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General Education Core & Areas of Inquiry

Undergraduate General Education Core
Fulfillment of the General Education Core helps to ensure that students gain the necessary skills and the breadth of knowledge needed to be responsible, competent, and contributing members of a diverse and increasingly technological society, both within and beyond their chosen professions. The General Education Core establishes the basis for lifelong learning after graduation from the College.

General Education Areas of Inquiry (21-23 credits)
The first five of the seven General Education Areas of Inquiry (AI) must be fulfilled with courses in the Arts & Sciences. A single course may not be used to fulfill more than one Area of Inquiry unless otherwise allowed under a specific Major's course requirements. In certain Majors, designated course requirements fulfill some of the Areas of Inquiry, as noted in the catalog.

General Education Core Continued

Majors Requiring a Foreign Language

Aesthetic - Area of Inquiry

Historical - Area of Inquiry

Multicultural - Area of Inquiry

Awareness of cultural diversity through the study of non-western, or nonwhite American, history/culture/literature; or comparative cultural studies; or the study of diversity in race, class, gender, sexuality, and/or disabilities; or the study of a foreign language at the intermediate level; or study or service-learning abroad for academic credit.

COURSE CODE
COURSE TITLE
CREDITS
Multicultural

 

 

X
 
 
ANTH101

ANTH101 - Principles of Anthropology

Anthropology offers the student a cross-cultural, comparative perspective on the human condition. In this course, students explore the varieties of ways in which human societies are organized. The five sub-disciplines of anthropology are introduced: cultural, biological or physical, archaeological, linguistic, and applied. Students gain an appreciation for the unique perspective of anthropology, including how anthropologists conduct fieldwork and contributions anthropology can make to effect social change. The aim of this course is to provide an overview of the field of anthropology, and to teach the student how to think systematically about how social groups work and how to understand human behavior in its cultural context.

X
Principles of Anthropology
3
ANTH103

ANTH103 - Human Origins

This course considers the morphological, behavioral and life history features that distinguish the primates from other mammals, and the hominoids from other primates. We begin with an overview of the primates and their behavioral ecology, and then explore in detail the adaptations of each of the major groups of extant primates. Finally, we apply our knowledge of morphology and behavioral patterns in living primates to the fossil record.

X
Human Origins
3
ANTH210

ANTH210 - Folklore & Folklife

This course serves as an introduction to folklore and folklife, the ways that individuals, families and communities express themselves, their beliefs, and their values within their own culture. It emphasizes the understanding of meaning revealed in the full range of folkloristic genres: oral literature such as the tales, sayings and poetry; material culture, the individual skills and techniques displayed by craftspeople and artists and the products resulting from their application; the social customs of rites of passage and festivals; and the aesthetically subtle performing folk arts such as singing and dancing. The primary focus of the course for each student is the folklore and folklife of his or her own family and/or a Lasell Village elder's family and community, which is documented in archive-ready format and organized in a personal report of Family Folklore. Class activities are designed to get at the "feel" of folklore and folklife.

X
Folklore & Folklife
3
ANTH212

ANTH212 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

X
Special Topics in Anthropology
3
ANTH312

ANTH312 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

X
Special Topics in Anthropology
3
ANTH412

ANTH412 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

X
Special Topics in Anthropology
3
BUSS332

BUSS332 - Cross Cultural Management

This course explores the process of cross-cultural man­agement and the challenges of working internationally. The course focuses on international organizational behavior and human resource issues and practices in global organizations. The course is divided into three parts. The first focuses on understanding the cultural roots of behavior in organizations, the second on the Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management issues that are relevant to international managers, and the third seeks to prepare students for international assignments. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

X
Cross Cultural Management
3
BUSS422

BUSS422 - Global Marketing

The complexity of operating in the global marketplace makes many demands on the marketer. The globalization of marketing takes place after the company has international experience in multiple markets. The three fundamental areas of corporate globalization are covered in this course: (1) integrate sourcing, production, and marketing; (2) allocate resources to achieve a balanced portfolio and growth; and (3) coordinate marketing activities across countries and regions. Importing, exporting, and licensing considerations are explored. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

X
Global Marketing
3
CJ315

CJ315 - Global Technology & Crime

In this course the advances in technology developed in crime investigation will be examined, like crime mapping. The impact of technology and media on international crime and new globally-oriented cooperative enforcement strategies will also be examined. Students will gain a better understanding of crime control in a global society.”

X
Global Technology & Crime
3
CJ317

CJ317 - Comparative Justice Systems

This course analyzes differences in global approaches to law enforcement, criminal procedure, criminal law, corrections, juvenile justice, and prevention. The material provides a worldwide overview of cultural and legal traditions that are related to crime. Through cross-cultural comparisons, the course examines whether due process rights must be sacrificed in order to achieve crime control effectiveness and efficiency. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

X
Comparative Justice Systems
3
CJ323

CJ323 - Justice, Class, Race & Gender

This course explores issues unique to individuals of different classes, gender, and/or races or ethnic groups. The course focuses on these issues specifically in the context of the American criminal justice and legal systems. Issues of diversity relevant to all aspects of the criminal justice system are examined. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101, Sophomore standing.

X
Justice, Class, Race & Gender
3
COM212

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

X
Intercultural Communication
3
ECON301

ECON301 - International Trade & Finance

This course examines theory, tariffs, and import quotas; adjustment mechanisms, foreign exchange, and exchange controls are also covered. Additional topics include the theory of comparative advantage, the causes and consequences of imbalances in the balance of payments or exchange rates, and the evolution of the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102.

X
International Trade & Finance
3
ED211

ED211 - Identifying Special Needs Learners

This course introduces students to characteristics of learners with special needs in regular classroom settings. Students focus on definitions; causes; assessments; medical, emotional, and behavioral differences; and educational interventions for students with various conditions including mental retardation; learning disabilities; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; emotional and/or behavioral disorders; differences in communication, hearing, vision, cognitive, and physical ability; and special gifts and talents.

X
Identifying Special Needs Learners
3
ED418

ED418 - Integrated Instruction: Elementary

In this course, students explore research on social studies education as well as the teaching methods and related teaching materials that encourage learning in this discipline among children in an elementary school setting. In addition, students examine a variety of ways to effectively integrate the arts into the elementary curriculum.

X
Integrated Instruction: Elementary
3
ED420

ED420 - Integrated Instruction: PK - Grade 2

In this course, students explore research on social studies education as well as the teaching methods and related teaching materials that encourage learning in this discipline among children in the early childhood education setting. In addition, students examine a variety of ways to effectively integrate the arts into the early childhood curriculum.

X
Integrated Instruction: PK - Grade 2
3
ENG104

ENG104 - Academic Reading & Writing

This elective writing course is designed for any student who recognizes the need for additional work on reading and/or writing following completion of ENG 101 and 102. The course focuses on close reading and academic writing in response to readings about American culture from across the academic disciplines. Students develop and reinforce their skills in using reading strategies and in selecting and integrating text from a reading, analyzing issues, and synthesizing ideas in a focused and coherent essay. Students may be placed into an ESL section of this course. Prerequisite: ENG 102

X
Academic Reading & Writing
3
ENG312

ENG312 - Literature of Post-Colonial World

In this course, students consider issues, movements, or traditions in literatures that respond to a history of colonization and/or imperialism. Latin American, African, and Asian cultures or traditions are emphasized in English or in English translations; issues addressed might include matters of publication and criticism, myths about the "third world," nationalism, fundamentalism, human rights, technology, and cultural resistance. Examples include The Novel in India, Caribbean Dub Poetry, Prison Writing, Major South African Writers, Magic Realism. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

X
Literature of Post-Colonial World
3
ENG313

ENG313 - American Multi Ethnic Literature

This course focuses on the history, variety, and aesthetic conventions of one or more racial-ethnic traditions in American writing. Individual courses might focus on key forms or authors; distinct traditions such as African-American, Latino, Asian-American, or Native American literature; or a survey across several traditions. Examples include Barack Obama and the African-American Tradition, Contemporary Latino Literatures, or Haiti and the US in Haitian-American Writing. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

X
American Multi Ethnic Literature
3
FASH204

FASH204 - Fashion Research Abroad

This course brings design and merchandising fashion students together in an international setting to offer exposure to and research of the ever changing global fashion industry. The spring portion of the This course focuses on the host country’s culture and fashion industry, setting the stage for an intensive study abroad experience. Course structure abroad is a combination of lecture and field practice. In addition to Lasell faculty, professionals from the host country’s fashion industry teaching a variety of topics. Hands-on workshops may play an important role in exploring content. Cultural immersion includes a community service project that engages students in reflecting on the evolving social consciousness in the global fashion market place. Prerequisite: ENG 101, FASH 101 or FASD 103 and permission of instructor.

X
Fashion Research Abroad
3
HIST203

HIST203 - The History of Women in U.S.

This course explores the social history of women in the United States, beginning in the colonial period and ending with an examination of twen­tieth century issues. Emphasis is on the image of women held during these periods, in contrast to actual conditions. Contributions of women to social change and the growth of women’s move­ments are also analyzed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

X
The History of Women in U.S.
3
HIST207

HIST207 - African American History

This course explores the history of African Americans in the United States from their African beginnings to the present. It traces the lives and status of African Americans, enslaved and emancipated, as they confronted the barriers of legal, institutional, and cultural prejudices; examines the socioeconomic and political experiences of blacks in America; and investigates strategies of accommodation, resistance, and protest in the struggle of African Americans to gain human and first-class citizenship rights. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

X
African American History
3
HIST208

HIST208 - Sub-Saharan Africa after 1800

This survey of sub-Saharan African history explores the ongoing story of African political, social, and economic developments from the post trans-Atlantic slave trade period to the present. The course includes treatment of the impact of European merchants, missionaries, and adventurers on Africa from the time immediately preceding imperialism and colonialism up through the emergence of nationalism and decolonization and liberation movements. The new nation-states, their post-colonial economies, and their developing systems of justice, education, and rule are investigated. Finally, topics such as soil erosion, disease, conservation, famine, and Africa’s relationships with the wider world are discussed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

X
Sub-Saharan Africa after 1800
3
HIST209

HIST209 - China from 1600 to Present

This course is a survey of modern Chinese history from the founding of the Qing Dynasty in the seventeenth century to Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms of the 1990s. Special attention will be paid to modernization, Western and Japanese imperialism in China, and the rise of Communism under Mao Zedong. In addition to learning about important milestones in Chinese history, students will also be introduced to aspects of Chinese art, culture, and women's issues through primary sources translated into English. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

X
China from 1600 to Present
3
HIST210

HIST210 - Latin Amer Colonial Period to Present

This survey looks at Latin American history from pre-Columbian to contemporary times. Emphasis is on native cultures, the “discovery” of the New World, European presence, colonialism, imperialism, the creation of the peasantry, wars of independence, the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, slavery and racism, development and underdevelopment, the Catholic Church, liberation theology, poverty, and revolution. Major emphasis in South America is on Argentina, Columbia, Peru, Chile, Venezuela, and the Portuguese speaking nation of Brazil. The course also includes examination of foreign intervention and inner instability in Mexico, including struggles for democracy, economic rights, and social justice. In the Hispanic Caribbean and Central America, especially, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama, land and labor systems, gender relations, race and ethnicity, and varied forms of rule are discussed. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

X
Latin Amer Colonial Period to Present
3
HIST211

HIST211 - Middle East & Islamic World Since 1800

This course looks at the Middle East and its relations with the wider world, from the appearance of Napoleon to the present. Topics include attempts at reform and modernization in the Ottoman Empire; the impact of Western imperialism on the region as a whole; and twentieth-century developments in the area, including nationalism, pan-Arabism, pan-Islamism, the cult of the personality, coup, revolution, Zionism, and the Palestinian-Israeli confrontation. The economic and social impact of oil, the influence of fundamentalism, and the Great Power rivalry down through the position of the United States toward the area are investigated. The efforts of Iran to gain acceptance in/by the contemporary world is examined, as is the shifting attitude of Egypt toward modernity. Finally, connections between the region and the rest of the Islamic world are explored. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

X
Middle East & Islamic World Since 1800
3
HIST212

HIST212 - Mod Japan: Culture & History

This course is a survey of Japan's modernization from the fall of the "warring states" period to the economic bubble of the 1980s. Special attention will be paid to the contributions of the "early modern" Tokugawa Shogunate, the Meiji period of cultural borrowing from the West, and the cultural nationalism of the Japanese empire until 1945. In addition to learning about important milestones in Japanese history, students will be introduced to aspects of Japanese art and culture through a variety of primary and secondary sources and film clips. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

X
Mod Japan: Culture & History
3
HIST218

HIST218 - Global History of Childhood

This course introduces students to how cultural ideas about childhood and childrearing have changed over time. Using Western history as a departure point, the course will compare and contrast key topics of childhood, such as child labor and child rights, in various cultures. This is primarily a discussion seminar, in which students present and discuss a variety of academic readings. There is also a service-learning component. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: HIST 103, HIST 104, HIST 123, HIST 124, or permission of instructor.

X
Global History of Childhood
3
HIST231

HIST231 - Revolutions & Revolutionary Thought

This course provides an analysis of many types, facets, and styles of revolution, including political, cultural, and scientific meanings of the concept. The readings are taken from literature as well as from history and the social sciences. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

X
Revolutions & Revolutionary Thought
3
HUM205

HUM205 - Mexico in Context

This fall semester course includes fifteen hours of service during the term and two weeks of community service and study in Mexico during January break. The course provides an introduction to Mexican history and culture and offers a variety of perspectives on globalization, poverty, and human rights. The experience in Mexico includes individual home stays with Mexican families and a minimum of 60 hours of manual labor and reflective intellectual work, including class sessions, as well as structured and unstructured encounters with business owners, farm workers, university students, and city officials in two cities in Veracruz, Mexico. The goal of service-learning in the state of Veracruz is not to change Mexico, but to learn about the country from Mexicans, and about the impact of the United States on its neighbors. The course and trip fulfill a Multicultural Area of Inquiry requirement. Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Mexico program director.

X
Mexico in Context
4
JPN102

JPN102 - Elementary Japanese II

This is a continuation of Japanese 101. Emphasis is placed on the spoken language and mastery of basic kanji characters. The course includes some readings in the hiragana writing system. Prerequisite: JPN 101 (with "C" or better) or permission of the instructor.

X
Elementary Japanese II
3
LS305

LS305 - Comparative Law & Legal Systems

This course introduces students to the complex issues involved in comparing various laws and legal systems around the contemporary world. The course focuses on the main legal systems in terms of the structure and sources of their laws and against the historical and political background in which these laws were formed. Prerequisite: LS 101.

X
Comparative Law & Legal Systems
3
MUS104

MUS104 - World Music

This course introduces students to the world of music through analysis and examination of music and culture from different ethnic groups. The musical characteristics of India, the Middle East, Indonesia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, Native American Indians, Ethnic North America, and the musical culture of Europe are addressed. Students listen to a selected repertoire and analyze the music and readings about music in class.

X
World Music
3
PHIL106

PHIL106 - World Religions

This course provides an overview of the major religious traditions: Taoism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Central themes from these traditions are studied through selected scriptures and texts of each tradition.

X
World Religions
3
PHIL208

PHIL208 - Knowing & Reality

This course is a comparative analysis of eastern and western perception of reality in philosophy and literature, beginning with an historical overview of theories of knowledge and truth as well as the psychological factors in learning. Prerequisites: PHIL 101, PSYC 101.

X
Knowing & Reality
3
POLS208

POLS208 - Contemporary International Relations

Basic concepts and major contemporary problems of international relations are examined in this course. Topics include the Middle East, East-West relations, deterrence versus disarmament, human rights, and developing countries. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

X
Contemporary International Relations
3
PSYC241

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

X
The Psychological Life of Girls & Women
3
PSYC316

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

X
Psychology of Diversity
3
SOC102

SOC102 - Introduction to Women's Studies

This course is designed to help students develop a critical framework for examining feminist thought and gender-related behaviors. Utilizing sociology, anthropology, history, and literature the course examines the roles and stereotypes society ascribes to women and how those roles impact the development of a feminist perspective in a contemporary world.

X
Introduction to Women's Studies
3
SOC301

SOC301 - Race & Ethnic Relations

This course examines the changing nature of race and ethnic relations with primary emphasis on the United States. Topics include: the origins and consequences of racial/ethnic discriminations; immigration policies; movements for integration and separatism; the role of class, religion, and gender on issues of race/ethnicity; the impact of widely differing cultural heritages on our national life: and specific present day problems and trends. Prerequisite: Any 200 level Social Science course.

X
Race & Ethnic Relations
3

Psychological and Societal - Area of Inquiry

Scientific - Area of Inquiry

Quantitative - Area of Inquiry

Moral and Ethical - Area of Inquiry