processes underlying pathologic conditions are made whenever practical. Prerequisite: CHEM 204

CHEM303 - Organic Chemistry

This course is focused on the structure and chemistry of organic compounds. Topics include thermodynamics, resonance, reaction mechanisms of organic functional groups and stereochemistry. The course meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM204. Corequisite CHEM303L

CHEM304 - Organic Chemistry II

The second half of a two-semester sequence. Topics include synthetic applications of organic reactions, delocalization and aromaticity. Principles and application of instrumental methods for organic structure determination will be studied in the laboratory. Prerequisite: C- or better in CHEM303. Corequisite CHEM304L

CHEM305 - Analytical Chemistry

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of analytical chemistry. Analytical chemistry is intended for the separation, identification, and quantification of matter. Topics include development of a quantitative understanding of acid-base titrations, optical spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and statistics. Pre-requisite: CHEM 204 (S, alternate years)

CHEM405 - Physical Chemistry

This course introduces students to the application of physics to chemistry. Physical chemistry explains, through the use of mathematics, why and how chemical reactions occur and explain how new chemical reactions may be created for research purposes. Topics include the laws of thermodynamics, equilibrium and kinetics of chemical changes, and statistical thermodynamics. Pre-requisites: CHEM204 and PHYS112 (F, alternate years)

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is solving systems of equations, the analysis and graphing of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational functions, the unit circle, and triangle (right and non-right) trigonometry. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathematics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I. Includes graphical and analytic integration, partial differentiation, and solving differential equations. Applications include business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS111L, PHYS111R.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111 with a C or better. Corequisite: PHYS112L, PHYS112R.