Academic Programs

Applied Mathematics with Secondary Education Concentration

Applied Mathematics with Secondary Education Concentration

The Education Major with Applied Mathematics with Secondary Education Concentration at Lasell has a professional focus, rooted in Connected Learning, that seeks to educate students by promoting self-expression, academic exploration and critical thinking in academic, civic, and career-relevant areas.

Lasell College provides an active learning environment that robustly links learning to multiple experiences.  The community is a collaborative one powered by possibilities, enhanced by high social interaction and meaningful practices. 100% of students complete at least one internship to gain experience and build their resumes. Located just outside of Boston, Lasell is a professional and educational hub of opportunities with small class sizes to provide a co-constructed, supportive learning space.  At Lasell, many doors are opened for students, they just have to choose which one to go through.

  • The Applied Mathematics with Secondary Education Concentration is designed provides a specialization in mathematics while preparing graduates to teach in secondary classrooms grades eight through twelve.
  • Students will be prepared and guided through the MTEL exams and will pass all necessary components for initial licensure prior to graduation.
  • From their first semester at Lasell, students begin their classroom experience and build their resumes.
  • Lasell's distinguished faculty supports the success of the students, by linking academic expertise with professional teaching experience to effectively prepare students for today's diverse classrooms.
  • The Education program has a Fifth Year option, which allows students to graduate with a master's and the fifth year feels seamless.

For more information about the Applied Mathematics with Secondary Education Concentration  curriculum, click here.

ED109 - Invitation to Teaching

This course explores careers in teaching beginning with the unifying question: Why should I become a teacher? Students examine their motivations to become teachers while they learn about college and state requirements and expectations.

ED110 - Teaching & Learning in American Schools

This course provides students pursuing or considering initial teacher licensure with an overview of the teaching profession. Students study and discuss history and philosophies of education systems, as well as current trends and issues. Massachusetts professional standards and requirements for licensure are explored. This course is a prerequisite for all other ED courses. Twenty-five hours of observation and tutoring in varied school settings are required. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ED210 - Reading & Writing Across the Curriculum

This course emphasizes the processes of reading and the critical nature of reading to learn in the content areas. Focus will be on literacy strategies to support teaching in content areas, the influences of diversity, the current methods of instruction, and assessments used to inform instruction. In addition, the current research on reading to learn will be read, discussed, and integrated in all course activities. Requires a pre-practicum of 25 hours minimum. Prerequisite: ED 219.

ED219 - Supporting Learner Variability

This course introduces students to characteristics of learners with special needs in classroom and community settings. It focuses on principles of Universal Design for Learning in developing appropriate learning environments to meet the variability of all students in Pre-K through high school settings. A required minimum 25-hour pre-practicum provides opportunities to teach and observe in area classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED308 - Responsive Teaching in Secondary Schools

Students will develop strategies and tools necessary to be responsive secondary. Participants in this course will observe secondary teachers, develop lesson plans, reflect on their teaching philosophy, apply leadership theory to classroom practice, explore current trends and issues that impact secondary classrooms, increase their cultural competence, and expand their toolkit of strategies for differentiating instruction to address the variability of secondary students. A minimum of 25 hours of classroom observation, reflection and teaching is required. Pre-requisite: ED 219

ED309 - Sheltered English Immersion

This course provides a grounding in current theory and practice related to teaching English Language Learners. In particular, students learn to effectively shelter their content instruction, so that ELL students can access curriculum, achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy. This course meets Massachusetts DESE standards for the required SEI endorsement. Course includes a minimum 25-hour pre-practicum in license-appropriate classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 206 or Department permission

ED437 - Pre-practicum: Secondary Math

Through a minimum of 150 hours of observation and reflection in public schools, and regular meetings with school and Lasell faculty, students in this course become familiar with the curriculum and organization of middle and/or high schools and mathematics classrooms in preparation for the practicum. Prerequisite: Senior standing; passing scores on all required MTEL; permission of Department Chair

ED492 - Practicum: Secondary Math

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary mathematics classroom and meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Department Chair required. Prerequisite: ED 437; passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101