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Fashion Design and Production

ARTH103 - Art History I

This course presents a survey of artistic styles from the prehistoric period through the art of the early Renaissance. Periods included are Egyptian, Aegean, Greek, Roman and Etruscan art, and the art of the Middle Ages. Films and slides are used in the presentation of works of art from the fields of architecture, sculpture, and painting.

ARTH104 - Art History II

This course presents a study of works of art from the High Renaissance and the Mannerist periods, the Renaissance in the North, the Baroque period, and the Modern Age. Slides and films are used in this presentation of works of art from the fields of architecture, sculpture, and painting.

ARTH107 - Special Topics in Art

This course introduces students to the study of Art History by focusing on one theme, one artist, or one form of art. Painting, sculpture, architecture, as well as prints and drawings may be considered. Stylistic, cultural, and historic elements are components of the course.

FASD103 - Clothing Construction I

Introducing techniques needed by the designer, the focus of this course is on developing basic skills applied to garment construction. Concentrating on industry techniques using woven fabrics, students gain insight into the components of a quality product.

FASD104 - Clothing Construction II

This course expands student competencies to include the assembly of more complex garments, including the use of knits. Industry methods of construction and production are emphasized to facilitate independent analysis of the apparel assembly process. Prerequisite: FASD 103 or permission of Department Chair.

FASD105 - Pattern Generation I

Introducing skills for fashion design development, students develop an aptitude for mechanical drawing and pattern generation through draping and drafting flat patterns. Students explore and express design ideas through two- and three-dimensional methods of developing and adapting the original basic patterns that are also referred to as slopers. The course is structured as a series of lectures, demonstrations, and exercises, including the completion of several hands-on projects.

FASD106 - Pattern Generation II

In this course, slopers for knits and wovens are developed, analyzed, and utilized to produce apparel designs. Emphasis is placed on the various development, fitting, and assembly techniques required for work with both two-way and four-way stretch fabrics. Prerequisite: FASD 105.

FASD201 - Flat Pattern Design I

This course emphasizes industry methods of producing patterns from basic slopers. Students learn to achieve different silhouettes and produce style variations. Dart manipulation is introduced to the student as a means of developing original design ideas. Collars and sleeves are examined, and components of good fit are explored. This course is structured as a series of demonstrations and exercises and includes developing an original design from conception to fashion fabric. Prerequisite: FASD 106 .

FASD202 - Flat Pattern Design II

In this course, advanced design development methods related to pattern drafting of tailored jackets and pants are explored. Students study grading as a means of creating a variety of sizes. An original design is developed fostering creative and technical competency.Prerequiste: FASD201

FASD205 - Digital Design for Apparel

This course introduces students to software that is used prominently in the apparel design and production industry. Projects include enhancing fashion illustrations, technical drawing, textile design and colorization, and editing and integrating photographic images. Skills developed in this course are necessary for communicating design ideas and lay the foundation for industry-specific software covered later in the curriculum.

FASD215 - Fashion Illustration

Emphasizing techniques essential to creating two-dimensional fashion design renderings, this course develops skills related to drawing the fashion figure, illustrating original design ideas through various media, rendering textiles and developing technical drawings. The elements and principles of design are applied to fashion illustration through exercises that explore the various components of apparel development: study of human anatomy, garment details, fabrics, textures, etc. Prerequisites: ARTS 101.

FASD219 - Textile Arts

This course is an introduction to surface design through fabric manipulation. Students learn to apply design elements and principles to the surface decoration of fabrics. A variety of techniques to create 2-D and 3-D effects for fabric surface embellishment are explored and researched. Students create a collection of resource samples and produce fabric lengths suitable for garments. The course explores a variety of textile manipulation methods such as dyeing on natural and synthetic fabrics, printing, shibori, felting, batik, and spraying transfer, as well as appliqué, creative embellishment, free machine embroidery. Prerequisite: FASH 210.

FASD220 - Fashion Design Concepts

In this course, fashion design ability is developed by exploring students’ creativity. An understanding of fashion design as a three-dimensional art form is cultivated in order to gain knowledge of various styles and details which are utilized to design garments for various markets. Students develop a critical eye based on aesthetic and market-related evaluation principles. Prerequisites: FASD 106, FASD 215 and FASH 210.

FASD225 - Fashion Design: Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage varies areas of the design discipline that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content will vary per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore design techniques and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASD301 - Professional Presentation Methods

This course develops industry-based visual presentation methods, such as advanced hand illustration techniques and cutting edge, 3D technology. Outcomes of the course include both hand-held and technological portfolios, creating a key component to successful employment in the fashion industry. Resume, cover letter and interviewing skills are developed in preparation for internship. Prerequisites: FASD 205, FASD 220.

FASD306X - Elements of Haute Couture

This course emphasizes the elements of Haute Couture where the application of superior workmanship, originality of design, and perfection of fit is must. Students will pay as much attention to interior garment construction as to the externally viewed fashion design. Working with specialty fabrics such as lace and silk, students will learn finishing techniques including hand-sewn buttonholes, hand-finished seam edges, evening gown/bustier lining and boning. The application of decorative surface techniques and embellishments will be part of the course as well. This is an advanced sewing class. Prerequisite: FASD 104

FASD325 - Fashion Design: Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses will offer students the opportunity to engage with various areas of the design discipline that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content will vary per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore design techniques and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses will be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASD330 - Accessories Design

This course explores the accessories market while fostering creativity and advanced drafting and construction skills. The history of accessories is discussed. Various areas of inquiry are explored for prototype development, such as millinery, handbags, glove making, etc. Prerequisites: FASD 202, FASD 220.

FASD331 - Drafting for Diverse Markets

Specialized areas such as couture, children’s and men’s wear are explored in this course, providing students expanded design experience. Student research projects results in visual and oral presentations related to various inspirational sources and markets. Garments are designed, developed, evaluated, and constructed. Prerequisite: FASD 202.

FASD340 - Draping

This course integrates basic and advanced methods of draping. Students learn how to use this three- dimensional technique to develop flat patterns. Costume design and reproduction is introduced, and a couture garment is created using vintage techniques. Experimental free drape fosters creativity. Extensive research is a core component of this writing intensive course. Prerequisite: FASD 202.

FASD350 - Tailoring

Traditional and contemporary methods of tailoring are studied in this course, with emphasis placed on the pressing, molding, and shaping of fabrics. Assembly of a lined, tailored jacket builds technical expertise. Prerequisite: FASD 104.

FASD409 - Senior Thesis Development

This studio course simulates an industry experience. Students are required to develop a collection of completed ensembles that will be finished in FASD 410 (Senior Thesis Production). Each student refines his or her distinct design style and develops a personal brand. Design development through trend analysis, fabric sourcing, pattern drafting and/or draping, and apparel construction, in conjunction with writing, critical thinking, independent time management and visual communication complete this capstone experience. Prerequisites: FASD 331, Senior standing. Corequisite FASD 465.

FASD410 - Senior Thesis Production

This course continues the industry-based design development process. The student finalizes a collection that is reviewed by peers, faculty and industry professionals. Each designer plans and executes a segment in the spring fashion show featuring his or her collection, and updates his or her portfolio to be interview-ready. Prerequisite: FASD 409. Corequisite: FASD 466.

FASD415 - Fashion Design Internship

Internships offer design students the practical training and working knowledge necessary for their development as practicing professionals while reflecting on their expereinces in an academic matter. Internships are designed to merge theory with practice. Comprised of a 150 hour commitment, the internship is recommended to be completed in the junior year of study. The course instructor will monitor the experience with feedback from the site supervisor. Students are required to complete a journal that is comprised of a list of goals and objectives, and reflective writing. Prerequisites: FASD 201 and department Chair approval if completing abroad.

FASD425 - Fashion Design: Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses will offer students the opportunity to engage with various areas of the design discipline that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content will vary per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore design techniques and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses will be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASD465 - Cad I- Lectra

This course focuses on the use of technology in the apparel industry examining its role in the global apparel complex. Students apply their hands-on technical skills to state-of-the-art industry programs. Using the LECTRA system of software, students will digitize, manipulate, grade, and nest patterns on MODARIS, learn to create markers on DIAMINO and plot using JUSTPRINT and ALYS applications. Prerequisites: FASD 331, Senior standing. Corequisite: FASD 409.

FASD466 - Cad II- Lectra

Using patterns generated in FASD 465, garments are brought into the arena of mass manufacturing. Comprehensive specification packages are created by using LECTRA KALEDO. The cutting-edge technology of MODARIS 3D modeling is introduced. Students also learn how to integrate their understanding of technology into a professional working portfolio. Prerequisite: FASD 465. Corequisite: FASD 410.

FASH101 - Contemporary Issues in Fashion

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historic, economic, and contemporary influences, giving students a basic understanding of the terms and concepts associated with the fashion and retail industries. Topics include: technological applications, environmental influences on fashion; the fashion cycle; trend forecasting; fashion marketing; women's, men's, and children's apparel; supply chain management; foreign and domestic market centers; and retail merchandising.

FASH200 - Fashion History

This course covers the evolution of fashion from the time of early civilization to the mid-nineteenth century. Students learn how to identify various characteristics of clothing by studying both the social and psychological aspects of western culture. An understanding of fashion trends in relationship to art, architecture, and human behavior throughout history, and the various social implications clothing has on a given society are also explored. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to interpret fashion as a cultural language with identifiable characteristics. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102, or permission of instructor.

FASH201 - Merchandise Planning & Control

This course provides an understanding of business strategies related to assortment planning, buying, and allocating inventory. Building upon retail math fundamentals, students create stock and sales plans in accordance with the goals and objectives of a given seasonal sales strategy, including methods of figuring markups, sales projections, turnover, average stock, stock-to-sales ratios, open-to-buy, markdowns, and gross margin. Negotiation skills related to terms of sale, shipping and pricing strategies are explored within the wholesale/retail business relationship. Both manual and computer-based calculations are explored through the use of Excel and other industry-based software. Prerequisite: FASH 101 & MATH116

FASH204 - Fashion Research Abroad

This course brings design and merchandising fashion students together in an international setting to offer exposure to and research of the ever changing global fashion industry. The spring portion of the This course focuses on the host country’s culture and fashion industry, setting the stage for an intensive study abroad experience. Course structure abroad is a combination of lecture and field practice. In addition to Lasell faculty, professionals from the host country’s fashion industry teaching a variety of topics. Hands-on workshops may play an important role in exploring content. Cultural immersion includes a community service project that engages students in reflecting on the evolving social consciousness in the global fashion market place. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH206 - Sustainability in the Fashion Industry

This course explores issues surrounding the concept of sustainability in relation to the fashion industry. The history and contemporary status of sustainability in a global fashion context will be explored, including the influence of social, cultural, and economic factors. Guest speakers include specialists in sustainable fashion design & production, the greening of the supply chain, merchandising, and promoting the sustainable product.

FASH207 - Digital Tools for Fashion

Technical skills are becoming more and more a required proficiency in all capacities of the fashion industry. This course introduces Fashion & Retail Merchandising and Fashion Communication & Promotion students to software prominently used for apparel manufacturing, retail and media. With a focus on methods of visual communication, projects include technical drawing, colorization, editing, and integration and manipulation of photographic images.

FASH208X - Monsters in my Closet: Waste Couture

The goal of ENV 208X/FASH 208X is to explore the environmental, social and economic issues and problems arising out of the global fashion industry. We will examine where and how our clothing is manufactured, distributed and disposed of as well as some of the innovative approaches some companies are taking in order to address some of the problems associated with the industry.

FASH210 - Textiles

This course introduces the study of textiles through exploration of the production of fibers and methods of creating fabrics. Students learn to identify fiber content, properties and various types of weaving and knitting applications. Other topics include the study of fiber characteristics, quality and care of fabric finishes, and a practical assessment of fabrics in realtionship to particular end uses.

FASH211 - Fashion Retail Management

This course explores the principles of retail management. Topics include; technological applications, marketing strategies, store image considerations, competitve analysis, legal constraints,consumer behavior,decision making and critical reasoning associated with reatail store practices. Principles are explored and applied through class discussion and lecture, and case studies exploration.Prerequisite: FASH101

FASH212 - Visual Merchandising

This course builds a foundation in basic visual methods to promote products. The use of interior, P.O.P., and exterior displays, fixturing, graphics and signage are discussed. Various hands-on projects develop an aptitude for working with color and proportion to create visual solutions for product promotion. Exploring color analysis and proportion, students create visual solutions that demonstrate artistic sensitivity and express a mood or idea. Additionally, students become familiar with journalistic reporting and written analysis through various media applications. Prerequisite: FASH 101, ARTS 120.

FASH216 - Digital Marketing for Fashion

The fashion and retail industry has changed radically with shifts into new digital channels. Omni-channel selling and communication models continue to be an opportunity for business growth and expansion. The rise of social media and the expanding proliferation of digital devices, platforms, and applications make digital marketing a necessity for corporate survival. Through a combination of case studies and exploration of innovative technology students learn how the elements of digital strategy work together with traditional media to attract prospective customers. This course will explore inventive kinds of marketing strategies where the new selling floor is the virtual world. Prerequisite: FASH 101

FASH218 - Fashion Communication

This course examines communication strategies in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different facets of communication including maintaining consistency with integrated and content marketing, navigating the global landscape, messaging through digital and various media channels, and managing emerging trends in social marketing. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Prerequisites: ENG 102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASH225 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH301 - Fashion Promotion

This course integrates fashion industry promotional activities centered around the "promotion mix." Through advertising, publicity, and special events including fashion shows, students create and execute promotional campaigns that link to various external constituents to stimulate consumption of a product or service. Prerequisite: FASH 212.

FASH302 - Retail Operations

This course builds on the concepts learned in FASH 201 Merchandise Planning & Control and FASH 211 Retail Management extending into retail store planning, trading area and site analysis, financial management, multi-channel retailing and performance metrics. All phases of merchandising and sales management, including merchandise logistics, enabling technology, distribution channels, retail assortment planning and labor administration are incorporated into a comprehensive study of retail operations. Technological applications that are industry specific are utilized throughout this course. Prerequisite: FASH 211

FASH303 - History of 20th Century Fashion

This course examines fashion from mid-nineteenth century to present day, exploring notable creators and addressing the aesthetic, economic, social, and political forces that impact the development of styles. Discussions and research focus predominantly on American and European culture, but endeavor to include a global perspective, taking into account issues of ethnicity, class, and sexuality. This course also includes first-hand examination of garments as part of an approach to develop critical thinking and “seeing.” Students utilize these observations to understand fashion as an art form, a commodity, and a symbol of cultural and personal identity. Prerequisites: ENG 102 and FASH 101 or permission of instructor.

FASH304 - Interior Display & Design

This course introduces students to the processes involved in designing a set, display, or interactive environment. The elements and principles of design are closely examined, developed, and applied. Students learn to solve problems of space, volume, color, texture, lighting, and design. Drafting techniques are emphasized, as are presentation skills. Practical modeling and construction techniques, including use of 3D computer software are used in the process of creating a setting and installations. Prerequisite: FASH 212.

FASH306 - Fashion Styling for Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation.

FASH307 - Fashion Branding

This course explores issues related to fashion branding and brand recognition by presenting an overview of brand management. Through case studies and analysis of contemporary media, students examine the notion that perceived value and ethos of a fashion brand can be increased through advertising, thematic control, and legal safeguards. The course also details how to build a fashion brand, maintain its brand equity, and re-tool a brand when its stature in the marketplace decreases due to consumer consumption and economic changes. Prerequisites: BUSS 220 or FASH 211.

FASH309 - Apparel Product Development

Exploring the global product development matrix, students in this course work together in teams to explore the product lifecycle in terms of sourcing and production. Class sessions combine cases with hands-on exercises to reinforce key concepts. Topics include planning time-and-action calendars, specification and technical package development, sizing, quality control, and evaluation of the global production environment. Prerequisite: FASH 211, or FASD 220, or FASH 218.

FASH315 - Trend Forecasting

This course teaches students to enhance their fashion forecasting ability through a combination of “pulse-point” research, analysis, and presentation. Exploring techniques for interpreting the social/cultural influences on fashion change facilitates the ability to recognize and predict fashion trends in the global context. Prerequisite: FASH 101.

FASH317 - Ethics in the Fashion Industry

This course integrates ethical, moral and legal issues regarding the fashion industry from design and manufacturing through distribution, promotion and sales. Grounded in theories of consumption, students will explore operating procedures for various aspects of the apparel business such as; responsible advertising, consumer privacy, compliance with sustainable practices, fair labor and working conditions, design with a focus on gender identity or age appropriateness, and recognizing fashion’s influence on body image and eating disorders. Students will address topics through in depth discussions using group models and by exploring and mastering decision making frameworks to generate solutions. Prerequisite: ENG 102

FASH325 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH342 - Fashion & Culture

This course evaluates the concept of fashion in the cultural context and its impact on human behavior as non-verbal communication, including the expression of national identity. Through a historical and contemporary study of the connection between fashion and society, the relationships between clothing, culture, ethnicity, social and political events, economic status, and geographical location are examined. Students explore the symbolic aspects of clothing from the personal and consumer standpoints. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

FASH401 - Fashion Industry Professional Dev

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through simulated business activities, case studies, and meetings with faculty and industry experts. The course explores career development and professional strategies, each of which is designed to prepare students for FASH 403 Field Assignment. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: FASH 211, FASH218, & JR status

FASH405 - Fashion Retail & Merchandising Capstone

This course offers the student an opportunity to reflect and directly apply industry methods and practices acquired over the course of their degree studies. Students design and execute an in-depth project that engages them in research and experimentation, applying merchandising theories to a variety of situations. Prerequisite: FASH 415.

FASH406 - Global Retailing

This course teaches students the importance of the global economy through the study of retailers who operate internationally. Students learn the legal, social, cultural, and economic environments that affect the distribution of consumer products worldwide. Required research assignments cover a wide range of international retailers, encompassing both department stores and independent retailers. Prerequisites: FASH 211, BUSS 220.

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Prerequisites: FASH 401 and senior standing

FASH420 - Collection Research and Management

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH421X - Collection Research & Management II

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH422 - Fashion Communication Capstone

The Fashion Communications and Promotion Capstone draws upon prior educational and internship experiences, synthesizing them into a capstone project that enhances the student's bridge to the next step in his or her academic or professional life. The capstone project is student-driven and mentored by select faculty. The project includes research, planning, process management, execution, and reflection. Prerequisites: FASH415.

FASH425 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

MATH106 - Algebraic Operations

This course is intended to strengthen students’ ability in algebra. The course begins with introductory topics such as operations with real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and systems of equations. This course also includes an introduction to rational expressions, radicals and rational exponents.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I, covering integration, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, maxmin problems, derivatives and integrals of trigonometric functions and differential equations with applications to business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH304X - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vectors and vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations, solutions of systems of differential equations using the theory of matrices, and determinants. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants and computer methods, as well as applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, archaeology, economics, communications, demography, weather prediction, connectivity of networks, graph theory, and fractals. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH328 - Mathematics Applied to Management

This course explores the art of mathematical modeling of managerial decision problems and the science of developing the solution techniques for these models. Topics include management science techniques used in today’s businesses, e.g., break-even analysis, presentation models, linear programming, transportation and assignments problems, decision theory, forecasting and inventory models, Markov analysis, and solution of nonlinear models in business using calculus-based optimization. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Mathematical Applications

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.