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Leadership in Civic Engagement Minor

The Leadership in Civic Engagement minor provides students with a focused, curricular context for understanding, interacting with, and working with community and other non-profit agencies to address compelling social issues. Through the requirements below, students will complete approximately 150 hours of community service, take on a variety of leadership roles as part of their service experience, and reflect on their experiences. The minor (and the community-based internship requirement) are administered by the director of the Center for Community-Based Learning.

COURSE CODE
COURSE TITLE
CREDITS
Core Courses

 

 

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SVL202

SVL202 - Introduction to Community Organizations

This course provides a forum for community service house residents to explore challenging service opportunities. The residents have opportunities to examine past service experience in order to identify more clearly with a cause or find an area about which they wish to learn more. They also have opportunities to research service needs for Greater Boston or for their hometowns, and to challenge themselves to envision events that would meet those needs. The course explores different ways of gaining insight into and knowledge of the service-learning field through discussion, peer-led activities, reflection, learning circles, and guest speakers. The materials and discussion serve to empower the residents to find and/or initiate meaningful service events. Open only to service house residents. Pass/Fail.

X
Introduction to Community Organizations
2
Choose 1 from the following:

 

 

X
 
 
SVL201

SVL201 - Service Learning Internship

The Service-Learning Internship provides individually arranged participation in a community-based or other non-profit organization in which the student provides 100 hours of meaningful service to that organization. Students may also be placed at a for-profit organization to work on a service project for the community. The primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing the internship, with support of the Center for Community-Based Learning (CCBL). Students meet regularly with the Director of the CCBL to discuss the internship. Evaluation of the internship is based on the students' reflections about that experience, a site visit, and communication with the internship site supervisor. Students may do six credits of service-learning internships. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing and the approval of the Director of the CCBL and the agency representative are required. This internship fulfills unrestricted elective credit; it does not supplant any internship requirement within a major.

X
Service Learning Internship
2
SVL301

SVL301 - Service learning Internship

The Service-Learning Internship provides individually arranged participation in a community-based or other non-profit organization in which the student provides 150 hours meaningful service to that organization. Students may also be placed at a for-profit organization to work on a service project for the community. The primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing the internship, with the support of the Center for Community-Based Learning. Students meet regularly with the Director of the CCBL to discuss the internship. Evaluation of the internship is based on the students' reflections about that experience, a site visit, and communication with the internship site supervisor. Students may do six credits of service-learning internships. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and the approval of the Director of the CCBL and the agency representative are required. This internship fulfills unrestricted elective credit; it does not supplant any internship requirement within a major.

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Service learning Internship
3
Choose 2 from the following:

 

 

X
 
 
BUSS334

BUSS334 - Nonprofit Management

Managing in the nonprofit sector is different than in the for-profit sector. In this course students explore businesses that do not intend to maximize profit and retain it for future expenditures. Managers must operate under more regulated conditions and must be well prepared to interact within the public sector. Not-for-profit managers must be well versed in public policy and other regulations that affect them. Students engage in projects with non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102

X
Nonprofit Management
3
CJ103

CJ103 - Principles of Human Rights

This course takes a global perspective defining human rights, reflecting on violations of these rights, considering arguments in support of human rights, and examining various new initiatives designed to protect human rights in different countries in all parts of the world. This course focuses on issues pertaining to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights such as slavery, personal security and equality before the law, freedom of marriage, freedom of assembly, and freedom of movement.

X
Principles of Human Rights
3
CJ303

CJ303 - Domestic Violence

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of the law relating to domestic violence. In addition the course examines the existence of violence among family members and in relationships in today's society. Topics include child abuse, partner abuse, and elder abuse. Prerequisite: LS 101, CJ 101 or any introductory social science course.

X
Domestic Violence
3
CJ309

CJ309 - Children & Violence

This course examines the psychological, criminal justice, and legal issues surrounding children who experience violence in their lives, either as victims or perpetrators of violence. Topics include child maltreatment, pedophilia, online child predators, school victimization, domestic violence, juvenile delinquency, child sex offenders, and youth homicide. Prerequisite: PSYC 221, PSYC 223, CJ 201, or LS 204.

X
Children & Violence
3
CJ319

CJ319 - Victimology

This course presents an overview of the history and theories of victimology. Students analyze victimization patterns with special emphasis on types of victims and crimes. The course also examines the interaction between victims of crime and the criminal justice system, the victim’s rights movement, and services offered to victims of crime. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

X
Victimology
3
CJ323

CJ323 - Justice, Class, Race & Gender

This course explores issues unique to individuals of different classes, gender, and/or races or ethnic groups. The course focuses on these issues specifically in the context of the American criminal justice and legal systems. Issues of diversity relevant to all aspects of the criminal justice system are examined. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101, Sophomore standing.

X
Justice, Class, Race & Gender
3
COM303

COM303 - Nonprofit Public Relations

This course invites students to explore "nonprofit public relations" as it is seen today and as experts suggest it will be seen in the future. Students have the opportunity to work with a "real world" nonprofit client by creating, preparing, and producing a complete public relations plan for that organization. Prerequisite: COM 213.

X
Nonprofit Public Relations
3
ECON103

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development. Prerequisite: A grade of C or above in Math 103 or placement in any math course above Math 103.

X
Economics of Social Issues
3
ENV101

ENV101 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

X
Introduction to Environmental Studies
3
ENV102

ENV102 - Environmental Ethics & Society

This course explores issues and problems arising out of ethical considerations related to the general environment and specific ecosystems. Also considered are the moral aspects of population control and resource use. The foundations for beliefs and worldviews regarding nature and the human relationship to it are explored. In addition, the variety of philosophical perspectives and pragmatic choices and actions people take related to environmental ethics are studied.

X
Environmental Ethics & Society
3
ENV211

ENV211 - Environmental Science

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell College on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

X
Environmental Science
3
ENV303

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

X
Environmental Justice
3
HIST105

HIST105 - History of Human Rights

This course surveys the complicated history of Human Rights from its origins to the modern era. Emphasis is on the historical forces, movements, and events, especially in the last three centuries, that have moved this concept from the realm of intellectual theory and conjecture to practical implementation and application. This course may also touch on some of the major philosophical, ethical, and moral questions intertwined with Human Rights.

X
History of Human Rights
3
PSYC111

PSYC111 - Aging in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

X
Aging in America
3
PSYC316

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

X
Psychology of Diversity
3
SOC221

SOC221 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course examines conditions and issues that result in tension and disorder. Examples drawn primarily from American society include: labeling and social control of deviants, oppression of minorities, poverty, violence, ageism, and ecological concerns. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

X
Contemporary Social Problems
3
SOC301

SOC301 - Race & Ethnic Relations

This course examines the changing nature of race and ethnic relations with primary emphasis on the United States. Topics include: the origins and consequences of racial/ethnic discriminations; immigration policies; movements for integration and separatism; the role of class, religion, and gender on issues of race/ethnicity; the impact of widely differing cultural heritages on our national life: and specific present day problems and trends. Prerequisite: Any 200 level Social Science course.

X
Race & Ethnic Relations
3
SOC335

SOC335 - Social Policy

This course examines historical and contemporary factors influencing the making of social policy and introduces the student to processes used to identify and solve social problems. Special attention is given to the relationships of values to social policy and the impact of social policy decisions on the provision of social and human services. Approaches to the analysis of social policy are examined. Prerequisite: Any 200 Level Sociology course.

X
Social Policy
3

A combination of four Linked-Credits in Service-Learning and Social Justice Activism (1 credit each, 4 credits total, with at least 2 in Service-Learning)*: 4 credits**

Students will select the balance of the required 18 credits in consultation with the Director of the Center for Community Based Learning: 3 or 4 credits

*Required part of the Core Courses
**Consistent with other College policy, students may take no more than a total of six Linked-credits throughout their coursework and up to three Service-Learning or three Social Justice Activism Linked-credits in total. Please note that several of the electives have prerequisites that must be taken before taking the course.

Please note: Students in this minor are highly encouraged to apply to participate in at least one of Lasell’s international service-learning experiences and/or the domestic alternative spring break.

Credit Requirements for minor: 18 credits