2017 - 2018 Academic Catalog

Environmental Studies

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions Department Faculty

This program is not admitting new students

As our society has become increasingly aware of, and alarmed about, the impact of humanity on the environment, sustainability has begun to permeate our culture. From industry to agriculture, to science and technology, individuals who are knowledgeable about the environment and best "green" practices are likely to have an advantage in the twenty-first century, as both the government and the public exert greater pressure for environmental accountability from all business, commercial, private, and public enterprises.

Environmental Studies is an interdisciplinary major with a primary focus on policy and advocacy, grounded in an understanding of relevant scientific and humanistic concepts. The Environmental Studies major provides students the opportunity to examine the connections between the environment and the community, both local and global. Through a combination of coursework and connected-learning experiences, the program prepares students to address the many environmental challenges we face, including matters of public policy, economics, and ethics. The Environmental Studies program utilizes Lasell College as a learning lab. We challenge students to consider the impact of the College on the environment and encourage students to propose solutions and take leadership action. Students are encouraged to minor in a field of interest to them in order to help them address environmental challenges in any of the various sectors in which they might pursue a career.

This major prepares students to pursue career opportunities in policy and regulation, advocacy, resource management, and outdoor education. Students may also continue with graduate study in such fields as environmental studies, environmental science, environmental law and policy, resource economics, and business management. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies.

The Environmental Studies Program at Lasell College provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to incorporate sustainability considerations into their decision-making in order to effect change in places where they live, work, and study.

By planning early in consultation with an academic advisor, students may be able to reduce the time it takes to complete a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies to 3 or 3½ years. 

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Environmental Studies:

Goal 1: Effective communication skills
Upon completion of the major program of study in Environmental Studies, students will be able to

  1. communicate effectively within the discipline in writing
  2. communicate effectively within the discipline orally
  3. communicate effectively within the discipline, using graphical, visual, and quantitative representation

Goal 2: Globally engaged citizenship
Upon completion of the major program of study in Environmental Studies, students will be able to

  1. evaluate need for citizen action and plan for/participate in such action
  2. practice/organize collaborative/interdisciplinary approaches to environmental issues
  3. consider sustainability in making decisions (environmental, social, and economic)

Goal 3: Evaluating and processing discipline-specific information
Upon completion of the major program of study in Environmental Studies, students will be able to

  1. communicate/evaluate/justify personal views on environmental issues
  2. identify/evaluate alternative courses of action/solutions to environmental issues
  3. read and comprehend discipline-specific information
Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
BIO102 Principles of Biology II (KP) 4
ECON101 Principles of Econ-Micro 3
ENV101 Intro to Environmental Studies (KP) 3
ENV102 Environmental Ethics & Society 3
ENV201 Environmental Law & Policy 3
ENV204 Environmental Economics 3
ENV205 Green Business 3
ENV207 Chemistry for a Sustainable Future 3
ENV211 Environmental Science (KP) 3
ENV220 World Geography (KP) 3
ENV302 Natural Resource Management/GIS 4
ENV303 Environmental Justice 3
ENV304 Environmental Field Sampling 4
ENV305 Energy: Moving on from Fossil Fuel 3
ENV400 Internship 4
ENV420 Environmental Studies Senior Seminar 3
IDS399 Internship Seminar 1
MATH208 Statistics 3
POLS101 American Government 3
Choose 1 from the following:
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives (KP) 3
SOC101 Sociological Imagination (KP) 3

Major Requirements: 62 credits

Core Curriculum Requirements: 18-24 credits

Unrestricted Electives:34-40 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120


BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Corequisite: BIO 101L.

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

BIO104 - Foundations in the Health Professions

This course provides a description of the various health care professions including educational and licensing requirements. The concepts of professionalism, health care teams, and current health care policies will be covered. Students will increase their knowledge of the various health care professions through job shadowing.

BIO107 - Topics In Biology (KP)

Preliminaries of the molecules of life and cell structures are investigated in this course. Topics from cell biology, nutrition, energy production, respiratory and circulatory systems, genetics, reproduction, evolutionary thought, and ecosystems are also explored.

BIO112L - Human Biology

This is a one semester lab course focusing on the functions of the human body in health and disease. The structure and function of the major body systems are emphasized. Systems discussed include: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, excretory, reproductive, nervous and endocrine. Corequisite: BIO 112L.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Corequisite: BIO 206L.

BIO211 - Microbiology

This course introduces the microbial world and the laboratory required for its study. Topics include the basic characteristics of fungi, algae, bacteria, and viruses. Topics and applications that relate to humans are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO 102

BIO301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course also describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

BIO340 - Research Methods

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industry including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208

BIO420 - Field Experience in Health Science

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 200 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 340 and Permission of Department Chair.

BIO430 - Health Science Capstone

The capstone course prepares students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for undergraduate research. Students will develop an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: BIO 340

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ECON102 - Principles of Econ-Macro

This course explores basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole and policies designed to affect its performance. Topics include economic scarcity; causes of unemployment and inflation; money and monetary policy; the impact of government taxation and spending; and the federal debt. Some consideration is given to international economic problems and to contrasting economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development.

ECON206 - Global Economic Development

The goal of this course is to introduce the main issues of global economic development. Students will explore the problems facing developing countries of the world as they attempt to industrialize, develop their economies and raise the standards of living of their people. The course will address the following broad questions: What is the meaning of Economic development? Why some countries are rich while others are poor? What would explain the success of such East Asian countries as China? What are the key constrains that prevent poor countries, especially those in the African continent, from achieving progress? What are the strategies that poor countries can adopt to foster development?

ECON207 - Vietnam Immersion

This fall semester course is linked to two weeks of service-learning in Vietnam during the winter break. The course introduces students to the Vietnamese society today. It covers basic elements of Vietnamese politics, economic development, culture, history, language, literature, and arts. The experience in Vietnam includes working for non-profit organizations that deal with social problems. This course fulfills the Multicultural Area of Inquiry. Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Vietnam program director.

ECON301 - International Trade & Finance

This course examines theory, tariffs, and import quotas; adjustment mechanisms, foreign exchange, and exchange controls are also covered. Additional topics include the theory of comparative advantage, the causes and consequences of imbalances in the balance of payments or exchange rates, and the evolution of the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102.

ENV101 - Intro to Environmental Studies (KP)

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

ENV102 - Environmental Ethics & Society

This course explores issues and problems arising out of ethical considerations related to the general environment and specific ecosystems. Also considered are the moral aspects of population control and resource use. The foundations for beliefs and worldviews regarding nature and the human relationship to it are explored. In addition, the variety of philosophical perspectives and pragmatic choices and actions people take related to environmental ethics are studied.

ENV201 - Environmental Law & Policy

This course examines the role of law and politics in the management of natural resources and the environment. The course first reviews the major US environmental protection legislation and then explores the process of developing and establishing environmental policy related to water, air, energy, and land resources. Historical and contemporary circumstances that influence public policy decisions, the influence of science and technology, social and economic paradigms, and ethics and values are discussed. Even though the emphasis is on domestic U.S. policies and institutions, international issues are addressed, including how US domestic environmental policies influence and are influenced by global forces. This is a writing intensive course.

ENV204 - Environmental Economics

This course explores economic problems associated with environmental issues. The course introduces modeling and analytical tools used in the field. The course first examines the problem of market failure in the presence of externalities and public goods, and considers public policy responses to these market failures, including command-and-control regulations, tax and subsidy incentives, and marketable pollution permits. The course then addresses the methods to measure the costs and benefits of environmental improvements and how these types of analysis are used in public policy decisions. These decisions are analyzed in the context of problems such as air pollution, ozone depletion and global warming, threats to biodiversity, and development. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ECON101

ENV205 - Green Business

All businesses, from oil companies to computer manufacturers want to be "green." Being "green" is not only good for a business' marketing and publicity, but it also helps the bottom line. This course examines what it means to be a "green" business. Topics include the Triple Bottom Line, sourcing materials, energy management and recycling.

ENV206 - Special Topics in Env Studies (KP)

This course examines a particular area of environmental studies with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests.

ENV207 - Chemistry for a Sustainable Future

This course will engage students in thinking about environmental problems through the context of chemistry. The relevance of chemistry to such topics as air pollution, climate change, and water management will be explored. Students will be challenged to consider the application of chemistry to help address many of these problems.

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell College on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

ENV220 - World Geography (KP)

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

ENV301 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV302 - Natural Resource Management/GIS

This course surveys natural resource issues from global to local scales through the use of geographic information systems (GIS). GIS, remotely sensed images, and global positioning systems are used as tools in managing community natural resources. Students map natural resources and community features to explore management strategies. Students work with town commissions, state agencies, and environmental organizations to obtain spatial data for analysis.

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

ENV304 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV305 - Energy: Moving on from Fossil Fuel

Our economic prosperity relies on burning fossil fuels to power everything from our trucks to our office computers. As fossil fuels become more scarce, it is necessary to find other sources of energy. This course introduces students to our energy grid and to alternative sources of energy like wind, solar and geothermal. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 211

ENV400 - Internship

This internship is scheduled to take place during the junior year and introduces students to challenges faced by companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies. Placement is tailored to meet the student’s career goals and interests in the environmental field. Students work 150 hours over the course of the semester alongside professionals in the field. Written reflections are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship as well as regular meetings with the internship supervisor. The internship supervisor monitors each student’s performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 102, ENV 201, ENV 211.

ENV420 - Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

This course is a capstone course in Environmental Studies that focuses on current issues and trends in the environmental field. Students complete an applied thesis or practicum project in an area related to their particular interest and present it to the class and/or at symposium. Environmental career opportunities are discussed along with resume development, networking, interviewing techniques, and other career development skills. Prerequisites: ENV 400, Senior standing.

MAHT304 - Mathematics for Educators

Mathematics for Educators

MATH106 - Algebraic Operations

This course is intended to strengthen students’ ability in algebra. The course begins with introductory topics such as operations with real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and systems of equations. This course also includes an introduction to rational expressions, radicals and rational exponents.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I, covering integration, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, maxmin problems, derivatives and integrals of trigonometric functions and differential equations with applications to business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH301 - Mathematical Modeling

Mathematical ModelingPrerequisite: C or better in MATH 205, 206, and 208

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vectors and vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations, solutions of systems of differential equations using the theory of matrices, and determinants. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants and computer methods, as well as applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, archaeology, economics, communications, demography, weather prediction, connectivity of networks, graph theory, and fractals. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH328 - Mathematics Applied to Management

This course explores the art of mathematical modeling of managerial decision problems and the science of developing the solution techniques for these models. Topics include management science techniques used in today’s businesses, e.g., break-even analysis, presentation models, linear programming, transportation and assignments problems, decision theory, forecasting and inventory models, Markov analysis, and solution of nonlinear models in business using calculus-based optimization. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Mathematical Applications

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

POLS101 - American Government

This is an examination of the basic principles that form the foundation for the structure and practice of American government. The impact of the political system on the citizen is explored along with the central assumptions and concepts that serve as the basis for the field of political science.

POLS201 - State & Local Government

This course begins with the constitutional and legal basis for state and local government. The functions of the executive and legislative branches are examined. Governmental bureaucracy and budgetary processes are studied as well as political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and political reporting in the press.

POLS202 - Issues in Contemporary Political Thought

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to selected contemporary American political issues. The course is designed to create a deeper understanding and interest in these issues and develop students' capacities as citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future. Its topics change frequently to keep up with the latest developments in the field. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

POLS208 - Contemporary International Relations

Basic concepts and major contemporary problems of international relations are examined in this course. Topics include the Middle East, East-West relations, deterrence versus disarmament, human rights, and developing countries. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

POLS210 - Political Theory

In this course, central questions in political theory are addressed. What is justice? What is freedom? What is the state? What makes a government legitimate? Is there any general obligation to obey the state? The course also focuses on theories of modernity and communities, the evolution of liberalism and individualism, and the relationship between politics and economics. Readings range from the Greeks to modern thinkers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

POLS211X - Politics & Culture of the Cold War

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the Cold War, from the end of World War II to the collapse of the Soviet Union. The course will focus primarily the Cold War’s effects on domestic policy and American society, especially in film and literature; as well as its effects on U.S. foreign policy in Europe, the Far East, and Central and South America

POLS302 - The Conspiracy in American Politics

This basis of this course will be an in- depth examination of various conspiracies in American Politics and Culture, beginning with the Salem Witch trials through the Lincoln Assassination Conspiracy, the Sacco & Vanzetti case and to the present day. More recent conspiracies include an examination of the JFK and RFK Assassinations, the Pentagon Papers case, the Watergate Conspiracy, the Iran/Contra scandal, Whitewater, the "Vast Right Wing Conspiracy," the World Trade Center bombing, the Oklahoma City Bombing, Bush/Gore 2000, Global Warming, and the 9/11 Investigation. The "Obama Birther" controversy will also be covered.

POLS303 - The American Presidency

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the American presidency from both historical and political perspectives. The course will be divided into 4 distinct segments: (1) Legal -foundation of the executive branch of American government; (2) the evolution of presidential power and authority; (3) the presidential election process; and (4) the transfer of power and the transition of administrations. The major focus of the course will be the modern presidency, its power and limitations.

POLS305X - Amer Pol Institutions: Congress vs. Pres

This course will provide an in depth examination of two of the major institutions that are involved in the American policy-making process: the Congress and the President. The student will learn about the Presidential, (as opposed to the parliamentary) model found in the United States. The course will focus on the complex relationship between the President and the Congress and how that relationship affects the public policy process, including the budgetary process. The course will include a discussion of the President's role as Chief Executive, and the implementation of congressional policies.

POLS320 - Policy Making & the Political Process

This course examines the dynamics of public policy-making in the United States at the national, state, and local levels. The course explores the factors influencing policy formation in a variety of areas: health, education, welfare, and urban planning. An analysis of how policy outcomes are evaluated is also covered.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC104 - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive. This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well being. This coursewould substitute for PSYC101 (Psychological Perspectives) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class but can be taken in addition to PSYC101.

PSYC111 - Generations in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC201 - Psychology of Drugs & Behavior

The course examines the relationship between drugs and behavior, including evidence about the effects of drugs on the brain. Several classes of drugs, including chemically or psychologically addictive substances, psychoactive and therapeutic agents, as well as recreational drugs, are examined. Drug use is related to psychological variables such as personality structure and interpersonal relationships, and theories of addictive processes and factors influencing drug use are examined, as are treatment strategies. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC205 - Human Sexuality

This course is designed to introduce factual information about gender identity and gender role theories, sexual preference and sexual orientation, and psychosexual development. The course examines issues related to research on human sexuality and behavior, as well as sexual education, sexual disorders, and societal impacts on sexuality. Students are challenged to think critically about many issues surrounding human sexuality and all of its manifestations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC206 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC209X - Psyc of the Black American Experience

This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Blacks in the United States, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. Connections between Africa, the Caribbean, and Black America will be examined with respect to culture, belief systems, and values. At the same time, we will also explore the many differences in history, culture, and experience within numerous groups and individuals of African-descent in the U. S. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC218 - Dynamics of Small Groups

This class examines the basic theory and application necessary to understand and facilitate small groups. Topics may include group types, formation, roles and stages; group process; cultural awareness; group interventions and ethics within the field of psychology and human service; therapeutic value of groups; and the family, classroom, and peers as small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC222 - Social Psychology in Film

This course uses film to examine social psychological concepts and research and provides an opportunity for students to explore how people influence and are influenced by their social relationships, communities, and larger society. Films illustrate a range of social encounters that are examined from a social psychological perspective. Topics include conflict, love, personal and group behavior, prejudice, roles, privilege, and oppression. NOTE: This course meets the social psychology requirement for Social Sciences majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC242X - Health Psychology

This course is a comprehensive study of the relationship between behavior and health including psychological factors in the development of and coping with disease. Students will learn about the biological, psychological, and social context of health and illness with a focus on maintainance of physical and emotional wellness. Topics covered may include stress, addictions, nutrition, eating disorders, adjustment, pain, pediatric health, aging and/or the psycholgocial impact of specific diseases.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC304 - Sensation & Perception

It is estimated that our five senses take in 11,000,000 bits of information per second, yet we weed out much of this information. Our unique ability to sense but selectively perceive allows us to survive and live our life without being bombarded by information. In this class, students will experience and examine how humans sense and perceive the world. Topics covered will include the sensory pathways, perceptual processing, and how we create meaning from our senses. We will discuss the orienting senses, skin senses (such as touch and pain), chemical senses (such as smell), hearing, vision, and the perception of time. Perceptual processes will include physiological, psychophysical, ecological, motivational, and computational. Pre-requisite: PSYC101

PSYC306 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC307 - Forensic Psychology

This course deals with the application of psychological knowledge to the judicial process and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include effects of defendant, juror and case characteristics on verdicts, variables affecting eyewitness accuracy, identification and testimony, and the role of forensic psychologists in competency and criminal responsibility assessments as well as criminal profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or PSYC 101.

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

PSYC318 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. Both traditional and contemporary theories of psychopathology are reviewed. Emphasis is also placed on the tools, techniques, and process of both the diagnosis and the treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 202 or PSYC 220.

PSYC322 - Abnormal Child Development

This course examines common psychological disorders that affect children and adolescents. Students review factors that contribute to emotional, behavioral, cognitive and social problems in children and adolescents, as well as specific diagnostic criteria of psychological disorders. In addition, treatment of childhood disorders is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 221.

PSYC323 - Brain Function & Dysfunction

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 & MATH 208

PSYC331 - Experimental Design in Psychology

This laboratory course covers concepts of the scientific method in psychology including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. As part of the lab, students carry out an experiment and learn to use SPSS to create a database and perform statistical analyses. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC333 - Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and Permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

PSYC345 - Assessment of Individual Differences

This course studies a wide variety of tests and measurements used to assess intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality in clinical and counseling psychology, in education, and in business. Consideration of the history and theory of these tests is complemented by discussion of practical concerns related to their selection, their administration, and their interpretation in specific settings. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and PSYC 101.

PSYC406 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC714 - Psyc of Sport, Injury & Rehabilitation

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the theory and application of psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation. Topics covered include cognitive appraisal, emotional response, behavioral response, motivation, mental skills training and use, psychological antecedents of injury, adherence to rehabilitation/exercise, sociocultural factors and psychology of injury, and research methods related to the psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation.

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination (KP)

This course is designed to help students develop their ability to think critically about the world around them using the framework of sociology. Students explore the relationship between individual and society – how personal experience is shaped by social forces, but also how society is created and changed through individual interaction. The focus is on the interrelationships of groups, social organization, and social institutions such as education, religion, family, and the economic and political order.

SOC102 - Women and Gender in Social Context(KP)

his course is designed to help students develop a critical framework for examining feminist thought and gender-related social processes. Through the lens of the Sociological Imagination the course examines the ways in which sex and gender are socially constructed, how that shapes group and individual behavior and the ways in which power manifests in inequality and exploitation, as well as the agency of individuals and groups to bring about change.

SOC206 - Food and Culture

In this course, students study "food ways"; that is, how food and eating reflects and impacts social life.   The course examines the beliefs, rituals, norms, and subcultures associated with food choice.   Further, we look at food in the larger contexts of politics, the economy, and cultural survival.  Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSYC 101

SOC207X - Wealth & Poverty

Why are millions of people poor in this rich country? Why are the richest 1% getting so much wealthier? One focus of the course is how the rules of the economy have changed in the last 30 years to favor wealthy individuals and corporations. How can unjust economic policies be changed? The second focus of the course is on the power of the federal government to outlaw some exploitive practices and promote shared prosperity. The US Senate in particular has a powerful influence on economic inequality, for better or for worse. Students will evaluate Senators’ policy positions related to wealth and poverty, and articulate their own opinions about controversial economic policy debates.

SOC208 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

SOC212 - Wellness & Society

This course explores the social dimension of health and illness. Both health and illness vary across times and cultures – and this is related to how we define “normal”. Our wellbeing is also closely related to our position in society – socio-economic status, race, gender, class, ethnicity, and physical ability impact life chances, lifestyles, access to care, and attitudes towards health and illness. This course therefore covers the social distribution of illness; health disparities; global comparisons in the health of populations; the social construction of illness; the structure of health care systems and institutions; and various historical and contemporary health care debates.Prerequisite: SOC101 or PSYC101

SOC214 - Family Diversity

This course explores the meaning of "family" in a historical and cross-cultural context - it looks at the way families and households are constructed, and at how these institutions are impacted by social forces including demographic, ideological, and economic changes in societies. Family diversity is discussed in the context of social constructions such as race, class, and gender. Current themes in family sociology that are covered include, amongst others, sexuality, marriage, parenting, violence, divorce and remarriage, and family policy. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC221 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course examines conditions and issues that result in tension and disorder. Examples are drawn primarily from American society include: labeling and social control of deviants, oppression of minorities, poverty, violence, ageism, and ecological concerns. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC223X - Social Movements

You are breathing clean air right now thanks to the environmental movement. Maybe you can vote thanks to the Civil Rights or women’s suffrage movement. And don’t forget the labor movement, the folks who brought you the weekend! What inequities and crises in today's society will social movements address next? In this course, students will study contemporary social problems and the solutions that can be found by people gathering together into movements for change. This course will bring US and global movements to life through videos, photos, stories, interactive exercises, writing and discussion. By the end of the course, students will understand the strategic choices that contribute to movement success or failure in solving social problems.

SOC301 - Race & Ethnicity

This course examines the sociological constructs of race and ethnicity with a primary emphasis on people living in the United States. Topics include: the origins and consequences of racial/ethnic discriminations; immigration policies; movements for integration and separatism; the role of class, religion, and gender on issues of race/ethnicity; the impact of widely differing cultural heritages on our national life: and specific present day problems and trends including relationships betwen people of different racial and ethnic identification. Prerequisite: Any 200 level Social Science course.

SOC307X - Action & Social Justice

How can students make a difference? Small student groups waging brief action campaigns have won victories on racism, climate change, education budget cuts, sexual assault and many other social justice issues . In this hands-on course, students will together pick one injustice, develop achievable goals, and design and carry out a pressure campaign. Working in teams, students will practice persuasive communication with off-campus decision-makers, nonprofit organizations working on the same issue, the media, and the public, as well as with the Lasell community. Students will learn many skills needed for future community engagement: strategizing, meeting facilitation and group decision-making, public relations and social media advocacy, lobbying, coalition-building and event planning. Injustices confronted in this course will vary from semester based on student interest as well as on social justice issues arising in the community. Pre-requisites: PSYC101 or SOC101 or permission by instructor.

SOC308 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

SOC310 - Sociological Perspectives

This course introduces classical and contemporary perspectives in sociology. Theories are examined as explanatory tools in the understanding of social structure and social change, and as reflections of the societal conditions from which they emerged. Theories are evaluated in terms of their applicability to contemporary issues in society. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Sociology course and Junior or Senior standing.

SOC331 - Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This laboratory course introduces students to the basic methods used in sociological research. Topics include scientific method, measurement, sampling, experiments, survey research, and qualitative approaches such as content analysis and field studies, and ethical issues in conducting research. As part of the lab, students learn to use SPSS to perform statistical analysis and to access and draw upon large data sets. Students learn to use professional online search procedures and write reports in accepted professional formats. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the Dept Chair.

SOC333 - Sociology Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisite: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

SOC335 - Social Policy

This course examines historical and contemporary factors influencing the making of social policy and introduces the student to processes used to identify and solve social problems. Special attention is given to the relationships of values to social policy and the impact of social policy decisions on the provision of social and human services. Approaches to the analysis of social policy are examined. Prerequisite: Any 200 Level Sociology course or permission by the department chair.

SOC406 - Selected Topics in the Lives of Women

This capstone course examines topics important to the study of women’s issues. Representative topics that might be covered include violence against women, women in public life, social policy related to women, women and work, and reproductive issues. Prerequisite: one of the following: SOC 102, PSYC 303, or HIST 203.

SOC408 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

Michael Daley

Associate Professor of Environmental Science

Office: Bancroft House

Deirdre Donovan

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Office: Maple Street MOD

Kimberly Farah

Director of Science; The Joan Weiler Arnow ’49 Professor; Professor of Chemistry

Office: Maple Street MOD

Monica Hall-Porter

Assistant Professor of Biology

Office: Maple Street MOD

Stephen Sarikas

Professor of Biology

Office: Maple Street MOD

Aaron Toffler

Director of the Environmental Studies Program; Associate Professor of Environmental Policy

Office: Bancroft House

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ENV101 - Intro to Environmental Studies (KP)

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

ENV102 - Environmental Ethics & Society

This course explores issues and problems arising out of ethical considerations related to the general environment and specific ecosystems. Also considered are the moral aspects of population control and resource use. The foundations for beliefs and worldviews regarding nature and the human relationship to it are explored. In addition, the variety of philosophical perspectives and pragmatic choices and actions people take related to environmental ethics are studied.

ENV201 - Environmental Law & Policy

This course examines the role of law and politics in the management of natural resources and the environment. The course first reviews the major US environmental protection legislation and then explores the process of developing and establishing environmental policy related to water, air, energy, and land resources. Historical and contemporary circumstances that influence public policy decisions, the influence of science and technology, social and economic paradigms, and ethics and values are discussed. Even though the emphasis is on domestic U.S. policies and institutions, international issues are addressed, including how US domestic environmental policies influence and are influenced by global forces. This is a writing intensive course.

ENV204 - Environmental Economics

This course explores economic problems associated with environmental issues. The course introduces modeling and analytical tools used in the field. The course first examines the problem of market failure in the presence of externalities and public goods, and considers public policy responses to these market failures, including command-and-control regulations, tax and subsidy incentives, and marketable pollution permits. The course then addresses the methods to measure the costs and benefits of environmental improvements and how these types of analysis are used in public policy decisions. These decisions are analyzed in the context of problems such as air pollution, ozone depletion and global warming, threats to biodiversity, and development. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ECON101

ENV205 - Green Business

All businesses, from oil companies to computer manufacturers want to be "green." Being "green" is not only good for a business' marketing and publicity, but it also helps the bottom line. This course examines what it means to be a "green" business. Topics include the Triple Bottom Line, sourcing materials, energy management and recycling.

ENV207 - Chemistry for a Sustainable Future

This course will engage students in thinking about environmental problems through the context of chemistry. The relevance of chemistry to such topics as air pollution, climate change, and water management will be explored. Students will be challenged to consider the application of chemistry to help address many of these problems.

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell College on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

ENV220 - World Geography (KP)

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

ENV302 - Natural Resource Management/GIS

This course surveys natural resource issues from global to local scales through the use of geographic information systems (GIS). GIS, remotely sensed images, and global positioning systems are used as tools in managing community natural resources. Students map natural resources and community features to explore management strategies. Students work with town commissions, state agencies, and environmental organizations to obtain spatial data for analysis.

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

ENV304 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV305 - Energy: Moving on from Fossil Fuel

Our economic prosperity relies on burning fossil fuels to power everything from our trucks to our office computers. As fossil fuels become more scarce, it is necessary to find other sources of energy. This course introduces students to our energy grid and to alternative sources of energy like wind, solar and geothermal. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 211

ENV400 - Internship

This internship is scheduled to take place during the junior year and introduces students to challenges faced by companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies. Placement is tailored to meet the student’s career goals and interests in the environmental field. Students work 150 hours over the course of the semester alongside professionals in the field. Written reflections are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship as well as regular meetings with the internship supervisor. The internship supervisor monitors each student’s performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 102, ENV 201, ENV 211.

ENV420 - Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

This course is a capstone course in Environmental Studies that focuses on current issues and trends in the environmental field. Students complete an applied thesis or practicum project in an area related to their particular interest and present it to the class and/or at symposium. Environmental career opportunities are discussed along with resume development, networking, interviewing techniques, and other career development skills. Prerequisites: ENV 400, Senior standing.

IDS399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful Internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Must have at least Sophomore standing.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

POLS101 - American Government

This is an examination of the basic principles that form the foundation for the structure and practice of American government. The impact of the political system on the citizen is explored along with the central assumptions and concepts that serve as the basis for the field of political science.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination (KP)

This course is designed to help students develop their ability to think critically about the world around them using the framework of sociology. Students explore the relationship between individual and society – how personal experience is shaped by social forces, but also how society is created and changed through individual interaction. The focus is on the interrelationships of groups, social organization, and social institutions such as education, religion, family, and the economic and political order.