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Sport Management

BUSS101 - Contemporary Issues in Business

This course is designed to familiarize students with various aspects of the business world. Areas covered include: private enterprise, forms of ownership, legal aspects, management, marketing, human resources, operations management, labor relations, and finance. In addition, students become aware of how business functions are integrated into an organization to achieve specific goals.

BUSS201 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with an applied knowledge of the fundamental accounting process and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements, as well as how to become intelligent users of financial information.

BUSS202 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a grade C or better.

BUSS203 - Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of finance. Various techniques of analysis that reveal the relationships of risk, return, and value are demonstrated. Topics include: financial reporting; long- and short-term forecasting; managing working capital; capital budgeting; and the nature of corporate securities and debt-equity mix. Prerequisites: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, SMGT 102; BUSS 202 with a grade C or better; ECON 102.

BUSS204 - Federal Income Taxation

This course provides students with a basic understanding of fundamentals of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, businesses, and not-for-profit taxable entities. It explores the broad range of tax topics, emphasizing the role of taxation in business decision-making process, tax research, and tax planning. Prerequisite: BUSS 201

BUSS205 - Legal Environment of Business

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to business and personal needs. The focus is primarily on contract law and property law.

BUSS207 - Fundamentals of Financial Planning

This course provides the foundation for understanding and using financial planning techniques. This framework is the basis for all financial decisions large and small. Topics covered are personal financial planning, consumer credit, budgeting, investments, and banking procedures. Risk analysis regarding portfolio management and tax liabilities is also examined.

BUSS208 - Financial Statement Analysis

This course examines financial statements and other financial reports with a view towards using accounting information in making investing, lending and other potential management decisions. Students explore methods of constructing, comparing and analyzing these statements and reports and the various use of such analyses. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS209X - Computerized Financial Applications

This hands-on course is designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge and understanding of computer applications in business. Strong emphasis of the course is on building competencies in industry-standard spreadsheet and database software applications.

BUSS210X - Federal Income Taxes

This course provides students with a basic understanding of fundamentals of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, businesses, and not-for-profit taxable entities. It explores the broad range of tax topics, emphasizing the role of taxation in business decision-making process, tax research, and tax planning. Prerequisite: BUSS 201Formerly - BUSS204

BUSS212 - Management Information Systems

This course takes a managerial approach to information technology concepts and applications. Given the pervasiveness of computer technology in today's world, professionals in various fields of endeavor often have a major responsibility for determining their organization's information needs and for designing and implementing information systems that support those needs. Students study concepts and issues related to information technology with the goal of understanding how it can be effectively used to improve their organization's over­all effectiveness and increase its level of success. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, SMGT 102, or FASH 101.

BUSS220 - Marketing

In this course, fundamentals of the nature of marketing are presented and evaluated for specific functions and institutions. Policies and practices as applied generally to marketing research involve product development, selection, channels of distribution buying and physical distribution selling. Pricing under competitive conditions, social benefits of competition and government regulations are included. Prerequisites: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102; ECON 101.

BUSS221X - Marketing & Society

This course aims to provide students with an appreciation of the positive and negative effects of marketing on society. The course will engender students with a critical understanding of the applications of marketing beyond commercial marketing and to instill an appreciation of marketers' ethical responsibilities to organizations and to society. The course will also consider the undesirable consequences of marketing, such as encouraging overconsumption and materialism, and especially the commercialization of childhood. Students will examine ethical concepts and to learn how marketers can use them to resolve moral dilemmas, to understand consumer marketing issues, and to apply ethical reasoning to guide marketers in their pursuits to persuade customers to practice ethically-sound consumer behavior. The course will also aid the student in becoming a more aware and intelligent consumer. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry - Moral and Ethical.

BUSS224 - Organizational Behavior

In this course, students study individuals within the context of the organization using a behavioral approach. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior. Areas covered include: structure, leadership, and change. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

BUSS231 - Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation

Entrepreneurship drives global innovation and economic growth. This course exposes business students to the study of entrepreneurship and the venture creation process. Topics include analyzing new business opportunities, developing business propositions, new venture planning and financing, marketing activities, financial controls, and other topics relevant to the entrepreneurial process. Students interact with faculty, local entrepreneurs, and small business owners/managers. As a culmination activity of this course, students are responsible for the development and presentation of a business plan. Prerequisite: BUSS 101.

BUSS232 - Operations Strategy

Operations strategy typically examines how operations can be used as sources of competitive advantage. This class will focus on understanding the need of formulating an operational strategy (long-term plan) and making strategic (important) operational decisions. The old view of operations management as the task of maintaining a comparatively static production or service facility has given way to one characterized by a need for renewed flexibility, relentless improvement, and the development of new capabilities at the operating unit level. As a result of this changing environment, the skills required of operations managers have changed as well. The course is based mostly on case studies supported by conceptual frameworks.

BUSS233 - American Enterprise Experience

This course studies the American enterprise experience from colonial times until the present. The course touches upon the business component of the American experience beginning with the individual artisan-merchant through the great innovators and organizers of the 19th and 20th centuries and beyond. The historical events, cultural changes, social upheavals, and political shifts that have influenced the development of the American business environment are the core of the study. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT102

BUSS235 - Ethics in Business

This course introduces students to ethical analysis in its application to management. A presupposition of the course is that ethical considerations are an integral part of effective management practices.. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101 FASH 101, or SMGT 102

BUSS236 - Career Development & Planning

This course introduces students to career planning and highlights how students can be more entrepreneurial as they look to the future. This course is also designed to prepare students for the process of acquiring an internship and developing their long-term career goals. Students assess their personal background; practice finding career opportunities through the job search process; develop a cover letter, resume, thank you letter, and complete a job application; participate in a mock interview; and demonstrate how to deal with interpersonal situations found in the workplace. This course also focuses on workplace interactions including employee communication, management and leadership, the art of self-marketing, team building, conflict management, problem solving in the workplace, portfolio development, planning for successful meetings, and strategies for effective negotiation. Visits to employment locations and participation in networking sessions are a vital component of this course. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

BUSS237 - Contemporary Global Leadership

In this course, students analyze what it means to be a global leader in the 21st century and identify the skills necessary to be successful in an increasingly global business climate. Students explore this question personally, collectively, and globally in a creative and collaborative atmosphere. Students examine classic as well as contemporary theories of leadership and how they apply to the dynamic global business culture. The course provides students with the opportunity to acquire perspectives and skills essential to successful management in the emerging markets that are increasingly becoming key contenders in world commercial enterprise. Prerequisite BUSS 224.

BUSS301 - Intermediate Accounting I

This course builds on concepts developed in Financial Accounting. Concentration is on the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to the preparation of financial statements with an in-depth review of cash, receivables, inventories, and plant assets. The course also covers the concept of the time value of money and the application of present value techniques to accounting valuations. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS302 - Intermediate Accounting II

This course is designed to continue the concepts of financial accounting and present a more thorough analysis of the requirements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Included in this course are earnings per share calculations, lease accounting, and pension accounting. The cash flow statement is also studied. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a grade C or better.

BUSS303 - Cost Accounting

Methods of identifying labor and material costs, and of allocating overhead as applied to job order, process, and standard cost systems are studied in this course, as are budgetary controls and the reporting procedures used by management. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS304 - Working Capital Management

This course explores working capital management, credit management, working capital funding, and the major sources of financing debt and equity. Students undertake financial analyses of theoretical models and real-world firms and organizations, recommend financing strategies, and present their findings by using management reporting methods. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS305 - International Accounting

This course addresses significant accounting matters experienced by multinational companies. Accounting matters include currency transactions and translational transfer price, and management planning and control. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a C or better.

BUSS306 - Accounting Information Systems

This course provides an understanding and appreciation of accounting information systems. The course teaches conceptual, analytical, and technical skills necessary to work efficiently and productively as an accountant in a computerized business information environment. The functions of Accounting Information Systems are explored from the perspective of financial accounting, managerial accounting, auditing, and tax. The course involves several hands-on exercises in Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel to develop database and spreadsheet skills. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a "C" or better.

BUSS307 - International Finance

This course studies the ways and means to reduce financial risk involved in international financial management. The course deals with the interrelationship between the international monetary environment and financial planning for corporations with overseas operations. It analyzes the effects on international financial planning of such factors as exchange rate fluctuations, currency restrictions, and tax regulations. It intensively examines financial aspects of multinational business including foreign investment, trade, and transfer of funds. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS308 - Government & Not-for-Profit Accounting

This course introduces financial accounting and reporting issues related to state and local government and non-profit organizations, including universities and health care facilities. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a grade C or better.

BUSS309 - Fraud Examination

This course covers techniques for identification and detection of asset misappropriation schemes and fraudulent financial statements, who commits fraud and why, and controls to prevent and detect problems. Prerequisite: BUSS 201.

BUSS311 - Investments

This course explores fundamentals of investing. The strategies used to create money from financial capital are thoroughly examined. Fnancial instruments such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, futures, options, and commodities are explored. The measurement tools used to assign risk and rate of return, performance, and value are covered. Students learn how to develop, analyze, and maintain a portfolio. Regulatory and ethical issues are examined and considered in the decision-making process. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a C or better.

BUSS312 - Risk Management

The basics of risk management are covered in this course. Problems of liability and personal loss exposures of a business are examined. Private insurance programs such as health and life insurance, and employee benefit plans are examined and assessed. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS313 - Business Negotiations

This course examines various negotiating tactics and techniques as they relate to different situations and environments. Particular attention is paid to buyer-seller communications, including negotiations of contracts and agreements. Students study the strengths and weaknesses of strategies used by both buyers and sellers. Prerequisites: BUSS 201, BUSS 220 and MATH 104.

BUSS315 - Emerging Global Markets

This course focuses on developing skills, strategies and insights crucial to conducting successful business operations in the emerging markets of Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa including the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for unprecedented economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and incomes, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. In this course, students study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors (such as the government and NGOs); analyze opportunities and risks presented by emerging markets; and analyze the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets.

BUSS320 - Consumer Behavior

This course examines the behavior of individuals and markets in relation to the purchase decision, including post-purchase evaluation and con­sumption. A behavioral science approach is taken. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS321 - Property and Liability Insurance

This course explores the fundamentals of commercial property and liability insurance including contracts, rating, underwriting, regulation and financial analysis of insurers. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS322 - Marketing Communications

This course focuses on a broad view of advertising, dealing with its planning, creation, and execution in relation to the marketing cycle. Topics include: organization and operation of the advertising agency; publicity; public relations; behavioral sciences as applied to advertising; budgeting; and planning. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS323 - Retirement Planning & Employee Benefits

This course provides the students an understanding of the retirement planning process. Students develop an ability to counsel others on retirement and employee benefit decisions. Topics covered are social security, qualified retirement plans, corporate profit sharing plans, health insurance, group life insurance, group disability insurance, and deferred compensation. Prerequsite: BUSS 203.

BUSS324 - E-Business

This course provides students with a broad overview of the concepts and principles of e-business. This knowledge is increasingly important for all students, regardless of their area of concentration, because traditional businesses and arts organizations are becoming hybrids by adding an online presence to their existing structure. Topics discussed include a definition of e-business, online management strategies, distribution channels, privacy and security issues, and cyberlaw, among others. Students develop an e-business plan and webpage.

BUSS325 - Sales Principles

This course analyzes salesmanship in modern business with emphasis placed on the principles and techniques of individual selling styles in both retail and wholesale markets. Topics covered include: dramatization of the sale presentation; the selling role; buyer characteristics and motivations; modern sales practices; corporate sales planning; sales-force policies; time and territory management; forecasting, budgeting; and expense control. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS327 - Life, Health, and Disability Insurance

This course study financial implications of death, disability and retirement, as well as the types of life insurance and annuity contracts and their uses. Regulations of life and health insurers, insurer operations and functions, legal aspects, group and individual life and health insurance products including medical, disability income and long-term care policies are covered. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS329 - New Product Development

New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. A major goal of this course is to help students learn to use an analytic decision-making approach in developing and marketing new products and services that meet customer needs in the consumer, industrial, and service settings. At the end of the course, the student should understand the role of decision models in analytic marketing decision-making; be able to follow the basic steps in opportunity identification, design, testing, and implementation; and know how to read and interpret new product and service market research. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS330 - Managing Change

This course examines the unique problems associated with managing organizations during mergers, reorganizations, and other times of change. Strategies to cope with change, as well as induce it, are examined. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS331 - Money and Capital Markets

This course offers an extensive examination of both money and capital markets. Students get “hands-on” experience evaluating long and short-term instruments. To connect theory to practice, students conduct technical and financial analyses. The basic characteristics of these markets and their contribution to the portfolio are explored. The case method is used to provide students with “real world” decision-making situations. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS332 - Cross Cultural Management

This course explores the process of cross-cultural man­agement and the challenges of working internationally. The course focuses on international organizational behavior and human resource issues and practices in global organizations. The course is divided into three parts. The first focuses on understanding the cultural roots of behavior in organizations, the second on the Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management issues that are relevant to international managers, and the third seeks to prepare students for international assignments. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS333 - Estate Planning and Trust

This course provides students with the knowledge base and analytical skills needed for effective financial planning and administration. Topics include wills, lifetime transfers, trusts, gifts, estate reduction techniques, tax implications in estate planning, business and inter-family transfers, dealing with incompetency, post mortem techniques, and the role of fiduciaries. Prerequsite: BUSS 204.

BUSS334 - Nonprofit Management

Managing in the nonprofit sector is different than in the for-profit sector. In this course students explore businesses that do not intend to maximize profit and retain it for future expenditures. Managers must operate under more regulated conditions and must be well prepared to interact within the public sector. Not-for-profit managers must be well versed in public policy and other regulations that affect them. Students engage in projects with non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102

BUSS335 - Business & Society

This course explores the effects of business decisions upon soci­ety. Students examine the relationships between business, government, and society, and how each entity must coexist with the other. Ethical issues and public policy are considered when making business decisions. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102 ; Junior standing.

BUSS336 - Human Resource Management

This course examines the staffing function of management including planning, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, appraisal, compensation, labor laws, and organizational development. The course also addresses current issues affecting the human resource manager, including the changing work force and need to increase productivity, as well as changes in the area of unions and affirmative action. Both class discussions and case studies are used to prepare students for the personnel and related tasks involved in a management position. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS337 - Managing the Growing Company

This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities of managing a growing entrepreneurial venture. Using practical management techniques, students address the management of rapidly growing entrepreneurial firms. Through a variety of learning activities, including case studies, reading, and visiting entrepreneurs, students examine companies, often family-run, during dynamic transition. The course specifically addresses the challenges faced by companies in various stages of growth and the exceptional challenges of rapid growth. Prerequisites: BUSS 201 & BUSS 231.

BUSS338 - Labor Relations

The focus of this course is on labor/management relations, particularly within a union environment. The role of unions and unionizing strategies are discussed with emphasis on the collective bargaining process, including interpretation and enforcement issues. The future of unions and effects of foreign competition are included in discussions. Students participate in case studies and simulations. Prerequisite: BUSS 336.

BUSS401 - Advanced Accounting

This course examines specialized topics in financial accounting. Problems associated with the partnership form of business organization, including partnership formation, division of income and losses, changes in ownership, and partnership liquidation are reviewed. Topics also include the subject of business combinations with emphasis on consolidated financial statements of parents and subsidiaries and elimination of intercompany transactions, accounting for foreign operations, and fund accounting as it relates to municipalities. Prerequisite:BUSS 302.

BUSS404 - Auditing

This courses examines the impact of auditing on constituencies external and internal to organizations, especially stockholders and management. Students examine the role of both the independent public accountant and the internal auditor, and study various control and reporting techniques involved in auditing. Prerequisites: BUSS 302, BUSS 303, and Senior standing.

BUSS405 - Accounting Theory

This course develops an understanding of generally accepted accounting principles and of the underlying theory upon which they are based, essentially through study and analysis of publications of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and other professional bodies. This course further emphasizes current developments in accounting thought. Prerequisites: BUSS 302, BUSS 303, both with a C or better, and senior standing.

BUSS406 - Financial Strategy

This is a capstone course utilizing lecture, discussion, and case analysis to define the process of financial management. The course of study presents the concepts of the advanced capital budget centering on decision-making concerning capital structure, dividend policy, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, reorganization, and international finance and exchange rates. Prerequisite: BUSS 203 with a grade C or better & senior standing.

BUSS418 - Special Topics in Accounting

This course provides students with an opportunity to study topics of special interest, which may vary each time the course is offered. Prerequisites: Permission of Department Chair, and Senior standing.

BUSS420 - Marketing Research

This course examines the process and tools involved in collecting, coding, and analyzing data. The course further integrates the application of computer software in compiling and interpreting statistical data in relation to marketing decisions, such as those related to market segmentation and distribution. Prerequisites: BUSS 220, MATH 208.

BUSS422 - Global Marketing

The complexity of operating in the global marketplace makes many demands on the marketer. The globalization of marketing takes place after the company has international experience in multiple markets. The three fundamental areas of corporate globalization are covered in this course: (1) integrate sourcing, production, and marketing; (2) allocate resources to achieve a balanced portfolio and growth; and (3) coordinate marketing activities across countries and regions. Importing, exporting, and licensing considerations are explored. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

BUSS425 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

This seminar offers an in-depth exploration of advanced entrepreneurship topics of current interest and importance. Using case studies and actual entrepreneurial ventures, students explore entrepreneurship with a focus on leadership, marketing, development, management, and growth of new business ventures. Students learn the practical skills needed to succeed as an entrepreneur and how to apply best practices for planning, initiating, and growing new companies. The course also emphasizes the analysis and evaluation of actual entrepreneurial ventures. Subjects vary from semester to semester. Prerequisites: BUSS 337 and Senior standing.

BUSS432 - Marketing Strategy

This course is designed to facilitate the ability to formulate and implement marketing strategy. The course integrates topics covered in other marketing classes. As part of the learning experience, students engage in a simulation program with teams taking charge of a company within a competitive environment. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

BUSS440 - Business Policy

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. The case study method is used. This course culminates in a formal professional presentation to members of the advisory board. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Marketing/Management or Accounting/Finance Majors.

BUSS497X - Mgmt, Mrkt & Hem Internship & Seminar

Mgmt, Mrkt & Hem Internship & Seminar

BUSS498 - Business Internship Seminar

A critical component of the internship experience is participating in a weekly seminar where students discuss and reflect on their experiences to gain a broader view of the workplace, contemporary issues and organizational trends, as well as their own developing abilities and career interests. This one credit course covers professional issues as they arise during the student's internship. Some of the topics covered include: supervision, boundary issues, self-care, stress management, and professionalism. Students are required to write a weekly reflective journal on their internship experience. Separate sections are offered for different business majors. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS 499.

BUSS499 - Business Internship

The internship is scheduled to take place during the senior year. Students serve as interns for a total of 144 hours over a 12-week period, done concurrently with on-campus course work as shown in the curriculum for each program. Detailed reports, a journal, and other written requirements are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. Separate sections are offered for different business majors. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS 498.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM103 - Human Communication

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM107LX - Wrt for Media Lab

Wrt for Media Lab

COM107X - Writing for the Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.Formerly COM105

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM206 - Professional Communication

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the most important communication and career-related formats of professional writing, including power point presentations, memos, business letters, reports, brief speeches, instructions, newsletters and brochures. Special emphasis is given to various writing processes one must complete on a tight deadline for a business audience of peers, customers or employers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles. Assignments may include politics, sports, entertainment, and interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, and graphic designers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast; and on what page to display them or in which order to broadcast them. The various reporting specialties covered in journalism – Health, Education, Business, Arts, Sports, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Travel - are explored. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM210X - Surveying Film Communication

In this introductory level course, students begin to appreciate film as a medium of expression by watching a variety of classic and contemporary works which highlight the various functions of film as a mode of entertainment, art, education, politics and social change. Students will learn the basic concepts of film and terms related to how the medium of film communicates ideas with visuals, storytelling, sound, and other techniques, and how filmmakers have traditionally communicated through cinema and video. Students will analyze elements of film expression, including form, narrative structure, editing, sound and cinematography, and will identify major trends and ideas important to the history of film as one of the most important forms of mass media.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

COM213 - Writing for Public Relations

This course serves as a workshop in which students apply the fundamental skills of journalism to the different formats commonly used in writing copy for public relations and advertising, including press releases, public service announcements, profiles, brochures, and advertisements. In addition, students continue to sharpen their editing skills by revising their own work and by copyediting and critiquing the work of other students. Central to the objectives of this course is that students improve their ability to write clearly and concisely, avoiding common errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM215 - Radio Production

This course introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell College Radio station.

COM217 - Video Production

This course introduces students to the basics of video production. Students learn basic videography techniques using professional video cameras such as the SONY HVR-HD1000U. In addition to videography, students learn the basics of digital video editing using industry-standard Avid nonlinear editing programs. Video projects include a video camera roll test, Avid editing assignment, news package, and a short movie where students shoot, direct, and edit their own creative narrative.

COM218 - Digital Video Editing

This course teaches students the basics of editing digital media using the popular software program Adobe Premiere Pro. The aesthetics of editing are also discussed and analyzed through screening various types of edited media. Projects for the course include editing TV commercials, news packages, movie scenes, and music videos. It is recommended that students have acquired basic computer skills prior to taking this class.

COM219 - Social Media

This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and practices of writing for weblogs and the use of social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter for reputation management in PR, journaling, and networking. Students learn about social media uses by studying successful blogs, reading assigned articles on the subject, contributing to regular discussions held on an online forum, and completing a personal blog entry each week. Students form small groups around topics of interest and work together in order to publish and promote their work on the web. Each student contributes to a class-made blog by writing, creating/finding art, copyediting, and assisting with podcast and video blog production. Students have a great deal of real-world experience with a live, constantly updated blog, and a solid understanding of the fundamentals of writing for the web and using social media for promotional purposes. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM221 - Advertising

This course introduces students to the field of advertising, including the role of promotional elements (advertising, direct mail, promotion, etc.) found in an advertising agency or in the communication program of an organization. In this course, students learn that advertising is more than just ads on television, on a web page or in print. Advertising is a process that starts with research and moves through analysis, planning, action, and evaluation. The development of an effective advertising strategy requires an understanding of overall communication processes and theoretical principles, how organizations organize and brand themselves for advertising and other promotional functions, consumer behavior, and how to set goals and objectives. A cooperative learning project requires students to engage in the kind of strategic thinking, planning and execution that is done by advertisers, researchers, media planners, and copywriters. The course also addresses how the advertising industry is regulated and how key social issues and various consumer constituencies can present problems for advertising professionals. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM222 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

COM223 - Advertising: Copy & Design

This course approaches the design and content of advertising from a variety of creative perspectives —from art to copy to production. The aim is to create eye catching, stand-out advertising —the kind that requires concentration, creativity, and focus. Students don’t have to be skilled graphic artists, but they do need to be able to explain in detail how a storyboard works and what message is intended for the consumer through an emphasis on: visual effects of the design; use of color and placement; and the significance of slogans, copy, and dialogue. This class duplicates as closely as possible the experience of working in a creative group within a real ad agency. Prerequisite: COM 221.

COM225 - TV I: Producing

Part I of this two-part course introduces students to the basics of TV producing. Students learn the process of writing a pitch, proposal, treatment, and budget. They also learn the fundamentals of basic screenwriting and production scheduling, as well as managing cast, crew and vendor relationships. The course also explores the roles of the casting director, location manager, production coordinator, and script supervisor. The course concludes with a preview of the production team and the role of the line producer, unit production manager, production manager and assistant directors involved in managing the physical production process of producing a television show.

COM226 - TV II: Production

Part II of this two-part course introduces students to the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment. Throughout the semester, students participate in a television crew to produce a high quality “Lasell TV” program to be aired on local access television. Students develop a genuine understanding of real-life television studio operation by rotating through the various positions in both control room and TV studio environments. Roles the students experience during the semester include: director, technical director, assistant director, computer graphics technician, audio technician, teleprompter operator, camera operator, and floor director. Prerequisite: COM 225 or Permission of Instructor

COM302 - Entertainment Media

A focus on the entertainment media industry requires making sense of the material that captures the audience's attention, influences culture, and provides enjoyment to mass media consumers. Course topics include the business of entertainment media, the production and distribution of media content, and multimedia convergence. Students in this course examine the multiple genres for the content of entertainment media, such as drama, comedy, reality TV, and gaming. Students learn how the entertainment industry works, captures the interests of contemporary audiences, and influences our culture and values. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM303 - Nonprofit Public Relations

This course invites students to explore "nonprofit public relations" as it is seen today and as experts suggest it will be seen in the future. Students have the opportunity to work with a "real world" nonprofit client by creating, preparing, and producing a complete public relations plan for that organization. Prerequisite: COM 213.

COM304 - TV Studio Production

This course introduces the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment at NewTV - Newton's own public access television studios. Students learn pre-production planning, live-to-tape directing, and participate in full television crew rotations to produce high quality PSAs and their very own TV show to be aired on local access television. Throughout the semester, students develop a variety of production skills from hands-on television studio operation.

COM305 - Screenwriting

This course includes writing techniques for series and stand alone productions in television and film. Students work both independently and collaboratively in order to understand industry procedures. Students experiment with several different genres and then develop a major project. Prerequisite: COM 105.

COM306 - Broadcast Journalism

This class introduces students to the basic skills in writing for radio and TV news, including beat reporting, writing, interviewing, and editing. Students critically evaluate newscasts and are introduced to the components of producing them. They also examine ethical challenges that arise when manipulation of images and sound can distort reality and compromise journalistic integrity.

COM307 - Understanding Video Games

This course introduces students to the foundation, process, and impact of the video game industry. Students evolve from merely riding the gaming highway to analyzing and deconstructing it. The course pays particular attention to the history and breakthroughs in the technology, social and political impacts such as the ESRB, sex and violence in games, as well as past, present and future trends of the gaming market.

COM308 - Conflict Resolution & Negotiations

This course helps students to understand the theoretical assumptions, elements, and processes of interpersonal conflict and negotiation, to increase their ability to objectively analyze conflict situations, and to creatively and productively manage conflict. Alternative Dispute Resolution approaches to litigation for resolving conflicts such as mediation, arbitration, and negotiation are examined. Prerequisites: COM 101, LS 101 or BUSS 101; Junior or Senior standing.

COM309 - Sports Communication

This course explores the unique writing and research style of sportswriters, while emphasizing the fundamentals of good journalism. Students learn how to write advance, follow-up, feature, and human-interest stories and columns. This course stresses the practical necessity of the fundamentals of reporting, research, interviewing, and ethics, and then demonstrates, through examples and experiences, how to turn information into accurate, readable stories. This course offers students the tools needed to be able to write sports stories worthy of publication, with one potential vehicle being The 1851 Chronicle student newspaper. Students learn about writing for newspapers, broadcast media, and magazines.

COM310 - Political Communication

This course focuses on the complex ideas associated with the role of the press in a democracy. The nature and climate of our political processes, particularly elections, have changed dramatically in the past two generations, due in part to the extensive use and influence of the media. Also, media techniques and strategies used by government and political figures continue to change with the emergence of new technologies and the dominance of global media companies. Students learn how to think critically and analytically about the political press and how journalists and politicians frame public policy issues. This course looks critically at whether or not the American press is truly representative of the civic values of democracy, truth, and responsible citizenship. Prerequisites: COM 101 or POLS 101 or SOC 101.

COM312 - Radio Production II

This course brings students with basic radio production skills to a higher level of proficiency. There is strong emphasis on radio as a digital medium and digital (nonlinear) audio editing with Adobe Audition. Projects include editing music for radio play, writing and mixing radio commercials, creating a radio interview podcast, and the development of an Air Check radio demo for student portfolios. Students also develop a deeper understanding of the radio business. Prerequisite: COM 215.

COM313 - Video Production II

This course takes students with basic video production skills to a higher level of expertise. There is strong emphasis on pre-production planning, teamwork, lighting, sound and special effects. The aesthetics of video production are also discussed by analyzing various film and video productions. Projects include a special effects reel, television commercial, short documentary, and a short screenplay adaptation. Throughout the semester, students develop a deeper understanding of the business of video production. Prerequisite: COM 217.

COM314 - Magazine & Feature Writing

This course is focused on the longer pieces of magazine writing, such as feature articles and interview profiles, and other forms of narrative, nonfiction journalistic writing. The course includes reading, analyzing, and modeling well-written newspaper and magazine articles that entertain as well as inform readers. Students have the opportunity to provide editorial support for and submit feature articles for publication to Polished, a Lasell College produced magazine. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 209.

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM316 - Publication Editing

This course is designed as a workshop in which students learn the fundamentals of editing for print and online publications. Students study and participate in various editing roles, including editorial director, articles editor, copy editor, proofreader and fact-checker. Students examine case studies of existing publications. In keeping with Lasell's Connected Learning approach, students propose work for Lasell's two student publications, The 1851 Chronicle and Polished, or other publications. The course focuses on learning to prepare cohesive editorial products with clear, compelling, professional content while avoiding common mistakes in usage, grammar, and style. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 105.

COM317 - Media Relations

Managing media relations for public relations professionals is the focus of this course. The course is intended to increase students’ knowledge of the principles and methods of generating publicity and to introduce the basics of planning and writing media relations campaigns. The rapidly changing nature of global companies and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways that communication professionals achieve their goals. Media relations can be a highly competitive and challenging field, where you must prove your productivity, accuracy, and creativity. Students discuss and experiment with successful strategies for gaining coverage in the press for clients, and they plan a comprehensive media relations program. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 208.

COM318 - Internet & the World Wide Web

This course teaches students how to design and publish an original web site using the latest version of HTML. Students learn to code text and tables, as well as incorporate graphics and links based on World Wide Web Consortium guidelines. Throughout the course, students explore the Internet's major historical events, current trends, and other web-related issues such as communication protocol, security/privacy, and e-commerce.

COM319 - Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns

This course provides an environment for students to become engaged in a professional style media planning and buying campaign, which is an essential strategic focus of the advertising industry. Students develop a full advertising plan based on the current planning structure of a contemporary advertising agency. Working in teams, students conduct a detailed advertising analysis that allows them to provide strategic and creative solutions to problems they have identified in their research. Student teams construct an advertising plan that positions and promotes a product, a message, a politician, or a brand to a con­sumer audience. Each student team produces a comprehensive media campaign that identifies and targets the appropriate media outlets for advertising placements. The class has a modicum of pressure and intensity that reflects some of the challenges necessary to succeed in the advertising industry. Prerequisite: COM 221.

COM320 - Organizational Communication

This course focuses on both the theoretical understanding and practical knowledge of the context and application of organizational communication. Topics include: leadership, new technologies and their impact on organizations, organizational climate and culture, ethics, formal and informal channels of communication within organizations, management of diversity and conflict, relational communication (with interpersonal and group work), and issues of power and politics within the context of the organizational settings. Prerequisite: COM 103

COM321 - Media & Children

This course examines the uses and effects of mass communication among children and adolescents. By taking a developmental perspective, the course explores how youth at different stages of cognitive development watch, understand, and respond to media content. The first part of the course focuses on children’s uses and processing of media. The second part of the course reviews the effects of various types of content (e.g., advertising, stereotypes, violence). The final part of the course considers the role of interventions (e.g., media literacy, ratings, parental mediation) in preventing media-related outcomes that are harmful and promoting those that are positive. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to critically evaluate the role of media in the lives of children. Prerequisites: COM 101 or PSYC 101.

COM322 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

COM323 - Corporate Communications

This course is designed to present students with an overview of corporate communication in contemporary society. The rapidly changing nature of global markets and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways in which communication professionals achieve their goals. The course explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental issues, investor relations, issues of multinationals, ethics, and governmental relations. Prerequisite: COM 213.

COM324 - Journalism II

This course, which is writing intensive, requires students to advance their writing and reporting (research) skills by covering a campus or community beat. This connected learning approach to journalism challenges students to do the work of the field as they report on student organizations, academic departments, or athletic teams, or local politics, sports, fashion, or culture. Assignments encourage students to take learning beyond the walls of the classroom while practicing journalism in the field. While encouraging students to deepen the basic skills of storytelling for print, the class also emphasizes new media platforms such as photo galleries, and video and audio news content. Students have the opportunity to contribute to the college newspaper and its website. Prerequisites: COM 105 and COM 209.

COM325 - Global Media

This course introduces students to the global media landscape. Students are exposed to a number of topics including: the power of language in media, recent global media controversies, the economics of global media & ownership, the politics of global media, and the coverage of international events in U.S. media. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 212

COM326 - Effective Speaking II

This advanced public speaking course builds on the foundation of Effective Speaking I to further a student’s development as a public speaker in a variety of settings. This is achieved through a combination of speaking, writing, and reading assignments. Specifically, students outline, develop, and deliver extemporaneous speeches incorporating relevant sources. Students learn how to develop and deliver messages that are appropriate and effective for the audience, purpose, and context using logical arguments within an ethical framework. Prerequisite: COM 203

COM399 - Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. Topics include the application of communication course work to a professional career and the development of skills necessary to locate an internship. The final goal of this course is to secure an internship. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. Students also keep a journal reflecting on their experiences and complete mid-and end-of-semester self-evaluations. The internship itself for 150 plus hours per week, the weekly seminar, and its assignments constitute the principle of the course.

COM402 - Field Experience II

This course builds on the skills and knowledge developed in COM 400, Internship Field Experience I. In today’s competitive job market, many employers are requiring that students complete more than one internship for credit and many students desire an exploration of more than one company, industry or job title. In this second-tier internship class, students can take advantage of a peer-learning group, as well as guided instruction on building a portfolio and perfecting interview skills and self-marketing skills. This course is offered spring semester only. Students must complete their internship in this course at a different organization than their first internship. Prerequisites: COM 399, COM 400, and senior standing.

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

COM422 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 103 or placement in any math course above MATH 103.

ECON102 - Principles of Econ-Macro

This course explores basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole and policies designed to affect its performance. Topics include economic scarcity; causes of unemployment and inflation; money and monetary policy; the impact of government taxation and spending; and the federal debt. Some consideration is given to international economic problems and to contrasting economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development. Prerequisite: A grade of C or above in Math 103 or placement in any math course above Math 103.

ECON206X - Global Economic Development

The goal of this course is to introduce the main issues of global economic development. Students will explore the problems facing developing countries of the world as they attempt to industrialize, develop their economies and raise the standards of living of their people. The course will address the following broad questions: What is the meaning of Economic development? Why some countries are rich while others are poor? What would explain the success of such East Asian countries as China? What are the key constrains that prevent poor countries, especially those in the African continent, from achieving progress? What are the strategies that poor countries can adopt to foster development? This course fulfills the Multicultural Area of Inquiry.

ECON301 - International Trade & Finance

This course examines theory, tariffs, and import quotas; adjustment mechanisms, foreign exchange, and exchange controls are also covered. Additional topics include the theory of comparative advantage, the causes and consequences of imbalances in the balance of payments or exchange rates, and the evolution of the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC104X - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive.This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well being.This course will satisfy the Psychological and Societal Area of Inquiry and can be used as a substitute for PSYC101 (Introduction to Psychology) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class. In addition, since the content is different from PSYC101, students who have taken PSYC101 but are interested in an additional Psychology elective, one that focuses on growth and well-being, are encouraged to take this class.

PSYC111 - Aging in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC201 - Psychology of Drugs & Behavior

The course examines the relationship between drugs and behavior, including evidence about the effects of drugs on the brain. Several classes of drugs, including chemically or psychologically addictive substances, psychoactive and therapeutic agents, as well as recreational drugs, are examined. Drug use is related to psychological variables such as personality structure and interpersonal relationships, and theories of addictive processes and factors influencing drug use are examined, as are treatment strategies. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC203X - Persuading People, Preserving Planet

This Connected Learning Experience is designed to continue students’ development along the Core Curriculum by demonstrating in an inquiry-based way the nature of integrative learning. As such, this team-taught, multidisciplinary course will develop the ability to foster behavior change within the places they live and work as they study how to create a more sustainable planet. Students will explore the environmental challenges created by our use of energy, consumption of water, use of transportation, production of waste, and practices in agriculture. These challenges include climate change, air pollution, water quality, and biodiversity loss. Students will also investigate the behaviors that drive these environmental challenges. Students will select behaviors to study on campus and use the tools of science to collect informing data. They will then study strategies to change behavior from the field of psychology. Applying these strategies, students will develop programs to foster sustainable behaviors on campus. Although this course is a pilot for the proposed Core Curriculum, it will satisfy the following Areas of Inquiry in our current general education curriculum: Psychological/Societal and Scientific. (Co-requisite is that students must register for a lab section on M, W, or F 10-10:50am)

PSYC205 - Human Sexuality

This course is designed to introduce factual information about gender identity and gender role theories, sexual preference and sexual orientation, and psychosexual development. The course examines issues related to research on human sexuality and behavior, as well as sexual education, sexual disorders, and societal impacts on sexuality. Students are challenged to think critically about many issues surrounding human sexuality and all of its manifestations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC206 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC209X - Psyc of the Black American Experience

This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Blacks in the United States, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. Connections between Africa, the Caribbean, and Black America will be examined with respect to culture, belief systems, and values. At the same time, we will also explore the many differences in history, culture, and experience within numerous groups and individuals of African-descent in the U. S. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC213 - Ethics Across Generations

A growing interest in ethics across different generations has emerged with dramatic changes in the age demographics of our society. This course examines a range of ethical dilemmas both unique to and common across different generations. Intervening factors such as generational identity, personal attitudes, and social forces are explored to understanding how individuals approach and behave in these situations.

PSYC218 - Dynamics of Small Groups

This class examines the basic theory and application necessary to understand and facilitate small groups. Topics may include group types, formation, roles and stages; group process; cultural awareness; group interventions and ethics within the field of psychology and human service; therapeutic value of groups; and the family, classroom, and peers as small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC222 - Social Psychology in Film

This course uses film to examine social psychological concepts and research and provides an opportunity for students to explore how people influence and are influenced by their social relationships, communities, and larger society. Films illustrate a range of social encounters that are examined from a social psychological perspective. Topics include conflict, love, personal and group behavior, prejudice, roles, privilege, and oppression. NOTE: This course meets the social psychology requirement for Social Sciences majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course examines the adolescent period of life as one of multiple simultaneous changes in the mind and body that set the stage for adult life. Particular attention is paid to gender differentiated experiences in adolescence; how males and females differ in their experience of the changes that occur during adolescence. The role of culture in determining the adolescent experience is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 112 or BIO 205.

PSYC306 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC307 - Forensic Psychology

This course deals with the application of psychological knowledge to the judicial process and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include effects of defendant, juror and case characteristics on verdicts, variables affecting eyewitness accuracy, identification and testimony, and the role of forensic psychologists in competency and criminal responsibility assessments as well as criminal profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or PSYC 101.

PSYC314 - Adult Development & Aging

This course examines the psychological development that occurs during the adult years. It begins with the transition years of the young adult and concludes with bereavement and death. Topics include formation of various forms of adult identities, the establishment of both family and casual social relationships, and the strategies used to deal with the physical, social, and cognitive transformations during the adult years, including aging processes. The course also examines theoretical accounts of aging and adaptation to extended life spans, characteristic of contemporary industrial societies. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223.

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

PSYC318 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. Both traditional and contemporary theories of psychopathology are reviewed. Emphasis is also placed on the tools, techniques, and process of both the diagnosis and the treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 202 or PSYC 220.

PSYC319 - Behavior Change

This course reviews the principles of human behavior based upon behavior therapy, social learning theory, and operant conditioning techniques. The course includes the study of positive control, aversive control, modeling behavior, token economy systems, and extinction procedures used to produce change in human behavior. Attention is paid to the ethical implications of controlling human behavior in educational, mental health, and medical settings. The material is relevant to those who are or will be working in organizations that serve people with developmental disabilities, children, adolescents and the elderly. Prerequisite: any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC322 - Abnormal Child Development

This course examines common psychological disorders that affect children and adolescents. Students review factors that contribute to emotional, behavioral, cognitive and social problems in children and adolescents, as well as specific diagnostic criteria of psychological disorders. In addition, treatment of childhood disorders is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 221.

PSYC323 - Brain Function & Dysfunction

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: BIO 101, BIO 112, or BIO 205.

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC331 - Experimental Design in Psychology

This laboratory course covers concepts of the scientific method in psychology including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. As part of the lab, students carry out an experiment and learn to use SPSS to create a database and perform statistical analyses. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC333 - Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and Permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

PSYC340X - Community Psychology

Community psychologists work with individuals and communities to effect broad changes to support well-being. In this class, we will explore the relationships between individuals, their communities, and society, applying knowledge from all of the social science disciplines. Health promotion, prevention of social problems, and social action are key methods in community psychology. We will work to create social justice, liberation, and well-being in our classroom and beyond. Through exercises addressing current issues in community life (e.g., immigration, poverty, ableism, mental health systems, racism, HIV/AIDS, climate change…) and through work with a Boston community agency, we will learn how to create interventions that help communities grow and support their members. This course will have a participatory action research component, and is open to students with some research experience such as a research class or an individual research project. Pre-requisites: PSYC331 or SOC331 or COM315 or permission of the instructor

PSYC345 - Assessment of Individual Differences

This course studies a wide variety of tests and measurements used to assess intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality in clinical and counseling psychology, in education, and in business. Consideration of the history and theory of these tests is complemented by discussion of practical concerns related to their selection, their administration, and their interpretation in specific settings. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and PSYC 101.

PSYC406 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

SMGT101 - Sport & Society

This course explores the factors that shape sport in a culture and how sport mirrors the society in which it exists. It examines the contributions of recreational and competitive sport to a culture. It includes the role of business in sport and how business interests in sport have served as a catalyst for growth.

SMGT102 - Contemporary Sport Management

This course provides an overview of general principles and practices of the sport industry, covering all facets of sport management, including leadership, sociology, marketing, legal aspects, finance, and governance, in both professional and amateur sports setting. Students learn and understand those unique aspects of sport management that distinguish it from other management fields. Students gain an increased awareness of various career opportunities in the sport industry.

SMGT201 - Legal Aspects of Sports

This course is an exploration of the relationship of the law to organized secondary school, collegiate, and professional sports. It provides an overview of a wide range of legal principles that relate to the sport management field. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SMGT 102 or LS 101.

SMGT202 - Ethics in Sport

This course examines theories of ethics as well as personal moral development as applied to sports. It explores the importance of personal ethics and organizational responsibility and the role of professional ethics in sport management.

SMGT205 - Pre-Practicum I

This course is designed for students to complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and approval of Department Chair.

SMGT206 - Sports Administration

This course studies the basic concepts, theories and organizations of administration as applied to sport. Areas covered include budgeting, human resources management, facilities, and legal issues.

SMGT207 - Special Topics in History of Sport

This course explores various aspects of sports and their historical development. The integration of gender, ethnic, religious, and other factors are discussed. The role that each area of sport plays within our society is examined.

SMGT208 - Sport Governance

This course focuses on the important role that governance plays within the sport industry. Students study the governance structures of various sports and sports governing bodies, including professional sports leagues, players’ associations, intercollegiate athletics, and Olympic sports, both within the United States and internationally.

SMGT209X - NCAA Compliance & Rules Admin

NCAA Compliance and Rules Administration is designed for students to gain an understanding of the enforcement policies, practices, and procedures, as well and the complexity of the rules and regulations governing NCAA and intercollegiate athletics. Student will review compliance cases, NCAA enforcement guidelines, and historical and contemporary compliance and rules administration cases.

SMGT210X - Navigating Sport Mgmt

This course is designed to provide an experiential learning experience in the field of Sport Management specifically related to the development and maintenance of a Fan Club for the North Shore Navigators (www.nsnavs.com) of the New England Collegiate Baseball League (NECBL www.necbl.com) The NECBL sponsored in part by the Major League Baseball, hosts the top collegiate professional prospects from universities around the country each summer from June through August 15th. The league has 12 franchises in all six New England States. The Navigators are based in Lynn, MA. Prerequisite: ENG 102

SMGT301 - Sport Facility & Event Management

This course explores the roles and functions of facility and events managers. It examines a variety of public assembly and privately managed sport facilities; the steps and skills required to effectively plan, organize, lead, and evaluate an event, and facilities to meet the needs of sports organizations. The course also examines resource allocation, strategic planning, and risk management and facility maintenance requirements. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and a 200 level Sport Management course.

SMGT302 - Sport Marketing

This course explores sport as a product, its consumer markets, and sports products markets. It examines the processes of sport marketing, research, information management, identification of target markets, and the development of a sport marketing mix and strategies. Prerequisites: SMGT 102, BUSS 220.

SMGT303 - Sport Finance

This course is a study of the financial challenges faced by sport administrators and those working within the sports industry. Topics include economic impact analysis, ticket operations, concessions, public-private partnerships, sport sponsorships, and fundraising. Prerequisites: SMGT 102, BUSS 203.

SMGT304 - Sports Information & Communication

This course examines the fundamentals in sport information, publicity, and promotions. Preparation of news releases, local features, publications of programs and brochures, statistical breakdowns, dealing with the press, and the promotion of specific events, teams, and individuals are included. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

SMGT305 - Pre-Practicum II

This course is designed for the students to complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisite: SMGT 205.

SMGT306 - Sport Leadership

This course teaches concepts, principles, and skills of leadership for managers in the sports industry. Styles of successful sport coaches and managers are examined and analyzed in the context of their times and their settings.

SMGT307 - Sport Sponsorship

This course provides an examination of the relationship between sport and corporate sponsorship, and strategies for selling sponsorship packages. Topics covered include the theoretical rationale for sponsorship, strategic communication through sponsorship, determining the value of a sponsorship, evaluation of sponsorship activities, and techniques used to sell sponsorship packages. Perspectives from the event holder (i.e., property) offering a sponsorship and from the organization functioning as the sponsor are considered.

SMGT311X - Research in Sport Industry

Using Research in the Sport Industry is designed for students to gain an understanding of the principles, procedures, processes, and types of writing and reports used to answer problems in the Sport Industry. Students will learn to identify, describe, analyze, and report on an issue or problem at their own workplace by drawing on the relevant sport and related literature.

SMGT401 - Special Topics in Sport Management

This course explores special segments and contemporary trends in the sport management industry. Topics may include sports medicine, health promotion, intercollegiate athletics, campus recreation, sport tourism, and international sport.

SMGT404 - Seminar in Sport Management

This course prepares the student for placement within an agency to complete their internship. Emphasis is placed on resume development, interview techniques, career development, net­working, issues in the workplace, and post-graduate opportunities related to sport management. This course must be completed in the semester prior to going on an internship. Prerequisite: SMGT 305.

SMGT407 - Sport Management Internship I

The internship provides students with administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisites: SMGT 205 and SMGT 305 . 

SMGT408 - Sport Management Internship II

The internship provides students with additional administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisite: SMGT 407. 

SMGT496 - Sport Management Capstone

This course is a culminating experience designed to provide the student with an opportunity to demonstrate synthesis of knowledge, practice, and skills developed throughout the program of study. Capstone assignments reflect the integration of research methodology, theory, and advanced knowledge in an area of specialization. Students develop a web-portfolio to showcase their work in the Sport Management program. Students incorporate aspects of past course assignments into a reflective thesis paper. Students also participate in a required service learning activity. To be completed in either the fall or spring semester of the final academic year of the student's program. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SMGT 410.