2016 - 2017 Academic Catalog

Marketing

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions Department Faculty

As both an art and a science, marketing is undergoing dramatic and exciting changes and the field promises to be just as dynamic in the years ahead. The Marketing curriculum introduces students to all the major marketing trends, including marketing research techniques and demographic studies, as well as business law and ethics, International marketing, nonprofit marketing, product marketing and service marketing. Marketing majors learn a broad range of transferable skills, and gain strong competence in critical thinking and hands on business experience. There is a wide variety of Connected Learning opportunities both on and off-campus for Marketing students. Additionally, all students in the Marketing major participate in Service Learning through Buss 220, Marketing, which is a required course. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing.

By planning early in consultation with an academic advisor, students may be able to reduce the time it takes to complete a bachelor’s degree in Marketing to 3 or 3½ years.

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Marketing.

Goal 1: Application of Principles of Marketing
Upon completion of the major program of study in Marketing, students will be able to

  1. demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of the marketing mix
  2. demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of information technology
  3. demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of global marketing
  4. demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of marketing research
  5. demonstrate a comprehensive level of knowledge in the area of marketing strategy

Goal 2: Application of Business Information
Upon completion of the major program of study in Marketing, students will be able to

  1. apply quantitative research methods to various challenges faced by marketing problems
  2. apply qualitative research methods to various challenges faced by marketing problems
  3. integrate business information into effective decision making

Goal 3: Ethical Decision-making
Upon completion of the major program of study in Marketing, students will be able to

  1. identify ethical issues implicit in marketing
  2. evaluate and decide among alternative solutions to ethical marketing problems

Goal 4: Professional skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Marketing, students will be able to

  1. communicate effectively in writing for the discipline
  2. communicate effectively orally within the discipline
  3. work effectively in teams
Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
BUSS101 Contemporary Issues in Business 3
BUSS201 Financial Accounting 4
BUSS202 Managerial Accounting 4
BUSS203 Financial Management 3
BUSS205 Legal Environment of Business 3
BUSS212 Management Information Systems 3
BUSS220 Marketing 3
BUSS224 Organizational Behavior 3
BUSS232 Operations Strategy 3
BUSS420 Marketing Research 3
BUSS422 Global Marketing 3
BUSS432 Marketing Strategy 3
BUSS440 Business Policy 3
BUSS498 Internship Seminar Acct/Fin 1
BUSS499 Internship Accounting/Finance 3
ECON101 Principles of Econ-Micro 3
ECON102 Principles of Econ-Macro 3
MATH205 Calculus I 4
MATH208 Statistics 3
Choose 3 from the following:
BUSS237 Contemporary Global Leadership 3
BUSS313 Business Negotiations 3
BUSS315 Emerging Global Markets 3
BUSS320 Consumer Behavior 3
BUSS322 Marketing Communications 3
BUSS324 E-Business 3
BUSS325 Sales Principles 3
BUSS329 New Product Development 3
BUSS341 Social Media Marketing 3
FASH211 Fashion Retail Management 3
Choose 1 from the following:
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives (KP) 3
SOC101 Sociological Imagination (KP) 3

Major Requirements: 70 credits

Core Curriculum Requirements: 24-30 credits 

Unrestricted Electives: 20-26 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120

Courses listed below fulfill Knowledge Perspective requirements:
Individuals & Society
PSYC 101 Psychological Perspectives -OR-
SOC 101 Sociological Imagination

MATH 205 fulfills the Quantitative Literacy requirement of the Core Curriculum for Marketing

Courses may require prior coursework depending upon Math placement:
MATH 205 Calculus I
MATH 208 Statistics

BUSS101 - Contemporary Issues in Business

This course is designed to familiarize students with various aspects of the business world. Areas covered include: private enterprise, forms of ownership, legal aspects, management, marketing, human resources, operations management, labor relations, and finance. In addition, students become aware of how business functions are integrated into an organization to achieve specific goals.

BUSS201 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with an applied knowledge of the fundamental accounting process and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements, as well as how to become intelligent users of financial information.

BUSS202 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a grade C or better.

BUSS203 - Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of finance. Various techniques of analysis that reveal the relationships of risk, return, and value are demonstrated. Topics include: financial reporting; long- and short-term forecasting; managing working capital; capital budgeting; and the nature of corporate securities and debt-equity mix. Prerequisites: BUSS 101 OR HEM 101 OR FASH 101 OR SMGT 102; BUSS 202 with a grade C or better & ECON 102.

BUSS205 - Legal Environment of Business

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to business and personal needs. The focus is primarily on contract law and property law.

BUSS207 - Fundamentals of Financial Planning

This course provides the foundation for understanding and using financial planning techniques. This framework is the basis for all financial decisions large and small. Topics covered are personal financial planning, consumer credit, budgeting, investments, and banking procedures. Risk analysis regarding portfolio management and tax liabilities is also examined.

BUSS208 - Financial Statement Analysis

This course examines financial statements and other financial reports with a view towards using accounting information in making investing, lending and other potential management decisions. Students explore methods of constructing, comparing and analyzing these statements and reports and the various uses of such analyses. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS209 - Computer Applications in Business

This hands-on course is designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge and understanding of computer applications in business. Strong emphasis of the course is on building competencies in industry-standard spreadsheet and database software applications.

BUSS210 - Federal Income Taxes

This course provides students with a basic understanding of fundamentals of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, businesses, and not-for-profit taxable entities. It explores the broad range of tax topics, emphasizing the role of taxation in business decision-making process, tax research, and tax planning. Prerequisite: BUSS 201

BUSS212 - Management Information Systems

This course takes a managerial approach to information technology concepts and applications. Given the pervasiveness of computer technology in today's world, professionals in various fields of endeavor often have a major responsibility for determining an organization's information needs and for designing and implementing information systems that support those needs. Students study concepts and issues related to information technology with the goal of understanding how it can be effectively used to improve an organization's over­all effectiveness and increase its level of success. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, HEM 102, SMGT 102, or FASH 101.

BUSS220 - Marketing

In this course, fundamentals of the nature of marketing are presented and evaluated for specific functions and institutions. Policies and practices as applied generally to marketing research involve product development, selection, channels of distribution buying and physical distribution selling. Pricing under competitive conditions, social benefits of competition and government regulations are included. Prerequisites: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102; ECON 101; HEM102.

BUSS224 - Organizational Behavior

In this course, students study individuals within the context of the organization using a behavioral approach. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior. Areas covered include: structure, leadership, and change. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

BUSS231 - Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation

Entrepreneurship drives global innovation and economic growth. This course exposes business students to the study of entrepreneurship and the venture creation process. Topics include analyzing new business opportunities, developing business propositions, new venture planning and financing, marketing activities, financial controls, and other topics relevant to the entrepreneurial process. Students interact with faculty, local entrepreneurs, and small business owners/managers. As a culmination activity of this course, students are responsible for the development and presentation of a business plan. Prerequisite: BUSS 101.

BUSS232 - Operations Strategy

Operations strategy examines how operations can be used as sources of competitive advantage. This class will focus on understanding the need of formulating an operational strategy (long-term plan) and making strategic operational decisions. The old view of operations management as the task of maintaining a comparatively static production or service facility has given way to one characterized by a need for renewed flexibility, relentless improvement, and the development of new capabilities at the operating unit level. As a result of this changing environment, the skills required of operations managers have changed as well. The course is based primarily on case studies supported by conceptual frameworks.

BUSS233 - American Enterprise Experience

This course studies the American enterprise experience from colonial times until the present. The course touches upon the business component of the American experience beginning with the individual artisan-merchant through the great innovators and organizers of the 19th and 20th centuries and beyond. The historical events, cultural changes, social upheavals, and political shifts that have influenced the development of the American business environment are the core of the study. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT102

BUSS235 - Ethics in Business

This course introduces students to ethical analysis in its application to management. A presupposition of the course is that ethical considerations are an integral part of effective management practices. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101 FASH 101, or SMGT 102

BUSS237 - Contemporary Global Leadership

In this course, students analyze what it means to be a global leader in the 21st century and identify the skills necessary to be successful in an increasingly global business climate. Students explore this question personally, collectively, and globally in a creative and collaborative atmosphere. Students examine classic as well as contemporary theories of leadership and how they apply to the dynamic global business culture. The course provides students with the opportunity to acquire perspectives and skills essential to successful management in the emerging markets that are increasingly becoming key contenders in world commercial enterprise. Prerequisite BUSS 224.

BUSS301 - Intermediate Accounting I

This course builds on concepts developed in Financial Accounting. Concentration is on the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to the preparation of financial statements with an in-depth review of cash, receivables, inventories, and plant assets. The course also covers the concept of the time value of money and the application of present value techniques to accounting valuations. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS302 - Intermediate Accounting II

This course is designed to continue the concepts of financial accounting and present a more thorough analysis of the requirements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Included in this course are earnings per share calculations, lease accounting, and pension accounting. The cash flow statement is also studied. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a grade C or better.

BUSS304 - Working Capital Management

This course explores working capital management, credit management, working capital funding, and the major sources of financing debt and equity. Students undertake financial analyses of theoretical models and real-world firms and organizations, recommend financing strategies, and present their findings by using management reporting methods. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS305 - International Accounting

This course addresses significant accounting matters experienced by multinational companies. Accounting matters include currency transactions and translational transfer price, and management planning and control. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a C or better.

BUSS306 - Accounting Information Systems

This course provides an understanding and appreciation of accounting information systems. The course teaches conceptual, analytical, and technical skills necessary to work efficiently and productively as an accountant in a computerized business information environment. The functions of Accounting Information Systems are explored from the perspective of financial accounting, managerial accounting, auditing, and tax. The course involves several hands-on exercises in Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel to develop database and spreadsheet skills. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a "C" or better.

BUSS307 - International Finance

This course studies the ways and means to reduce financial risk involved in international financial management. The course deals with the interrelationship between the international monetary environment and financial planning for corporations with overseas operations. It analyzes the effects on international financial planning of such factors as exchange rate fluctuations, currency restrictions, and tax regulations. It intensively examines financial aspects of multinational business including foreign investment, trade, and transfer of funds. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS308 - Government & Not-for-Profit Accounting

This course introduces financial accounting and reporting issues related to state and local government and non-profit organizations, including universities and health care facilities. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a grade C or better.

BUSS309 - Fraud Examination

This course covers techniques for identification and detection of asset misappropriation schemes and fraudulent financial statements, who commits fraud and why, and controls to prevent and detect problems. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a "C" or better.

BUSS311 - Investments

This course explores fundamentals of investing. The strategies used to create money from financial capital are thoroughly examined. Financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, futures, options, and commodities are explored. The measurement tools used to assign risk and rate of return, performance, and value are covered. Students learn how to develop, analyze, and maintain a portfolio. Regulatory and ethical issues are examined and considered in the decision-making process. Prerequisite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS312 - Risk Management

The basics of risk management are covered in this course. Problems of liability and personal loss exposures of a business are examined. Private insurance programs such as health and life insurance, and employee benefit plans are examined and assessed. Prerequisite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS313 - Business Negotiations

This course examines various negotiating tactics and techniques as they relate to different situations and environments. Particular attention is paid to buyer-seller communications, including negotiations of contracts and agreements. Students study the strengths and weaknesses of strategies used by both buyers and sellers. Prerequisites: BUSS 201, BUSS 220 and MATH 104.

BUSS315 - Emerging Global Markets

This course focuses on developing skills, strategies and insights crucial to conducting successful business operations in the emerging markets of Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa including the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for unprecedented economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and incomes, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. In this course, students study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors (such as the government and NGOs); analyze opportunities and risks presented by emerging markets; and analyze the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets. Prerequisite: BUSS101

BUSS319 - Cost Accounting

Study of a typical firm’s cost data and how that data can transformed into information for business analysis and decision making. Topics include how to identify fixed versus variable cost, cost volume profit analysis, flexible budgeting, Activity Based Costing and standard cost systems with detail variance analysis. Process and job order costing systems are examined in terms of how these systems are used to accumulate cost to determine accurate product or service costs and why this is necessary in setting product/service selling prices to maximize profits. Other topics include the numerous cost allocation processes that take place in the typical manufacturing and service industries, and transfer pricing within companies that are doing business internationally. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a "C" or better.

BUSS320 - Consumer Behavior

This course examines the behavior of individuals and markets in relation to the purchase decision, including post-purchase evaluation and con­sumption. A behavioral science approach is taken. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS321 - Property and Liability Insurance

This course explores the fundamentals of commercial property and liability insurance including contracts, rating, underwriting, regulation and financial analysis of insurers. Prerequisite:BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS322 - Marketing Communications

This course focuses on a broad view of advertising, dealing with its planning, creation, and execution in relation to the marketing cycle. Topics include: organization and operation of the advertising agency; publicity; public relations; behavioral sciences as applied to advertising; budgeting; and planning. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS323 - Retirement Planning & Employee Benefits

This course provides the students with an understanding of the retirement planning process. Students develop an ability to counsel others on retirement and employee benefit decisions. Topics covered are social security, qualified retirement plans, corporate profit sharing plans, health insurance, group life insurance, group disability insurance, and deferred compensation. Prerequsite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS324 - E-Business

This course provides students with a broad overview of the concepts and principles of e-business. This knowledge is increasingly important for all students, regardless of their area of concentration, because traditional businesses and arts organizations are becoming hybrids by adding an online presence to their existing structure. Topics discussed include a definition of e-business, online management strategies, distribution channels, privacy and security issues, and cyberlaw, among others. Students develop an e-business plan and webpage. Prerequisite: BUSS101

BUSS325 - Sales Principles

This course analyzes salesmanship in modern business with emphasis placed on the principles and techniques of individual selling styles in both retail and wholesale markets. Topics covered include: dramatization of the sale presentation; the selling role; buyer characteristics and motivations; modern sales practices; corporate sales planning; sales-force policies; time and territory management; forecasting, budgeting; and expense control. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS327 - Life, Health, and Disability Insurance

This course studies financial implications of death, disability and retirement, as well as the types of life insurance and annuity contracts and their uses. Regulations of life and health insurers, insurer operations and functions, legal aspects, group and individual life and health insurance products including medical, disability income and long-term care policies are covered. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS328 - Entertainment Marketing

This course will provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of several major sectors within the entertainment industry. Students will compare and contrast successful entertainment marketing strategies with traditional product-based companies. Entertainment Marketing surveys the strategy, techniques and communication media employed to market the range of entertainment available to the American audience. The course examines the organizations and people who conceive, create and distribute video, film, print, interactive and new technology within the framework of the entertainment promotion landscape. The course demonstrates how advertising, publicity, promotion, research and overall marketing campaigns are created and the impact on the creative and business operations of entertainment companies.The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of the marketing issues faced by entertainment companies, highlighting the experiential nature of the products and the fast-pace of change within the industry. Prerequisite: COM216 or COM302

BUSS329 - New Product Development

New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. A major goal of this course is to help students learn to use an analytic decision-making approach in developing and marketing new products and services that meet customer needs in the consumer, industrial, and service settings. At the end of the course, the student should understand the role of decision models in analytic marketing decision-making; be able to follow the basic steps in opportunity identification, design, testing, and implementation; and know how to read and interpret new product and service market research. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS330 - Managing Change

This course examines the unique problems associated with managing organizations during mergers, reorganizations, and other times of change. Strategies to cope with change, as well as induce it, are examined. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS331 - Money and Capital Markets

This course offers an extensive examination of both money and capital markets. Students get “hands-on” experience evaluating long and short-term instruments. To connect theory to practice, students conduct technical and financial analyses. The basic characteristics of these markets and their contribution to the portfolio are explored. The case method is used to provide students with “real world” decision-making situations. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS332 - Cross Cultural Management

This course explores the process of cross-cultural management and the challenges of working internationally. The course focuses on international organizational behavior and human resource issues and practices in global organizations. The course is divided into three parts. The first focuses on understanding the cultural roots of behavior in organizations, the second on the Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management issues that are relevant to international managers, and the third seeks to prepare students for international assignments. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS333 - Estate Planning and Trust

This course provides the students with an understanding of the retirement planning process. Students develop an ability to counsel others on retirement and employee benefit decisions. Topics covered are social security, qualified retirement plans, corporate profit sharing plans, health insurance, group life insurance, group disability insurance, and deferred compensation. Prerequsite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS334 - Nonprofit Management

Managing in the nonprofit sector is different than in the for-profit sector. In this course students explore businesses that do not intend to maximize profit and retain it for future expenditures. Managers must operate under more regulated conditions and must be well prepared to interact within the public sector. Not-for-profit managers must be well versed in public policy and other regulations that affect them. Students engage in projects with non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102.

BUSS336 - Human Resource Management

This course examines the staffing function of management including planning, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, appraisal, compensation, labor laws, and organizational development. The course also addresses current issues affecting the human resource manager, including the changing work force and need to increase productivity, as well as changes in the area of unions and affirmative action. Both class discussions and case studies are used to prepare students for the personnel and related tasks involved in a management position. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS337 - Managing the Growing Company

This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities of managing a growing entrepreneurial venture. Using practical management techniques, students address the management of rapidly growing entrepreneurial firms. Through a variety of learning activities, including case studies, reading, and visiting entrepreneurs, students examine companies, often family-run, during dynamic transition. The course specifically addresses the challenges faced by companies in various stages of growth and the exceptional challenges of rapid growth. Prerequisites: BUSS 201 & BUSS 231.

BUSS339X - The World of Apps

This course is designed to introduce the business world of smart phone applications and provide an overview of recent and near-future developments in the realm of mobile technology. We will explore the best 30 to 50 apps in the world today, address new technologies and platforms, new trends and business models for mobile. We'll learn how to imagine, design, and build a prototype/wireframe of an app. No prerequisites. Basic understanding of technology. Must have a smart phone.

BUSS341 - Social Media Marketing

This course takes an in-depth look at social networks, social media platforms and online advertising to offer students an advantage in many positions involving marketing, consulting and brand management both on the buyer and seller side of social media. Students with an interest in entrepreneurship will also find the course useful as new businesses often rely on social media marketing. The course covers a number of topics including the differences and interaction between traditional and social media; two-sided markets and social media platforms (including verticals such as gaming, shopping and entertainment); basic theory of social networks online and offline (graph theory, sociology, information diffusion); consumer behavior and digital media; social Media Analytics and Monitoring; brand strategies on social media; best marketing practices for paid and unpaid social media; B2B marketing and social media. Prerequisite: BUSS220.

BUSS403 - Advanced Accounting

This course examines specialized topics in financial accounting. Problems associated with the partnership form of business organization, including partnership formation, division of income and losses, changes in ownership, and partnership liquidation are reviewed. Topics also include the subject of business combinations with emphasis on consolidated financial statements of parents and subsidiaries and elimination of intercompany transactions, accounting for foreign operations, and fund accounting as it relates to municipalities. Prerequisite: BUSS 302 with grade C or better; BUSS 319 with "C" or better; and Senior Standing

BUSS405 - Accounting Theory

This course develops an understanding of generally accepted accounting principles and of the underlying theory upon which they are based, essentially through study and analysis of publications of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and other professional bodies. This course further emphasizes current developments in accounting thought. Prerequisites: BUSS 302, BUSS 303, both with a C or better, and senior standing.

BUSS406 - Financial Strategy

This is a capstone course utilizing lecture, discussion, and case analysis to define the process of financial management. The course of study presents the concepts of the advanced capital budget centering on decision-making concerning capital structure, dividend policy, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, reorganization, and international finance and exchange rates. Prerequisite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better & senior standing.

BUSS408 - Auditing

This courses examines the impact of auditing on constituencies external and internal to organizations, especially stockholders and management. Students examine the role of both the independent public accountant and the internal auditor, and study various control and reporting techniques involved in auditing. Prerequisites: BUSS 302, BUSS 319, and Senior standing.

BUSS418 - Special Topics in Accounting

This course provides students with an opportunity to study topics of special interest, which may vary each time the course is offered. Prerequisites: Permission of Department Chair, and Senior standing.

BUSS420 - Marketing Research

This course examines the process and tools involved in collecting, coding, and analyzing data. The course further integrates the application of computer software in compiling and interpreting statistical data in relation to marketing decisions, such as those related to market segmentation and distribution. Prerequisites: BUSS 220, MATH 208.

BUSS422 - Global Marketing

The complexity of operating in the global marketplace makes many demands on the marketer. The globalization of marketing takes place after the company has international experience in multiple markets. The three fundamental areas of corporate globalization are covered in this course: (1) integrate sourcing, production, and marketing; (2) allocate resources to achieve a balanced portfolio and growth; and (3) coordinate marketing activities across countries and regions. Importing, exporting, and licensing considerations are explored. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

BUSS425 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

This seminar offers an in-depth exploration of advanced entrepreneurship topics of current interest and importance. Using case studies and actual entrepreneurial ventures, students explore entrepreneurship with a focus on leadership, marketing, development, management, and growth of new business ventures. Students learn the practical skills needed to succeed as an entrepreneur and how to apply best practices for planning, initiating, and growing new companies. The course also emphasizes the analysis and evaluation of actual entrepreneurial ventures. Subjects vary from semester to semester. Prerequisites: BUSS 337 and Senior standing.

BUSS432 - Marketing Strategy

This course is designed to facilitate the ability to formulate and implement marketing strategy. The course integrates topics covered in other marketing classes. As part of the learning experience, students engage in a simulation program with teams taking charge of a company within a competitive environment. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

BUSS440 - Business Policy

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. The case study method is used. This course culminates in a formal professional presentation to members of the advisory board. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Marketing/Management or Accounting/Finance Majors.

BUSS497 - Mgmt, Mrkt, & Hem Internship & Seminar

Mgmt, Mrkt, & Hem Internship & Seminar

BUSS498 - Internship Seminar Acct/Fin

A critical component of the internship experience is participating in a weekly seminar where students discuss and reflect on their experiences to gain a broader view of the workplace, contemporary issues and organizational trends, as well as their own developing abilities and career interests. This one credit course covers professional issues as they arise during the student's internship. Some of the topics covered include: supervision, boundary issues, self-care, stress management, and professionalism. Students are required to write a weekly reflective journal on their internship experience. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. Separate sections are offered for different business majors. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS 499.

BUSS499 - Internship Accounting/Finance

The internship is scheduled to take place during the senior year. Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours over a 12-week period, done concurrently with on-campus course work as shown in the curriculum for each program. Detailed reports, a journal, and other written requirements are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. Separate sections are offered for different business majors. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS 498.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ECON102 - Principles of Econ-Macro

This course explores basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole and policies designed to affect its performance. Topics include economic scarcity; causes of unemployment and inflation; money and monetary policy; the impact of government taxation and spending; and the federal debt. Some consideration is given to international economic problems and to contrasting economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development.

ECON206 - Global Economic Development

The goal of this course is to introduce the main issues of global economic development. Students will explore the problems facing developing countries of the world as they attempt to industrialize, develop their economies and raise the standards of living of their people. The course will address the following broad questions: What is the meaning of Economic development? Why some countries are rich while others are poor? What would explain the success of such East Asian countries as China? What are the key constrains that prevent poor countries, especially those in the African continent, from achieving progress? What are the strategies that poor countries can adopt to foster development?

ECON207 - Vietnam Immersion

This fall semester course is linked to two weeks of service-learning in Vietnam during the winter break. The course introduces students to the Vietnamese society today. It covers basic elements of Vietnamese politics, economic development, culture, history, language, literature, and arts. The experience in Vietnam includes working for non-profit organizations that deal with social problems. This course fulfills the Multicultural Area of Inquiry. Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Vietnam program director.

ECON301 - International Trade & Finance

This course examines theory, tariffs, and import quotas; adjustment mechanisms, foreign exchange, and exchange controls are also covered. Additional topics include the theory of comparative advantage, the causes and consequences of imbalances in the balance of payments or exchange rates, and the evolution of the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102.

FASH101 - Contemporary Issues in Fashion

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historic, economic, and contemporary influences, giving students a basic understanding of the terms and concepts associated with the fashion and retail industries. Topics include: technological applications, environmental influences on fashion; the fashion cycle; trend forecasting; fashion marketing; women's, men's, and children's apparel; supply chain management; foreign and domestic market centers; and retail merchandising.

FASH200 - Fash Hist I:Imperial Societies to Indust

This course surveys the history of prevailing dress from Ancient Egypt into the nineteenth century, expanding upon a general understanding of shifting modes to examine the symbolism of fashion from extensive perspectives. Students will develop a context for fashion and its relation to aesthetic expression and function within various societies over time. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students will examine a range of scholarly resources that pertain to the field, including The Lasell Fashion Collection. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102, or permission of instructor.

FASH201 - Merchandise Planning & Control

This course provides an understanding of business strategies related to assortment planning, buying, and allocating inventory. Building upon retail math fundamentals, students create stock and sales plans in accordance with the goals and objectives of a given seasonal sales strategy, including methods of figuring markups, sales projections, turnover, average stock, stock-to-sales ratios, open-to-buy, markdowns, and gross margin. Negotiation skills related to terms of sale, shipping and pricing strategies are explored within the wholesale/retail business relationship. Both manual and computer-based calculations are explored through the use of Excel and other industry-based software. Concepts related to retail analytics and predictive modeling as they relate to consumer buying patterns will also be discussed. Prerequisite: FASH 101 & MATH116

FASH204 - Fashion Research Abroad

This course brings fashion communication, design and merchandising fashion students together in an international setting to offer exposure to and research of the ever changing global fashion industry. Course structure focuses on the host country’s culture and fashion industry, setting the stage for an intensive study abroad experience. While abroad, students will experience a combination of lecture and field practice. In addition to Lasell faculty, professionals from the host country’s fashion industry leacture on a variety of topics. Hands-on workshops play an important role in exploring content. Cultural immersion includes a community service project that engages students in reflecting on the evolving social consciousness in the global fashion market place. Prerequisite: By application, Permission of instructor.

FASH206 - Sustainability in the Fashion Industry

This course explores issues surrounding the concept of sustainability in relation to the fashion industry. The history and contemporary status of sustainability in a global fashion context will be explored, including the influence of social, cultural, and economic factors. Guest speakers include specialists in sustainable fashion design & production, the greening of the supply chain, merchandising, and promoting the sustainable product.

FASH207 - Digital Tools for Fashion

Technical skills are becoming more and more a required proficiency in all capacities of the fashion industry. This course introduces Fashion & Retail Merchandising and Fashion Communication & Promotion students to software prominently used for apparel manufacturing, retail and media. With a focus on methods of visual communication, projects include technical drawing, colorization, editing, and integration and manipulation of photographic images.

FASH210 - Textiles

This course introduces the study of textiles through exploration of the production of fibers and methods of creating fabrics. Students learn to identify fiber content, properties and various types of weaving and knitting applications. Other topics include the study of fiber characteristics, quality and care of fabric finishes, and a practical assessment of fabrics in relationship to particular end uses.

FASH211 - Fashion Retail Management

This course explores the principles of retail management. Topics include; technological applications, marketing strategies, store image considerations, competitive analysis, legal constraints, consumer behavior, decision making and critical reasoning associated with retail store practices. Concepts are explored such as operating in an omnichannel environment and the use of retail analytics. Principles are examined and applied through class discussion and lecture, group projects and case studies. Prerequisite: FASH101

FASH212 - Visual Merchandising

This course builds a foundation to communicate design concepts and create visual solutions for promoting merchandise or ideas. Observation and critiques foster understanding of visual merchandising as a promotional tool. Hands on projects require research, synthesis of technical, aesthetic and conceptual knowledge to create effective solutions through use of color theories and design principles. Students become familiar with journalistic reporting and written analysis through various media applications.Prerequisite: FASH 101, ARTS 120.

FASH216 - Digital Marketing for Fashion

The fashion and retail industry has changed radically with shifts into new digital channels. Omni-channel selling and communication models continue to be an opportunity for business growth and expansion. The rise of social media and the expanding proliferation of digital devices, platforms, and applications make digital marketing a necessity for corporate survival. Through a combination of case studies and exploration of innovative technology students learn how the elements of digital strategy work together with traditional media to attract prospective customers. This course will explore inventive kinds of marketing strategies where the new selling floor is the virtual world. Prerequisite: FASH 101

FASH218 - Fashion Communication

This course examines communication strategies in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different facets of communication including maintaining consistency with integrated and content marketing, navigating the global landscape, messaging through digital and various media channels, and managing emerging trends in social marketing. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Prerequisites: ENG 102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASH225 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH301 - Fashion Promotion

This course integrates fashion industry promotional activities centered around the "promotion mix." Through the creative integration of topics such as advertising, public relations, marketing, social media, direct marketing, sales promotions, personal selling, visual merchandising and special events, students create and execute multidimensional promotional campaigns. The class explores the concept of integrated marketing communications linking various external and internal factors that stimulate consumption of a product or service. Students participate in group projects that replicate industry scenarios, both creatively and logistically. Exploration of contemporary methods to measure consumer behavior are also considered. Prerequisite: FASH 212 or FASH 218

FASH302 - Retail Operations

This course builds on the concepts learned in FASH 201 Merchandise Planning & Control and FASH 211 Retail Management extending into retail store planning, trading area and site analysis, financial management, omnichannel retailing and performance metrics. All phases of merchandising and sales management, including merchandise logistics, enabling technology, distribution channels, retail assortment planning and labor administration are incorporated into a comprehensive study of retail operations. Technological applications that are industry specific are utilized throughout this course. Prerequisite: FASH 211

FASH303 - Fash Hist II:Modernity to Globalization

This course picks up the history of fashion as it moves from the nineteenth century into a new era, examining the aesthetic and sociocultural forces that have influenced the development of styles from modernity to globalization. Students will use their skills in critical thinking to understand fashion as an art form, a commodity, and a symbol of cultural and personal expression. Students will also explore how contemporary designers draw from and reinterpret fashions from across the twentieth century. Prerequisites: ENG 102

FASH306 - Fashion Styling for Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation.

FASH307 - Fashion Branding

This course explores issues related to fashion branding and brand recognition by presenting an overview of brand management. Through case studies and analysis of contemporary media, students examine the notion that perceived value and ethos of a fashion brand can be increased through advertising, thematic control, and legal safeguards. The course also details how to build a fashion brand, maintain its brand equity, and re-tool a brand when its stature in the marketplace decreases due to consumer consumption and economic changes. Prerequisites: BUSS 220 or FASH 211.

FASH308 - Fashion Show Production

This course focuses on development of a working knowledge of planning, management, and organizational skills required to produce successful fashion shows. Hands on experiences throughout the semester address the importance of teamwork, communication, and professionalism demanded in the fashion industry. Students plan, organize, and produce the annual fashion show as final project. Prerequisite: FASH 211 or FASH218

FASH309 - Apparel Product Development

Exploring the global product development matrix, students in this course work together in teams to explore the product lifecycle in terms of sourcing and production. Class sessions combine lectures and cases with hands-on exercises to reinforce key concepts. This survey course covers topics including supply chain management, design calendars, apparel product price points, brand differentiation, product distribution channels, trend forecasting services, color management, specification and technical package development, sizing, quality control, ethics, and evaluation of the global production environment. Pre-requisite: FASD 220, FASH211, or FASH218

FASH315 - Trend Forecasting

This course introduces students to theories and framework used to explain and predict fashion change. Course includes field trips to trade shows, museum visits , and presentations by industry professionals to help students understand the relationship of economic, artistic, technological, social and cultural influences to fashion change.Students apply creative ,research, and analytical skills to plan and develop a trend forecast. Prerequisite: FASH 101.

FASH317 - Ethics in the Fashion Industry

This course integrates ethical, moral and legal issues regarding the fashion industry from design and manufacturing through distribution, promotion and sales. Grounded in theories of consumption, students will explore operating procedures for various aspects of the apparel business such as; responsible advertising, consumer privacy, compliance with sustainable practices, fair labor and working conditions, design with a focus on gender identity or age appropriateness, and recognizing fashion’s influence on body image and eating disorders. Students will address topics through in depth discussions using group models and by exploring and mastering decision making frameworks to generate solutions. Prerequisite: ENG 102

FASH325 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH342 - Fashion & Culture

This course evaluates the concept of fashion in the cultural context and its impact on human behavior as non-verbal communication, including the expression of national identity. Through a historical and contemporary study of the connection between fashion and society, the relationships between clothing, culture, ethnicity, social and political events, economic status, and geographical location are examined. Students explore the symbolic aspects of clothing from the personal and consumer standpoints. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

FASH401 - Fash Industry Professional Development

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through simulated business activities, case studies, and meetings with faculty and industry experts. The course explores career development and professional strategies, each of which is designed to prepare students for FASH 403 Field Assignment. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: FASH 211 or FASH218, & JR status

FASH405 - Fashion Retail & Merchandising Capstone

This course offers the student an opportunity to reflect and directly apply industry methods and practices acquired over the course of their degree studies. Students design and execute an in-depth project that engages them in research and experimentation, applying merchandising theories to a variety of situations. Prerequisite: FASH 415.

FASH406 - Global Retailing

This course teaches students the importance of the global economy through the study of retailers who operate internationally. Students learn the legal, social, cultural, and economic environments that affect the distribution of consumer products worldwide. Required research assignments cover a wide range of international retailers, encompassing both department stores and independent retailers. Prerequisites: FASH 211, BUSS 220.

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Collaborative experience affords students capability to maximize opportunities and explore career path optionswhile receiving four academic credits Prerequisites: FASH 401 and senior standing

FASH420 - Collection Research and Management

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH421X - Collection Research & Management II

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH422 - Fashion Communication Capstone

The Fashion Communications and Promotion Capstone draws upon prior educational and internship experiences, synthesizing them into a capstone project that enhances the student's bridge to the next step in his or her academic or professional life. The capstone project is student-driven and mentored by select faculty. The project includes research, planning, process management, execution, and reflection. Prerequisites: FASH415.

FASH425 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

MAHT304 - Mathematics for Educators

Mathematics for Educators

MATH106 - Algebraic Operations

This course is intended to strengthen students’ ability in algebra. The course begins with introductory topics such as operations with real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and systems of equations. This course also includes an introduction to rational expressions, radicals and rational exponents.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I, covering integration, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, maxmin problems, derivatives and integrals of trigonometric functions and differential equations with applications to business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vectors and vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations, solutions of systems of differential equations using the theory of matrices, and determinants. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants and computer methods, as well as applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, archaeology, economics, communications, demography, weather prediction, connectivity of networks, graph theory, and fractals. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH328 - Mathematics Applied to Management

This course explores the art of mathematical modeling of managerial decision problems and the science of developing the solution techniques for these models. Topics include management science techniques used in today’s businesses, e.g., break-even analysis, presentation models, linear programming, transportation and assignments problems, decision theory, forecasting and inventory models, Markov analysis, and solution of nonlinear models in business using calculus-based optimization. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Mathematical Applications

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC104 - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive. This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well being. This coursewould substitute for PSYC101 (Psychological Perspectives) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class but can be taken in addition to PSYC101.

PSYC111 - Generations in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC201 - Psychology of Drugs & Behavior

The course examines the relationship between drugs and behavior, including evidence about the effects of drugs on the brain. Several classes of drugs, including chemically or psychologically addictive substances, psychoactive and therapeutic agents, as well as recreational drugs, are examined. Drug use is related to psychological variables such as personality structure and interpersonal relationships, and theories of addictive processes and factors influencing drug use are examined, as are treatment strategies. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC205 - Human Sexuality

This course is designed to introduce factual information about gender identity and gender role theories, sexual preference and sexual orientation, and psychosexual development. The course examines issues related to research on human sexuality and behavior, as well as sexual education, sexual disorders, and societal impacts on sexuality. Students are challenged to think critically about many issues surrounding human sexuality and all of its manifestations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC206 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC209X - Psyc of the Black American Experience

This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Blacks in the United States, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. Connections between Africa, the Caribbean, and Black America will be examined with respect to culture, belief systems, and values. At the same time, we will also explore the many differences in history, culture, and experience within numerous groups and individuals of African-descent in the U. S. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC218 - Dynamics of Small Groups

This class examines the basic theory and application necessary to understand and facilitate small groups. Topics may include group types, formation, roles and stages; group process; cultural awareness; group interventions and ethics within the field of psychology and human service; therapeutic value of groups; and the family, classroom, and peers as small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC222 - Social Psychology in Film

This course uses film to examine social psychological concepts and research and provides an opportunity for students to explore how people influence and are influenced by their social relationships, communities, and larger society. Films illustrate a range of social encounters that are examined from a social psychological perspective. Topics include conflict, love, personal and group behavior, prejudice, roles, privilege, and oppression. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC304X - Sensation & Perception

if you are talking to your friends, you might not realize that someone just walked in the room, even though you probably did hear the door creak and their footsteps. Clearly you 'sensed' all the information, but because your brain didn’t interpret it, you didn’t 'perceive' the person walking in. This scenario highlights the central question that we will discuss in this course: how and why are we so wonderfully inefficient and delusional sometimes? It is estimated that our five senses take in 11,000,000 bits of information per second, yet we weed out all but 40 bits. This ability to sense but selectively perceive allows us to survive and live our life without being bombarded. Throughout this course, I hope to convince you that we don't perceive things as they are, we perceive things as we are - so don't be surprised if next time you are watching a RedSox game, a gorilla could run off the field without you noticing it at all. This course will substitute for Cognitive Processes for Psychology majors. Pre-reqs: Psyc 101.

PSYC306 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC307 - Forensic Psychology

This course deals with the application of psychological knowledge to the judicial process and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include effects of defendant, juror and case characteristics on verdicts, variables affecting eyewitness accuracy, identification and testimony, and the role of forensic psychologists in competency and criminal responsibility assessments as well as criminal profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or PSYC 101.

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

PSYC318 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. Both traditional and contemporary theories of psychopathology are reviewed. Emphasis is also placed on the tools, techniques, and process of both the diagnosis and the treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 202 or PSYC 220.

PSYC322 - Abnormal Child Development

This course examines common psychological disorders that affect children and adolescents. Students review factors that contribute to emotional, behavioral, cognitive and social problems in children and adolescents, as well as specific diagnostic criteria of psychological disorders. In addition, treatment of childhood disorders is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 221.

PSYC323 - Brain Function & Dysfunction

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 & MATH 208

PSYC331 - Experimental Design in Psychology

This laboratory course covers concepts of the scientific method in psychology including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. As part of the lab, students carry out an experiment and learn to use SPSS to create a database and perform statistical analyses. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC333 - Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and Permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

PSYC345 - Assessment of Individual Differences

This course studies a wide variety of tests and measurements used to assess intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality in clinical and counseling psychology, in education, and in business. Consideration of the history and theory of these tests is complemented by discussion of practical concerns related to their selection, their administration, and their interpretation in specific settings. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and PSYC 101.

PSYC406 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC714 - Psyc of Sport, Injury & Rehabilitation

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the theory and application of psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation. Topics covered include emotion, motivation, mental skills training and use, psychological antecedents of injury, psychology of injury and rehabilitation, career transition and termination, disabilities, rehabilitation/exercise adherence, eating disorders, alcohol and drug/substance abuse, gender and cultural diversity, and research methods related to the psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation.

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination (KP)

This course is designed to help students develop their ability to think critically about the world around them using the framework of sociology. Students explore the relationship between individual and society – how personal experience is shaped by social forces, but also how society is created and changed through individual interaction. The focus is on the interrelationships of groups, social organization, and social institutions such as education, religion, family, and the economic and political order.

SOC102 - Introduction to Women's Studies (KP)

This course is designed to help students develop a critical framework for examining feminist thought and gender-related behaviors. Utilizing sociology, anthropology, history, and literature the course examines the roles and stereotypes society ascribes to women and how those roles impact the development of a feminist perspective in a contemporary world.

SOC206 - Food and Culture

In the Sociology of Food and Culture, we study "food ways"; that is, how food and eating reflects and impacts social life.   The course examines the beliefs, rituals, norms, and subcultures associated with food choice.   Further, we look at food in the larger contexts of politics, the economy, and cultural survival.  Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSYC 101

SOC207X - Wealth & Poverty

Wealth & Poverty

SOC208 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

SOC212 - Wellness & Society

This course explores the social dimension of health and illness. Both health and illness vary across times and cultures – and this is related to how we define “normal”. Our wellbeing is also closely related to our position in society – socio-economic status, race, gender, class, ethnicity, and physical ability impact life chances, lifestyles, access to care, and attitudes towards health and illness. This course therefore covers the social distribution of illness; health disparities; global comparisons in the health of populations; the social construction of illness; the structure of health care systems and institutions; and various historical and contemporary health care debates.

SOC214 - Family Diversity

This course explores the meaning of "family" in a historical and cross-cultural context - it looks at the way families and households are constructed, and at how these institutions are impacted by social forces including demographic, ideological, and economic changes in societies. Family diversity is discussed in the context of social constructions such as race, class, and gender. Current themes in family sociology that are covered include, amongst others, sexuality, marriage, parenting, violence, divorce and remarriage, and family policy. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC221 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course examines conditions and issues that result in tension and disorder. Examples drawn primarily from American society include: labeling and social control of deviants, oppression of minorities, poverty, violence, ageism, and ecological concerns. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC223X - Social Movements

You are breathing clean air right now thanks to the environmental movement. Maybe you can vote thanks to the Civil Rights or women’s suffrage movement. And don’t forget the labor movement, the folks who brought you the weekend! What other changes will social movements bring to your life? This course will bring US and global social movements to life through videos, photos, stories, interactive exercises, writing and discussing By the end of the course you will understand the strategic choices people in movements make and why movements succeed or fail. If you dream of making a difference, this course will tell you how. But even if you never expect to join a social movement, learning how movements work will make you a more savvy citizen.

SOC301 - Race & Ethnicity

This course examines the changing nature of race and ethnic relations with primary emphasis on the United States. Topics include: the origins and consequences of racial/ethnic discriminations; immigration policies; movements for integration and separatism; the role of class, religion, and gender on issues of race/ethnicity; the impact of widely differing cultural heritages on our national life: and specific present day problems and trends. Prerequisite: Any 200 level Social Science course.

SOC307X - Action & Social Justice

Mass incarceration, police brutality, climate change, sexual assault, excessive student debt: small groups waging brief social action campaigns have won victories on these problems and many others social justice issues. In this hands-on course, students will pick an injustice, develop achievable goals, design and carry out a group campaign to promote social justice. Students will learn many skills needed for future community engagement, including meeting facilitation, group decision-making, strategizing, persuasive communication, social media advocacy, graphic design, lobbying, coalition-building and event planning.

SOC308 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

SOC310 - Sociological Perspectives

This course introduces classical and contemporary perspectives in sociology. Theories are examined as explanatory tools in the understanding of social structure and social change, and as reflections of the societal conditions from which they emerged. Theories are evaluated in terms of their applicability to contemporary issues in society. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Sociology course and Junior or Senior standing.

SOC331 - Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This laboratory course introduces students to the basic methods used in sociological research. Topics include scientific method, measurement, sampling, experiments, survey research, and qualitative approaches such as content analysis and field studies, and ethical issues in conducting research. As part of the lab, students learn to use SPSS to perform statistical analysis and to access and draw upon large data sets. Students learn to use professional online search procedures and write reports in accepted professional formats. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the Dept Chair.

SOC333 - Sociology Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisite: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

SOC335 - Social Policy

This course examines historical and contemporary factors influencing the making of social policy and introduces the student to processes used to identify and solve social problems. Special attention is given to the relationships of values to social policy and the impact of social policy decisions on the provision of social and human services. Approaches to the analysis of social policy are examined. Prerequisite: Any 200 Level Sociology course or permission by the department chair.

SOC406 - Selected Topics in the Lives of Women

This capstone course examines topics important to the study of women’s issues. Representative topics that might be covered include violence against women, women in public life, social policy related to women, women and work, and reproductive issues. Prerequisite: one of the following: SOC 102, PSYC 303, or HIST 203.

SOC408 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

Jeffrey Corcoran

Associate Professor of Management

Office: DeArment House

Janet Huetteman

Assistant Professor of Marketing

Office: Maple St MOD

Bruce McKinnon

Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship

Office: Maple Street MOD

Siddharth Mobar

Assistant Professor of Hospitality and Event Management

Office: DeArment G-2

Matthew Reilly

Visiting Assistant Professor of Marketing

Office: Maple Terr MOD

Dina Tanvuia

Assistant Professor of Hospitality and Event Management

Office: DeArment House

Melissa Varao

Chair of Marketing/Management; Associate Professor Hospitality and Event Management

Office: DeArment House, #5

Nancy Waldron

Associate Professor of Marketing

Office: DeArment House

Martin Walsh

Associate Professor of Management

Office: DeArment House

BUSS101 - Contemporary Issues in Business

This course is designed to familiarize students with various aspects of the business world. Areas covered include: private enterprise, forms of ownership, legal aspects, management, marketing, human resources, operations management, labor relations, and finance. In addition, students become aware of how business functions are integrated into an organization to achieve specific goals.

BUSS201 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with an applied knowledge of the fundamental accounting process and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements, as well as how to become intelligent users of financial information.

BUSS202 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a grade C or better.

BUSS203 - Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of finance. Various techniques of analysis that reveal the relationships of risk, return, and value are demonstrated. Topics include: financial reporting; long- and short-term forecasting; managing working capital; capital budgeting; and the nature of corporate securities and debt-equity mix. Prerequisites: BUSS 101 OR HEM 101 OR FASH 101 OR SMGT 102; BUSS 202 with a grade C or better & ECON 102.

BUSS205 - Legal Environment of Business

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to business and personal needs. The focus is primarily on contract law and property law.

BUSS212 - Management Information Systems

This course takes a managerial approach to information technology concepts and applications. Given the pervasiveness of computer technology in today's world, professionals in various fields of endeavor often have a major responsibility for determining an organization's information needs and for designing and implementing information systems that support those needs. Students study concepts and issues related to information technology with the goal of understanding how it can be effectively used to improve an organization's over­all effectiveness and increase its level of success. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, HEM 102, SMGT 102, or FASH 101.

BUSS220 - Marketing

In this course, fundamentals of the nature of marketing are presented and evaluated for specific functions and institutions. Policies and practices as applied generally to marketing research involve product development, selection, channels of distribution buying and physical distribution selling. Pricing under competitive conditions, social benefits of competition and government regulations are included. Prerequisites: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102; ECON 101; HEM102.

BUSS224 - Organizational Behavior

In this course, students study individuals within the context of the organization using a behavioral approach. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior. Areas covered include: structure, leadership, and change. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

BUSS232 - Operations Strategy

Operations strategy examines how operations can be used as sources of competitive advantage. This class will focus on understanding the need of formulating an operational strategy (long-term plan) and making strategic operational decisions. The old view of operations management as the task of maintaining a comparatively static production or service facility has given way to one characterized by a need for renewed flexibility, relentless improvement, and the development of new capabilities at the operating unit level. As a result of this changing environment, the skills required of operations managers have changed as well. The course is based primarily on case studies supported by conceptual frameworks.

BUSS420 - Marketing Research

This course examines the process and tools involved in collecting, coding, and analyzing data. The course further integrates the application of computer software in compiling and interpreting statistical data in relation to marketing decisions, such as those related to market segmentation and distribution. Prerequisites: BUSS 220, MATH 208.

BUSS422 - Global Marketing

The complexity of operating in the global marketplace makes many demands on the marketer. The globalization of marketing takes place after the company has international experience in multiple markets. The three fundamental areas of corporate globalization are covered in this course: (1) integrate sourcing, production, and marketing; (2) allocate resources to achieve a balanced portfolio and growth; and (3) coordinate marketing activities across countries and regions. Importing, exporting, and licensing considerations are explored. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

BUSS432 - Marketing Strategy

This course is designed to facilitate the ability to formulate and implement marketing strategy. The course integrates topics covered in other marketing classes. As part of the learning experience, students engage in a simulation program with teams taking charge of a company within a competitive environment. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

BUSS440 - Business Policy

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. The case study method is used. This course culminates in a formal professional presentation to members of the advisory board. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Marketing/Management or Accounting/Finance Majors.

BUSS498 - Internship Seminar Acct/Fin

A critical component of the internship experience is participating in a weekly seminar where students discuss and reflect on their experiences to gain a broader view of the workplace, contemporary issues and organizational trends, as well as their own developing abilities and career interests. This one credit course covers professional issues as they arise during the student's internship. Some of the topics covered include: supervision, boundary issues, self-care, stress management, and professionalism. Students are required to write a weekly reflective journal on their internship experience. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. Separate sections are offered for different business majors. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS 499.

BUSS499 - Internship Accounting/Finance

The internship is scheduled to take place during the senior year. Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours over a 12-week period, done concurrently with on-campus course work as shown in the curriculum for each program. Detailed reports, a journal, and other written requirements are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. Separate sections are offered for different business majors. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS 498.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ECON102 - Principles of Econ-Macro

This course explores basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole and policies designed to affect its performance. Topics include economic scarcity; causes of unemployment and inflation; money and monetary policy; the impact of government taxation and spending; and the federal debt. Some consideration is given to international economic problems and to contrasting economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

BUSS237 - Contemporary Global Leadership

In this course, students analyze what it means to be a global leader in the 21st century and identify the skills necessary to be successful in an increasingly global business climate. Students explore this question personally, collectively, and globally in a creative and collaborative atmosphere. Students examine classic as well as contemporary theories of leadership and how they apply to the dynamic global business culture. The course provides students with the opportunity to acquire perspectives and skills essential to successful management in the emerging markets that are increasingly becoming key contenders in world commercial enterprise. Prerequisite BUSS 224.

BUSS313 - Business Negotiations

This course examines various negotiating tactics and techniques as they relate to different situations and environments. Particular attention is paid to buyer-seller communications, including negotiations of contracts and agreements. Students study the strengths and weaknesses of strategies used by both buyers and sellers. Prerequisites: BUSS 201, BUSS 220 and MATH 104.

BUSS315 - Emerging Global Markets

This course focuses on developing skills, strategies and insights crucial to conducting successful business operations in the emerging markets of Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa including the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for unprecedented economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and incomes, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. In this course, students study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors (such as the government and NGOs); analyze opportunities and risks presented by emerging markets; and analyze the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets. Prerequisite: BUSS101

BUSS320 - Consumer Behavior

This course examines the behavior of individuals and markets in relation to the purchase decision, including post-purchase evaluation and con­sumption. A behavioral science approach is taken. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS322 - Marketing Communications

This course focuses on a broad view of advertising, dealing with its planning, creation, and execution in relation to the marketing cycle. Topics include: organization and operation of the advertising agency; publicity; public relations; behavioral sciences as applied to advertising; budgeting; and planning. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS324 - E-Business

This course provides students with a broad overview of the concepts and principles of e-business. This knowledge is increasingly important for all students, regardless of their area of concentration, because traditional businesses and arts organizations are becoming hybrids by adding an online presence to their existing structure. Topics discussed include a definition of e-business, online management strategies, distribution channels, privacy and security issues, and cyberlaw, among others. Students develop an e-business plan and webpage. Prerequisite: BUSS101

BUSS325 - Sales Principles

This course analyzes salesmanship in modern business with emphasis placed on the principles and techniques of individual selling styles in both retail and wholesale markets. Topics covered include: dramatization of the sale presentation; the selling role; buyer characteristics and motivations; modern sales practices; corporate sales planning; sales-force policies; time and territory management; forecasting, budgeting; and expense control. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS329 - New Product Development

New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. A major goal of this course is to help students learn to use an analytic decision-making approach in developing and marketing new products and services that meet customer needs in the consumer, industrial, and service settings. At the end of the course, the student should understand the role of decision models in analytic marketing decision-making; be able to follow the basic steps in opportunity identification, design, testing, and implementation; and know how to read and interpret new product and service market research. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS341 - Social Media Marketing

This course takes an in-depth look at social networks, social media platforms and online advertising to offer students an advantage in many positions involving marketing, consulting and brand management both on the buyer and seller side of social media. Students with an interest in entrepreneurship will also find the course useful as new businesses often rely on social media marketing. The course covers a number of topics including the differences and interaction between traditional and social media; two-sided markets and social media platforms (including verticals such as gaming, shopping and entertainment); basic theory of social networks online and offline (graph theory, sociology, information diffusion); consumer behavior and digital media; social Media Analytics and Monitoring; brand strategies on social media; best marketing practices for paid and unpaid social media; B2B marketing and social media. Prerequisite: BUSS220.

FASH211 - Fashion Retail Management

This course explores the principles of retail management. Topics include; technological applications, marketing strategies, store image considerations, competitive analysis, legal constraints, consumer behavior, decision making and critical reasoning associated with retail store practices. Concepts are explored such as operating in an omnichannel environment and the use of retail analytics. Principles are examined and applied through class discussion and lecture, group projects and case studies. Prerequisite: FASH101

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination (KP)

This course is designed to help students develop their ability to think critically about the world around them using the framework of sociology. Students explore the relationship between individual and society – how personal experience is shaped by social forces, but also how society is created and changed through individual interaction. The focus is on the interrelationships of groups, social organization, and social institutions such as education, religion, family, and the economic and political order.