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General Education Core & Areas of Inquiry

Undergraduate General Education Core
Fulfillment of the General Education Core helps to ensure that students gain the necessary skills and the breadth of knowledge needed to be responsible, competent, and contributing members of a diverse and increasingly technological society, both within and beyond their chosen professions. The General Education Core establishes the basis for lifelong learning after graduation from the College.

General Education Areas of Inquiry (21-23 credits)
The first five of the seven General Education Areas of Inquiry (AI) must be fulfilled with courses in the Arts & Sciences. A single course may not be used to fulfill more than one Area of Inquiry unless otherwise allowed under a specific Major's course requirements. In certain Majors, designated course requirements fulfill some of the Areas of Inquiry, as noted in the catalog.

General Education Core Continued

Majors Requiring a Foreign Language

Aesthetic - Area of Inquiry

Historical - Area of Inquiry

Multicultural - Area of Inquiry

Psychological and Societal - Area of Inquiry

Inquiry into the internal and external processes and structures that influence the relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions.

COURSE CODE
COURSE TITLE
CREDITS
Psychological and Societal

 

 

X
 
 
ANTH101

ANTH101 - Principles of Anthropology

Anthropology offers the student a cross-cultural, comparative perspective on the human condition. In this course, students explore the varieties of ways in which human societies are organized. The five sub-disciplines of anthropology are introduced: cultural, biological or physical, archaeological, linguistic, and applied. Students gain an appreciation for the unique perspective of anthropology, including how anthropologists conduct fieldwork and contributions anthropology can make to effect social change. The aim of this course is to provide an overview of the field of anthropology, and to teach the student how to think systematically about how social groups work and how to understand human behavior in its cultural context.

X
Principles of Anthropology
3
CJ101

CJ101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, and legal issues related to the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, focusing on critical decisions with an emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends.

X
Introduction to Criminal Justice
3
ECON101

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 103 or placement in any math course above MATH 103.

X
Principles of Econ-Micro
3
ECON103

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development. Prerequisite: A grade of C or above in Math 103 or placement in any math course above Math 103.

X
Economics of Social Issues
3
ENV101

ENV101 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

X
Introduction to Environmental Studies
3
LS101

LS101 - Foundations of American Legal System

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the law. Students are introduced to the basics of the legal system in the United States including its organization and operation. The course covers major areas of legal practice and the legal principles that apply. Legal concepts are explained and legal terminology defined.

X
Foundations of American Legal System
3
POLS101

POLS101 - American Government

This is an examination of the basic principles that form the foundation for the structure and practice of American government. The impact of the political system on the citizen is explored along with the central assumptions and concepts that serve as the basis for the field of political science.

X
American Government
3
POLS201

POLS201 - State & Local Government

This course begins with the constitutional and legal basis for state and local government. The functions of the executive and legislative branches are examined. Governmental bureaucracy and budgetary processes are studied as well as political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and political reporting in the press.

X
State & Local Government
3
POLS202

POLS202 - Issues in Contemporary Political Thought

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to selected contemporary American political issues. The course is designed to create a deeper understanding and interest in these issues and develop students' capacities as citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future. Its topics change frequently to keep up with the latest developments in the field. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

X
Issues in Contemporary Political Thought
3
PSYC101

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

X
Psychological Perspectives
3
PSYC111

PSYC111 - Aging in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

X
Aging in America
3
SOC101

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination

This course is designed to help students develop their ability to think critically about the world around them using the framework of sociology. Students explore the relationship between individual and society – how personal experience is shaped by social forces, but also how society is created and changed through individual interaction. The focus is on the interrelationships of groups, social organization, and social institutions such as education, religion, family, and the economic and political order.

X
Sociological Imagination
3
SOC102

SOC102 - Introduction to Women's Studies

This course is designed to help students develop a critical framework for examining feminist thought and gender-related behaviors. Utilizing sociology, anthropology, history, and literature the course examines the roles and stereotypes society ascribes to women and how those roles impact the development of a feminist perspective in a contemporary world.

X
Introduction to Women's Studies
3

Scientific - Area of Inquiry

Quantitative - Area of Inquiry

Moral and Ethical - Area of Inquiry