1940s/1950s/1960s

1940s/1950s/1960s

Catalogue Home 1920s 1930s

Date Artist Medium Description Additional Information Cultural Significance
Image of living environment including furniture and accessories 1940s/1950s Artist Unknown Copy of black and white painting Image of living environment including furniture and accessories Clean and modern furniture became popular as ornamentation was pared down exposing structure. The modernity of the furniture was inspired by streamline modes.
Front and back view of women's daywear 1940s Artist Unknown Painting Front and back view of women's daywear This fashion statement uses excessive fabric for a combination style of tailoring and movement through a long and voluminous skirt. Fashion was greatly impacted by Utility regulations during WWII. In 1947 Christian Dior launched his New Look which promoted more elaborate and feminine styles.
Young women in shorts 1955 Artist Unknown Drawing on paper Young women in shorts Teenagers were not seen as a separate consumer market until the 1950s and 1960s. American designers such as Claire McCardell revolutionized sportswear for women into attractive matching sets that featured a connection to health and fitness. These styles were popular for their ease of movement and accessible fastenings.
Women in plaid shorts 1955 Artist Unknown Drawing on paper Women in plaid shorts After a long period of financial woes and somber fashion, the 1950s began to bring youth and energy back into casualwear. Due to the mass-production techniques honed during World War II, the ready to wear market expanded using similar methods to produce civilian clothing. This allowed the general public to be exposed to the latest trends.
Fall fashion show flyer 1960s Artist unknown (show hosted by women of Central Presbyterian church) Drawing on paper Fall fashion show flyer of woman in peplum dress The 1960s featured experimental shapes and colors as Space Age and mod fashions dominated trends. The revealing hemlines of the 1960s were indicative of the cultural shift happening: women were gaining more freedom and hemlines flaunted their sexuality and economic independence.

Photography by David Parnes