2016 - 2017 Academic Catalog

Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

AAC101 - The Learning Process

This course introduces new students to strategic learning techniques focusing on effective use of prior knowledge and targeted strategies to advance and optimize their learning in college. Students actively integrate and apply various study skills, learning strategies, active reading/note-taking, time management and organization skills learned in this course to their other courses throughout the semester. This is the first of a two semester experience.

AAC102 - The Learning Process

This continues to support new students with reinforcing strategic learning techniques focusing on effective use of prior knowledge and targeted strategies to advance and optimize their learning in college. Students actively integrate and apply various study skills, learning strategies, active reading/note-taking, time management and organization skills learned in this course to their other courses throughout the semester. This is the second of a two semester experience.

AAC103 - Academic Achievement Center

This course supports returning students with strategic learning techniques to promote a successful academic semester. Students practice targeted strategies to advance and optimize their learning experience while completing course requirements. Students actively integrate and apply various study skills, learning strategies, active reading/note-taking, time management and organization skills learned in this course to their other courses throughout the semester.

ANTH101 - Principles of Anthropology

Anthropology offers the student a cross-cultural, comparative perspective on the human condition. In this course, students explore the varieties of ways in which human societies are organized. The five sub-disciplines of anthropology are introduced: cultural, biological or physical, archaeological, linguistic, and applied. Students gain an appreciation for the unique perspective of anthropology, including how anthropologists conduct fieldwork and contributions anthropology can make to effect social change. The aim of this course is to provide an overview of the field of anthropology, and to teach the student how to think systematically about how social groups work and how to understand human behavior in its cultural context.

ANTH103 - Human Origins

This course considers the morphological, behavioral and life history features that distinguish the primates from other mammals, and the hominoids from other primates. We begin with an overview of the primates and their behavioral ecology, and then explore in detail the adaptations of each of the major groups of extant primates. Finally, we apply our knowledge of morphology and behavioral patterns in living primates to the fossil record.

ANTH210 - Folklore & Folklife

This course serves as an introduction to folklore and folklife, the ways that individuals, families and communities express themselves, their beliefs, and their values within their own culture. It emphasizes the understanding of meaning revealed in the full range of folkloristic genres: oral literature such as the tales, sayings and poetry; material culture, the individual skills and techniques displayed by craftspeople and artists and the products resulting from their application; the social customs of rites of passage and festivals; and the aesthetically subtle performing folk arts such as singing and dancing. The primary focus of the course for each student is the folklore and folklife of his or her own family and/or a Lasell Village elder's family and community, which is documented in archive-ready format and organized in a personal report of Family Folklore. Class activities are designed to get at the "feel" of folklore and folklife.

ANTH212 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

ANTH213 - Visual Anthropology

This course focuses on the encounter of the anthropologist and the filmmaker with that of his or her subjects and deals with issues of cultural perspective, gender, power, and authorship. Through the film screenings, lectures, ethnographies, theoretical readings, classroom discussions and the creation of their own documentary film, students develop a critical perspective for viewing films, videos, and television presentation and representation of different peoples and cultures. Students learn the fundamentals of viewing and undertaking ethnography, screenwriting, working with a digital camera, and editing. A key course objective is for students to acquire the basic skills to create visually interesting artistic statements through film that are a meta-commentary on contemporary youth culture.

ANTH214 - Documentary Film for Social Change

This course considers the history and development of anthropological, ethnographic, and trans-cultural filmmaking. It is an in-depth examination of important anthropological films in terms of content, methodology, techniques, and strategies of expression such as the storyline, themes, editing, inter-titles, narration, voice-over, dialogue, subtitles, style (artistic and aesthetic sensibilities,) accuracy, and film truth. Through the film screenings, lectures, theoretical readings, classroom discussions and the creation of their own documentary short film, students develop a critical perspective for viewing films, videos, television presentation, and representation of different peoples and cultures.

ANTH312 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

ANTH412 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

ARTH103 - Art History I

This course presents a survey of artistic styles from the prehistoric period through the art of the early Renaissance. Periods included are Egyptian, Aegean, Greek, Roman and Etruscan art, and the art of the Middle Ages. Films and slides are used in the presentation of works of art from the fields of architecture, sculpture, and painting.

ARTH104 - Art History II

This course presents a study of works of art from the High Renaissance and the Mannerist periods, the Renaissance in the North, the Baroque period, and the Modern Age. Slides and films are used in this presentation of works of art from the fields of architecture, sculpture, and painting.

ARTH107 - Special Topics in Art (KP)

This course introduces students to the study of art history by focusing on one theme, one artist, or one form of art. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints and drawings may be considered. Stylistic, cultural, and historic elements are components of the course.

ARTS101 - Studio Drawing I

This course introduces students to a variety of drawing tools and media. Drawing from life, line, tonality, illusional space, and perspective are explored. Creativity and individual expression are stressed.

ARTS103 - Printmaking

This course provides an introduction to printmaking with an emphasis on the translation and development of images into a printed media, as well as the design and organization of space. Types of printmaking to be explored include relief, monotype, and drypoint.

ARTS106 - Museum Discovery (KP)

This course introduces students to the world of art museums, galleries, auction houses, and various other art institutions, through a series of site visits and some involvement in actual gallery work. By exploring venues and the communities they serve, students will address the question, "What is an art museum or gallery, and why is it a part of our society?"

ARTS108 - Fundamentals of Art Management

This course exposes students to a variety of leadership and managerial roles in the context of an arts organization. Topics include strategic planning, budgeting, program development, fundraising and grant writing, as well as an examination of the differences between non-profit and for-profit arts management.

ARTS110 - Traditions & Methods of Art Photo (KP)

This course focuses on Photography as an art form, introducing students to the history of the practice, its most significant practitioners and their work, as well as techniques and methodologies of art photography. The course will combine both survey and studio teaching approaches so that students have the opportunity to immediately put into practice newly acquired knowledge and skills.

ARTS111X - Intro to Ceramics

This course will teach the fundamentals of working with the potters wheel, forming bowls and cylinders, texturing and coloring, surface decoration, glazing and firing in our renovated kilns. Students also learn theories and best practices of working with ceramics—studying ancient traditions and more modern approaches in a hands-on exploration of form and function.

ARTS113X - Clay figure Sculpting

Using water-based clay, the class will create small-scale figure studies, sculpt individual parts of the face and end with one life-size portrait bust. With an emphasis on realism, the course is designed to cover structure, form, proportion and anatomy, as tools for self-expression. No prior art experience is necessary.

ARTS120 - Three-D Design

This course introduces students to the notion of creating within three-dimensional space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive perspectives. Students construct various models and/or maquettes. Problem solving and individual expression are emphasized NOTE: Graphic Design majors should seek out the majors-only section when enrolling.

ARTS126 - Principles of Design & Color (KP)

This course is an introduction to the theories and concepts of design and color with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one’s life and as a way to complement one’s aesthetic needs. This is a lecture/discussion/critique course with visual material, critical essays, individual expression, and museum/gallery trips. NOTE: First year Graphic Design majors should seek out the majors-only section when enrollling.

ARTS130 - Watercolor

This is an introductory course on watercolor painting that incorporates various techniques such as glazing, wet on wet, graduated tone, and negative painting. Students acquire an understanding of basic color theory and composition. They experiment with the different relationships of wet paper, dry paper, and pigments.

ARTS201 - Studio Drawing II

This course offers the experienced drawing student a chance to continue building life drawing, human figure, still lifes and landscape skills. In addition to studio work, students learn what is necessary to advance their knowledge of design by studying the masters. Periodic class discussions help students learn visual analysis and a general approach to the criticism of art. Prerequisite: ARTS 101 or permission of instructor.

ARTS203 - Painting

This course introduces students to a variety of styles and techniques used in oil and/or acrylic painting. Canvas stretching and priming, color mixing, and brush selection are addressed. Prerequisite: ARTS 101 or permission of instructor.

ARTS205 - Art for Educators

The arts process allows students to call on many talents simultaneously, including perceiving, responding, understanding, creating, self-evaluation, and development of related skills. This course exposes education students to new ideas and art forms, and ideas, tools, and processes from arts disciplines. Students work with a variety of art forms including drawing, painting & 3D.

ARTS207 - Figure Drawing

The purpose of this course is to help students obtain the basic skill of drawing the human form, including anatomy, observation of the human form and fundamental exercises in gesture, contour, outline, and tonal modeling. $50 Student Fee for the models.

ARTS212X - Fighting Injustice Thru Art & Creativity

In this interdisciplinary class, we will use and interpret historical and contemporary forms of creative expression to highlight and seek to understand oppression, personal struggle and injustice. This class will integrate the Individual and Society, Global and Historical, and Aesthetics and Creativity knowledge perspectives into our exploration of inequity and injustice that exists around the world.

ARTS219 - Digital Photograhy I

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

ARTS301 - Studio Drawing III

This course is for students who wish to advance their drawing skills to a higher level. In addition to refining techniques with various drawing media, such as ink, graphite, and mixed media, students address perceptual and aesthetic issues in relation to their own work within contemporary and historical contexts. The expressive character of lines, tones, and marks are studied as inseparable from fundamental concepts and content of drawing. Developing a unique and personal vision is a primary consideration. Prerequisite: ARTS 201 or permission of instructor.

ARTS302 - Studio Painting II

This course is designed for students who wish to advance their painting skills to a higher level. In addition to refining painting techniques, students address perceptual and aesthetic issues in relation to their own work within contemporary and historical contexts. Merging inquiry and intuition, students are expected to commit to discovering individual creative expression. Prerequisite: ARTS 203 or permission of instructor.

ARTS319 - Digital Photography II

This course involves the study of the graphic image and how visual messages are used in a diverse media. This is an advanced photography course with an emphasis on technical methods. Hands-on studio projects give the student skills that contribute to thoughtful and effective communication. Prerequisite: ARTS 219.

ARTS399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter and resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Junior standing is required.

ARTS400 - Internship

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing.

ARTS404 - Senior Thesis I

Arts Management students engage in an individual research and writing practice that challenges them to analyze and investigate a specialized area of arts administration and arts management. This capstone course also provides students an opportunity to clarify their professional goals based on their interests in arts management. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ARTS406 - Senior Practicum

The Arts Management senior practicum provides an opportunity for students in the final semester of their program to produce a self-directed capstone project that applies the theories and techniques that they have been developing over the last four years. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ASL111 - Elementary ASL I

This first course in the three-course ASL sequence introduces students to the structure of ASL and its status as a world language; it also addresses the history and culture of the Deaf community. Students master fundamental receptive and expressive ASL skills, with emphasis when appropriate on communicative competence, vocabulary development, ASL grammar, and narrative/artistic forms. This is a four-credit course.

ASL112 - Elementary ASL II

In this second course in the three-course ASL sequence, students continue to master the structure of ASL as a world language. Students continue to learn vocabulary, features of ASL grammar, and facets of Deaf cultural behavior. The course also addresses narrative/artistic forms, pertinent social service agencies, history of the Deaf community, and political concerns. This is a four-credit course. Prerequisite: ASL111 or permission of instructor.

ASL211 - Intermediate ASL I

In this third course in the three course sequence, students advance and refine their mastery of the structure of ASL. Students continue to learn ASL vocabulary and are introduced to advanced features of ASL grammar. Students examine increasingly sophisticated narrative/artistic forms; students also consider the ways in which signed language both reflects and enriches Deaf culture. In addition, political concerns of the Deaf community are considered, as students explore the Deaf experience. Prerequisite: ASL112

AT101 - Essentials of Musculoskeletal Anatomy

This course provides students with foundational concepts associated with the healthcare and fitness industry. Through connected learning projects, emphasis is placed on understanding musculoskeletal anatomy and medical nomenclature. Formerly - AHLT101

AT103 - Techniques of Emergency Care

This course emphasizes principles and techniques for recognition and management of life-threatening and non-life-threatening medical emergency situations. Additionally, the course content includes a variety of injury and illness prevention techniques including, taping, bracing and proper hydration. The lab component of the course includes techniques for immobilization, airway management, athletic equipment management, and removal in emergency situations. At the completion of the course students will be eligible for certification in CPR Professional Rescuer/AED and First Aid by the American Red Cross.

AT202 - Foundations in Sport Medicine

This course is a basic athletic training course providing an overview of prevention, recognition, and initial management of common athletic injuries. Additional topics covered in the course include: issues in health care administration, nutritional considerations, environmental issues, protective equipment, tissue healing, bloodborne pathogens and rehabilitation concepts. Formerly - AT201

AT204 - Clinical Athletic Training II

This course requires a minimum of 125 hours of supervised clinical education experience at affiliated athletic training sites. Emphasis is placed on the athletic trainer’s role in working with an athletic team. The laboratory component meets two hours weekly to develop additional evaluation techniques and knowledge of anatomical landmarks. Prerequisites: AT 211

AT205 - Clinical Athletic Training I

"This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of supervised clinical education experience at affiliated athletic training sites. Clinical education experiences include working with intercollegiate athletic teams with an emphasis placed on understanding the operation of an AT facility, policies and procedures, implementation of emergency techniques and first aid, application of taping and bracing techniques and engaging in professional interactions. The laboratory component of the course meets 2 hours weekly and focuses on musculoskeletal anatomy, taping and bracing, wound care and basic injury evaluations. Prerequisites: AT103 & AT202; Co-requisite AT 211Formerly - AT203"

AT206 - Clinical Athletic Training II

This course requires a minimum of 100 hours of supervised clinical education experience at affiliated athletic training sites. Emphasis is placed on the athletic trainer’s role in working with an athletic team. The laboratory component meets two hours weekly to develop additional evaluation techniques and the application of knowledge, skills and abilites aquired in previous coursework Prerequisites: AT 205, AT 211; Co-requisite AT 212 and AT 213

AT211 - Assessment Diagnosis I

This course focuses on techniques for orthopedic and neurological assessment of musculoskeletal injuries to the lower extremities and low back. The lab component emphasizes developing clinical skills including palpation of bony landmarks, manual muscle testing, goniometry measurements, stress tests and special tests. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: AT 202 & BIO 205 Formerly - AT350/350L

AT212 - Assessment Diagnosis II

This course focuses on techniques for orthopedic and neurological assessment of musculoskeletal injuries to the upper extremities and thorax, as well as internal injuries. The laboratory component emphasizes developing clinical skills including palpation of bony landmarks, performing stress and special tests. Prerequisite: AT 211.Corequisite: AT212L

AT213 - Assessment & Diagnosis: Head & Spine

Course Description:This course provides a comprehensive study of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine. Topics include applied biomechanics, techniques for orthopedic and neurological assessment, and rehabilitation/management techniques. These topics are addressed through a problem-based learning format. Through lecture and laboratory opportunities, the student will develop a systematic approach to the evaluation process and develop accurate impressions and treatment protocols. Prerequisite: AT 211

AT301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course also describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

AT302 - Clinical Athletic Training III

This course requires between 150 and 225 hours of supervised clinical experience in the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Students may have peer teaching responsibilities. The laboratory component meets two hours per week. Emphasis is placed on identification of anatomical landmarks and evaluation techniques being stressed. Prerequisite: AT 206

AT303 - Therapeutic Modalities

This course is an examination of the treatment of athletic injuries through the use of cold and heat modalities, hydrotherapy, and electrical modalities. Emphasis is placed on theoretical and physiological effects on healing, and on indications and contraindications for use of each modality. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

AT304 - Therapeutic Exercise & Rehab Techniques

This course presents intermediate and advanced principles and techniques of rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Emphasis is placed on designing rehabilitation progressions and integrating them appropriately for return to sport activity. The lab component focuses on proper techniques for specific exercises, exercise contraindications, and use of special rehabilitation equipment.Corequisite AT304L. Prerequisite: AT212 and AT 213

AT305 - Clinical Athletic Training IV

This course requires between 150 and 225 hour of supervised clinical experience in the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Students are exposed to increasing amounts of responsibility and advanced tasks within the role of the athletic trainer. Students may have peer teaching responsibilities. The laboratory component of the course meets 2 hours weekly and focuses on rehabilitation techniques with an emphasis on therapeutic exercise. Prerequisite: AT 302.

AT306 - Applied Ethics in Health Care

Develop a moral and ethical decision making framework as related to the healthcare field as individuals (clinician) and groups (healthcare team) through the application ethical principles and concepts

AT402 - Clinical Athletic Training V

This course requires between 150-225 hours of supervised clinical experience in the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Students have increasing responsibility for coordinating all aspects of athletic training services for an athletic team. Increasing amounts of administrative and peer teaching responsibilities are provided. The laboratory component meets for two hours weekly with emphasis on rehabilitation techniques, specifically therapeutic modalities. Prerequisite: AT 305.

AT403 - Organization & Healthcare Administration

This course presents administrative concerns of the certified athletic trainer including: development of policies and procedures, legal issues, budget management, facility planning, staffing, hiring process, medical insurance issues and drug testing. Prerequisite: AT 305.

AT405 - Clinical Athletic Training VI

This course requires between 150-225 hours of supervised clinical experience at the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Increased emphasis on research, peer teaching, and presentations. The laboratory component meets for two hours weekly to review anatomical landmarks and special techniques. Prerequisite: AT 402.

AT407 - Clinical Athletic Training V

"This course requires minimum of 200 hours of supervised clinical experience in the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Students have increasing responsibility for coordinating all aspects of athletic training services for an athletic team. Increasing amounts of administrative and peer teaching responsibilities are provided. BOC Exam prepartation is emphasized. The laboratory component meets for two hours weekly with emphasis on rehabilitation techniques, specifically therapeutic modalities. Prerequisite: AT 305.Formerly - AT402"

AT421 - Advanced Concepts in Patient Care

This course focuses on pharmacology, ethics, psychosocial aspects of care and athletic training for special populations. Emphasis is placed on advance concepts intended to prepare students for entry-level jobs in the field of athletic training. Prerequisites: Senior standing, PSYC 101, AT 301

AT430 - Athletic Training Capstone

This course is designed to serve as a capstone course for seniors in the athletic training education program. The primary goal is to better prepare students to engage in research at the graduate level. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for undergraduate research, with three course design options: development of original case study research, with focus on adhering to written and oral presentation standards within the field; development of an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis; development of an understanding of the research process, with focus on review of the literature, defining the research question, and study methodology. Prerequisites: Senior standing, EXSC340

BIO101 - Principles of Biology I (KP)

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Corequisite: BIO 101L.

BIO102 - Principles of Biology II (KP)

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

BIO107 - Topics In Biology (KP)

Preliminaries of the molecules of life and cell structures are investigated in this course. Topics from cell biology, nutrition, energy production, respiratory and circulatory systems, genetics, reproduction, evolutionary thought, and ecosystems are also explored.

BIO112 - Human Biology

This is a one semester lab course focusing on the functions of the human body in health and disease. The structure and function of the major body systems are emphasized. Systems discussed include: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, excretory, reproductive, nervous and endocrine. Corequisite: BIO 112L.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Corequisite: BIO 206L.

BUSS101 - Contemporary Issues in Business

This course is designed to familiarize students with various aspects of the business world. Areas covered include: private enterprise, forms of ownership, legal aspects, management, marketing, human resources, operations management, labor relations, and finance. In addition, students become aware of how business functions are integrated into an organization to achieve specific goals.

BUSS201 - Financial Accounting

This course provides students with an applied knowledge of the fundamental accounting process and procedures used in business. Students learn how to identify and record business transactions. In addition, students learn how to create financial statements, as well as how to become intelligent users of financial information.

BUSS202 - Managerial Accounting

In this course, students gain experience in the development and use of information within an organization. Course topics include: cost terms; production costing; cost allocation for planning and control; cost behavior patterns; cost-volume-profit relationships; budgeting; inventory planning and control; pricing decisions; and aspects of investment decisions. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a grade C or better.

BUSS203 - Financial Management

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of finance. Various techniques of analysis that reveal the relationships of risk, return, and value are demonstrated. Topics include: financial reporting; long- and short-term forecasting; managing working capital; capital budgeting; and the nature of corporate securities and debt-equity mix. Prerequisites: BUSS 101 OR HEM 101 OR FASH 101 OR SMGT 102; BUSS 202 with a grade C or better & ECON 102.

BUSS205 - Legal Environment of Business

This course provides a working knowledge of everyday law as it applies to business and personal needs. The focus is primarily on contract law and property law.

BUSS207 - Fundamentals of Financial Planning

This course provides the foundation for understanding and using financial planning techniques. This framework is the basis for all financial decisions large and small. Topics covered are personal financial planning, consumer credit, budgeting, investments, and banking procedures. Risk analysis regarding portfolio management and tax liabilities is also examined.

BUSS208 - Financial Statement Analysis

This course examines financial statements and other financial reports with a view towards using accounting information in making investing, lending and other potential management decisions. Students explore methods of constructing, comparing and analyzing these statements and reports and the various uses of such analyses. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS209 - Computer Applications in Business

This hands-on course is designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge and understanding of computer applications in business. Strong emphasis of the course is on building competencies in industry-standard spreadsheet and database software applications.

BUSS210 - Federal Income Taxes

This course provides students with a basic understanding of fundamentals of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, businesses, and not-for-profit taxable entities. It explores the broad range of tax topics, emphasizing the role of taxation in business decision-making process, tax research, and tax planning. Prerequisite: BUSS 201

BUSS212 - Management Information Systems

This course takes a managerial approach to information technology concepts and applications. Given the pervasiveness of computer technology in today's world, professionals in various fields of endeavor often have a major responsibility for determining an organization's information needs and for designing and implementing information systems that support those needs. Students study concepts and issues related to information technology with the goal of understanding how it can be effectively used to improve an organization's over­all effectiveness and increase its level of success. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, HEM 102, SMGT 102, or FASH 101.

BUSS220 - Marketing

In this course, fundamentals of the nature of marketing are presented and evaluated for specific functions and institutions. Policies and practices as applied generally to marketing research involve product development, selection, channels of distribution buying and physical distribution selling. Pricing under competitive conditions, social benefits of competition and government regulations are included. Prerequisites: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102; ECON 101; HEM102.

BUSS224 - Organizational Behavior

In this course, students study individuals within the context of the organization using a behavioral approach. Group dynamics and intergroup dynamics are emphasized in relation to productivity and work satisfaction along with the examination of specific aspects of organizations that influence behavior. Areas covered include: structure, leadership, and change. Teaching modalities include case studies and role-playing. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

BUSS231 - Entrepreneurship & Venture Creation

Entrepreneurship drives global innovation and economic growth. This course exposes business students to the study of entrepreneurship and the venture creation process. Topics include analyzing new business opportunities, developing business propositions, new venture planning and financing, marketing activities, financial controls, and other topics relevant to the entrepreneurial process. Students interact with faculty, local entrepreneurs, and small business owners/managers. As a culmination activity of this course, students are responsible for the development and presentation of a business plan. Prerequisite: BUSS 101.

BUSS232 - Operations Strategy

Operations strategy examines how operations can be used as sources of competitive advantage. This class will focus on understanding the need of formulating an operational strategy (long-term plan) and making strategic operational decisions. The old view of operations management as the task of maintaining a comparatively static production or service facility has given way to one characterized by a need for renewed flexibility, relentless improvement, and the development of new capabilities at the operating unit level. As a result of this changing environment, the skills required of operations managers have changed as well. The course is based primarily on case studies supported by conceptual frameworks.

BUSS233 - American Enterprise Experience

This course studies the American enterprise experience from colonial times until the present. The course touches upon the business component of the American experience beginning with the individual artisan-merchant through the great innovators and organizers of the 19th and 20th centuries and beyond. The historical events, cultural changes, social upheavals, and political shifts that have influenced the development of the American business environment are the core of the study. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT102

BUSS235 - Ethics in Business

This course introduces students to ethical analysis in its application to management. A presupposition of the course is that ethical considerations are an integral part of effective management practices. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101 FASH 101, or SMGT 102

BUSS237 - Contemporary Global Leadership

In this course, students analyze what it means to be a global leader in the 21st century and identify the skills necessary to be successful in an increasingly global business climate. Students explore this question personally, collectively, and globally in a creative and collaborative atmosphere. Students examine classic as well as contemporary theories of leadership and how they apply to the dynamic global business culture. The course provides students with the opportunity to acquire perspectives and skills essential to successful management in the emerging markets that are increasingly becoming key contenders in world commercial enterprise. Prerequisite BUSS 224.

BUSS301 - Intermediate Accounting I

This course builds on concepts developed in Financial Accounting. Concentration is on the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to the preparation of financial statements with an in-depth review of cash, receivables, inventories, and plant assets. The course also covers the concept of the time value of money and the application of present value techniques to accounting valuations. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a grade C or better.

BUSS302 - Intermediate Accounting II

This course is designed to continue the concepts of financial accounting and present a more thorough analysis of the requirements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Included in this course are earnings per share calculations, lease accounting, and pension accounting. The cash flow statement is also studied. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a grade C or better.

BUSS304 - Working Capital Management

This course explores working capital management, credit management, working capital funding, and the major sources of financing debt and equity. Students undertake financial analyses of theoretical models and real-world firms and organizations, recommend financing strategies, and present their findings by using management reporting methods. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS305 - International Accounting

This course addresses significant accounting matters experienced by multinational companies. Accounting matters include currency transactions and translational transfer price, and management planning and control. Prerequisite: BUSS 301 with a C or better.

BUSS306 - Accounting Information Systems

This course provides an understanding and appreciation of accounting information systems. The course teaches conceptual, analytical, and technical skills necessary to work efficiently and productively as an accountant in a computerized business information environment. The functions of Accounting Information Systems are explored from the perspective of financial accounting, managerial accounting, auditing, and tax. The course involves several hands-on exercises in Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel to develop database and spreadsheet skills. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a "C" or better.

BUSS307 - International Finance

This course studies the ways and means to reduce financial risk involved in international financial management. The course deals with the interrelationship between the international monetary environment and financial planning for corporations with overseas operations. It analyzes the effects on international financial planning of such factors as exchange rate fluctuations, currency restrictions, and tax regulations. It intensively examines financial aspects of multinational business including foreign investment, trade, and transfer of funds. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS308 - Government & Not-for-Profit Accounting

This course introduces financial accounting and reporting issues related to state and local government and non-profit organizations, including universities and health care facilities. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a grade C or better.

BUSS309 - Fraud Examination

This course covers techniques for identification and detection of asset misappropriation schemes and fraudulent financial statements, who commits fraud and why, and controls to prevent and detect problems. Prerequisite: BUSS 201 with a "C" or better.

BUSS311 - Investments

This course explores fundamentals of investing. The strategies used to create money from financial capital are thoroughly examined. Financial instruments such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, futures, options, and commodities are explored. The measurement tools used to assign risk and rate of return, performance, and value are covered. Students learn how to develop, analyze, and maintain a portfolio. Regulatory and ethical issues are examined and considered in the decision-making process. Prerequisite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS312 - Risk Management

The basics of risk management are covered in this course. Problems of liability and personal loss exposures of a business are examined. Private insurance programs such as health and life insurance, and employee benefit plans are examined and assessed. Prerequisite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS313 - Business Negotiations

This course examines various negotiating tactics and techniques as they relate to different situations and environments. Particular attention is paid to buyer-seller communications, including negotiations of contracts and agreements. Students study the strengths and weaknesses of strategies used by both buyers and sellers. Prerequisites: BUSS 201, BUSS 220 and MATH 104.

BUSS315 - Emerging Global Markets

This course focuses on developing skills, strategies and insights crucial to conducting successful business operations in the emerging markets of Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa including the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India and China. Globalization offers these countries the opportunity for unprecedented economic development. By participating in the international marketplace, emerging countries increase their chances of raising wages and incomes, accumulating wealth, and reducing poverty. These countries also provide opportunities for companies, mostly from developed countries, to extend their markets. In this course, students study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers; explore the differences in the contexts and roles of various actors (such as the government and NGOs); analyze opportunities and risks presented by emerging markets; and analyze the strategies of firms dealing with emerging markets. Prerequisite: BUSS101

BUSS319 - Cost Accounting

Study of a typical firm’s cost data and how that data can transformed into information for business analysis and decision making. Topics include how to identify fixed versus variable cost, cost volume profit analysis, flexible budgeting, Activity Based Costing and standard cost systems with detail variance analysis. Process and job order costing systems are examined in terms of how these systems are used to accumulate cost to determine accurate product or service costs and why this is necessary in setting product/service selling prices to maximize profits. Other topics include the numerous cost allocation processes that take place in the typical manufacturing and service industries, and transfer pricing within companies that are doing business internationally. Prerequisite: BUSS 202 with a "C" or better.

BUSS320 - Consumer Behavior

This course examines the behavior of individuals and markets in relation to the purchase decision, including post-purchase evaluation and con­sumption. A behavioral science approach is taken. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS321 - Property and Liability Insurance

This course explores the fundamentals of commercial property and liability insurance including contracts, rating, underwriting, regulation and financial analysis of insurers. Prerequisite:BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS322 - Marketing Communications

This course focuses on a broad view of advertising, dealing with its planning, creation, and execution in relation to the marketing cycle. Topics include: organization and operation of the advertising agency; publicity; public relations; behavioral sciences as applied to advertising; budgeting; and planning. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS323 - Retirement Planning & Employee Benefits

This course provides the students with an understanding of the retirement planning process. Students develop an ability to counsel others on retirement and employee benefit decisions. Topics covered are social security, qualified retirement plans, corporate profit sharing plans, health insurance, group life insurance, group disability insurance, and deferred compensation. Prerequsite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS324 - E-Business

This course provides students with a broad overview of the concepts and principles of e-business. This knowledge is increasingly important for all students, regardless of their area of concentration, because traditional businesses and arts organizations are becoming hybrids by adding an online presence to their existing structure. Topics discussed include a definition of e-business, online management strategies, distribution channels, privacy and security issues, and cyberlaw, among others. Students develop an e-business plan and webpage. Prerequisite: BUSS101

BUSS325 - Sales Principles

This course analyzes salesmanship in modern business with emphasis placed on the principles and techniques of individual selling styles in both retail and wholesale markets. Topics covered include: dramatization of the sale presentation; the selling role; buyer characteristics and motivations; modern sales practices; corporate sales planning; sales-force policies; time and territory management; forecasting, budgeting; and expense control. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS327 - Life, Health, and Disability Insurance

This course studies financial implications of death, disability and retirement, as well as the types of life insurance and annuity contracts and their uses. Regulations of life and health insurers, insurer operations and functions, legal aspects, group and individual life and health insurance products including medical, disability income and long-term care policies are covered. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS328 - Entertainment Marketing

This course will provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of several major sectors within the entertainment industry. Students will compare and contrast successful entertainment marketing strategies with traditional product-based companies. Entertainment Marketing surveys the strategy, techniques and communication media employed to market the range of entertainment available to the American audience. The course examines the organizations and people who conceive, create and distribute video, film, print, interactive and new technology within the framework of the entertainment promotion landscape. The course demonstrates how advertising, publicity, promotion, research and overall marketing campaigns are created and the impact on the creative and business operations of entertainment companies.The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of the marketing issues faced by entertainment companies, highlighting the experiential nature of the products and the fast-pace of change within the industry. Prerequisite: COM216 or COM302

BUSS329 - New Product Development

New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. A major goal of this course is to help students learn to use an analytic decision-making approach in developing and marketing new products and services that meet customer needs in the consumer, industrial, and service settings. At the end of the course, the student should understand the role of decision models in analytic marketing decision-making; be able to follow the basic steps in opportunity identification, design, testing, and implementation; and know how to read and interpret new product and service market research. Prerequisite: BUSS 220.

BUSS330 - Managing Change

This course examines the unique problems associated with managing organizations during mergers, reorganizations, and other times of change. Strategies to cope with change, as well as induce it, are examined. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS331 - Money and Capital Markets

This course offers an extensive examination of both money and capital markets. Students get “hands-on” experience evaluating long and short-term instruments. To connect theory to practice, students conduct technical and financial analyses. The basic characteristics of these markets and their contribution to the portfolio are explored. The case method is used to provide students with “real world” decision-making situations. Prerequisite: BUSS 203.

BUSS332 - Cross Cultural Management

This course explores the process of cross-cultural management and the challenges of working internationally. The course focuses on international organizational behavior and human resource issues and practices in global organizations. The course is divided into three parts. The first focuses on understanding the cultural roots of behavior in organizations, the second on the Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management issues that are relevant to international managers, and the third seeks to prepare students for international assignments. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS333 - Estate Planning and Trust

This course provides the students with an understanding of the retirement planning process. Students develop an ability to counsel others on retirement and employee benefit decisions. Topics covered are social security, qualified retirement plans, corporate profit sharing plans, health insurance, group life insurance, group disability insurance, and deferred compensation. Prerequsite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better.

BUSS334 - Nonprofit Management

Managing in the nonprofit sector is different than in the for-profit sector. In this course students explore businesses that do not intend to maximize profit and retain it for future expenditures. Managers must operate under more regulated conditions and must be well prepared to interact within the public sector. Not-for-profit managers must be well versed in public policy and other regulations that affect them. Students engage in projects with non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102.

BUSS336 - Human Resource Management

This course examines the staffing function of management including planning, recruitment, selection, training, motivation, appraisal, compensation, labor laws, and organizational development. The course also addresses current issues affecting the human resource manager, including the changing work force and need to increase productivity, as well as changes in the area of unions and affirmative action. Both class discussions and case studies are used to prepare students for the personnel and related tasks involved in a management position. Prerequisite: BUSS 224.

BUSS337 - Managing the Growing Company

This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities of managing a growing entrepreneurial venture. Using practical management techniques, students address the management of rapidly growing entrepreneurial firms. Through a variety of learning activities, including case studies, reading, and visiting entrepreneurs, students examine companies, often family-run, during dynamic transition. The course specifically addresses the challenges faced by companies in various stages of growth and the exceptional challenges of rapid growth. Prerequisites: BUSS 201 & BUSS 231.

BUSS339X - The World of Apps

This course is designed to introduce the business world of smart phone applications and provide an overview of recent and near-future developments in the realm of mobile technology. We will explore the best 30 to 50 apps in the world today, address new technologies and platforms, new trends and business models for mobile. We'll learn how to imagine, design, and build a prototype/wireframe of an app. No prerequisites. Basic understanding of technology. Must have a smart phone.

BUSS341 - Social Media Marketing

This course takes an in-depth look at social networks, social media platforms and online advertising to offer students an advantage in many positions involving marketing, consulting and brand management both on the buyer and seller side of social media. Students with an interest in entrepreneurship will also find the course useful as new businesses often rely on social media marketing. The course covers a number of topics including the differences and interaction between traditional and social media; two-sided markets and social media platforms (including verticals such as gaming, shopping and entertainment); basic theory of social networks online and offline (graph theory, sociology, information diffusion); consumer behavior and digital media; social Media Analytics and Monitoring; brand strategies on social media; best marketing practices for paid and unpaid social media; B2B marketing and social media. Prerequisite: BUSS220.

BUSS403 - Advanced Accounting

This course examines specialized topics in financial accounting. Problems associated with the partnership form of business organization, including partnership formation, division of income and losses, changes in ownership, and partnership liquidation are reviewed. Topics also include the subject of business combinations with emphasis on consolidated financial statements of parents and subsidiaries and elimination of intercompany transactions, accounting for foreign operations, and fund accounting as it relates to municipalities. Prerequisite: BUSS 302 with grade C or better; BUSS 319 with "C" or better; and Senior Standing

BUSS405 - Accounting Theory

This course develops an understanding of generally accepted accounting principles and of the underlying theory upon which they are based, essentially through study and analysis of publications of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and other professional bodies. This course further emphasizes current developments in accounting thought. Prerequisites: BUSS 302, BUSS 303, both with a C or better, and senior standing.

BUSS406 - Financial Strategy

This is a capstone course utilizing lecture, discussion, and case analysis to define the process of financial management. The course of study presents the concepts of the advanced capital budget centering on decision-making concerning capital structure, dividend policy, leasing, mergers and acquisitions, reorganization, and international finance and exchange rates. Prerequisite: BUSS 203 with a "C" or better & senior standing.

BUSS408 - Auditing

This courses examines the impact of auditing on constituencies external and internal to organizations, especially stockholders and management. Students examine the role of both the independent public accountant and the internal auditor, and study various control and reporting techniques involved in auditing. Prerequisites: BUSS 302, BUSS 319, and Senior standing.

BUSS418 - Special Topics in Accounting

This course provides students with an opportunity to study topics of special interest, which may vary each time the course is offered. Prerequisites: Permission of Department Chair, and Senior standing.

BUSS420 - Marketing Research

This course examines the process and tools involved in collecting, coding, and analyzing data. The course further integrates the application of computer software in compiling and interpreting statistical data in relation to marketing decisions, such as those related to market segmentation and distribution. Prerequisites: BUSS 220, MATH 208.

BUSS422 - Global Marketing

The complexity of operating in the global marketplace makes many demands on the marketer. The globalization of marketing takes place after the company has international experience in multiple markets. The three fundamental areas of corporate globalization are covered in this course: (1) integrate sourcing, production, and marketing; (2) allocate resources to achieve a balanced portfolio and growth; and (3) coordinate marketing activities across countries and regions. Importing, exporting, and licensing considerations are explored. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

BUSS425 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

This seminar offers an in-depth exploration of advanced entrepreneurship topics of current interest and importance. Using case studies and actual entrepreneurial ventures, students explore entrepreneurship with a focus on leadership, marketing, development, management, and growth of new business ventures. Students learn the practical skills needed to succeed as an entrepreneur and how to apply best practices for planning, initiating, and growing new companies. The course also emphasizes the analysis and evaluation of actual entrepreneurial ventures. Subjects vary from semester to semester. Prerequisites: BUSS 337 and Senior standing.

BUSS432 - Marketing Strategy

This course is designed to facilitate the ability to formulate and implement marketing strategy. The course integrates topics covered in other marketing classes. As part of the learning experience, students engage in a simulation program with teams taking charge of a company within a competitive environment. Prerequisite: BUSS 220 with a C or better.

BUSS440 - Business Policy

This capstone course requires students to apply a broad knowledge of management and administrative techniques to specific situations. An emphasis is placed on strategy formulation and implementation. The case study method is used. This course culminates in a formal professional presentation to members of the advisory board. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Marketing/Management or Accounting/Finance Majors.

BUSS497 - Mgmt, Mrkt, & Hem Internship & Seminar

Mgmt, Mrkt, & Hem Internship & Seminar

BUSS498 - Internship Seminar Acct/Fin

A critical component of the internship experience is participating in a weekly seminar where students discuss and reflect on their experiences to gain a broader view of the workplace, contemporary issues and organizational trends, as well as their own developing abilities and career interests. This one credit course covers professional issues as they arise during the student's internship. Some of the topics covered include: supervision, boundary issues, self-care, stress management, and professionalism. Students are required to write a weekly reflective journal on their internship experience. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. Separate sections are offered for different business majors. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS 499.

BUSS499 - Internship Accounting/Finance

The internship is scheduled to take place during the senior year. Students serve as interns for a total of 150 hours over a 12-week period, done concurrently with on-campus course work as shown in the curriculum for each program. Detailed reports, a journal, and other written requirements are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship. The internship supervisor monitors each student's performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing, and a 2.0 cumulative average in all business prefix courses. Separate sections are offered for different business majors. Must be taken concurrently with BUSS 498.

CHEM105X - Chemistry of Art & Fashion (KP)

This course examines the connections between chemistry and art. This course is a lab centered course where students will explore topics such as light absorption and reflection; the nature of color; synthesis and use of dyes, paints, and pigments. Students will use spectroscopy and other methods of chemical investigation such as chromatography to examine materials used in art. Students will conduct inquiry-based projects focusing on areas of interest.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I (KP)

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH 106 or higher. Corequisite: CHEM 203L.

CHEM204 - General Chemistry II

This second half of this two-semester sequence explores areas of solution chemistry, acid/base chemistry, chemical kinetics and physical chemistry, nuclear, and organic chemistry. Physical properties of solutions are explained including vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression and osmotic pressure. The effects of chemical kinetics on reactions are covered. Chemical equilibrium, acid and base equilibrium, and solubiity equilibrium are introduced. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: CHEM 203. Corequisite: CHEM 204L.

CHEM301 - Human Biochemistry

This course is an in-depth study of biochemical substances and their reaction in the body with major emphasis placed on metabolism at the cellular level and examined in the tissues of the various organs where these reactions occur. Correlation of biochemical processes underlying pathologic conditions are made whenever practical. Prerequisite: CHEM 202.

CJ101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (KP)

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, and legal issues related to the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, focusing on critical decisions with an emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends.

CJ103 - Principles of Human Rights

This course takes a global perspective defining human rights, reflecting on violations of these rights, considering arguments in support of human rights, and examining various new initiatives designed to protect human rights in different countries in all parts of the world. This course focuses on issues pertaining to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights such as slavery, personal security and equality before the law, freedom of marriage, freedom of assembly, and freedom of movement.

CJ201 - Criminology

In this course, contemporary criminological theories are analyzed and evaluated with an emphasis on the social construction of crime, criminal offending, and victimization. Theories of crime are distinguished from theories of criminality. Assessments of theoretical advances, including theory integration and general theories of crime are examined. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101, or SOC 101

CJ202 - Juvenile Justice

This course focuses on the history and philosophy of juvenile justice, landmark court cases, police handling of juveniles, the juvenile court, the deinstitutionalization of status offenders, and juvenile rehabilitation. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC101, or SOC 101.

CJ203 - Juvenile Delinquency & Gangs

This course examines juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime. There is consideration of factors and theories that attempt to explain delinquency, gangs, and status offending. The course also examines delinquent subculture, and programs for control and prevention. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

CJ205 - Forensics

This course provides an introduction to the modern methods used in the detection, investigation, and solution of crimes. Practical analysis of evidence such as: fingerprints and other impressions, ballistics, glass, hair, handwriting and document examination, and drug analysis are studied. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ206 - Drugs & Society

This course examines the social origins and consequences of the use and abuse of consciousness-altering substances (including alcohol) within American society. It considers how society defines drug use, drug abuse, and social harm, as well as how society responds to drug use and abuse. Included is examination of socio-historical perspectives on drug consumption and control, the structure of legal and illegal drug markets, the relationship between drugs and crime, and competing models of drug policy and enforcement. Prerequisite: CJ 101, PSYC 101, SOC 101, or LS101

CJ207 - Criminal Investigations

This course examines the fundamentals of criminal investigation including scientific aids, interviews, interrogations, collection and preservation of evidence, methods of surveillance, follow-up and case preparation. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ210 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

This course provides special subjects in Criminal Justice in order to satisfy interests of both faculty and students. Examples of such topics are: restorative justice, global violence against women, or computer crime.

CJ211 - Terrorism

No other issues generate as much discussion and controversy as the contemporary debate over "terrorism". But what is terrorism? And how should we respond to it? This course examines terrorism with a critical eye, looking at the different ways that the subject is framed by various disciplines and examines the ways that terrorism has been presented, debated, and analyzed. The course addresses the social-political conditions that spawn terrorist organizations, examines terrorism in a historical context, and looks at methods of terrorism. The course explores the psychological processes that create a terrorist, the psychological impact of terrorist activities, and explores counter-terrorism strategies through creative problem-solving.

CJ212X - Fighting Injustice Thru Art & Creativity

In this interdisciplinary class, we will use and interpret historical and contemporary forms of creative expression to highlight and seek to understand oppression, personal struggle and injustice. This class will integrate the Individual and Society, Global and Historical, and Aesthetics and Creativity knowledge perspectives into our exploration of inequity and injustice that exists around the world. As such this course will satisfy either the Psychological and Societal Area of Inquiry AI(PS) or the Aesthetics Area of Inquiry (AI(A)). We will seek to examine the healing nature of creativity and expression as we investigate artists from different parts of society and the globe who use art to give voice to their pain and challenge oppression.

CJ213 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

The field of criminal justice operates most effectively when it relies on a core of ethical principles to guide discretionary actions. If criminal justice professionals are to maintain our personal integrity in light of organizational and social demands can be difficult. As criminal justice professionals our choices and policies emanate from our personal beliefs and values. In principle we intend to come to an understanding of what various ethical considerations can assist us to make the right decision when exercising our discretion. Prerequisite: CJ101 or LS101 & ENG102

CJ303 - Domestic Violence

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of the law relating to domestic violence. In addition the course examines the existence of violence among family members and in relationships in today's society. Topics include child abuse, partner abuse, and elder abuse. Prerequisite: LS 101, CJ 101 or any introductory social science course.

CJ305 - Crime & Popular Culture

Crime is considered a major social problem in our country, but our understanding of crime and justice are derived more from indirect mediated images than direct personal experience. Popular culture, distributed through mass media and composed of popular news and entertainment, is a major source for shaping this understanding, especially when it comes to crime a staple of mass media. This course will examine images of crime and justice in popular culture and consider the sources of these popular culture accounts of crime and justice. It also will evaluate the influence popular culture has on our understanding of crime and criminal justice policy. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing , CJ 201 & ENG 102

CJ309 - Children & Violence

This course examines the psychological, criminal justice, and legal issues surrounding children who experience violence in their lives, either as victims or perpetrators of violence. Topics include child maltreatment, pedophilia, online child predators, school victimization, domestic violence, juvenile delinquency, child sex offenders, and youth homicide. Prerequisite: PSYC 221, PSYC 223, CJ 201, or LS 204.

CJ312 - Corrections

Corrections is the vast collection of persons, agencies, and organizations that manage convicted criminals. This course examines theories of punishment, the history of corrections, classification and sentencing schemes, prisons, probation and parole, and alternative sanctions. It also explores corrections-related personnel issues, legal issues, and specific concerns dealing with race, age, and gender. Prerequisite: CJ101 or LS101 & Sophomore standing

CJ313 - Police & Society

This course examines policing from a variety of perspectives. The philosophical foundations of social control in relation to policing, as well as the emergence, organization, and structure of police systems are examined. There is also an examination of the relationship between the police and the public in different historical, political, and economic contexts. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

CJ314 - White Collar and Organized Crime

This course addresses the definition, detection, prosecution, sentencing, and impact of white collar, occupational, and organized crime. Special consideration is given to the role of federal law and enforcement practices due to the frequent national and international scope of these types of crimes.

CJ315 - Global Technology & Crime

In this course the advances in technology developed in crime investigation will be examined, like crime mapping. The impact of technology and media on international crime and new globally-oriented cooperative enforcement strategies will also be examined. Students will gain a better understanding of crime control in a global society.”

CJ316 - Criminal Procedure

Criminal procedure refers to the process whereby the criminal law is enforced. Major topics to be covered in this course include: the exclusionary rule, search and seizure, identification, interrogation, trial rights, sentencing, and due process. Special emphasis is placed upon how the rules of procedure affect the components of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ317 - Comparative Justice Systems

This course analyzes differences in global approaches to law enforcement, criminal procedure, criminal law, corrections, juvenile justice, and prevention. The material provides a worldwide overview of cultural and legal traditions that are related to crime. Through cross-cultural comparisons, the course examines whether due process rights must be sacrificed in order to achieve crime control effectiveness and efficiency. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

CJ318 - Violence & Aggression

This course investigates and analyzes aggression and violence as forms of individual, group, and societal behavior. It includes an assessment of anthropological, biological, philosophical, political, and sociological theories of violence. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or Permission of Dept Chair

CJ319 - Victimology

This course presents an overview of the history and theories of victimology. Students analyze victimization patterns with special emphasis on types of victims and crimes. The course also examines the interaction between victims of crime and the criminal justice system, the victim’s rights movement, and services offered to victims of crime. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

CJ321 - Probation, Parole & Other Sanctions

This course examines the development and application of traditional forms of conditional and unconditional prison release, as well as a variety of new intermediate or alternative sanctions. Different sentencing options are evaluated to determine which, if any, of the theories of criminology or philosophies of sentencing are satisfied by their use. Current research and analytical perspectives are examined. Prerequisite: CJ 101, LS 101, or SOC 101.

CJ323 - Justice, Class, Race & Gender

This course explores issues unique to individuals of different classes, gender, and/or races or ethnic groups. The course focuses on these issues specifically in the context of the American criminal justice and legal systems. Issues of diversity relevant to all aspects of the criminal justice system are examined. Prerequisites: CJ 101, LS 101, PSYC 101 or SOC 101, Sophomore standing.

CJ329X - Domestic Violence Practicum

In this experimental Criminal Justice elective, students will deepen their understanding of domestic violence through exercises, field trips and trainings while building networks and partnering with the domestic violence community at Lasell College and in the Newton service community. This class will focus on utilizing the students’ expertise to expand and perfect a college-based version of the “In Her Shoes” training created by Lasell College Domestic Violence class participants. During the “In Her Shoes” group training, participants ‘walk in the shoes’ of survivors experiencing violence by reading a series of short stories describing their experiences. Participants then are asked to make real-life choices that determine ‘their’ fate. By walking in the shoes of survivors experiencing violence, participants will gain powerful insight into the many obstacles they encounter as a result of abuse. This powerful training, written by college students for college students, will be utilized to train the Lasell College campus and has the potential to become a national training model for college campuses across the country. These students, working with the Peer Health Educators, will learn to test, administer and evaluate the training with the guidance and support of community-based sexual and domestic violence advocates. This training is already the recipient of the Betsy McCandless Break The Silence Award, and offers a unique opportunity to make a concrete difference by increasing awareness and elevating the college culture around sexual and domestic violence

CJ331 - Research Methods in Criminal Justice

"The course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research using the field of criminaljustice as the backdrop. The purpose of this course is to provide the background that will help thestudent to read, understand, and critique data and studies in the field. Students will acquire aworking knowledge of programs like excel to collect and also analyze federal and other statisticalstudies. Required for all CJ majors.Prerequisite: MATH 208

CJ335X - Sexual Violence Advocacy

This sexual violence class uses the Boston Area Rape Crisis Curriculum to teach students how to recognize, advocate for and support survivors of sexual assault in an advocacy capacity. Through articles, role plays, videos and active participation, students will learn the importance of identifying the impacts and symptoms of sexual violence and will receive training in how to lend support and offer a myriad of resources to survivors of sexual violence. The class will explore historical and cultural components of sexual violence as well as activist movements led by student survivors to change the landscape of how sexual violence is perceived and addressed on college campuses. Turning our lens toward college campuses, students will develop and institute a service project designed to educate, prevent, and/or respond to sexual violence on college campuses.. Upon successful completion of the course as defined by the professor, students will receive 35 hours of sexual violence training which they can use to leverage internships and professional opportunities. This class is designed to inform, educate and professionally prepare students who may encounter sexual violence survivors in their work such as human services, legal services, education, athletic training, law enforcement and psychology.

CJ441 - Topics in Crime & Public Policy I

This course is the first portion of the Capstone course offered in the fall semester to introduce seniors to a general understanding of policy studies. Students examine what policy analysis consists of, stages of policy analysis, and assessment of policy change. The class examines current policy issues in Criminal Justice such as community policing, sentencing, and minority overrepresentation in prison populations. The course examines various research strategies, design and methods and addresses research problem definition and how to produce a state of the art policy paper and literature review. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: PSYC 331 or SOC 331.

CJ442 - Topics in Crime & Public Policy II

In this part of the Capstone course offered in the spring semester, the student can use the field internship placement as the target for the individual policy analysis paper. The student can acquire data available at the agency or use generally available data from different sources to answer a policy question that can be applied to the agency the student works in or to similar agencies. The student is required to submit a detailed policy analysis and produce a paper and project to be presented at the Connected Learning Symposium. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: CJ 441, SR Standing & CJ331X or SOC331.

CJ443 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar I

This course provides an opportunity for participants to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours during the fall semester in a professional work setting related to the student’s interest. Each student is monitored throughout the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Dept Chair approval.

CJ444 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar II

This course provides an opportunity for participants to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours during the spring semester in a professional work setting related to the student’s interest. Each student is monitored throughout the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisites: CJ/LS 443, Senior standing and Dept Chair approval.

CJ701 - The Criminal Justice System & Process

This course provides a foundation and overview of the criminal justice system and process. The major components include crime, law, criminology, law enforcement, adjudication by the courts, corrections, juvenile justice, and current issues and policies.

CJ702 - Critical Legal Issues in Crim Justice

This course provides the student with current and critical information regarding legal issues in criminal justice with a focus on constitutional criminal procedure. The course explores new perspectives on historical issues and takes into account new appellate cases and events, including current debates over important legal controversies in the criminal justice arena.

CJ703 - Advanced Criminological Thought

This course consists of an in-depth analysis of various explanations of criminal behavior. Readings include selections from a broad range of disciplines like political science, sociology, and psychology as they relate to crime, social deviance, and causation. Ethical and legal foundations in defining social deviance and crime are also considered. This course is well suited for criminal justice practitioners, as students apply criminological theory to contemporary issues

CJ704 - Ethical Theory & Criminal Justice Policy

This course examines the ethical issues relevant to the administration of criminal justice. The origins of ethical standards, the effect of these standards on the administration of justice, and issues of ethical leadership will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of ethics into criminal justice policy making and the establishment of defined values for the field.

CJ705 - Criminal Justice Leadership & Management

This course analyzes the structures, functions, and operations of criminal justice agencies including the police, the courts, and corrections (jail, probation, prison, and parole) within the context of the entire criminal justice system. The course will provide a comprehensive overview of criminal justice administration and management with an emphasis on organizational theories. These diverse theories of organizational behavior will be explored specifically as to how they relate to the administration of criminal justice agencies .Three credits.

CJ709 - Research Methods & Statistical Analysis

This course provides students with the necessary tools for evaluating, designing and implementing applied research in criminal justice. The association between theories and research methods used in the study of criminal justice is explored through a variety of relevant and related data sources. Topics covered include: the principles of research design; issues in measurement; modes of observation; and basic methods of both quantitative and qualitative analysis.

CJ720 - Crisis & Emergency Management

This course is designed to provide graduate level students with core knowledge of emergency management related concepts, theories and principles through an in depth analysis of past and current emergency management policies, practices and events. Students will analyze and discuss national, state and local government structure, responsibilities, authorities and relationships and will analyze cases that provide the framework for applying crisis control principles. The nature of disaster, the complexities of disaster response operations, and the roles and responsibilities of various emergency management personnel will be examined. Students will gain an understanding of common post-disaster problems and how the emergency management community can overcome these challenges.

CJ721 - Risk Management & Planning

Risk management planning provides a general philosophy, description, and use of tools and methods that can be utilized to manage the risk associated with all types of crises. This course will review the crises that can impact a community and the methods for determining the risk and vulnerability due to these perils and discuss ways of preventing and/or mitigating their impact The course will examine the best practices and proper methodologies for regulating and enforcing techniques to lessen the impacts of hazardous events. The course will also provide the tools (operational, statistical and technological) required to mitigate these risks. Another purpose of the course is to examine and critically discuss current and future methods to create best practices for security management planning.

CJ730 - Terrorism & Homeland Security

This course provides a critical analysis of the Department of Homeland Security and the political and organizational factors involved in its structure and administration. Students will explore the evolution of homeland security as a concept and a redirection of national policies and priorities, including any related issues and challenges with implementation. Homeland security is a continuously changing field with close connections to numerous academic disciplines and practitioner communities (i.e. law enforcement, emergency management, public safety, the military). This course is designed to draw on insights from these connections as well as useful insights from other areas, such as business, economics and organizational studies, to examine how homeland security strategy and policy is made.

CJ731 - Transnational Crime

This course addresses the nature and scope of international and transnational crime and the emerging legal framework for its prevention and control. The course will emphasize international aspects of the work of different criminal justice agencies, such as formal and informal police cooperation and the use of mutual assistance and extradition agreements, on the international structures created for crime prevention, punishment and control. The course also explores current issues and controversies of transnational crime, international law, and/or human rights. Possible topics include terrorism, genocide, human trafficking, and immigration issues.

CJ732 - Cybercrime & Data Security

In this class, students analyze methods criminals use on the Internet to commit crimes. The course also covers various methods of computer security, their complexity and adequacy. Students study methods for creating backup information systems and developing means for recovering data in case it is destroyed or stolen. Potential threats to Internet systems and how they could affect the way individuals and companies use and rely on the systems are introduced.This course also examines the political, legal and policy aspects of the use of information technologies by governmental organizations

CJ740 - Theories of Violence & Aggression

This course investigates and analyzes aggression and violence as forms of individual, group, and societal behavior. The course also includes an assessment of anthropological, biological, philosophical, political, and sociological theories on the causes of violence and aggression.

CJ741 - Interpersonal & Relationship Violence

This course utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to examining interpersonal violence as a critical and complex social issue. Specific types of interpersonal violence covered include child abuse and neglect, child sexual violence, spousal abuse, elder abuse, date rape and other forms of intimate sexual and physical violence. The course includes a comprehensive examination of theoretical perspectives regarding the nature and origins of interpersonal violence as well as a critical examination of the effectiveness of the mental health, child welfare, and criminal justice system’s approach to interpersonal violence prevention, intervention, and policy.

CJ750 - Global Criminal Justice Systems

This course analyzes crime and criminal justice systems in selected countries and cultures. The course also focuses on the ways these different societies define and respond to criminal behavior and specifically addresses how different societies structure their justice systems to meet their goals and reflect their values. The course engages students in comparative issues and research to reveal political, historical, and cultural factors that have influenced criminal justice and law in both the United States and other countries.

CJ751 - Victimology

This course involves a scientific study of crime victims and public policy responses to them. The course will focus on the nature and extent of criminal victimization, the dynamics of victim-offender relationships, theories of victimization, a historical analysis of the victim’s role in the criminal justice process, the restorative justice model, and the contemporary victim rights and victim services’ movements.

CJ752 - Cls, Race, Ethic & Gender Issues in CJ

This course is an examination of how class, race, gender and ethnicity impact the criminal justice system. It will explore these topics in depth, focusing on criminal victimization and patterns of offending and how these concepts affect equal treatment by the police, courts and corrections.

CJ798 - Research Project Capstone

This culminating experience helps students integrate their knowledge of criminological theory and justice policy with research and analytical skills, synthesizing this knowledge with practical skills. Under the supervision of a faculty mentor, students engage in a comprehensive research project enabling the student to demonstrate the mastery of the concepts, ideas, knowledge and insights implicit in the Criminal Justice curriculum.

CJ799 - Internship

This culminating experience helps students integrate their knowledge of criminological theory and justice policy with research and analytical skills, synthesizing this knowledge with practical skills. Students engage in an internship and complete 150 hours in organizations that are committed to providing interns a high quality educational experience. As a part of their internship, students engage in meaningful projects, including written reflection and analysis.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM103 - Human Communication (KP)

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM206 - Professional Communication

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the most important communication and career-related formats of professional writing, including power point presentations, memos, business letters, reports, brief speeches, instructions, newsletters and brochures. Special emphasis is given to various writing processes one must complete on a tight deadline for a business audience of peers, customers or employers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles. Assignments may include politics, sports, entertainment, and interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, and graphic designers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast; and on what page to display them or in which order to broadcast them. The various reporting specialties covered in journalism – Health, Education, Business, Arts, Sports, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Travel - are explored. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

COM213 - Writing for Public Relations

This course serves as a workshop in which students apply the fundamental skills of journalism to the different formats commonly used in writing copy for public relations and advertising, including press releases, public service announcements, profiles, brochures, and advertisements. In addition, students continue to sharpen their editing skills by revising their own work and by copyediting and critiquing the work of other students. Central to the objectives of this course is that students improve their ability to write clearly and concisely, avoiding common errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM215 - Radio Production

This course introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell College Radio station.

COM216 - Entertainment Media

A focus on the entertainment media industry requires making sense of the material that captures the audience's attention, influences culture, and provides enjoyment to mass media consumers. Course topics include the business of entertainment media, the production and distribution of media content, and multimedia convergence. Students in this course examine the multiple genres for the content of entertainment media, such as drama, comedy, reality TV, and gaming. Students learn how the entertainment industry works, captures the interests of contemporary audiences, and influences our culture and values. Prerequisite: COM 101. Formerly - COM302

COM217 - Video Production

This course introduces students to the basics of video production. Students learn basic videography techniques using professional video cameras such as the SONY HVR-HD1000U. In addition to videography, students learn the basics of digital video editing using industry-standard Avid nonlinear editing programs. Video projects include a video camera roll test, Avid editing assignment, news package, and a short movie where students shoot, direct, and edit their own creative narrative.

COM218 - Digital Video Editing

This course teaches students the basics of editing digital media using the popular software program Adobe Premiere Pro. The aesthetics of editing are also discussed and analyzed through screening various types of edited media. Projects for the course include editing TV commercials, news packages, movie scenes, and music videos. It is recommended that students have acquired basic computer skills prior to taking this class.

COM219 - Social Media

This course is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and practices of writing for weblogs and the use of social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter for reputation management in PR, journaling, and networking. Students learn about social media uses by studying successful blogs, reading assigned articles on the subject, contributing to regular discussions held on an online forum, and completing a personal blog entry each week. Students form small groups around topics of interest and work together in order to publish and promote their work on the web. Each student contributes to a class-made blog by writing, creating/finding art, copyediting, and assisting with podcast and video blog production. Students have a great deal of real-world experience with a live, constantly updated blog, and a solid understanding of the fundamentals of writing for the web and using social media for promotional purposes. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM221 - Advertising

This course introduces students to the field of advertising, including the role of promotional elements (advertising, direct mail, promotion, etc.) found in an advertising agency or in the communication program of an organization. In this course, students learn that advertising is more than just ads on television, on a web page or in print. Advertising is a process that starts with research and moves through analysis, planning, action, and evaluation. The development of an effective advertising strategy requires an understanding of overall communication processes and theoretical principles, how organizations organize and brand themselves for advertising and other promotional functions, consumer behavior, and how to set goals and objectives. A cooperative learning project requires students to engage in the kind of strategic thinking, planning and execution that is done by advertisers, researchers, media planners, and copywriters. The course also addresses how the advertising industry is regulated and how key social issues and various consumer constituencies can present problems for advertising professionals. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM223 - Advertising: Copy & Design

This course approaches the design and content of advertising from a variety of creative perspectives —from art to copy to production. The aim is to create eye catching, stand-out advertising —the kind that requires concentration, creativity, and focus. Students don’t have to be skilled graphic artists, but they do need to be able to explain in detail how a storyboard works and what message is intended for the consumer through an emphasis on: visual effects of the design; use of color and placement; and the significance of slogans, copy, and dialogue. This class duplicates as closely as possible the experience of working in a creative group within a real ad agency. Prerequisite: COM 221.

COM224 - Elements of Film

In this introductory level course, students begin to appreciate film as a medium of communication and expression by watching a variety of classic and contemporary works which function as modes of entertainment, art, education, politics and social change. Using a media literacy approach, this course will focus on content analysis of motion pictures by examining elements of cinematic expression including form, narrative structure, editing, sound, acting/performance, and cinematography. Students will be responsible for learning proper terminology to discuss, analyze, and write about films for relevant assignments. Students will identify major trends and ideas important to the history of film as one of the most important forms of mass media; explore messages and themes highlighted by style and content, as well as the various effects of those messages in specific cultural or industry contexts including classical and contemporary Hollywood, European art cinema, Japan, Russia, and West Africa. Prerequisite: COM 101

COM225 - TV I: Producing

Part I of this two-part course introduces students to the basics of TV producing. Students learn the process of writing a pitch, proposal, treatment, and budget. They also learn the fundamentals of basic screenwriting and production scheduling, as well as managing cast, crew and vendor relationships. The course also explores the roles of the casting director, location manager, production coordinator, and script supervisor. The course concludes with a preview of the production team and the role of the line producer, unit production manager, production manager and assistant directors involved in managing the physical production process of producing a television show.

COM226X - Fashion TV

Students will produce, write and broadcast a Fashion TV show using the studios of NewTV, in Newton. This laboratory course will guide students through the process of creating and producing a Fashion TV show, to be broadcast over the Lasell College cable channel. All aspects of television producing will come into play, as will the art and practice of working a series of studio shoots. The goal will not only be for students to find their own artistic voice, but to produce a show that will go on their demo reels for future employment possibilities. This course is distinct from the Television Production course offered the same term.Prerequisite: COM225X

COM227 - Challenging Hollywood

This course focuses on the theme of innovative classic and contemporary films which challenge society and film industry standards. Beginning with the threats to society posed by early cinema and star scandals, leading to a universal censorship code, students will be introduced to how early films affected society and the future of Hollywood. Students will then watch, analyze, and think critically about popular, artistic, and influential American movies including the subversive film noirs of the post-WWII era such as The Maltese Falcon and Double Indemnity, and films from the 1960s and 1970s such as The Graduate, Easy Rider, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, as well as representations of African-American characters during segregation and the “LA Rebellion” and “New Black Cinema” movements which challenged those representations. We will also explore explosions of themes of violence and sex in contemporary Hollywood which further stretch and shape societal conventions in the US, including discussions of films like Bonnie and Clyde, Pulp Fiction, and Natural Born Killers.

COM228X - How Privileged are You?

Satisfy either your Historical (AI(H)) or Psychological and Societal (AI(PS)) Areas of Inquiry through this interdisciplinary team-taught course. As Ebola has popped up in the U.S., Americans have expressed concern and governmental agencies have reacted accordingly. Once again, as has happened in the past, people are increasingly demanding that more be done. Is this reaction a logical one to a potentially fatal illness or is this a manifestation of Western privilege objecting not to the illness, but to its presence at home? Using case studies of, for instance, the international reactions to epidemics in the past and present, students will explore the ways in which privilege has historically been constructed and the ways in which it impacts societal relations related to health issues. Students will take an inquiry-based approach to these case studies as they come to better understand the societal and psychological factors as well as the historical ones underlying power and privilege.

COM229 - Photojournalism

This is an introductory course in photojournalism that will touch on basic photography skills (composition, focus, subject, and angle), but is not strictly a photography class. This course will use two methods of learning: one is a hands-on, connected learning where students will tell stories through cameras and video; and another is a survey approach, through reading, discussion, lectures, journals, and multimedia presentations which illustrate photojournalism history and current trends. The class supports the college’s minor in photography as well as the communication’s department concentration in journalism and media writing. In an effort to make the course accessible to students from all departments across campus, the first few weeks of the class will provide readings, lecture, and discussion on the background and history of the journalism field.

COM303 - Nonprofit Public Relations

This course invites students to explore "nonprofit public relations" as it is seen today and as experts suggest it will be seen in the future. Students have the opportunity to work with a "real world" nonprofit client by creating, preparing, and producing a complete public relations plan for that organization. Prerequisite: COM 213.

COM304 - TV Studio Production

This course introduces the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment at NewTV - Newton's own public access television studios. Students learn pre-production planning, live-to-tape directing, and participate in full television crew rotations to produce high quality PSAs and their very own TV show to be aired on local access television. Throughout the semester, students develop a variety of production skills from hands-on television studio operation.

COM305 - Screenwriting

This course includes writing techniques for series and stand alone productions in television and film. Students work both independently and collaboratively in order to understand industry procedures. Students experiment with several different genres and then develop a major project. Prerequisite: COM 105.

COM306 - Broadcast Journalism

This class introduces students to the basic skills in writing for radio and TV news, including beat reporting, writing, interviewing, and editing. Students critically evaluate newscasts and are introduced to the components of producing them. They also examine ethical challenges that arise when manipulation of images and sound can distort reality and compromise journalistic integrity. Prerequisite: COM 209

COM307 - Understanding Video Games

This course introduces students to the foundation, process, and impact of the video game industry. Students evolve from merely riding the gaming highway to analyzing and deconstructing it. The course pays particular attention to the history and breakthroughs in the technology, social and political impacts such as the ESRB, sex and violence in games, as well as past, present and future trends of the gaming market.

COM308 - Conflict Resolution & Negotiations

This course helps students to understand the theoretical assumptions, elements, and processes of interpersonal conflict and negotiation, to increase their ability to objectively analyze conflict situations, and to creatively and productively manage conflict. Alternative Dispute Resolution approaches to litigation for resolving conflicts such as mediation, arbitration, and negotiation are examined. Prerequisites: COM 101, LS 101 or BUSS 101; Junior or Senior standing.

COM309 - Sports Communication

This course explores the dynamic organizations and diverse professions reflective of the sports communication field while emphasizing the fundamentals of good public relations and solid journalism. Types of organizational inquiry will include major television, radio and digital networks, leading magazines and newspapers, college athletics and professional sports as well as marketing and advertising firms. Topics covered will span journalism and publishing, community, media and public relations, marketing and advertising as well as digital and social media. In this course, students will learn how to research and write for broadcast, digital and print media; how to define, develop, and deliver effective sports communication campaigns; how to use mass and social media platforms for brands, personalities and teams; and how to manage and mitigate crisis communication.

COM310 - Political Communication

This course focuses on the complex ideas associated with the role of the press in a democracy. The nature and climate of our political processes, particularly elections, have changed dramatically in the past two generations, due in part to the extensive use and influence of the media. Also, media techniques and strategies used by government and political figures continue to change with the emergence of new technologies and the dominance of global media companies. Students learn how to think critically and analytically about the political press and how journalists and politicians frame public policy issues. This course looks critically at whether or not the American press is truly representative of the civic values of democracy, truth, and responsible citizenship. Prerequisites: COM 101 or POLS 101 or SOC 101.

COM312 - Radio Production II

This course brings students with basic radio production skills to a higher level of proficiency. There is strong emphasis on radio as a digital medium and digital (nonlinear) audio editing with Adobe Audition. Projects include editing music for radio play, writing and mixing radio commercials, creating a radio interview podcast, and the development of an Air Check radio demo for student portfolios. Students also develop a deeper understanding of the radio business. Prerequisite: COM 215.

COM313 - Video Production II

This course takes students with basic video production skills to a higher level of expertise. There is strong emphasis on pre-production planning, teamwork, lighting, sound and special effects. The aesthetics of video production are also discussed by analyzing various film and video productions. Projects include a special effects reel, television commercial, short documentary, and a short screenplay adaptation. Throughout the semester, students develop a deeper understanding of the business of video production. Prerequisite: COM 217.

COM314 - Magazine & Feature Writing

This course is focused on the longer pieces of magazine writing, such as feature articles and interview profiles, and other forms of narrative, nonfiction journalistic writing. The course includes reading, analyzing, and modeling well-written newspaper and magazine articles that entertain as well as inform readers. Students have the opportunity to provide editorial support for and submit feature articles for publication to Polished, a Lasell College produced magazine. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 209.

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM316 - Publication Editing

This course is designed as a workshop in which students learn the fundamentals of editing for print and online publications. Students study and participate in various editing roles, including editorial director, articles editor, copy editor, proofreader and fact-checker. Students examine case studies of existing publications. In keeping with Lasell's Connected Learning approach, students propose work for Lasell's two student publications, The 1851 Chronicle and Polished, or other publications. The course focuses on learning to prepare cohesive editorial products with clear, compelling, professional content while avoiding common mistakes in usage, grammar, and style. Prerequisites: COM 105.

COM317 - Media Relations

Managing media relations for public relations professionals is the focus of this course. The course is intended to increase students’ knowledge of the principles and methods of generating publicity and to introduce the basics of planning and writing media relations campaigns. The rapidly changing nature of global companies and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways that communication professionals achieve their goals. Media relations can be a highly competitive and challenging field, where you must prove your productivity, accuracy, and creativity. Students discuss and experiment with successful strategies for gaining coverage in the press for clients, and they plan a comprehensive media relations program. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 208.

COM319 - Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns

This course provides an environment for students to become engaged in a professional style media planning and buying campaign, which is an essential strategic focus of the advertising industry. Students develop a full advertising plan based on the current planning structure of a contemporary advertising agency. Working in teams, students conduct a detailed advertising analysis that allows them to provide strategic and creative solutions to problems they have identified in their research. Student teams construct an advertising plan that positions and promotes a product, a message, a politician, or a brand to a con­sumer audience. Each student team produces a comprehensive media campaign that identifies and targets the appropriate media outlets for advertising placements. The class has a modicum of pressure and intensity that reflects some of the challenges necessary to succeed in the advertising industry. Prerequisite: COM 221.

COM320 - Organizational Communication

This course focuses on both the theoretical understanding and practical knowledge of the context and application of organizational communication. Topics include: leadership, new technologies and their impact on organizations, organizational climate and culture, ethics, formal and informal channels of communication within organizations, management of diversity and conflict, relational communication (with interpersonal and group work), and issues of power and politics within the context of the organizational settings. Prerequisite: COM 103

COM321 - Media & Children

This course examines the uses and effects of mass communication among children and adolescents. By taking a developmental perspective, the course explores how youth at different stages of cognitive development watch, understand, and respond to media content. The first part of the course focuses on children’s uses and processing of media. The second part of the course reviews the effects of various types of content (e.g., advertising, stereotypes, violence). The final part of the course considers the role of interventions (e.g., media literacy, ratings, parental mediation) in preventing media-related outcomes that are harmful and promoting those that are positive. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to critically evaluate the role of media in the lives of children.COM 101 or PSYC 101.

COM323 - Corporate Communications

This course is designed to present students with an overview of corporate communication in contemporary society. The rapidly changing nature of global markets and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways in which communication professionals achieve their goals. The course explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental issues, investor relations, issues of multinationals, ethics, and governmental relations. Prerequisite: COM 213.

COM324 - Journalism II

This is an advanced, connected-learning focused course in which student journalists do the work of the field. Students with basic reporting and editing experience are challenged to demonstrate their news and feature writing skills to a new level of competence. This course requires student to cover a campus or community beat as they report on a student organization, department, team, or local politics, sports, fashion or culture. Projects will focus on new media platforms such as photo galleries and video and audio news content and producing news media packages for print. Students will be encouraged to submit their work to the 1851 Chronicle and the1851chronicle.org. Prerequisite: COM209

COM325 - Global Media

This course introduces students to the global media landscape. Students are exposed to a number of topics including: the power of language in media, recent global media controversies, the economics of global media & ownership, the politics of global media, and the coverage of international events in U.S. media. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 212

COM326 - Effective Speaking II

This advanced public speaking course builds on the foundation of Effective Speaking I to further a student’s development as a public speaker in a variety of settings. This is achieved through a combination of speaking, writing, and reading assignments. Specifically, students outline, develop, and deliver extemporaneous speeches incorporating relevant sources. Students learn how to develop and deliver messages that are appropriate and effective for the audience, purpose, and context using logical arguments within an ethical framework. Prerequisite: COM 203

COM328 - Video Games & Culture

Video Games & Culture brings students on a virtual tour around the globe for a look at the video game industry through the perspectives of numerous cultures. Students will investigate subjects such as video game piracy in Italy & China, professional gaming in Korea, video game censorship in Australia & the Middle East, and much more. The course also compares the North American market with other continents such as Asia, Europe, and South America. The interplay between video games and culture will be discussed, and students will be given hands-on opportunities to sample video games from other countries that were never released in the US. The course emphasizes the competency of ‘knowledge of the media’ and reinforces the competencies of writing, research, visual communication, and speech. This course can be used in substitution for COM 307 Understanding Video Games for Multimedia & Web Design Majors if necessary.

COM330 - Advertising Strategy

This course introduces students to the development of effective advertising strategies. Over the past twenty years, account planning has evolved into a critical element of advertising campaign strategy and execution. The course will explore: 1) The origin and fundamentals of account planning; 2) The role of the account planner in an agency structure; 3) The influence of account planning on the process and role of advertising research and strategic development; 4) Practical implications for account planning in advertising campaign development. Topics include; consumer behavior, attitude development, persuasion tactics, targeting, advertising segmentation, advertising analysis and designing advertising strategies to support a brand. Prerequisite: COM 221 Advertising

COM332 - Television Studies

This course will explore this significant question: Should we take TV seriously as a form of mass communication? The answer can be found in the ways that TV produces meanings for the audience and our culture as a dominant form of entertainment over that past 60 plus years in post WWII America. As such, TV demands our scrutiny. Throughout the course, we will look at such topics as how TV entertainment narrative is structured, how sets are designed, how sound interacts with image, how commercials persuade and how these structures can emphasize certain meanings (and de-emphasize others) and transmit values to viewers. Current trends in technological shifts have forced changes in the delivery of TV programming, for example to audio and video files streaming on computers, such as tablets, the decline of network TV and the rise of hundreds of cable channels. However, all of these new technologies demand more TV entertainment content, not less.This course uses two avenues of inquiry: one exploring the mass communication basis for studying the content delivered through medium of TV; and another outlining an analysis of TV content which illustrates the transmission of cultural values (primarily American) to the audience. Prerequisites: COM 101

COM334 - Comparing Cultures Through Film

By examining films from Iraq, Cuba, India, Native Americans, Mexico, Nigeria, China, South Africa, and Chad, students will gain exposure to various social, cultural, political, and economic systems, leading to discussion and exploration of other cultures as well as reflection about American culture. Students will engage in an interdisciplinary approach which adopts terminology and theories from film studies and criticism, sociology, and cultural anthropology, in order to study other cultures and cultural methods of visual storytelling. Ultimately, goals include increased intercultural competence and sensitivity accompanied by an empathy for the “other” and an increased awareness and raised consciousness of past and contemporary global issues. Prerequisite: COM 101

COM399 - Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop professional objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. In this seminar students identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will develop effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students apply search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. The internship course is comprised of a minimum of 150 hours in the field, the weekly seminar, and its assignments, including an oral presentation. Students also write weekly reflections on their experience, complete written assignments, and do an oral presentation to a group of their peers. The field supervisor contributes to the student’s learning through guidance, feedback and evaluation of the students work.

COM402 - Field Experience II

COM 402 follows COM 400, in which students learned how to apply theory to practice in a work environment. This course will take those skills one step further and enhance the students understanding of the Communication discipline, the skills required to succeed in the job market, and how to conduct the necessary research to find a job and a career which is a good fit and will lead the student to professional success. Projects will include facilitating a workshop, conducting a focus group, developing a marketing strategy, creating a hard portfolio, a leave-behind piece, and an e-portfolio. Students should complete the internship in a different organization than the placement for COM 400. Contact Sarah Burrows with questions: sburrows@lasell.edu

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ECON102 - Principles of Econ-Macro

This course explores basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole and policies designed to affect its performance. Topics include economic scarcity; causes of unemployment and inflation; money and monetary policy; the impact of government taxation and spending; and the federal debt. Some consideration is given to international economic problems and to contrasting economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 101.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development.

ECON206 - Global Economic Development

The goal of this course is to introduce the main issues of global economic development. Students will explore the problems facing developing countries of the world as they attempt to industrialize, develop their economies and raise the standards of living of their people. The course will address the following broad questions: What is the meaning of Economic development? Why some countries are rich while others are poor? What would explain the success of such East Asian countries as China? What are the key constrains that prevent poor countries, especially those in the African continent, from achieving progress? What are the strategies that poor countries can adopt to foster development?

ECON207 - Vietnam Immersion

This fall semester course is linked to two weeks of service-learning in Vietnam during the winter break. The course introduces students to the Vietnamese society today. It covers basic elements of Vietnamese politics, economic development, culture, history, language, literature, and arts. The experience in Vietnam includes working for non-profit organizations that deal with social problems. This course fulfills the Multicultural Area of Inquiry. Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Vietnam program director.

ECON301 - International Trade & Finance

This course examines theory, tariffs, and import quotas; adjustment mechanisms, foreign exchange, and exchange controls are also covered. Additional topics include the theory of comparative advantage, the causes and consequences of imbalances in the balance of payments or exchange rates, and the evolution of the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102.

ED109 - Invitation to Teaching

This course explores careers in teaching beginning with the unifying question: Why should I become a teacher? Students examine their motivations to become teachers while they learn about college and state requirements and expectations.

ED110 - Teaching & Learning in American Schools

This course provides students pursuing or considering initial teacher licensure with an overview of the teaching profession. Students study and discuss history and philosophies of education systems, as well as current trends and issues. Massachusetts professional standards and requirements for licensure are explored. This course is a prerequisite for all other ED courses. Twenty-five hours of observation and tutoring in varied school settings are required. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ED206 - Early Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the preschool and early elementary years, including transitions to reading and writing, role of phonemic awareness and phonics in emergent and early literacy, varied assessments to measure developing literacy, instructional strategies and materials to support young learners. Minimum 25 pre-practicum hours. This is a writing intensive course. Co-requisite ED 206L

ED208 - Elem Literacy Teaching & Learning

This course explores literacy development in the elementary years (through grade 6), including reading in content areas, fluency, reading/writing connections, varied assessments to measure literacy development, and instructional strategies and materials to support elementary learners through grade 6. Minimum 25 pre-practicum hours; Co-requisite ED 208L

ED210 - Reading & Writing Across the Curriculum

This course emphasizes the processes of reading and the critical nature of reading to learn in the content areas. Focus will be on literacy strategies to support teaching in content areas, the influences of diversity, the current methods of instruction, and assessments used to inform instruction. In addition, the current research on reading to learn will be read, discussed, and integrated in all course activities. Requires a pre-practicum of 25 hours minimum. Prerequisite: ED 219.

ED219 - Supporting Learner Variability

This course introduces students to characteristics of learners with special needs in classroom and community settings. It focuses on principles of Universal Design for Learning in developing appropriate learning environments to meet the variability of all students in Pre-K through high school settings. A required minimum 25-hour pre-practicum provides opportunities to teach and observe in area classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED221X - Mindfulness&Growth Mindset for Educators

The integration of mindfulness and a growth mindset in the classroom environment can have a major impact on student social-emotional developement and academic success. This course will provide students interested in education with the knowledge and tools to help cultivate students' growth and awareness of stress, emotional regulation and improved sustained attention. The course will include current research on mindfulness, growth mindset, and science behind its practice while also providing a method for implementioning it in the classroom. Educators trained in mindfulness and growth mindset report higher levels of student focus, productivity, and engagement in the classroom.

ED232 - Cultural Competence & Global Classroom

This fall semester course is paired with an international service-learning trip in the Caribbean island nation of Antigua & Barbuda during the winter break. The course provides an opportunity for students to explore the intersection of culture, disability, and teaching in international settings. The service-learning trip includes a school-based experience of 40 hours spent observing, supporting, and teaching students with and without disabilities in the public schools in Antigua & Barbuda. Course activities will focus on reflective intellectual work about intercultural competence in the classroom through written reflections, readings, class discussion, and curriculum development. 

ED308 - Responsive Teaching in Secondary Schools

Students will develop strategies and tools necessary to be responsive secondary. Participants in this course will observe secondary teachers, develop lesson plans, reflect on their teaching philosophy, apply leadership theory to classroom practice, explore current trends and issues that impact secondary classrooms, increase their cultural competence, and expand their toolkit of strategies for differentiating instruction to address the variability of secondary students. A minimum of 25 hours of classroom observation, reflection and teaching is required. Pre-requisite: ED 219

ED309 - Sheltered English Immersion

This course provides a grounding in current theory and practice related to teaching English Language Learners. In particular, students learn to effectively shelter their content instruction, so that ELL students can access curriculum, achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy. This course meets Massachusetts DESE standards for the required SEI endorsement. Course includes a minimum 25-hour pre-practicum in license-appropriate classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 206 or Department permission

ED327 - Literacy Assessment & Instruction

This course explores strategies for integrating the language arts and teaching literacy across the curriculum for learners through grade 6, including assessment for planning and evaluation, classroom organization, management, unit and lesson planning, and resources. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ED 208; pass all required MTEL Communication and Literacy Test; Co-requisite 327L

ED330 - Pre-Internship Seminar

Usually taken in spring of the junior year, this seminar helps students identify objectives and research potential sites for the internship. Prerequisites: Junior standing and department permission.

ED335 - Teaching Mathematics: PK - 2

This course covers the development of number sense, one to one correspondence, meaning of operations, estimation, graphing, and patterns. The use of developmentally appropriate materials, manipulatives, technology, and children’s literature for the teaching of math are addressed. The course explores a variety of math curricula, assessment techniques, and the use of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for designing instruction. Includes a 25-hour pre-practicum. Prerequisite: Pass all required MTEL.

ED337 - Teaching & Applying Mathematics: 1 - 6

Students use state and national curriculum standards, teaching strategies, and instructional resources for effective mathematics instruction. Through classroom activities and a 25-hour pre-practicum, students demonstrate their ability to solve problems, reason mathematically, and support young learners in their development of mathematics understanding. Prerequisites: MATH 104, 107; pass all required MTEL.

ED338 - Inclusive Education

In this course, students develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to create learning environments appropriate to the full variability of learners in pre-K through grade 6. Through in-class activities and a 25-hour pre-practicum, students expand their understanding and use of strategies and resources including Universal Design for Learning, appropriate instructional technology, and positive behavioral supports. Prerequisites: ED 219, Co-requisite ED 338L

ED340 - Topics in Education

This course explores current issues and policies in education, emphasizing their background, development, varied perspectives, and current relevance for educators. Topics vary each semester, but may include reading comprehension strategies, classroom uses of children’s literature, art and music as educational media in preschool settings, policies related to curriculum content and standards, and appropriate uses of assessments. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics change.

ED342 - Teaching Science Concepts: PK - 2

This course engages students in integrating early childhood science content with state and national curriculum standards and resources, including instructional technology, to develop effective science lessons. The course includes practice in integrating science concepts with early childhood curriculum and requires a 25 hour pre-practicum in local classrooms. Prerequisite: pass all required MTEL. 4 credits

ED344 - Science Concepts & Curriculum: 1-6

This course engages students in integrating elementaryscience content with state and national curriculumstandards and resources, including instructional technology, to develop effective science lessons. The course includes practice in integrating science concepts with elementary curriculum and requires a 25 hour pre-practicum in elementary classrooms. Prerequisite: pass all required MTEL.

ED413 - Prof, Respon, & Ethics in Curr Instr

This capstone course integrates classroom practice, course work, and current developments in curriculum and instruction. The course includes a weekly seminar addressing problem solving in the field placement as well as current professional, ethical, moral, and legal issues facing professionals in education-related fields. Prerequisite: Senior standing or department permission. Co-requisite: ED 427.

ED417 - Pre-Practicum: PK - Grade 2

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours of supervised field experience in classrooms appropriate for their concentration. Students observe, teach, and assist their cooperating teacher with classroom responsibilities. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of pre-practicum-related issues. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair.

ED418 - Integrated Instruction: Elementary: 1-6

In this course, students explore research on social studies education as well as the teaching methods and related teaching materials that encourage learning in this discipline among children in an elementary school setting. In addition, students examine a variety of ways to effectively integrate the arts into the elementary curriculum.

ED419 - Pre-Practicum: Elementary (1 - 6)

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours of supervised field experience in classrooms appropriate for their concentration. Students observe, teach, and assist their cooperating teacher with classroom responsibilities. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of pre-practicum related issues. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chair.

ED420 - Integrated Instruction: PK - Grade 2

In this course, students explore research on social studies education as well as the teaching methods and related teaching materials that encourage learning in this discipline among children in the early childhood education setting. In addition, students examine a variety of ways to effectively integrate the arts into the early childhood curriculum.

ED421 - Curriculum Integration

In this capstone course, students integrate theory and previous field experiences with their 150-hour pre-practicum. Research and discussion topics include classroom management and organization, use of various curriculum materials and resources, and ethical issues in educational settings. Students design a classroom-based research project which will be completed during the practicum (ED 496 or 498). Prerequisites: Senior standing, pass all required MTEL, concurrent enrollment in ED433, 435 OR 437

ED426 - Advanced Teaching Seminar

This capstone seminar offers intensive coaching on practical aspects of course development and design, management of class discussion, and selection of class assignments in a college course setting. Students may collaborate with faculty members teaching existing courses, or may design and teach a one-credit seminar (ED 112). Course is offered as needed. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair.

ED427 - Curriculum & Instruction Internship

In this course, students complete a minimum of 150 hours in a supervised setting, arranged in ED 330 (Pre-internship seminar) related to their career interest. Prerequisites: Senior Standing and permission of Department Chair. Co-requisite: ED 413

ED429 - Adv Internship Curriculum & Instruction

This course is for students who have completed ED 427 (Internship) and desire additional experience to continue preparing for a career area. Student must follow department procedures for locating, designing, and obtaining approval for the internship. Requires 150 clock hours in a supervised setting and in-depth reflection component. Prerequisites: Department permission; ED 413 and ED 427.

ED433 - Pre-practicum: Secondary English

Through a minimum of 150 hours of observation and reflection in public schools, and regular meetings with school and Lasell faculty, students in this course become familiar with the curriculum and organization of middle and/or high schools and English classrooms in preparation for the practicum. Prerequisite: Senior standing; passing scores on all required MTEL; permission of Department Chair. Co-requisite: ED421

ED435 - Pre-practicum: Secondary History

Through a minimum of 150 hours of observation and reflection in public schools, and regular meetings with school and Lasell faculty, students in this course become familiar with the curriculum and organization of middle and/or high schools and history classrooms in preparation for the practicum. Prerequisite: Senior standing; passing scores on all required MTEL; permission of Department Chair. Co-requisite: ED421

ED437 - Pre-practicum: Secondary Math

Through a minimum of 150 hours of observation and reflection in public schools, and regular meetings with school and Lasell faculty, students in this course become familiar with the curriculum and organization of middle and/or high schools and mathematics classrooms in preparation for the practicum. Prerequisite: Senior standing; passing scores on all required MTEL; permission of Department Chair

ED482 - Practicum: Secondary English

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary English classroom and meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Department Chair required. Prerequisite: ED 433; passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL.

ED484 - Practicum: Secondary History

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary history classroom and meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Department Chair required. Prerequisite: ED 435; passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL

ED492 - Practicum: Secondary Math

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary mathematics classroom and meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Department Chair required. Prerequisite: ED 437; passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL.

ED494 - Professional Standards & Ethics

Taken concurrently with ED 496 or ED 498, this capstone seminar engages students in ethical questions such as student confidentiality, testing, and communicating with various constituencies as well as practical aspects of preparing for an initial teaching position. It includes conducting and reporting on the classroom-based research project that was designed in ED 421. Co-requisite: ED 496 or ED 498.

ED496 - Practicum: Early Childhood

This practicum provides experience in two early childhood education settings. One setting is in Preschool or Kindergarten and the other setting is in grade one or two. Students spend five days a week in the classroom, assuming increasing responsibility that culminates with a “take over” week. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of practicum-related issues. Topics of discussion include the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working with parents. Permission of the Department Chair required. Prerequisite: Passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL.

ED498 - Practicum: Elementary (1 -6)

In this course, students are placed in elementary schools for a five day a week placement. Students assume increasing responsibility and end with a “take over” week in the classroom. A weekly seminar provides a forum for discussion of practicum related issues. Topics of discussion include the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working with parents. Permission of the Department Chair required. Prerequisite: Passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL.

ENG100I - Writing Skills

This course, designed to prepare the nonnative speaker of English for the Core Writing I - Writing II sequence, addresses the development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening competencies crucial to the successful completion of college coursework. Placed in this course on the basis of the TOFEL score, students work on oral and written English language skills through informal exercises and formal oral and written projects; the lab component of this course provides an opportunity for individual conferencing around written assignments. Students must receive a grade of “C” or higher in order to pass this course.

ENG101 - Writing I

In this course, students gain understanding of and confidence in effective writing. Students write in several different genres such as narrative, analysis, digital writing, annotated bibliography, researched argument and/or collaborative writing. The course emphasizes writing as a process and focuses on the rhetorical choices writers make. Students who choose to take Writing I Workshop are provided with time during class to work on their writing while the instructor and a peer writing consultant are present to provide assistance.

ENG102 - Writing II

This course builds on and refines skills and techniques gained in Writing I. Readings in a variety of genres from across disciplines are included, and students write in multiple genres with a heavy emphasis on research writing. Prerequisite: ENG101 or ENG101 Workshop with a grade of C or better

ENG104 - Academic Reading & Writing

This elective writing course is designed for any student who recognizes the need for additional work on reading and/or writing following completion of ENG 101 and 102. The course focuses on close reading and academic writing in response to readings about American culture from across the academic disciplines. Students develop and reinforce their skills in using reading strategies and in selecting and integrating text from a reading, analyzing issues, and synthesizing ideas in a focused and coherent essay. Students may be placed into an ESL section of this course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG107 - Oral Communication & Presentation Skills

This course is designed to help international students develop confidence in their oral English skills, so that they can participate freely in classroom discussions and present comfortably in the classroom context. Students work at their English listening and speaking skills in order to improve their English fluency and comprehensibility, benefiting from the regular practice and from instructor feedback; coursework focuses on pronunciation, vocabulary, and English usage conventions. Course activities include speaking opportunities, vocabulary building exercises, group discussions, and a series of presentations scheduled during the semester. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

ENG201 - Eng Lit/Themes & Writers

This course offers a special thematic approach to the study of English literature. Various authors, such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Shaw, and Yeats, are studied within such contexts as convention and revolt, the hero and the heroine, or evil and decadence. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG208 - The Structure of the English Language

This course focuses on essential elements of the structure of the English language: its phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), and syntax (sentence structure). Students draw on their own knowledge of language as they examine spoken English; they then study the relationship between spoken and written language. As students discuss issues pertinent to teachers and to writers, the relevance of linguistic analysis both to written language development and to writing practice is considered. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG209 - Intro to Literature & Literary Studies

This is a foundations course required for the major and the minor in English. The course provides an introduction to a variety of forms and styles in poetry, drama, short story, fiction, memoir, and essay; European, African, North American, Central and South American, and Asian literatures are considered. The focus is on interpreting texts; students are introduced to various schools of interpretation and to standards for supporting an interpretation. Students become familiar with the conventional elements of each genre and with the terminology of critical interpretation. The course introduces print and database tools for research on literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG210 - Survey of American Literature

This course surveys representative periods, authors, or genres in American literature from beginnings in Native American oral literatures through contemporary works. Individual sections organize study of classic and contemporary texts around particular themes, such as Queering American Literatures, American Migrations, Hemispheric American Literature, or Americans on the Edge: "Frontiers" in the American Imagination. Individual sections also trace twentieth- or twenty-first-century movements to their roots in or resistance to earlier movements or forms. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG211 - Modern Drama

This survey course introduces students to great modern works of drama, considering the late nineteenth century through the present. Plays are considered in terms of performance as well as in literary terms, with a focus on the ways in which the philosophies and sensibilities of modernism and postmodernism are reflected both on the page and on the stage. Readings include modern classics by such writers as Ibsen, O'Neill, Brecht, and Beckett, as well as more recent works. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG212 - Literature for Young Adults

This course surveys current literature for adolescent and teen readers. It prepares students to evaluate young adult books in terms of literary quality, reader interest, and social and political perspectives. Strategies for use in the classroom are explored; various genres are examined. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG214 - Special Topics in Literature

This course concentrates on an interdisciplinary approach to literature. The focus is on one theme, one author, one period, or one genre. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in analysis, criticism, and/or research. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG216 - The Mystery Novel

This course examines the history of one type of genre fiction, the mystery, beginning with texts from the late nineteenth century and ending with contemporary novels. Emphasis is on the development of the form, the social context of the texts including historical background, changes in popular taste, and analysis of the popularity of the genre. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG217 - Contemporary Literature (KP)

In this course, we consider contemporary literature in its global context. Viewing literature as the expression of individual national/cultural traditions and as a rendering of the universally human condition, we examine both national literatures and texts written for a global readership. Topics such as global citizenship, diaspora, postcolonial aesthetics, modernism, postmodernism, and cultural/literary redefinition may be addressed; sample texts include Tagore's King of the Dark Chamber, Kincaid's Among Flowers, Aidoo's No Sweetness Here, Kafka's The Metamorphosis, and Heaney's The Spirit Level. Prerequisite: ENG102

ENG218 - British Literature

This course surveys British writing in poetry, fiction, and drama, with a focus on key periods in the development of British literature. Emphasis is on representative writers in each period. Periods and movements surveyed include Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary or Postmodern. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG219 - Creative Writing

In this course, students explore various types of creative writing including fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students do a wide range of in-class and out-of-class writing assignments, and they have the opportunity to select one form for a major project. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG222 - Lyric Poetry

This course considers the lyric poem in global contexts, with attention to poetic voice, composition, sense, and sound. Form and content are examined in medieval to modern meditative and lyric poems. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG223 - Ethics & Morality in Literature

This course focuses on the role that ethics and morality play in a variety of literary texts. Emphasis is on analysis of characters' decisions and choices that relate to ethical issues as well as to the formation of their ethical codes. Characters' positions relating to ethical systems and the prevailing morality of their society are considered. Literature is selected from diverse genres and traditions. The focus of the course changes each semester. Possible topics include Literature of Human Rights, Prison Writing, Literature and the Environment, and Literature of War. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG224 - Film & Literature

In this course, the nature of narrative in literature and film is explored; focus is on analysis of literature that has been made into movies. Students consider the types of changes inolved in the transformation from one form to another, as well as the complex reasons for variations. Prerequisite: ENG102.

ENG225 - The Short Story

In this course, students study the development of the short story as a twentieth-century form; critical and creative approaches are offered. Selections are taken from such authors as Edith Wharton, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Joyce Carol Oates, Doris Lessing, and Alice Walker. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG235 - From Sounds to Sentences

This course considers the acquisition of human language as a biologically based and species-specific communication system. The interaction, from infancy through early and later childhood, between biological preparedness and environmental influence is studied, as is the development of phonology (sound system), lexicon (vocabulary), syntax (sentence structure), and pragmatics (language use). The developmental phases through which a young learner passes as the language systems develop are also studied in this course. Bilingualism, dialect, language disorder, and early written language development are considered. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG237X - Becoming Ourselves in Society

How are we influenced by our group and our society? What attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs do we develop in our social contexts? These questions have been addressed through the lens of social psychology; in addition, creative writers have been moved to explore them. In this course, we consider the individual’s interface with social groups from psychological and literary perspectives. This is a four-credit interdisciplinary course. Prerequisites: ENG102, PSYC101 or SOC101.

ENG304 - Stories of Origin

This course considers both written and oral traditional texts. Texts originating in expressions of faith, devotion, cultural origin or expression, and ethnic identity are examined, with attention to narration, characterization, sacred mystery, moral /ethical content, and interpretation. Readings include selections from Ancient Greek and Roman literature, the Bible and/or the Qur’an, and world myths and folktales. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

ENG307 - Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop

In this course, students study the literary genre of creative nonfiction by exploring a variety of personal essays and memoirs and by engaging in writing practice. Work by class members is read and discussed, as are textbook readings that illuminate the use of craft tools such as description, imagery, diction, syntax, text structure, and metaphor in the development of personal essays and memoirs. Reading assignments involve the close examination of essays and memoirs; written assignments involve in-class work, reflections on craft essays, annotations on creative reading, and one 10-page text of original creative nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENG219, COM209, or permission of instructor.

ENG308 - Fiction Writing Workshop

In this course, students write various types of fiction. They work on different types of short stories and may have the opportunity to work with longer forms such as the novella or the novel. Students will analyze the work of professional writers in order to understand a variety of writing strategies, including the uses of and approaches to plot, dialogue, point of view, and description. Students work on short and longer assignments to develop technique and also have the opportunity to structure some of their own assignments. Students' analysis of one another's writing is an extremely important component of the course. Prerequisite: ENG 219 or Permission of Instructor

ENG310 - Poetry Writing Workshop

In this course, we consider English verse by exploring lyric poetry and engaging in its practice. Work by class members is read and discussed, as are other example poems whose study illuminates the use of tools such as imagery, diction, sound device, structure, lineation, and figurative language in the construction of poetic meaning. Reading assignments involve the close examination of poems; written assignments include short poetry annotations and the creation of a portfolio of original poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 219 or ENG 222.

ENG312 - Literature of Postcolonial World

In this course, students consider issues, movements, or traditions in literatures that respond to a history of colonization and/or imperialism. Latin American, African, and Asian cultures or traditions are emphasized in English or in English translations; issues addressed might include matters of publication and criticism, myths about the "third world," nationalism, fundamentalism, human rights, technology, and cultural resistance. Example topics include The Novel in India, Caribbean Dub Poetry, Prison Writing, Major South African Writers, Magic Realism. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

ENG313 - American Multiethnic Literature

This course focuses on the history, variety, and aesthetic conventions of one or more racial-ethnic traditions in American writing. Individual courses might focus on key forms or authors; distinct traditions such as African-American, Latino, Asian-American, or Native American literature; or a survey across several traditions. Examples include Barack Obama and the African-American Tradition, Contemporary Latino Literatures, or Haiti and the US in Haitian-American Writing. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

ENG340 - Classics of World Literature

This course explores representative fiction, poetry, or drama by major figures in world literature, centering on topics such as love, tragedy, comedy, immortality, madness, wasteland, quest for knowledge, voyages, or exploration. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

ENG402 - Advanced Writing Workshop

This is the capstone course for creative writing majors and minors. Working with a faculty mentor, each student develops and completes a major writing project that focuses on the student’s writing interests. Review, critique, and drafting are crucial course components. The course includes reading assignments that relate to the writing projects. This one-semester course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG307, ENG308, or ENG310.

ENV101 - Intro to Environmental Studies (KP)

This course uses case studies to explore global environmental challenges and engages students in considering sustainable solutions. Solutions that promote a healthy environment, social equality, and economic viability are discussed. Students explore steps individuals, organizations, and communities can take to reduce their ecological footprint and to slow global warming. Leaders from community organizations and local government agencies are invited to discuss issues with students.

ENV102 - Environmental Ethics & Society

This course explores issues and problems arising out of ethical considerations related to the general environment and specific ecosystems. Also considered are the moral aspects of population control and resource use. The foundations for beliefs and worldviews regarding nature and the human relationship to it are explored. In addition, the variety of philosophical perspectives and pragmatic choices and actions people take related to environmental ethics are studied.

ENV201 - Environmental Law & Policy

This course examines the role of law and politics in the management of natural resources and the environment. The course first reviews the major US environmental protection legislation and then explores the process of developing and establishing environmental policy related to water, air, energy, and land resources. Historical and contemporary circumstances that influence public policy decisions, the influence of science and technology, social and economic paradigms, and ethics and values are discussed. Even though the emphasis is on domestic U.S. policies and institutions, international issues are addressed, including how US domestic environmental policies influence and are influenced by global forces. This is a writing intensive course.

ENV204 - Environmental Economics

This course explores economic problems associated with environmental issues. The course introduces modeling and analytical tools used in the field. The course first examines the problem of market failure in the presence of externalities and public goods, and considers public policy responses to these market failures, including command-and-control regulations, tax and subsidy incentives, and marketable pollution permits. The course then addresses the methods to measure the costs and benefits of environmental improvements and how these types of analysis are used in public policy decisions. These decisions are analyzed in the context of problems such as air pollution, ozone depletion and global warming, threats to biodiversity, and development. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ECON101

ENV205 - Green Business

All businesses, from oil companies to computer manufacturers want to be "green." Being "green" is not only good for a business' marketing and publicity, but it also helps the bottom line. This course examines what it means to be a "green" business. Topics include the Triple Bottom Line, sourcing materials, energy management and recycling.

ENV206 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies

This course examines a particular area of environmental studies with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests.

ENV207 - Chemistry for a Sustainable Future

This course will engage students in thinking about environmental problems through the context of chemistry. The relevance of chemistry to such topics as air pollution, climate change, and water management will be explored. Students will be challenged to consider the application of chemistry to help address many of these problems.

ENV211 - Environmental Science (KP)

During this course, students are introduced to the concept of environmental sustainability. Issues such as climate change, biodiversity, food and agriculture, water resources, and energy are explored. Students are challenged to consider the impact of Lasell College on the environment and will complete a greenhouse gas inventory. Students also examine the role of science and technology in the pursuit of environmental sustainability.

ENV220 - World Geography (KP)

This course surveys the earth's social, cultural and economic patterns and their relationship to the physical geography of the earth. A regional approach is taken to provide a foundation for more intensive systematic studies of important environmental/political issues.

ENV301 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV302 - Natural Resource Management/GIS

This course surveys natural resource issues from global to local scales through the use of geographic information systems (GIS). GIS, remotely sensed images, and global positioning systems are used as tools in managing community natural resources. Students map natural resources and community features to explore management strategies. Students work with town commissions, state agencies, and environmental organizations to obtain spatial data for analysis.

ENV303 - Environmental Justice

All people should have the right to live in and enjoy a clean and healthful environment. However, access to clean air and water, exposure to excessive noise, and access to natural areas is inequitable in our society. This course explores how racial, economic, and cultural backgrounds influence access to a clean and safe environment. Local, national, and international issues of the environment and social justice are explored. Students engage with local community organizations on projects promoting environmental justice.

ENV304 - Environmental Field Sampling

The environmental movement relies on monitoring data to make the case for cleaner air, water, etc. In this course, students learn how to conduct basic water quality, air quality, and other forms of environmental monitoring as well as discuss how to use the data that is collected.

ENV305 - Energy: Moving on from Fossil Fuel

Our economic prosperity relies on burning fossil fuels to power everything from our trucks to our office computers. As fossil fuels become more scarce, it is necessary to find other sources of energy. This course introduces students to our energy grid and to alternative sources of energy like wind, solar and geothermal. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 211

ENV400 - Internship

This internship is scheduled to take place during the junior year and introduces students to challenges faced by companies, non-profit organizations, or government agencies. Placement is tailored to meet the student’s career goals and interests in the environmental field. Students work 150 hours over the course of the semester alongside professionals in the field. Written reflections are submitted during and at the conclusion of the internship as well as regular meetings with the internship supervisor. The internship supervisor monitors each student’s performance and visits each internship site as needed. Prerequisites: ENV 101, ENV 102, ENV 201, ENV 211.

ENV420 - Environmental Studies Senior Seminar

This course is a capstone course in Environmental Studies that focuses on current issues and trends in the environmental field. Students complete an applied thesis or practicum project in an area related to their particular interest and present it to the class and/or at symposium. Environmental career opportunities are discussed along with resume development, networking, interviewing techniques, and other career development skills. Prerequisites: ENV 400, Senior standing.

EXSC101 - Essentials of Musculoskeletal Anatomy

This course provides students with foundational concepts associated with the healthcare and fitness industry. Through connected learning projects, emphasis is placed on understanding musculoskeletal anatomy and medical nomenclature Formerly - AHLT101

EXSC104 - Principles & Problems of Coaching

This course provides students with an introduction to the profession of coaching. Students develop a base of knowledge through the study of principles and concepts from the areas of coaching philosophy, sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology, and sports management. Upon successful completion of the course, students have a thorough understanding and appreciation of possible solutions for those problems that are most frequently encountered in coaching, as well as the ability to apply principles of coaching to individual athletes and/or a team.

EXSC106 - Resistance Training

This course will explore the fundamentals of strength and conditioning instruction. Students will develop a practical/technical foundation for designing, instructing, and evaluating strength and conditioning routines for a variety of clientele. Major compound movements, Olympic lifts, and advanced conditioning techniques will be emphasized. Students will utilize their anatomical and kinesiological knowledgebase to evaluate exercise technique and form. Students will also develop foundational knowledge of exercise safety, cueing/correction techniques, exercise demonstration and modification, exercise progression and professionalism.

EXSC107 - Lifestyles & Human Behavior

This course focuses on the benefits of a healthy lifestyle and the interactive principles of human behavior across the lifespan from adolescence through adult development. Topics include exercise adherence and maintenance, weight management, smoking cessation, and stress management. Formerly - AHLT107

EXSC108 - Group Exercise

This course will introduce students to group exercise instruction methods. Students will gain knowledge of and skill in planning exercise sessions for groups of exercisers using a variety of formats and instructional techniques. Communication, instruction, safety, motivation, organization, music selection, and choreography with be discussed and practiced. In addition, the application of common anatomy, physiology, and behavior modification principles will be used in designing and progressing group exercise sessions. A variety of fitness activities will be explored including sports conditioning, circuit training, boot camp, step aerobics, kickboxing, strength training, yoga and indoor cycling. This course will also prepare students to sit for national certification exams.

EXSC202 - Applied Coaching Techniques

The course is designed to help aspiring coaches teach the skills athletes need in order to perform effectively in team and individualized sports. Students will learn how to address the various issues faced by athletic coaches by thoroughly examining such concepts as individual differences exhibited by athletes; technical, tactical, and mental skills athletes need to learn; content and structure of skill practice; the art of providing feedback; and the preparation of athletes for competition. This exploration prepares coaches to work with athletes competently and confidently in most coaching settings.

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC211 - Personal Fitness

This course prepares students for national certification exams as personal trainers. Each class addresses pertinent topics of the health fitness professional. These topics include health screening and assessment and comprehensive program design for multiple populations. The course empowers students with the skills necessary to become qualified fitness professionals.

EXSC213 - Coaching Practicum

This course provides students the opportunity to apply the principles and practices of coaching in a junior high, high school, or collegiate environment. Students participate actively in practical coaching experiences under the guidance and supervision of a qualified coach. Prerequisite: EXSC 104 and EXSC 202

EXSC222 - Kinesiology

This course examines the anatomical and mechanical concepts required for critical assessment, description, and qualitative analysis of human motion. The laboratory component includes analysis of human motion. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206, PHYS 111.

EXSC302 - Exercise Physiology

This course explores the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the structure and function of the body with an emphasis on the acute responses of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neuromuscular systems. Various concepts related to physical fitness such as body composition, skill related fitness, and cardiovascular fitness are introduced. The practical applications of major principles are demonstrated in a laboratory setting. Students are advised that the capability to exercise moderately and maximally may be required and that documentation of a medical examination indicating cardiopulmonary status and exercise capacity may be requested by the instructor. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC304 - Exercise Testing & Prescription

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to engage in the application of physiological principles and development of practical skills for fitness evaluation and exercise prescription. Course content will emphasis: pre-test screening and assessment and prescription fundamentals for cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness, body composition, and flexibility. Prerequisite EXSC 302.

EXSC305 - Strength Training & Conditioning

Lecture and practical sessions include principles of weight training and conditioning, orientation to different modalities, including free weights, weight machines (i.e., Nautilus), and circuit training and development of individual and group exercise programs. Students may be required to obtain medical clearance prior to participation. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EXSC306 - Applied Ethics in Health Care

Develop a moral and ethical decision making framework as related to the healthcare field as individuals (clinician) and groups (healthcare team) through the application ethical principles and concepts.

EXSC307 - Advanced Sports Performance

This course is designed to provide students advanced concepts in strength and conditioning. Emphasis is placed on the application of principles and theories covered in the Strength and Conditioning class. Students focus on the development of sports specific programs for the purpose of improving athletic performance. Prerequisite: EXSC 305.

EXSC340 - Research Concepts

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industy including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

EXSC401 - Exercise Science Seminar II

This course provides students with the skills needed to prepare for entrance into the workforce or graduate school. Emphasis is placed on cover letters and resume writing, interview skills, the graduate school application process, professionalism, and ethical decision making. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Co-requisite - EXSC 340

EXSC403 - Exercise for Special Populations

This course provides the exercise physiologist with an in-depth knowledge of application of exercise principles for patients participating in adult fitness programs. It includes client characteristics, screening, and program supervision. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: EXSC 302 or EXSC304

EXSC405 - Organization & Healthcare Administration

This course presents the principles of managing physical education, intramural and athletic programs, and sport and fitness businesses. Course topics include facility management, human relations, legal issues, scheduling, drug testing, staffing, and related duties of facility managers. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

EXSC406 - Advanced Topics in Exercise Physiology

This course explores and evaluates current concepts in the understanding of physiological function and effects of exercise. Particular emphasis is placed on the physiological function and effects of exercise across the lifespan and in-depth examination of current literature in advanced exercise science topics. Pre-requisite: EXSC 302.

EXSC410 - Exercise Science Field Experience I

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic, corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 150 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC 302, EXSC 305 and Permission of Department Chair.

EXSC420 - Exercise Science Field Experience II

This is an off-campus experience in a hospital, clinic,corporate, university or commercial setting, as appropriate. Concepts, theories, and practices learned in the classroom are applied in a supervised setting. Students must successfully complete at least 300 hours of field experience in addition to written assignments. Prerequisites: EXSC 302, EXSC 305 and Permission of Department Chair.

EXSC430 - Exercise Science Capstone

The capstone course synthesizes theories and practices of exercise physiology into one culminating and progressive exercise program for a client. Students serve as subjects, technicians, and administrators. The primary goal is to better prepare students to engage in research at the graduate level and to create an opportunity for students to apply various concepts and theories attained throughout the curriculum. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for exercise program design and undergraduate research, with three course design option; development of original case study research, with focus on adhering to written and oral presentation standards within the field; development of an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis; or development of an understanding of the research process, with focus on review of the literature, defining the research question, and study methodology. Prerequisite: EXSC 340

FASD103 - Apparel Construction Techniques I

Introducing techniques needed by the designer, the focus of this course is on developing basic skills applied to garment construction. Concentrating on industry techniques using woven fabrics, students gain insight into the components of a quality product. Formerly - Clothing Construction I

FASD104 - Apparel Construction Techniques II

This course expands student competencies to include the assembly of more complex garments, including the use of knits. Industry methods of construction and production are emphasized to facilitate independent analysis of the apparel assembly process. Prerequisite: FASD 103 or permission of Department Chair.Formerly - Clothing Construction II

FASD107 - Draping I - Fundamentals

This course introduces students to the essential elements, theories, tools and techniques of fashion design and creation. Beginner design students will explore the development of foundation patterns while discovering the relationship of fabric grain to desired garment shapes. Manipulating fabric on three-dimensional forms will help students to understand harmony and balance while stimulating creativity. Muslin patterns will translate into a finished garment to be presented at the annual fashion show. Co-requisite: FASD 103

FASD201 - Flat Pattern Design I

This course emphasizes industry methods of producing patterns from basic slopers. Students learn to achieve different silhouettes for skirts, bodices, collars and sleeves. Pattern variations are achieved with dart manipulation, slash and spread, and pivoting techniques. Methods for grading from size to size and components of good fit are explored. This course is structured as a series of demonstrations and exercises and includes developing an original design from conception to fashion fabric. Prerequisite: FASD 107

FASD202 - Flat Pattern Design II

In this course, students draft basic slopers for the bodice, sleeve, torso, jacket torso, jacket sleeve, and trouser. Advanced pattern development methods for different pant designs and notch collar jackets are introduced. Students develop unstructured jackets that are unlined but finished inside and fly front pants. Fitting with live models is emphasized. Original designs are developed to foster creative and technical competency. Pre-requiste: FASD201

FASD205 - Digital Design for Apparel

This course introduces students to software that is used prominently in the apparel design and production industry. Projects include enhancing fashion illustrations, technical drawing, textile design and colorization, and editing and integrating photographic images. Skills developed in this course are necessary for communicating design ideas and lay the foundation for industry-specific software covered later in the curriculum. Prerequisite: FASD215, can be taken concurrenlty

FASD206 - Cut & Sew Stretch Knits

The creation of garments using knit fabric requires a distinctive skill set for designers. This course will engage students with the variety of knowledge and applications necessary in creating and manufacturing stretch fabric designs. Students will develop foundation patterns and learn appropriate stitching and trimming techniques for 2-way and 4-way stretch fabrics while preparing tech packs for industry production. Final projects will be presented at the annual fashion showcase. Prerequisite: FASD 201

FASD215 - Fashion Illustration

Emphasizing techniques essential to creating two-dimensional fashion design renderings, this course develops skills related to drawing the fashion figure, illustrating original design ideas through various media, rendering textiles and developing technical drawings. The elements and principles of design are applied to fashion illustration through exercises that explore the various components of apparel development: study of human anatomy, garment details, fabrics, textures, etc. Prerequisites: ARTS207

FASD219 - Textile Arts

This course is an introduction to surface design through fabric manipulation. Students learn to apply design elements and principles to the surface decoration of fabrics. A variety of techniques to create 2-D and 3-D effects for fabric surface embellishment are explored and researched. Students create a collection of resource samples and produce fabric lengths suitable for garments. The course explores a variety of textile manipulation methods such as dyeing on natural and synthetic fabrics, printing, shibori, felting, batik, and spraying transfer, as well as appliqué, creative embellishment, free machine embroidery. Prerequisite: FASH 210.

FASD220 - Fashion Design Concepts

In this course, fashion design ability is developed by exploring students’ creativity. An understanding of fashion design as a three-dimensional art form is cultivated in order to gain knowledge of various styles and details which are utilized to design garments for various markets. Students develop a critical eye based on aesthetic and market-related evaluation principles. Prerequisites: FASD 215 & FASH 210.

FASD225 - Fashion Design: Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage varies areas of the design discipline that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content will vary per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore design techniques and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASD301 - Professional Presentation Methods

This course develops industry-based visual presentation methods, such as advanced hand illustration techniques and cutting edge, 3D technology. Outcomes of the course include both hand-held and technological portfolios, creating a key component to successful employment in the fashion industry. Resume, cover letter and interviewing skills are developed in preparation for internship. Prerequisites: FASD 205, FASD 220.

FASD306X - Elements of Haute Couture

This course emphasizes the elements of Haute Couture where the application of superior workmanship, originality of design, and perfection of fit is must. Students will pay as much attention to interior garment construction as to the externally viewed fashion design. Working with specialty fabrics such as lace and silk, students will learn finishing techniques including hand-sewn buttonholes, hand-finished seam edges, evening gown/bustier lining and boning. The application of decorative surface techniques and embellishments will be part of the course as well. This is an advanced sewing class. Prerequisite: FASD 104

FASD307 - Flat Pattern III - Tailoring

Tailoring is the ultimate shape maker in women and men’s coats, jackets and suits. This course is designed to challenge the student to explore new drafting techniques while developing critical fitting proficiencies and advancing construction methods. Students will design, draft and execute a professional hand tailored, lined jacket and accompanying garment in preparation for presentation at our annual fashion showcase. Prerequisite: FASD 104 & FASD 202

FASD313 - Draping II - Couture

This course will expand skills acquired in Draping I by focusing on advanced techniques, French draping methodology, and intricate garment production. Extensive written research will provide a foundation for students to engage with a high level of creativity in the effort to produce unique, custom, professional looks while applying couture construction practices.Prerequisite: FASD 202

FASD322 - Sweater Knit Design

This course introduces the principal elements, theories and techniques of design and construction for sweater knit garments. Students will learn how to knit, create knitting plans, and develop hand knit garments. Advanced knowledge of construction methodologies using finishes, trims, and notions that are appropriate for sweater knit design will be explored. The class will work as a design team to produce a collection of cohesive knit ensembles, while each student has the opportunity to channel unique design themes and designer inspirations. Professional knitting plans and tech packs will translate to finished garments to be presented at the annual fashion show. Prerequisite: FASD 206 & FASD220

FASD325 - Fashion Design: Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses will offer students the opportunity to engage with various areas of the design discipline that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content will vary per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore design techniques and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses will be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASD327 - Market of Specilization

Before beginning the design process, students in this course will explore the history of a chosen market, examining how it has evolved and what makes it unique from other markets. Research will focus on evolution and innovation of the chosen market. Design and construction of one original, complete look from chosen market will be critiqued in the context of a group collection. (Pre-Req FASD 202, 220)

FASD331 - Drafting for Diverse Markets

Specialized areas such as couture, children’s and men’s wear are explored in this course, providing students expanded design experience. Student research projects results in visual and oral presentations related to various inspirational sources and markets. Garments are designed, developed, evaluated, and constructed. Prerequisite: FASD 202.

FASD340 - Draping

This course integrates basic and advanced methods of draping. Students learn how to use this three- dimensional technique to develop flat patterns. Costume design and reproduction is introduced, and a couture garment is created using vintage techniques. Experimental free drape fosters creativity. Extensive research is a core component of this writing intensive course. Prerequisite: FASD 202.

FASD350 - Tailoring

Traditional and contemporary methods of tailoring are studied in this course, with emphasis placed on the pressing, molding, and shaping of fabrics. Assembly of a lined, tailored jacket builds technical expertise. Prerequisite: FASD 104.

FASD409 - Senior Thesis Development

Designed to reflect industry practice, students are required to develop a collection of 10 looks that will be completed in FASD 410 (Senior Thesis Production). Each student refines their distinct design style and develops a personal brand. Design development through trend analysis, fabric sourcing, pattern drafting, and apparel construction, in conjunction with research, writing, critical thinking, independent time management and visual communication complete Part I of this capstone experience. Prerequisites: FASD 327, Senior standing. Corequisite FASD 465.

FASD410 - Senior Thesis Production

This course continues the industry-based design development process. In Part II of the capstone, students finalize an 8 look collection that is reviewed by peers, faculty and industry professionals. Each designer plans and executes a segment of the spring fashion show featuring his or her collection, and updates their portfolio preparing for a chosen fashion industry career path. Prerequisite: FASD 409. Corequisite: FASD 466.

FASD415 - Fashion Design Internship

Internships offer design students the practical training and working knowledge necessary for their development as practicing professionals while reflecting on their experiences in an academic matter. Internships are designed to merge theory with practice. Comprised of a 150 hour commitment, the internship is recommended to be completed in the junior year of study. The course instructor will monitor the experience with feedback from the site supervisor. Students are required to complete a journal that is comprised of a list of goals and objectives, and reflective writing. Prerequisites: FASD 201 and department Chair approval if completing abroad.

FASD425 - Fashion Design: Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses will offer students the opportunity to engage with various areas of the design discipline that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content will vary per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore design techniques and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses will be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASD465 - Cad I- Lectra

This course focuses on the use of technology in the apparel industry examining its role in the global apparel complex. Students apply their hands-on technical skills to state-of-the-art industry programs. Using the LECTRA system of software, students will digitize, manipulate, grade, and nest patterns on MODARIS, learn to create markers on DIAMINO and plot using JUSTPRINT and ALYS applications. Prerequisites: FASD 327, Senior standing. Corequisite: FASD 409.

FASD466 - Cad II- Lectra

Using patterns generated in FASD 465, garments are brought into the arena of mass manufacturing. Comprehensive specification packages are created by using LECTRA KALEDO. The cutting-edge technology of MODARIS 3D modeling is introduced. Students also learn how to integrate their understanding of technology into a professional working portfolio. Prerequisite: FASD 465. Corequisite: FASD 410.

FASH101 - Contemporary Issues in Fashion

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historic, economic, and contemporary influences, giving students a basic understanding of the terms and concepts associated with the fashion and retail industries. Topics include: technological applications, environmental influences on fashion; the fashion cycle; trend forecasting; fashion marketing; women's, men's, and children's apparel; supply chain management; foreign and domestic market centers; and retail merchandising.

FASH200 - Fash Hist I:Imperial Societies to Indust

This course surveys the history of prevailing dress from Ancient Egypt into the nineteenth century, expanding upon a general understanding of shifting modes to examine the symbolism of fashion from extensive perspectives. Students will develop a context for fashion and its relation to aesthetic expression and function within various societies over time. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students will examine a range of scholarly resources that pertain to the field, including The Lasell Fashion Collection. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102, or permission of instructor.

FASH201 - Merchandise Planning & Control

This course provides an understanding of business strategies related to assortment planning, buying, and allocating inventory. Building upon retail math fundamentals, students create stock and sales plans in accordance with the goals and objectives of a given seasonal sales strategy, including methods of figuring markups, sales projections, turnover, average stock, stock-to-sales ratios, open-to-buy, markdowns, and gross margin. Negotiation skills related to terms of sale, shipping and pricing strategies are explored within the wholesale/retail business relationship. Both manual and computer-based calculations are explored through the use of Excel and other industry-based software. Concepts related to retail analytics and predictive modeling as they relate to consumer buying patterns will also be discussed. Prerequisite: FASH 101 & MATH116

FASH204 - Fashion Research Abroad

This course brings fashion communication, design and merchandising fashion students together in an international setting to offer exposure to and research of the ever changing global fashion industry. Course structure focuses on the host country’s culture and fashion industry, setting the stage for an intensive study abroad experience. While abroad, students will experience a combination of lecture and field practice. In addition to Lasell faculty, professionals from the host country’s fashion industry leacture on a variety of topics. Hands-on workshops play an important role in exploring content. Cultural immersion includes a community service project that engages students in reflecting on the evolving social consciousness in the global fashion market place. Prerequisite: By application, Permission of instructor.

FASH206 - Sustainability in the Fashion Industry

This course explores issues surrounding the concept of sustainability in relation to the fashion industry. The history and contemporary status of sustainability in a global fashion context will be explored, including the influence of social, cultural, and economic factors. Guest speakers include specialists in sustainable fashion design & production, the greening of the supply chain, merchandising, and promoting the sustainable product.

FASH207 - Digital Tools for Fashion

Technical skills are becoming more and more a required proficiency in all capacities of the fashion industry. This course introduces Fashion & Retail Merchandising and Fashion Communication & Promotion students to software prominently used for apparel manufacturing, retail and media. With a focus on methods of visual communication, projects include technical drawing, colorization, editing, and integration and manipulation of photographic images.

FASH210 - Textiles

This course introduces the study of textiles through exploration of the production of fibers and methods of creating fabrics. Students learn to identify fiber content, properties and various types of weaving and knitting applications. Other topics include the study of fiber characteristics, quality and care of fabric finishes, and a practical assessment of fabrics in relationship to particular end uses.

FASH211 - Fashion Retail Management

This course explores the principles of retail management. Topics include; technological applications, marketing strategies, store image considerations, competitive analysis, legal constraints, consumer behavior, decision making and critical reasoning associated with retail store practices. Concepts are explored such as operating in an omnichannel environment and the use of retail analytics. Principles are examined and applied through class discussion and lecture, group projects and case studies. Prerequisite: FASH101

FASH212 - Visual Merchandising

This course builds a foundation to communicate design concepts and create visual solutions for promoting merchandise or ideas. Observation and critiques foster understanding of visual merchandising as a promotional tool. Hands on projects require research, synthesis of technical, aesthetic and conceptual knowledge to create effective solutions through use of color theories and design principles. Students become familiar with journalistic reporting and written analysis through various media applications.Prerequisite: FASH 101, ARTS 120.

FASH216 - Digital Marketing for Fashion

The fashion and retail industry has changed radically with shifts into new digital channels. Omni-channel selling and communication models continue to be an opportunity for business growth and expansion. The rise of social media and the expanding proliferation of digital devices, platforms, and applications make digital marketing a necessity for corporate survival. Through a combination of case studies and exploration of innovative technology students learn how the elements of digital strategy work together with traditional media to attract prospective customers. This course will explore inventive kinds of marketing strategies where the new selling floor is the virtual world. Prerequisite: FASH 101

FASH218 - Fashion Communication

This course examines communication strategies in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different facets of communication including maintaining consistency with integrated and content marketing, navigating the global landscape, messaging through digital and various media channels, and managing emerging trends in social marketing. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Prerequisites: ENG 102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASH225 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH301 - Fashion Promotion

This course integrates fashion industry promotional activities centered around the "promotion mix." Through the creative integration of topics such as advertising, public relations, marketing, social media, direct marketing, sales promotions, personal selling, visual merchandising and special events, students create and execute multidimensional promotional campaigns. The class explores the concept of integrated marketing communications linking various external and internal factors that stimulate consumption of a product or service. Students participate in group projects that replicate industry scenarios, both creatively and logistically. Exploration of contemporary methods to measure consumer behavior are also considered. Prerequisite: FASH 212 or FASH 218

FASH302 - Retail Operations

This course builds on the concepts learned in FASH 201 Merchandise Planning & Control and FASH 211 Retail Management extending into retail store planning, trading area and site analysis, financial management, omnichannel retailing and performance metrics. All phases of merchandising and sales management, including merchandise logistics, enabling technology, distribution channels, retail assortment planning and labor administration are incorporated into a comprehensive study of retail operations. Technological applications that are industry specific are utilized throughout this course. Prerequisite: FASH 211

FASH303 - Fash Hist II:Modernity to Globalization

This course picks up the history of fashion as it moves from the nineteenth century into a new era, examining the aesthetic and sociocultural forces that have influenced the development of styles from modernity to globalization. Students will use their skills in critical thinking to understand fashion as an art form, a commodity, and a symbol of cultural and personal expression. Students will also explore how contemporary designers draw from and reinterpret fashions from across the twentieth century. Prerequisites: ENG 102

FASH306 - Fashion Styling for Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation.

FASH307 - Fashion Branding

This course explores issues related to fashion branding and brand recognition by presenting an overview of brand management. Through case studies and analysis of contemporary media, students examine the notion that perceived value and ethos of a fashion brand can be increased through advertising, thematic control, and legal safeguards. The course also details how to build a fashion brand, maintain its brand equity, and re-tool a brand when its stature in the marketplace decreases due to consumer consumption and economic changes. Prerequisites: BUSS 220 or FASH 211.

FASH308 - Fashion Show Production

This course focuses on development of a working knowledge of planning, management, and organizational skills required to produce successful fashion shows. Hands on experiences throughout the semester address the importance of teamwork, communication, and professionalism demanded in the fashion industry. Students plan, organize, and produce the annual fashion show as final project. Prerequisite: FASH 211 or FASH218

FASH309 - Apparel Product Development

Exploring the global product development matrix, students in this course work together in teams to explore the product lifecycle in terms of sourcing and production. Class sessions combine lectures and cases with hands-on exercises to reinforce key concepts. This survey course covers topics including supply chain management, design calendars, apparel product price points, brand differentiation, product distribution channels, trend forecasting services, color management, specification and technical package development, sizing, quality control, ethics, and evaluation of the global production environment. Pre-requisite: FASD 220, FASH211, or FASH218

FASH315 - Trend Forecasting

This course introduces students to theories and framework used to explain and predict fashion change. Course includes field trips to trade shows, museum visits , and presentations by industry professionals to help students understand the relationship of economic, artistic, technological, social and cultural influences to fashion change.Students apply creative ,research, and analytical skills to plan and develop a trend forecast. Prerequisite: FASH 101.

FASH317 - Ethics in the Fashion Industry

This course integrates ethical, moral and legal issues regarding the fashion industry from design and manufacturing through distribution, promotion and sales. Grounded in theories of consumption, students will explore operating procedures for various aspects of the apparel business such as; responsible advertising, consumer privacy, compliance with sustainable practices, fair labor and working conditions, design with a focus on gender identity or age appropriateness, and recognizing fashion’s influence on body image and eating disorders. Students will address topics through in depth discussions using group models and by exploring and mastering decision making frameworks to generate solutions. Prerequisite: ENG 102

FASH325 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH342 - Fashion & Culture

This course evaluates the concept of fashion in the cultural context and its impact on human behavior as non-verbal communication, including the expression of national identity. Through a historical and contemporary study of the connection between fashion and society, the relationships between clothing, culture, ethnicity, social and political events, economic status, and geographical location are examined. Students explore the symbolic aspects of clothing from the personal and consumer standpoints. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

FASH401 - Fash Industry Professional Development

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through simulated business activities, case studies, and meetings with faculty and industry experts. The course explores career development and professional strategies, each of which is designed to prepare students for FASH 403 Field Assignment. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: FASH 211 or FASH218, & JR status

FASH405 - Fashion Retail & Merchandising Capstone

This course offers the student an opportunity to reflect and directly apply industry methods and practices acquired over the course of their degree studies. Students design and execute an in-depth project that engages them in research and experimentation, applying merchandising theories to a variety of situations. Prerequisite: FASH 415.

FASH406 - Global Retailing

This course teaches students the importance of the global economy through the study of retailers who operate internationally. Students learn the legal, social, cultural, and economic environments that affect the distribution of consumer products worldwide. Required research assignments cover a wide range of international retailers, encompassing both department stores and independent retailers. Prerequisites: FASH 211, BUSS 220.

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Collaborative experience affords students capability to maximize opportunities and explore career path optionswhile receiving four academic credits Prerequisites: FASH 401 and senior standing

FASH420 - Collection Research and Management

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH421X - Collection Research & Management II

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH422 - Fashion Communication Capstone

The Fashion Communications and Promotion Capstone draws upon prior educational and internship experiences, synthesizing them into a capstone project that enhances the student's bridge to the next step in his or her academic or professional life. The capstone project is student-driven and mentored by select faculty. The project includes research, planning, process management, execution, and reflection. Prerequisites: FASH415.

FASH425 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FED232 - Cultural Competence & Global Classroom

Cultural Competence & Global Classroom

FREN111 - Elementary French I

This course introduces students to the elements of French through the multiple skills of understanding, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. It is open to students who are beginning their postsecondary French language study and have not had more than two years of secondary school French. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FREN112 - Elementary French II

This course is a continuation of FREN 111, with continued focus on understanding, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or 111 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

FREN211 - Intermediate French I

This course reviews and reinforces prior grammar knowledge through speaking, listening, reading, and writing; more advanced grammar constructs are introduced to support written and spoken language growth. Texts and discussion focus on French culture, art, and society. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or 112 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

FREN212 - Intermediate French II

In this course, students continue to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through the analysis and discussion of cultural and literary texts. The course includes a review of advanced grammatical structures. Prerequisite: FREN 201 or 211 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

FREN311 - French Civilization I

This course includes composition and conversation, with emphasis on the political, social, and cultural life of France and other French-speaking societies. Social problems in contemporary society are examined through readings. The course is conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or FREN 202 (with C or better) or permission of instructor.

FYA102 - The Learning Experience

The Learning Experience

FYS103 - First Year Seminar

First Year Seminar (FYS) is a theme-based inquiry course that provides the foundational experience of a Lasell education for students. Through studying an academic topic, students develop and apply core intellectual skills and receive an introduction to the core knowledge perspectives. At the same time, students connect to the experiences and people that make up the Lasell College Community. Course outcomes are accomplished through engaging activities including reading, writing, class discussions, presentations, team projects, field trips, service learning, and exploration of campus resources. Past course titles have included: Challenging Hollywood: Thinking Critically about Movies, Exploring Activism-Changing Our World, Let Us Rock, Pets: Our Perfect Companion, The Meaning of Dress, The “Reality” of Relationships, The Spark of Creativity, The Witch in History and Pop Culture, Women and Sports, and Zombies, Vampires and Revolutionaries. This requirement may be fulfilled by taking either FYS 103 or HON 101.

GLBS400 - Reading & Research in Global Studies

This course represents the first semester of a two-semester individualized global studies capstone sequence. The student works closely with a faculty mentor from one of the disciplines represented in this interdisciplinary major, meeting weekly with the mentor to define a topic for in-depth examination through reading, research, and writing. Reading and research will begin during GLB400 and will continue during the following semester in GLB401. Students must complete GLB400 before enrolling in GLB401. Prerequisite: Global Studies Major

GLBS401 - Capstone in Global Studies

In this individual tutorial, the student works with the faculty mentor who oversees the capstone project. Meeting weekly with the mentor to discuss readings, research methodology, study design, and essay drafts, the student completes a substantial capstone essay on well-defined topic in global studies. Prerequisite: GLBS400

GRAP105 - Digital Design Essentials

This course offers an introduction to three of the most important software applications in the Adobe Creative Suite for a student who is interested in Graphic Design: Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign. Students learn image generation and editing in both pixel-based and vector-based environments as well as digital page composition for print publishing. This is a project-based course that initiates and improves students' skill set for the implementation of computer graphics.

GRAP201 - Imaging for Graphic Design

This illustration course is designed to develops students' compositional and image development skills for the field of Graphic Design. Using a combination of traditional and digital methods of imaging, students expand their visual vocabulary for successful graphic communications. Prerequisite: GRAP105

GRAP202 - Adobe InDesign

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for digital page layout. Through a series of publication design projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP203 - Lettering

This is an introduction to the art, craft, and history of letterforms. With an emphasis on calligraphy and continuing with digital imaging, students gain a historical perspective of the development of letterforms and how they influence modern communications.

GRAP204 - Graphic Design I

This is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of graphic design, with an emphasis on developing a working literal and visual vocabulary. Students are challenged with conceptual design exercises that promote the essential values of good research, process, and presentation practices. Prerequisite: GRAP 201.

GRAP205 - Graphic Design II

This course builds on the foundational principles that are introduced in Graphic Design I. Students strengthen their design skills through a series of design briefs in the areas of print and electronic media. Reflective writings and research assignments contribute to improved critical thinking and writing skills. Prerequisite: GRAP 204.

GRAP206 - Adobe Illustrator

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for vector-based, digital illustration. Through a series of illustration projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP207 - Web Design & Development

This course introduces the student to the most current coding languages that are integral to successful Web site development. It also introduces the student to authoring software, such as Adobe Dreamweaver, that assists with the application of these coding languages. Other topics which add to this comprehensive course are: the history of the Internet and World Wide Web Consortium, the power of CSS, and the design and layout principles that contribute to successful Web site development from technical, interactive, and aesthetic viewpoints.

GRAP208 - Graphic Design History

This course introduces students of design to the origins of the discipline. It emphasizes the Modernist period, during which design rapidly evolved as typography, photography and new printing methods were explored by artists of the Bauhaus and other European schools and movements. The course demonstrates how these innovators influence graphic design as we know it today.

GRAP209 - Adobe Photoshop

This course offers an introduction and continues with an in-depth concentration in the most popular software application for pixel-based digital imaging and editing. Through a series of projects, students advance their ability to use this versatile and powerful computer application while reinforcing basic graphic design skills.

GRAP210 - Photography for Design

This course will emphasize graphic design workflows that use photography as key elements of design. Students will deepen their understanding of shooting for design outcomes, exploring product shot staging and lighting, working with models, props and sets. In turn, they will add to their image editing, compositing and layout skills by working with their photos using a powerful digital toolset.

GRAP301 - Typography I

This course surveys the application of expressive letterforms since the invention of the printing press. With a historical overview that illuminates the terminology used by professional designers, students are encouraged to explore their own means of typographic expression. The fundamentals of structure, spacing, and rhythm are emphasized as they influence form and function. Prerequisites: GRAP 105.

GRAP302 - Typography II

In this course, students expand their design practice in the application of typography to a variety of forms and contexts. This is a process-oriented course focused on the advancement of a personal "typographic voice." Students learn to structure informational hierarchies and how to sequence typographic materials across multiple pages. Issues of personal interpretation and legibility are emphasized. Prerequisite: GRAP 301.

GRAP307 - Motion Graphics

In this course, students develop conceptual and visual problem-solving skills as they relate to motion studies and time-based art. Through demonstrations, studio sessions, and critiques students create portfolio quality animation and motion study projects.

GRAP308 - Interactive Design

This course offers a deeper exploration of interactive design and authoring, building upon skills and strategies acquired in basic Web and motion design classes. Advanced animation and interactivity for the Web, desktop, and mobile devices are emphasized as students learn authoring tools that emphasize HTML5, CSS3 and javascript.

GRAP309 - Graphic Design for the Marketplace

This course engages advanced graphic design students with a curriculum derived from a collection of prepared design briefs. With established methods of research, conceptualization, innovation and art production, students are offered "real world" challenges for graphic design solutions. This course emphasizes sound business practices and ethical guidelines for a career in commercial art. Prerequisites: GRAP 205, GRAP 302.

GRAP399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful Internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter and resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Must have Junior standing.

GRAP400 - Field Experience

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting. Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing. Prerequisite: ARTS 399

GRAP401 - Publication Design

This course involves graphic design students in the theoretical and practical processes of successful publication design through research, conceptual explorations, studio practice, and presentations. This course offers experience in the design of traditional and electronic publications in order to prepare students for a career in graphic design. Prerequisite: GRAP 302

GRAP403 - Senior Portfolio Development

This course prepares design students for effective and personalized presentation of their design work. Students are encouraged to prepare a physical "book" portfolio with interchangeable pages to allow customization of presentations. They are also encouraged to establish their own web presence by building an online portfolio on a Web site with their own URL. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP404 - Senior Thesis Assignment

Students engage in an individual research and writing practice that challenges them to analyze and articulate their personal philosophy of design. This capstone course also provides students an opportunity to clarify their professional goals based on their interests in graphic design. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GRAP406 - Senior Practicum Project

The senior practicum provides an opportunity for students in their final semester of the design program to produce a self-directed capstone project that applies the design theory and studio techniques that they have been developing over the last four years. The practicum project is presented in a Senior Show at the end of their final semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

HEM101 - Hospitality Management

This course examines the Hospitality and Tourism industry with emphasis on individual sectors of the industry and their business functions. The infrastructure and interrelationships of lodging, tourism, food service, events, and entertainment organizations are examined. Career opportunities, current operational issues, and emerging trends in the hospitality industry are also explored.

HEM102 - Fundamentals of Event Management

This course focuses on components of organizing and executing events. Components such as: sectors of the events industry, Requests for Proposals (RFPs), Banquet Event Orders (BEO's), client management, vendor management and contract negotiations are introduced. This course is hands-on, allowing the student to apply basic skills and techniques for negotiating with suppliers and service contractors. This is a project driven course and includes industry certifications.

HEM103 - Economic Development & Mgmt in Tourism

This course offers a survey of trends and developments in the hospitality and tourism industry, including a total approach to lodging operations, events management, global tourism, and foodservice establishments. It offers an introduction to the broad fields of travel and tourism. Among the topics covered are cultural tourism, eco-tourism, sociology of tourism, tourism development, the economic role of tourism demand and tourism marketing. Prerequisite: HEM101

HEM108X - Distinguished Hospitality Speaker Series

Open to all hospitality majors and minors. This course will offer a series of guest lectures by high-level hospitality industry executives covering all phases of management: strategy, marketing, brand management, operations and finance. This will provide you with an opportunity to learn about:•Their views of the current and future challenges and opportunities of the hospitality industry•The strategies their organizations will follow to meet these challenges and take advantage of the opportunities•The career paths followed by the executives•Job opportunities available for hospitality program interns and graduatesAssignments will include the preparation of questions to be asked of the speakers, background research on speakers and their organizations and summaries of what the speakers have discussed.

HEM199 - Field Exp Prep & Prof Development in HEM

This course introduces students to field experience, internship and career planning and highlights how students can be more entrepreneurial and business focused as they look to the future. This course is designed to prepare students for the process of acquiring an internship and developing their long-term career goals. Students assess their personal background; practice finding career opportunities through the job search process; develop a cover letter, resume, practice networking and begin developing a portfolio; Additionally, students will participate in mock interviews and demonstrate how to deal with interpersonal situations found in the workplace. This course also focuses on workplace interactions including employee communication, management and leadership, the art of self-marketing, team building, conflict management, problem solving in the workplace and strategies for effective negotiation. Visits with potential employers and participation in networking sessions are a vital component of this course. Prerequisite: HEM 101 or HEM 102 with a C or better.

HEM205 - Private Club Management

This course explores many areas vital to the success of club management including business, finance, food, beverage, facilities, sales, operations, and multiple recreational activities while stressing the supreme importance of customer service quality. By taking this course, HEM students explore a field that covers all aspects of the hospitality industry. We are privileged to be in a great location, close to many of the area’s most notable private clubs, which can provide students with employment experience and internship opportunities. Prerequisite: HEM 101.

HEM206 - Lodging Management

This course concentrates on providing an in depth view of the various aspects and departments that fall under what is commonly known as Lodging Management or Lodging Operations. Some of the specific departments this course explores are - Front Office, Housekeeping, Human Resources, Security, Engineering, Maintenance, Food and Beverage, Recreation, and Accounting and Finance. Aside from the various operational procedures utilized, the course also addresses service philosophies, best practices, revenue management, and technology. Prerequisite: HEM 101.

HEM207 - Resort & Casino Management

This course provides students with an introduction to the hospitality management specialization of Resort and Casino Management. Subjects covered include operational infrastructures of resorts and casinos, organizational structures, service in resort and casino environments, securities, technologies, and revenue management and tourism. This course includes guest speakers and field trips. Prerequisite: HEM101.

HEM208 - Human Resources in Hospitality

This course examines management considerations for the successful operation of a major resort. Emphases is placed on the various departments and how each contributes to the recreation, ancillary and lodging areas including service experiences. This includes recreation development, risk management, visitor education, rental and retail operations, lodging, guest services, and human resources management. Students will learn how each of these departments function, along with the many skills required to address the issues and challenges faced in everyday operations. Course assignments focus on human resources operations, industry regulations and certification, risk management, guest service, and dealing with seasonality. These particular areas are studied in relation to resorts of different sizes and scales from all over the world so that comparisons can be made regarding different management and operational procedures, regulations, and guest expectations. Prerequisite: HEM 207 with a C or better.

HEM209 - Expl of the Las Vegas Casino Industry

Students in this course will study materials and case studies related to specific components of major casino markets as well as take part in both a day-long visit to the limited casino market in Connecticut and a 4-5 day site visit to Las Vegas during the college’s spring recess. The course will provide students who are interested specifically in the resort and casino segment of the hospitality industry direct exposure to the industry in the country’s largest casino market. Focus will be placed on current issues and events affecting the industry and, in particular, the companies that will be visited during the site visits. Students will study and meet with executives from different resort and casino departments at major resort/casino operations including Slots and Table Games Operations, Human Resources, Marketing, Security, Surveillance, Food and Beverage, and more. Prerequisite: HEM 207 with a C or better.

HEM213 - Global Issues in Hospitality

n this course, students examine the position of hospitality in the global market place. The course explores factors influencing the global environment and the contemporary struggle for economic/political power between world regions and the impact on the hospitality industry. The role and significance of hospitality multinationals in light of the current trend of sustainability is analyzed. In addition, the global drivers and industry strategies affecting multinationals are explored. Finally, students analyze the role of culture and its impact on different management styles in an international industry. Prerequisite: HEM 101 or HEM 102 with a C or better.

HEM214 - Ecotourism

Ecotourism promotes cultural and environmental awareness and has local, environmental and economic benefits. This course introduces students to the history, principles, marketing, and management of ecotourism activities and development. The course takes a holistic approach to planning and tourism development and standard industry practices and processes are discussed. Students enrolled in this course participate in an educational trip to Belize to view, research, and participate in a newly developing ecotourism system. Students must apply and be selected and may only register with the permission of the Ecotourism Program Director.

HEM215 - Meeting & Convention Sales & Planning

This course provides an overview of conference planning and group coordination as it relates to the sale and final contract. Students become familiar with Meetings, Expositions, Events, and Conventions (MEEC), destination specialists, negotiating with suppliers and service contractors, meeting budgets, travel planners, and their place of importance within the industry. Site evaluations are analyzed as they relate to group needs. Emphasis is placed on the development of a group resume agendas, analyses of service options, and contractual and legal liability issues. Prerequisite: HEM 102 with a C or better.

HEM299 - Field Experience I

This course provides a supervised work experience in the hospitality or event management industry as a complement to academic coursework. Students earn 150 hours in the field, gain practical skills in a business environment, and begin to view the workplace from a management perspective. During the course of the field experience, students keep a personal reflective journal of critical incidents. In addition, they complete a detailed profile of the management systems and policies at their workplace for submission at the end of the field experience. Students participate in weekly discussion groups during the course of the semester to evaluate and compare their experiences. Prerequisites: HEM 101.

HEM301 - Social Event Management

This course explores the complex area of special and social event planning, including non-profit, community, corporate, wedding, religious, holiday, and other major social events. The course provides students with a basis for using research as a tool to plan and organize special events. The class works toward understanding, practicing, and executing the elements of successful event planning such as budgeting, site-selection, food and beverage management, promotions, and site logistics. This is a project-based course and requires the execution of a successful event. Prerequisite: HEM 102 with a C or better.

HEM302 - Casino Regulation & Security

This course is designed to give an in-depth overview of the regulatory, legal, and security aspects of the casino industry including federal and local gaming laws and regulations, difficulties and liabilities surrounding those regulations, casino cage operations, surveillance operations, and security technologies. Prerequisite: HEM 207.

HEM303 - Law & Ethics in Hospitality

This course provides a study of the nature and function of both legal and ethical issues as applied to the hospitality industry. Topics include operator relationships, contract law, torts, civil rights, wage and labor laws, gaming laws, property law, and insurable risks. This course also examines ethical issues in the hospitality industry. Prerequisite: HEM101 and BUSS 336.

HEM305 - Resort Management & Development

This course examines management considerations for the successful operation of a major resort. Emphases is placed on the various departments and how each contributes to the recreation, ancillary and lodging areas including service experiences. This includes recreation development, risk management, visitor education, rental and retail operations, lodging, guest services, and human resources management. Students will learn how each of these departments function, along with the many skills required to address the issues and challenges faced in everyday operations. Course assignments focus on human resources operations, industry regulations and certification, risk management, guest service, and dealing with seasonality. These particular areas are studied in relation to resorts of different sizes and scales from all over the world so that comparisons can be made regarding different management and operational procedures, regulations, and guest expectations. Prerequisite: HEM 207 with a C or better.

HEM307 - Tech for Resort & Casino Management

This course explores principles of executive casino operations as it relates to technology, as well as providing hands-on opportunities for students to both observe and work within real programs including, but not limited to, casino operations business assessments, casino floor operations financial integrations, pit and floor statistics analysis, casino credit authorizer development, cage operations management software, casino accounting programs, table games accounting audits, currency transaction reporting, and surveillance technology. Students must be 21 years of age by April 1st of the year the course is running in order to enroll. Prerequisite: HEM 207 with a C or better and Permission of the Instructor.

HEM312 - Global Issues in Hospitality

In this course, students examine the position of hospitality in the global market place. The course explores factors influencing the global environment and the contemporary struggle for economic/political power between world regions and the impact on the hospitality industry. The role and significance of hospitality multinationals in light of the current trend of sustainability is analyzed. In addition, the global drivers and industry strategies affecting multinationals are explored. Finally, students analyze the role of culture and its impact on different management styles in an international industry. Prerequisite: HEM 101.

HEM321 - Revenue Management & Technology

This course provides an advanced overview of the revenue management function in the hospitality industry. Revenue management is a method for managing capacity profitably. This course offers an integrated approach to maximizing revenue that includes capacity analysis, demand forecasting, variable pricing, and distribution technology. The objective of this course is to help students learn how to apply the principles of revenue management to maximize profitability in the hospitality industry. Topics to be covered include forecasting, overbooking, reservations systems, information technology, process design, pricing, and management and marketing issues. Prerequisite: HEM206 & BUSS 201.

HEM399 - Field Experience II

This course provides an additional supervised work experience in the hospitality or event management industry as a complement to academic coursework. Students earn 150 hours in the field, gain practical skills in a business environment, and begin to view the workplace from a management perspective. During the course of the field experience, students keep a personal reflective journal of critical incidents. In addition, students complete a detailed profile of the management systems and policies at their workplace for submission at the end of the field experience. Students participate in weekly discussion groups during the course of the semester to evaluate and compare their experiences. Students must have permission of the Program Director. Prerequisites: HEM 299.

HEM401 - Managing Quality in Hospitality

This course explores the application of customer service quality as well as management theories and techniques in the hospitality industry with a focus on organizational effectiveness. Case studies and major projects with real hospitality companies facilitate students’ synthesis of previous knowledge with the principles of service quality and excellence. This is a research project driven course. Prerequisites: BUSS 224 & MATH 208.

HEM402 - Casino & Gaming Operations

This course provides students with an advanced look into the hospitality management specialization of Resort and Casino Management. Students learn advanced strategic management skills and theory as they relate to both resorts and casinos. Key topics include how to responsibly overcome common challenges in the industry, managerial and human resource challenges, marketing strategies, labor laws and disputes, operations strategies, and resort realestate development and planning. The goal of this course is to aid students in developing decision-making, financial, and strategic management skills appropriate for careers in the casino and resort industries. Students develop an advanced understanding of the stakeholders and industry practices necessary for success in managerial and executive positions. Prerequisite: HEM 207.

HEM403 - Food & Beverage Management

This course examines the details of food and beverage management, with an emphasis on running a profitable operation and understanding basic menu and beverage detail. It examines the impact of menu planning, purchasing, receiving, inventory control, production, pairing and service to the guest. Students apply commonly-used formulas and strategies for calculating appropriate selling prices and evaluating actual cost percentages. Special attention is paid to the use of management systems and tools to help minimize food, beverage and labor costs, to ensure collection of revenue, and ultimately to maximize profits. Topics include purchasing, safe-serving, receiving, storage, production, beverage management and appreciation, beverage service and cost control. The course also explores basic culinary and beverage menu building and appreciation topics. Case studies are incorporated into class discussions. Students must be 21 years of age prior to April 1st of the course year to register. Prerequisites: HEM 101 or HEM 102 with a C or better and Permission of the Instructor.

HEM405 - Hotel Franchising & Brand Management

This class covers an in-depth study of Hotel Franchising & Brand Management, particularly focusing of key advantages & disadvantage of franchising, evaluation of hotel brands & their fees, growth strategies, entry into new global markets, importance of franchisor & franchisee relationships, franchise & management contracts, & key in-sights of brand management in the hotel industry.

HEM408X - Seminar w/Distinguished Hosp Speakers

Open only to seniors in Hospitality Management, Event Management, and Resort and Casino Management. This course is designed to allow a limited number of students to interact with Distinguished Hospitality Speakers in an informal, intimate setting. This offers a unique networking opportunity with high-level industry executives. Students complete assignments related to the week's speakers, their company backgrounds, opportunities available, the current industry climate and are given one-on-one interviews and project time with the industry executives. Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

HEM496 - Hospitality Operations Capstone

This is a capstone course in Hospitality and Event Management that focuses on strategic operational methods within the industry. Theoretical strategies are explored through a variety of readings, case studies, and class discussions. Students complete an applied research or practicum project in an area related to their specific hospitality focus, current trends in the industry and career interests. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

HEM499 - Internship

Hospitality and Event Management students are involved in practical on-the-job experience (250 contact hours) in a professional environment. Each student develops a learning contract with the site supervisor and faculty member that includes an internship-related project. Evaluation of the internship experience is based on performance of the student as reviewed with the employer and faculty member. Prerequisites: HEM 299

HIST103 - World Civilization I

Beginning with prehistory, this course explores early civilizations and then follows developments in a global context, showing interconnections between Asia, Africa, and Europe. Emphasis is placed on cultural, social, economic, religious, and political developments.

HIST104 - World Civilization II (KP)

This Knowledge Perspective course will provide students with the opportunity to interpret and analyze the complex interrelationships and inequities in human societies in a global historical context. Emphasizing the interrelatedness and mutuality of influence between East and West, we examine questions of exclusiveness, intolerance, and cooperation. Prerequisite: ENG101.

HIST105 - History of Human Rights

This course surveys the complicated history of human rights from its origins to the modern era. Emphasis is on the historical forces, movements, and events, especially in the last three centuries, that have moved this concept from the realm of intellectual theory and conjecture to practical implementation and application. This course may also touch on some of the major philosophical, ethical, and moral questions intertwined with human rights.

HIST123 - American Civilization I

This course examines the chief political, social, and cultural features of American society as they have developed through the period of Reconstruction. Emphasis is on Colonial America, the War of Independence, the Constitution, and the emergence of the Republic through the Civil War.

HIST124 - American Civilization II

This course is a continuation of HIST 123 from the period of Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is on reconstruction, industrialization, immigration, constitutional issues, and the emergence of American foreign policy. There is some examination of American political life in the nuclear age.

HIST203 - The History of Women in U.S.

This course explores the social history of women in the United States, beginning in the colonial period and ending with an examination of twentieth-century issues. Emphasis is on the image of women held during these periods, in contrast to actual conditions. Contributions of women to social change and the growth of women’s movements are also analyzed. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST204 - Recent American History

This course focuses on the presidencies from the Kennedy era to the present. Work is divided roughly into three areas: foreign affairs; domestic politics; and economic, social, and cultural needs. Topics range from the Vietnam War to the Iraq War, the weakening of Congress and the expansion of the presidency, the women's movement, changes in popular culture, and domestic economic developments. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST207 - African American History

This course explores the history of African Americans in the United States from their African beginnings to the present. It traces the lives and status of African Americans, enslaved and emancipated, as they confronted the barriers of legal, institutional, and cultural prejudices; it examines the socioeconomic and political experiences of blacks in America and investigates strategies of accommodation, resistance, and protest in the struggle of African Americans to gain human and first-class citizenship rights. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST208 - Sub-Saharan Africa after 1800

This survey of sub-Saharan African history explores the ongoing story of African political, social, and economic developments from the post-transatlantic slave trade period to the present. The course considers the impact of European merchants, missionaries, and adventurers on Africa from the time immediately preceding imperialism and colonialism up through the emergence of nationalism and the decolonization and liberation movements. The new nation-states, their postcolonial economies, and their developing systems of justice, education, and rule are investigated. Finally, topics such as soil erosion, disease, conservation, famine, and Africa’s relationships with the wider world are discussed. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST209 - China from 1600 to Present

This course is a survey of modern Chinese history from the founding of the Qing Dynasty in the seventeenth century to Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms of the 1990s. Special attention will be paid to modernization, Western and Japanese imperialism in China, and the rise of Communism under Mao Zedong. In addition to learning about important milestones in Chinese history, students will be introduced to aspects of Chinese art, culture, and women's issues through primary sources translated into English. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST210 - Latin Amer Colonial Period to Present

This survey looks at Latin American history from pre-Colombian to contemporary times. Emphasis is on native cultures, the “discovery” of the New World, European presence, colonialism, imperialism, the creation of the peasantry, wars of independence, the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, slavery and racism, development and underdevelopment, the Catholic Church, liberation theology, poverty, and revolution. Major emphasis in South America is on Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Chile, Venezuela, and the Portuguese-speaking nation of Brazil. The course also examines foreign intervention and inner instability in Mexico, including struggles for democracy, economic rights, and social justice. In the Hispanic Caribbean and Central America, especially with regard to Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama, land and labor systems, gender relations, race and ethnicity, and varied forms of rule are discussed. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST211 - Middle East & Islamic World Since 1800

This course looks at the Middle East and its relations with the wider world, from the appearance of Napoleon to the present. Topics include attempts at reform and modernization in the Ottoman Empire; the impact of Western imperialism on the region as a whole; and twentieth-century developments in the area, including nationalism, pan-Arabism, pan-Islamism, the cult of the personality, coup, revolution, Zionism, and the Palestinian-Israeli confrontation. The economic and social impact of oil, the influence of fundamentalism, and the Great Power rivalry down through the position of the United States toward the area are investigated. The efforts of Iran to gain acceptance in/by the contemporary world are examined, as is the shifting attitude of Egypt toward modernity. Finally, connections between the region and the rest of the Islamic world are explored. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST212 - Mod Japan: Culture & History

This course is a survey of Japan's modernization from the fall of the warring states period to the economic bubble of the 1980s. Special attention will be paid to the contributions of the early modern Tokugawa Shogunate, the Meiji period of cultural borrowing from the West, and the cultural nationalism of the Japanese empire until 1945. In addition to learning about important milestones in Japanese history, students will be introduced to aspects of Japanese art and culture through a variety of primary and secondary sources and film clips. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST218 - Global History of Childhood

This course introduces students to the ways in which cultural ideas about childhood and childrearing have changed over time. Using Western history as a departure point, the course will compare and contrast key topics of childhood, such as child labor and child rights, in various cultures. This is primarily a discussion seminar, in which students present and discuss a variety of academic readings. There is also a service-learning component. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: HIST 103, HIST 104, HIST 123, HIST 124, or permission of instructor.

HIST223 - Special Topics in History

In this course, a single topic in history is explored for the entire semester. Possible topics include Islamic civilization, India in the twentieth century, nationalism and imperialism in the last two centuries, United States and the world in the twentieth century, and the African American in the development of the United States. This course may be repeated for credit, as different special topics are offered. Prerequisite: 100-level history course or ENG102 with a C or better

HIST228X - How Privileged are You?

Satisfy either your Historical (AI(H)) or Psychological and Societal (AI(PS)) Areas of Inquiry through this interdisciplinary team-taught course. As Ebola has popped up in the U.S., Americans have expressed concern and governmental agencies have reacted accordingly. Once again, as has happened in the past, people are increasingly demanding that more be done. Is this reaction a logical one to a potentially fatal illness or is this a manifestation of Western privilege objecting not to the illness, but to its presence at home? Using case studies of, for instance, the international reactions to epidemics in the past and present, students will explore the ways in which privilege has historically been constructed and the ways in which it impacts societal relations related to health issues. Students will take an inquiry-based approach to these case studies as they come to better understand the societal and psychological factors as well as the historical ones underlying power and privilege.

HIST231 - Revolutions & Revolutionary Thought

This course provides an analysis of many types, facets, and styles of revolution, including political, cultural, and scientific meanings of the concept. The readings are taken from literature as well as from history and the social sciences. Prerequisite: a 100-level history course or ENG 102.

HIST323 - Special Topics in History

In this course, a single topic in history is explored at a level appropriate for the serious and experienced history student. Possible topics in this advanced course include microhistory, gender in African history, and European intellectual history. This course may be repeated for credit, as different special topics are offered. Prerequisite: A 200-level history course or instructor permission.

HIST325 - The Intellectual Origins of Western Civ

This seminar traces the roots of modern Western thought from ancient Greece through the Enlightenment by discussing and analyzing selections from the writings of major European thinkers. The seminar focuses on dominant figures representative of an historical epoch and examines their ideas in light of existing and future political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. Prerequisite: a 200-level history course or permission of instructor.

HIST330 - Europe & The World/ Age of Expansion

This course examines political, economic, social, scientific, and religious developments that contributed to European desire for land and power, and also to fantasies and phobias directed by European conquerors toward those whom they subdued and subjected to Western rule. The reaction toward the white Westerners on the part of those exploited is also explored. The period covered is from the mid-fifteenth century through the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: a 200-level history course or permission of instructor.

HIST352 - Nature & Meaning of History

The first half of this course examines selective theories of history from Herodotus through Braudel. The second part investigates the historiography of a single topic according to student interest. Readings are selected to introduce the student to interpretive issues surrounding the selected topic. The perspectives of several practicing historians are considered. Students write a research paper. This course is intended for history majors and as a capstone course for history minors; it is open to others who have successfully completed at least three history courses and have the permission of the instructor. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 200-level history course and permission of instructor.

HIST400 - Individual Seminar in Reading & Research

This course will serve as the first semester of a two-semester individualized history capstone sequence. Students will work closely on an individual basis with a full-time faculty member, meeting weekly to define a topic for in-depth examination through reading, research, and writing. Reading and research will begin during HIST 400 and will continue during the following semester in HIST 401. Students must complete HIST 400 before enrolling in HIST 401. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and HIST 352 (can be taken concurrently).

HIST401 - Tutorial in History

This capstone course focuses on research methodology and practice in history. The student must gain the written agreement of the faculty member who oversees the project. Each student defines a topic by the end of the first week of the semester. Subsequent weekly meetings address progress and problems encountered in research of the topic. The finished product is a substantial paper (ca. 30 pages) with full scholarly apparatus. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, HIST 352, and HIST 400.

HON101 - Honors Colloquium

This course is interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and geared toward debate and dialogue. Students explore unexpected topics and learn to analyze from a variety of perspectives including race, class, gender, and sexuality. The course is designed to further develop students' critical thinking, writing, and oral presentation skills. It also connects first year students to a larger, intellectually curious community through special events. Topics vary widely but connect to contemporary questions and problems. The course offers a seminar discussion led by College President Michael Alexander. Past topics have included: cultural notions of bodies and body art; graphic novels; sex and death; telling life stories; truth, terror, love, and lies; and uses and abuses of science and technology. Honors 101 substitutes for First Year Seminar, which is required of all students not eligible for HON101. Restricted to Honors Program students only.

HON205 - Honors Seminar

This course uses community-based service learning to examine issues of social justice in order to develop critical, capable, and ethical leaders and team-builders. Students explore obstacles, challenges, and failures of leadership as well as models for success. With the aim 1) to differentiate service learning from voluntary service, and 2) to promote leadership, social justice, and real world problem-solving among students, service activities are supported and analyzed through reading, writing, and discussion. Prerequisite: HON101 or permission from Honors Program Director

HON299X - Independent Component Workshop

HON 299X Independent Component WorkshopFinally! Do you dream of doing an Honors Component that is not attached to one of your semester courses? Have an idea, a passion, a project? Something that will deepen your knowledge or build professional skills, something you need to research whether that research takes traditional or non-traditional forms? This new Independent Component workshop aims to provide workshop structure to that dream so you can collaborate with others, share your enthusiasms and your work and get the guidance you need. Register now with an idea and we will frame it and connect to faculty mentors in the first three weeks of the term.

HON305 - Honors Sem II:Interdisciplinary Topics

This course guides student research on challenging, provocative, and multi-dimensional topics. The course takes seminar form, using debate, dialogue, reading, writing, and individualized research to develop the student's interdisciplinary perspectives, moral and cultural understanding, and problem-solving skills. Topics vary widely. Past courses have included: HIV/AIDS in America; The Wire: Intersections of Class, Power, Crime, and Choice; Sextopia; The Postcolonial World; Bioethics; Revolutions and Revolutionary Thought; Women and Beauty. Most courses fulfill either a Multicultural, Moral/Ethical or Aesthetic area of inquiry. Prerequisites: Junior standing, HON101, HON205, or permission from Honors Program Director.

HON401 - Honors Capstone Seminar

This course occurs fall term only and is required for all Honors Program graduates. It brings senior students together across majors to critically discuss and evaluate their academic and personal development. Students engage in critical reflection on the education they have had and the men and women they have become. They work to present a clear, concise statement of who they are, what they have been able to accomplish, and a sense of how they want to develop from here. Students meet weekly and help each other create a retrospective understanding of the value and significance of each of their individualized Honors Components, their interdisciplinary Honors Courses, and their major course of study. Students discuss, present, and develop team projects and goals for their futures. Prerequisites: Senior standing, all Honors core courses must be completed, or permission from Honors Program Director.

HS101 - Human Services: Systems & Skills

This course encourages an examination of one’s own value system, motivations and interests in relation to the wish to pursue a career working with people. Students are introduced to the history and development of the field: the concept of the social welfare system; resources and services offered by a range of community agencies; a model to understand social and psychological problems; and interventions to address social needs interventions range from individual case management and counseling to community organizing and planning. The course highlights a social justice basis for human service work. A service learning requirement enables students to examine their interests and apply the concepts learned in class.

HS103 - Navigating Human Service Systems

This course explores the many systems and agencies involved in providing social services. The course brings in guest speakers from several agencies, the Court Clinic, and includes field trips to a Court House, Hospital, and other settings. 1 credit. Pre-requisite: PSYC101, SOC101 or CJ101

HS203X - Trauma and Recovery

Trauma is one of the most powerful categories that we use to understand suffering. This one category encompasses responses to widely diverse experiences, from war and terrorism, to natural disasters, to physical and sexual abuse. Trauma and recovery help us make sense of experiences that may seem unbearable. The shared suffering that sometimes arises from trauma can be a powerful basis for identity and/or a source of marginalized and erased histories. In this way, way trauma helps us frame how we understand our own experiences, and how we recognize the pain of others. This class will examine the following: • The genealogy of psychological trauma as a medical and lay category • The relationship between biological and behavioral responses and social and medical framings • The links between embodied, psychic, emotional, and cultural dimensions of trauma • Trauma diagnosis in war, humanitarian and cross-cultural settings • Collective trauma, memory and memorialization • Alternative ways of talking about feeling, suffering, and memor • Trauma therapies and interviewing Prerequisites: PSYC101 or SOC101

HS210 - Case Management & Counseling

This course introduces students to interviewing skills used by counselors and case managers and to the types of counselor responses that can be effective in human services work. Students learn to assess clients and interventions at the micro, meso and macro levels and explore issues of professional ethics and values. Students also examine cultural contexts as they impact the client, counselor, and client-counselor relationship. Some of the contexts may include race, class, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender, and immigration status. The course relies heavily on in-class exercises. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, HS 101 with a C or better.

HS215 - Foundation Internship

This internship provides human service students the opportunity to experience field work. Training in the skills by which students can offer direct and indirect assistance to the client population is provided. Prerequisites: HS 210 with a grade of C or better; and permission of Internship Coordinator. Corequisite: HS 217.

HS217 - Foundations of Ethical Fieldwork

This seminar is taken concurrently with the Foundation Internship (HS 215). The seminar provides a forum for discussing common human service experiences, including pathways to professional careers and practice related issues, and includes an introduction to ethical issues such as confidentiality and privacy in the context of an examination of ethical dilemmas. It also gives students an opportunity to build skills necessary to offer direct and indirect assistance to clients at internship sites. Students review professional and research literatures in relation to a topic connected to the internship experience. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HS 210 with a grade of C or better; and permission of the Internship Coordinator required. Co-requisite: HS 215.

HS415 - Advanced Internship I

Seniors who have met program requirements spend 125 hours in an approved supervised internship. Prerequisites: HS 215, HS 217, with a grade of C or better; and permission of the Internship Coordinator; Co-requisite: HS 417.

HS417 - Field Intervention Strategies

This seminar is taken concurrently with Advanced Internship I (HS 415). Students integrate theory learned throughout their college career with their fieldwork experience. The seminar further develops professional behaviors such as record keeping, creating and maintaining supervisory relationships, conflict resolution, and job effectiveness. Students are also offered an opportunity to analyze cases and tasks assigned to them in their field placements, providing a theoretical framework for understanding them. There is an intensive examination of the ethical considerations involved in working with clients. Students identify and develop a research topic and conduct an extensive review of current literature on a topic related to their internship. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HS 215, HS 217 with a grade of C or better, and permission of the Internship Coordinator; Co-requisite: HS 415.

HS425 - Advanced Internship II

This seminar is a continuation of HS 415. Students spend 125 hours working in an approved supervised field site. Prerequisite: HS 415 with a grade of C or better; Co-requisite: HS 427.

HS427 - Systems & Organizational Change

This capstone seminar is a continuation of Field Intervention Strategies (HS417) and is taken concurrently with Advanced Internship II (HS425). Building on knowledge and skills gained throughout the Social Sciences program, students continue to integrate theory with practice through seminar discussion and internship-related experiences. There is an increased focus on the delivery of services, examination of ethical dilemmas, and analysis of the broader systems in which services are delivered and policies are formulated. Students also have an opportunity to explore career development issues through examination of the graduate school and employment processes. This course has been designated as a writing intensive course and also has a strong public speaking component. Prerequisites: HS 415, HS 417 with a grade of C or better; and either PSYC 331 or SOC 331. Corequisite: HS 425.

HUM103 - Invitation to the Humanities

This course invites students to consider what it means to be human from manifold scholarly perspectives. As such, students are introduced to the many disciplines included in the humanities. Arguably, there are eight: art, communication, history, language, literature, music, philosophy, and religion. Taking a thoroughly interdisciplinary approach, this course investigates how humanists employ these varied disciplines in studying and expressing humanness.

HUM203X - The New Testament

The Christian New Testament is one of the most widely read documents in the world, and one of the most widely misunderstood. In this course, we will read the New Testament and study it from several critical perspectives. This is not a “Bible study” reading of the New Testament; come prepared to have your assumptions challenged and your standard interpretations questioned. Historical criticism, source criticism, feminist criticism, and close textual analysis will contribute to a lively and refreshing look at this classic of Western literature. Critical thinking and an open mind are prerequisites to a successful learning experience. Prerequisite: ENG102

HUM207X - Mexico/U.S.: Poverty & Human Rights

In this course, we will study poverty from the perspective of poor people themselves. Examining the diverse cultures and peoples of Mexico, we consider the way in which people in one Mexican state help themselves. Their history and struggles will shed light on the dire poverty in which half the world’s population lives, as we work shoulder to shoulder with a farming community taking its future into its own hands. The course includes an immersion component in January, involving daily service and study in Mexico through the international nonprofit Niños de Veracruz. The course also includes fifteen hours of service to Niños de Veracruz in November. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry – Multicultural [AI(MC)] and the Area of Inquiry – Moral/Ethical [AI(ME)] and supports the Human Rights Minor.

HUM399 - Humanities Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop objectives and identify potential sites for the senior internship. Topics include the application of humanities course work to a professional career and the development of skills necessary to locate an internship. The final goal of this course is to locate an appropriate internship. Junior or senior standing is required; this course is designed for Humanities Department majors only.

HUM400 - Humanities Field Experience

This course provides individually arranged participation in a work setting related to students' majors. Students spend 150 hours at the internship site over the course of the semester. Primary responsibility rests with students in identifying and pursuing an area of interest in consultation with the instructor. Students participate in a one-hour seminar each week that focuses on reflective activities that enhance the internship experience. Students complete written exercises about and evaluations of the experience. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed by the employer and instructor at the internship site, as well as participation in the seminar and written assignments. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, approval of instructor, HUM 399. Humanities Department majors only.

HUM419 - Seminar in Hum: Readings & Research

This capstone course serves as the direct complement to HUM420. Whereas HUM420 is a writing-intensive course, this course is research and reading intensive; students work in a tutorial fashion (i.e., one on one) with the instructor to choose a research topic, read closely in pertinent sources, and report back through informative and exploratory writing assignments and conversations. Like HUM420, this course focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and the solution of problems; when taken together, these courses serve as a capstone experience. Prerequisite:Junior or Senior standing. Humanities Department and IDS majors only.

HUM420 - Seminar in Humanities

This capstone course focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and problem solving. The topic will change; however, the course emphasizes extensive research projects related to students' fields of interest. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisites: HUM419 and Junior or Senior standing. Humanities Department and IDS majors only.

IDS100 - Field Assignment Seminar

This course provides students with a professional/skills development opportunity to practice professional theory and skills in a real work setting. The internship itself, the weekly seminar, and its written assignments constitute the IDS 100 Field Assignment Seminar, a one-credit course. The student typically participates in 8-10 hours per week in a work setting (for a total of 50 hours minimum). Students are responsible for identifying and securing the internship placement in consultation with faculty and the Director of Internship Programs. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members and student at the completion of the experience.

IDS106 - Peer Mentorship & Organizational Leaders

IDS 106 and IDS 107: These sequential courses are each one-credit seminars with a service-learning component. Students study concepts of mentorship and advising as well as leadership. The service component involves working in the College's First Year Seminar and advising system, serving as a Peer Mentor to first year students.

IDS107 - Peer Mentorship & Organizational Leaders

IDS 106 and IDS 107: These sequential courses are each one-credit seminars with a service-learning component. Students study concepts of mentorship and advising as well as leadership. The service component involves working in the College's First Year Seminar and advising system, serving as a Peer Mentor to first year students.

IDS108 - Peer Mentorship & Org Leader III

This course is a continuation of IDS 106 and IDS 107. Students in this course work independently and in groups on projects related to first year students and advising. The course has a service component that involves working in the College’s advising system, serving as a Peer Mentor to first year students. Students conduct research as part of this course. Prerequisites: IDS 106, IDS 107.

IDS215X - Professional Development Seminar

Professional Development Seminar

IDS220X - I'm Back, Now What? Rethinking the World

This course brings together students returning from every different kind of global region and experience, and it is open to all those who have experienced travel, study abroad, Shoulder to Shoulder experiential programs, alternative breaks or those who anticipate such study travel in the near future. An intensive experience elsewhere is often overwhelming because of the depth of new perspective it calls for and the many challenges it poses to the ways of living and thinking we once considered “normal.” Our sense of self, our family and friends, our goals, and even our understanding of the world may be in the process of a fundamental shift. This course creates the opportunity for us to exchange our varied international and regional experiences and to guide each other through those changes together. Readings, essays, documentaries, and dialogues will help us reframe our experiences in both a global and a local context. We want to reintegrate our experiential discovery into a larger framework for understanding why things work the way they do and how they are interconnected. We will examine various cultures and their values, international relations, the world's political economy, the global environment, etc. Each student will conduct further fact-based research on those regions to which they have traveled or plan to travel to and investigate the questions that this comparative framework opens about their experiences elsewhere.

IDS398X - Developing Your Professional Identity

A critical component of a successful career is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career path, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding career opportunities. A goal of this course is to secure interviews for a job or an internship for the following semester. Must have at least sophomore standing. Highly recommended for seniors.

IDS399 - Internship Seminar

A critical component of a successful Internship experience is finding an appropriate placement. In this seminar students will identify their personal work style and strengths, will identify a good career match, will create an effective cover letter & resume, will explore effective networking, interviewing, and negotiation skills. This course will help students identify search tools for finding internships. A goal of this course is to secure an internship for the following semester. Must have at least Sophomore standing.

IDS400 - Field Experience

This course provides the student with professional experience through an individually arranged participation of 12-15 hours per week in a work setting (for a total of 150 hours minimum). Primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing his/her areas of interests, in consultation with his/her team of faculty advisors and the Director of Internship Programs. Each student is monitored during the field experience and must complete a related written project assigned by his/her team of faculty advisors. Evaluation of the field experience is based on student performance as reviewed with the employer, faculty members, and student at the completion of the experience. Junior or Senior standing. Prerequisite: IDS399, COM 399, HUM 399. In addition, IDS398X may be a substitution for these.

IGS100 - Intergenerational Studies

This course is linked to three or four credit courses across the curriculum. Students in this course complete a project that focuses on an intergenerational (across age or across generation) topic. Students wishing to enroll in an IGS Lined-Credit course must have the permission of the instructor and must submit a proposal to the Director of the Fuss Center for Research on Aging and Intergenerational Studies. Restrictions: Students may enroll for only one IGS Linked-Credit in a give semester; students may complete up to, but not more than, three IGS Linked-Credits towards completion of the bachelor's degree. To receive credit and a grade for an IGS linked option, students must receive a passing grade in the host course. The IGS Linked-Credit cannot be taken pass/fail, and cannot be linked to a course that is taken pass/fail. This credit counts toward an unrestricted elective and there accumulated credits may b e counted toward the elective requirement in the Minor in Aging and Intergenerational Studies. IGS credits do not satisfy other degree requirements unless authorized by an academic department.

JPN111 - Elementary Japanese I

This course introduces students to basic elements of Japanese through the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. It is open to students who are at the beginning of Japanese language study or who have not had more than one year of secondary school Japanese.

JPN112 - Elementary Japanese II

This is a continuation of JPN 111. Emphasis is placed on the spoken language and on mastery of basic kanji characters. The course includes some readings in the hiragana writing system. Prerequisite: JPN 111 or JPN 101 (with C or better) or permission of instructor.

LS101 - Foundations of American Legal System(KP)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the law. Students are introduced to the basics of the legal system in the United States including its organization and operation. The course covers major areas of legal practice and the legal principles that apply. Legal concepts are explained and legal terminology defined.

LS202 - Legal Research & Analysis

This course serves as an introduction to American constitutional interpretation. Topics to be covered include legal precedent, legal issues surrounding the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the role of the Supreme Court as a political institution, and the Court’s interpretations of issues dealing with the Bill of Rights. Prerequisite: LS 101.

LS203 - Justice, Law & the Constitution

This course serves as an introduction to American constitutional interpretation. Topics to be covered include legal precedent, legal issues surrounding the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the role of the Supreme Court as a political institution, and the Court’s interpretations of issues dealing with the Bill of Rights.

LS204 - Criminal Law

This course examines the history and contemporary practice of criminal law. Topics include the purposes of the law, categories and general features of crime, elements of criminal offenses for prosecution, and categories of defenses. Prerequisite: LS 101 or CJ 101.

LS210 - Special Topics in Legal Studies

This course provides specialized offerings in Legal Studies in order to satisfy interests of both faculty and students. Examples of topics are: Property or Real Estate Law. Cyberlaw, or Law and Education.

LS213 - Mock Trial Practicum I

This course engages students in preparing for trial advocacy through analyzing American Mock Trial Competition (“AMTA”) case materials and engaging in the practical skills of questioning witnesses through direct and cross-examination, applying rules of evidence, formulating and making objections, preparing opening and closing statements, and arguing the law applicable to the particular case. Through this course students learn rules of evidence, court procedures, trial strategies, legal advocacy and taking on various roles in courtroom proceedings. Essential skills acquired include debate, public speaking, professional collaboration and teamwork and critical thinking. This “connected learning” course introduces students to law in an applied setting and the students will participate in one or more intercollegiate scrimmages and/or invitational tournament in preparation for the AMTA in February. Participation in LS 216: Mock Trial Practicum II (1 credit) and the regional AMTA Mock Trial Regional competition in the spring is required. Students are permitted to repeat this course. Department Chair/Instructor permission required. (Fall Semester as needed)

LS214 - Communication Law

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the law and governmental regulations that apply to communication practitioners. Course topics include the First Amendment, defamation and libel, invasion of privacy law, copyright, advertising regulation, obscenity, pornography, internet law, protecting “news sources” for journalists, FCC regulation of broadcasting, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. Prerequisite: COM 101 or LS 101.

LS215 - Entertainment Law

This course will explore legal and regulatory issues as they affect the entertainment industry including an examination of: intellectual property, antitrust regulation, agent, manager and other entertainment contracts, administrative regulation and constitutional issues in the music, television, live performance and motion picture industries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or LS 101.

LS216 - Mock Trial Practicum II

This course is a continuation of Mock Trial Practicum I. Students refine the skills and knowledgethey developed in Mock Trial Practicum I and they engage deeply in the facts of that year's AMTA caseand the related courtroom procedures.The class will meet regularly, preparing for at least one invitational tournament, and culminating in the AMTA Regional tournament in February.There is also the potential to advance through additional rounds. Students will be required to also meet and practice outside standard meeting times. Participation in LS 213 Mock Trial Practicum I is expected. Students are permitted to repeat this course.Department Chair/Instructor permission required. (Spring semester as needed)

LS301 - Legal Writing & Reasoning

This course focuses on the development of fundamental skills necessary for successful legal writing that could assist in employment in a law office, such as drafting correspondence, developing various documents, and preparing legal memoranda. It looks at legal research, writing, and reasoning as a continuum, since the results of nearly all legal research must be submitted in written form. Legal writing is examined as a three step process. The steps consist of identifying the document’s purpose, audience, and constraints; developing a structure and draft; and editing and rewriting. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: LS 101 & LS202.

LS304 - Litigation Practice

This course is designed to provide instruction pertaining to key areas of litigation. These areas include interviewing, document handling, preparing evidence, interacting with clients, preparing motions, legal arguments and trials. Prerequisite: LS101 of Permission of Dept Chair.

LS305 - Comparative Law & Legal Systems

This course introduces students to the complex issues involved in comparing various laws and legal systems around the contemporary world. The course focuses on the main legal systems in terms of the structure and sources of their laws and against the historical and political background in which these laws were formed. Prerequisite: LS 101.

LS307 - Tort & Personal Injury Law

This course is designed to give the student a basic overview of concepts in tort and personal injury law. Topics to be covered include: defamation, negligence, intentional torts, and general personal injury law. Prerequisite: LS 101.

LS311 - The American Court System

This course provides students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the criminal courts. In addition, the course explores the rules of criminal procedure, including their underlying assumptions, how they evolved, and the goals they hope to achieve. Students learn how the dynamics of the courtroom and the criminal justice system itself affect the actual application of the law. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or LS101

LS320 - Philosophy of Law

This course explores selected philosophical issues in law. Topics include human and civil rights, personal autonomy and the right of the state to regulate conduct, the extent to which an individual’s rights should be sacrificed for the common good, and other concepts of justice.

LS325 - Evidence

This course provides a detailed examination of the law of evidence. Topics include types of evidence, principles of exclusion, evaluation and examination of evidence, competency of witnesses, and the rule against hearsay evidence and the exceptions to this rule. Prerequisite: LS 101 or CJ 101.

LS441 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law I

This fall portion of the Capstone course is designed to identify and discuss various legal and political issues in society today, including but not limited to issues of gender, race, and other relevant historical and contemporary political topics and movements. This first semester develops the student’s ability to research, write and debate current issues. This is a writing intensive and speaking across the curriculum course. Limited to Legal Studies and Law and Public Affairs majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

LS442 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law II

The spring semester of the Capstone course focuses on the process of producing a final legal research paper on one of the topics of the first semester. Students hone their research and writing skills culminating in the presentation of a final capstone project presentation. This is a writing intensive and speaking across the curriculum intensive course. Prerequisites: LS 441 and Senior standing.

LS443 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar I

This course provides an opportunity for students to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours in the fall semester in a professional work setting related to their interest. Each student is monitored during the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

LS444 - Justice Studies Internship & Seminar II

This course provides an opportunity for students to be in an individually arranged, college-supervised internship for 120 hours in the fall semester in a professional work setting related to their interest. Each student is monitored during the internship by the faculty advisor and attends a corresponding classroom seminar each week. Prerequisite: Prerequisites: LS/CJ 443 and Senior standing

MAHT304 - Mathematics for Educators

Mathematics for Educators

MATH106 - Algebraic Operations

This course is intended to strengthen students’ ability in algebra. The course begins with introductory topics such as operations with real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials and factoring, quadratic equations and systems of equations. This course also includes an introduction to rational expressions, radicals and rational exponents.

MATH107 - College Geometry

This course is an introduction to the essentials of Euclidean geometry. Topics covered include: reasoning in mathematics, the relationship between algebra and geometry, analytic geometry, proofs and constructive triangles, circles, quadrilaterals, polygons, surfaces and solids and historical notes about famous geometricians. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing.

MATH109 - Modern Mathematics (KP)

This course is an introduction to mathematics developed in the last 100 years. The course connects recently-discovered mathematics with current, real-world problems. Aesthetic elements of mathematics are emphasized. Topics may include the mathematics of voting, sharing, touring, games, networks, scheduling, money, symmetry, fractal shapes, descriptive statistics and probability. The course is appropriate for students majoring in Communication, Criminal Justice, English/History/Humanities-with Secondary Ed, English, Environmental Studies, Fashion Design, History, Hospitality and Event Management, Humanities, Human Services, Law and Public Affairs, Legal Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or Sport Management. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH116 - Merchandising and Financial Mathematics

This course focuses on retail mathematics. Topics include simple and compound interest, the time-value of capital, annuities, amortization, sinking funds, bond and investment, business problem-solving and decision making. Other topics include profit, loss, and break-even analysis, pricing, inventory, and merchandise planning. The course introduces basic theories of statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or through placement testing.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH205 - Calculus I

This course is an introduction to limits, continuity, and methods of differentiation. Application to problems in business management and physical science is emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 203 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 206, or any 300 level mathematics courses.

MATH206 - Calculus II

This is a continuation of Calculus I, covering integration, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, maxmin problems, derivatives and integrals of trigonometric functions and differential equations with applications to business, biological sciences, and physical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed MATH 320, MATH 328, or MATH 330.

MATH207 - Applied Trigonometry

This course is an in-depth study of trigonometry with attention to theory, proofs, modeling, and history. Trigonometric and related functions are used to model, analyze, and solve real-life problems. Applications are chosen from disciplines such as agriculture, architecture, astronomy, biology, business, chemistry, earth science, engineering, medicine, meteorology, and physics. Topics covered include a review of trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, vectors and dot products, complex number theory, trigonometric forms of complex numbers, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric models, Gaussian and logistic growth models, conic sections, and polar equations of conics. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 106 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

MATH210 - Math Applied to Science

This course provides a review of fundamental mathematical concepts such as probability and trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions and explores the ways that these topics and techniques have been applied to investigations in architecture, calculus, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic scales, earthquake analysis, astronomy, biology, medicine, genetics, radiocarbon dating, chemistry, and Newtonian physics. The course is designed to demonstrate the power and utility of mathematics and explores the development of mathematics during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, especially in Greek, Hindu and Arabic cultures. Prerequisite: MATH 205 with a grade of C or better.

MATH212 - Finite Mathematics

The focus of this course is to develop mathematical models and to demonstrate the utility of various mathematical techniques that are most applicable to the creation of computer algorithms. Topics include functions and models, linear regression, solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and Leontief Input-Output models, linear programming (graphical and simplex methods), principle of duality, estimated and theoretical probability and Markov Chains. Applications are derived from current real world data and require mastery of Microsoft Excel and graphing calculator technology. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH215X - Discrete Math

Topics will include logic, proofs, algorithms, counting, recurrence relations, graph theory, trees, networks, Boolean algebra, and automata.Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 205

MATH304 - Mathematics for Educators

This course engages students in mathematical concepts through examples, investigations, and active problem solving explorations. Content is drawn from subject matter knowledge required for elementary and early childhood licensure, with emphasis on number theory and operations. This course is for students seeking elementary or early childhood licensure. Concurrent enrollment in ED 335 is required.

MATH307 - Calculus III

This course is an introduction to sequences and series, parametric and polar curves, vectors and vector functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH320 - Differential Equations

This is an introduction to the many ways of solving various types of differential equations with emphasis on theory, methods of solution and applications. Topics include solutions of first, second and simple higher order differential equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations, solutions of systems of differential equations using the theory of matrices, and determinants. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of B- or better.

MATH325 - Linear Algebra

This is an introductory course in linear algebra blending the requirements of theory, problem solving, analytical thinking, computational techniques, and applications. Topics include in-depth treatment of matrix algebra, linear systems, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants and computer methods, as well as applications and modeling of real phenomena in transportation systems, archaeology, economics, communications, demography, weather prediction, connectivity of networks, graph theory, and fractals. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH328 - Mathematics Applied to Management

This course explores the art of mathematical modeling of managerial decision problems and the science of developing the solution techniques for these models. Topics include management science techniques used in today’s businesses, e.g., break-even analysis, presentation models, linear programming, transportation and assignments problems, decision theory, forecasting and inventory models, Markov analysis, and solution of nonlinear models in business using calculus-based optimization. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH330 - Mathematical Modeling

This is an application-oriented course on how to solve real word problems from the social, medical and life sciences, business, and economics by set­ting up a mathematical model of the situation and then developing techniques for analyzing these models and solving them. Topics include the modeling process, linear models, financial models, modeling using proportionality, fitting linear and nonlinear models to data graphically, the least-squared criterion, linear programming models, modeling using the derivative, matrix and probability models, Markov chain models, and modeling interactive dynamic systems. Prerequisite: MATH 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH338 - Mathematical Statistics

In this introduction to statistical theory, the roles probability and statistics play in business analysis and decision making are investigated. Topics include probability distributions, statistical inference, sampling distribution theory, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 206 with a grade of C or better.

MATH399 - Mathematical Applications

In this capstone course, Students investigate mathematics from a variety of fields and choose a topic for a mathematics project in their Field of Application. Mathematical methods for analysis, modeling, prediction, and/or problem solving are discussed. Students demonstrate knowledge of a substantial area of mathematics and present their work at a department seminar or the Connected Learning Symposium.

MATH499 - Internship

The internship seminar is a work or research experience where students combine theory and practice.

MDSC203 - Multidisciplinary Experience

In this project-based course, students explore a social or intellectual problem using at least two knowledge perspectives. Faculty and students follow a collaborative process of exploration, discussion, and problem solving that integrates knowledge perspectives and core intellectual skills.

MUS101 - Music Appreciation I (KP)

This is a survey course in which students acquire listening skills and learn how to talk about music. The Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical periods of European music (1450-1800) are covered, with an emphasis on the history and development of music in its social and historical context. Students will learn to identify music from these three periods and will gain a more general understanding of music that can be applied to all eras and styles. Composers include Ockeghem, Palestrina, Byrd, Gabrieli, Purcell, Telemann, Bach, Handel, Haydn, and Mozart.

MUS102 - Music Appreciation II (KP)

In this course, students will explore the role of music in various contexts, in order to better understand its role in culture and in society. The hands-on curriculum calls for lots of listening and active participation; students will develop their listening skills, their awareness of the elements of music, and their understanding of the musical experience.

MUS104 - World Music

This course introduces students to the world of music through analysis and examination of music and culture from different ethnic groups. The musical characteristics of India, the Middle East, Indonesia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, Native American Indians, Ethnic North America, and the musical culture of Europe are addressed. Students listen to a selected repertoire and analyze the music and readings about music in class.

MUS107 - Understanding & Playing the Blues

This course formally introduces students to the blues through theoretical study and practical application. As a result, students not only become familiar with all the basic blues elements (e.g., rhythm, harmony, form) but also learn how to play the blues on keyboards. (Prior keyboard or piano experience is NOT necessary.)

MUS108 - Blues: Harmony & Theory

This course develops an understanding and appreciation of music, covering genres including blues, pop, and jazz. Music theory, blues theory, harmony, and chordal theory are examined. Through a combination of listening to recordings and live examples, students apply their knowledge and gain a deeper understanding of music.

MUS109 - American Folk Music (KP)

Integrating folklore, American history, and songwriting, this course examines American culture through the lens of American folk songs-songs written by others and songs we will write ourselves. Readings, recordings, and class discussion illustrate the importance of love songs, protest songs, work songs, and ballads as resources for understanding and expressing American life.

MUS201 - Musical Comedy

This is a survey of the rise of the musical theatre from origins in England in the eighteenth century (Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera) through the 1920s in the United States. Works by Weill, Kern, Hammerstein, Rogers, Gershwin, Bernstein, Porter, Lerner and Loewe, Wilson, and others are studied.

MUS202 - Fundamentals of Music

This course is designed for students who are interested in mastering basic music literacy and its application in basic piano skills. The course is appropriate for those who already read some music and would like to develop their written music skills; it is also appropriate for those who have little or no experience reading sheet music. Topics include musical notation, rhythm, and basic piano skills including but not limited to scale building, intervals, and chords. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry – Aesthetic [AI(A)].

MUS203 - Popular Music (KP)

The years after World War II found American society and culture evolving in ways that both led to and mirrored the birth of rhythm 'n' blues, rock 'n' roll, and soul music, creating a new popular music that has indeed taken over the world. Yet it is impossible to understand fully modern popular music without exploring its roots in blues, jazz, hillbilly, ragtime, Afro-Caribbean, and other styles. In this course, we survey the history of American pop from its birth in the early nineteenth century up to 1970; by this crucial year, most of the styles reflected in today's music had been established. We pay special attention to the ways in which American music synthesizes African and European elements in a myriad of new forms.

MUS207X - Songwriting: Craft & Creation

This course is designed for both experienced and first-time songwriters. We will study basic music theory and engage in ear training, melody writing, and lyric writing as we consider songs in a variety of contemporary and traditional styles. Class completion will include the study of songs within their musical, historical, and social context, and the creation and simple performance (live or recorded) of at least four original songs.

MUS215 - History of Jazz

This is an in-depth study of the history of Jazz with an overview of the influences of African traditions and the development of the blues. Students gain insight into the various jazz idioms through recordings of significant artists and compositions. Topics covered range from Dixieland to contemporary styles with an emphasis on swing and bebop.

PERF101 - Chorus

This course focuses on developing basic steps for voice technique and group singing. The class meets for two hours, as most of the work for the course is done during class time. Students are presented the basic principles of singing and apply those to vocal ensemble singing. The repertoire is based on the vocal ensemble formed, yet the song literature includes works from different styles and periods. Students perform as members of Lasell College chorus. This course may be repeated for credit.

PERF103X - Piano Instruction

Have you ever wanted to learn to play the piano? In this one-credit course designed for both beginning and experienced keyboard players, students will learn to read and play their favorite songs! Basic concepts in musical notation and music theory will be introduced at the beginning of each class; students will then receive individualized instruction on the classical, pop, rock, or jazz pieces they would like to learn. This course can be repeated.

PERF105 - Basic Acting

This course provides the beginning student interested in acting with basic skills involved in the art. Explorations include: physical awareness and the use of the body as an expressive tool; intellectual and emotional approaches to creating a role; and the uses for imagination and creativity that actors apply. Students work both individually and interactively on acting exercises and master basic text analysis for actors as an aid to building a character.

PERF106 - Vocal Techniques & Voice Training

This one-credit course is designed for beginning voice students and introduces the basic skills needed for successful vocal performance, with a focus on vocal technique and artistic presentation. Training also covers areas such as good practice technique and repertoire choices. This course can be repeated.

PERF107 - Introduction to Theater Arts

This is an introduction to the principles and practice of the related arts that are involved in the production of a play in the theatre. Study includes analysis of the dramatic script in terms of the actor; the director; the scenic, costume, and lighting designers; and the technicians. Lab theatre productions integrate the content of the course.

PERF108 - Dance Techniques

This course prepares beginner to advanced beginner classical ballet students with the foundation necessary for progression to the intermediate and advanced levels. Every student’s ability is assessed, and training follows a curriculum under which each student progresses to his or her maximum potential. The course includes classical ballet vocabulary, technique, self-discipline, motivation, creativity, critical thinking, and confidence building. This course can be repeated.Course is held at the Boston Ballet School, 863 Washington Street Newton, MAStudents are to meet in the Valentine Parking Lot

PERF110X - Preparing for Musical Theatre

This one-credit course is designed for students interested in auditioning for and performing in musicals, operettas, and/or operas. Students will gain the tools they need to prepare for an audition and/or a role in local or regional theatre. Students will work on scenes, monologues, audition cuts, and dance/movement skills; they will also learn acting and performance basics. New students are welcomed, as are students who have completed PERF106. This course can be repeated.

PERF111 - Performing Arts Practices

This course focuses on theory and practice in staged performances. Readings include critical studies of performance and performances, creative texts, and subjective accounts of the performance experience. The following questions are considered: What are the expectations of performance? How is a performance framed and organized? What are the sequences and contexts of performance? How is a performance evaluated by the audience and by the performers themselves? How does the performer understand and experience his or her role and personal status, on- and offstage? How does the audience imagine the offstage performer? Writing assignments will be based on both creative works and theoretical studies and will involve critical reflection, exegesis, and analysis; students will also complete a course project in which findings from multiple sources are synthesized and presented in oral and/or written form. Course goals include the deepening of student appreciation of each performance art form through connections across forms, as well as a capacity to contextualize studied forms to artistic and performance traditions. This course is a required course in the Performing Arts minor.

PERF113X - The Business of Artistry

The arts are an integral component of our everyday lives. No matter where we walk, drive, run, or contemplate, we are influenced by the art around us. Artists create the landscapes for our lives; at the same time, they strive to survive on the merits of their craft. The Business of Artistry explores the insight that artists are not only creators and out-of-the-box thinkers but also business proprietors. In ever-changing economic and artistic contexts, artists must acquire the tools to position themselves for success. We will focus on concepts like professionalism, community ethics, the development of a catalogue of work, and the achievement of work environments that benefit the artist as well as the consumer

PERF115X - Tap Dance

In this one-credit movement-based course, we will investigate tap dance. We will examine the technique, vocabulary, dynamics, rhythm, and musicality of tap while exploring several of the most influential tap legends, including Savion Glover, Steve Condos, and Dianne Walker. In addition, we will discuss the historical, socioeconomic, and musical contexts from which specific styles emerged. This course can be repeated.

PERF201 - Intermediate Acting

This course is designed for acting students who wish to further develop, refine, and apply acting techniques in a performance-oriented environment. Using voice, body, imagination, technique, and research, students explore the challenge of acting in more complex media, styles, and dramatic literature. Techniques for acting for the camera are introduced, as is individual coaching for students’ strengths and weaknesses. The development and application of the monologue, scene work from world literature, work with another actor, and character analysis are covered. Performance opportunities are available in concert with Lasell productions. Prerequisite: PERF 105 or PERF 107.

PERF202 - World Percussion:Theory & Practice (KP)

This multicultural survey course will focus on the theory and practice in the use of percussion as ritual, communication, and recreation around the world. Students will learn through lecture and critical readings of descriptive accounts of the uses of percussion, as well as through the subjective experience of learning percussive rhythms using a variety of musical instruments: congas, djembes, atumpani, berimbau, shakere, clavier, ago-go bells, and – of course – cowbells. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry – Aesthetic [AI(A)] and the Area of Inquiry – Multicultural [AI(MC)].

PERF203 - Dance Explorations (KP)

This course is designed for the undergraduate students of Lasell College, in partnership with the Boston Ballet School. Through lectures, readings, and practical applications, students will explore history and theory, gaining knowledge and understanding of the importance of the development of technique in relation to the artistry of ballet and modern dance. Students will also participate weekly in a ballet/modern technique class focusing on ballet technique, with an emphasis on contemporary movement. The dance portion of the class will be held at the Boston Ballet School Newton Studio and will be taught by a faculty member at the Boston Ballet School.Course is held at the Boston Ballet School, 863 Washington Street Newton, MAStudents are to meet in the Valentine Parking Lot

PERF205X - Blues Piano

Do you like rock, pop, jazz, country, or gospel music? The foundation of all these musical forms is the blues. In this performance course designed for both beginning and experienced keyboard players, students receive individualized instruction in blues keyboard techniques. Building on a base in blues theory, students master the chords, progressions, rhythms, and harmonies fundamental to keyboard accompaniment and improvisation in the blues idiom. This course can be repeated.

PERF399 - Performing Arts Practicum

In this one-credit practicum course, the student completes the minor in Performing Arts by participating in a college performance experience. Under the supervision of a faculty mentor, the student participates in a college drama or musical production, sings with the college chorus, performs in a college vocal or instrumental recital, or participates in a college dance performance. In weekly conference with the faculty mentor, the student establishes performance goals and assesses/addresses progress toward those goals; in addition, the student writes an essay of reflection on the relation between theory and practice in the arts. This course is a required course in the Performing Arts minor. Prerequisite: 100-level or 200-level MUS or PERF course in the practicum performance field.

PHIL101 - Introduction to Philosophy

This course is an introduction to the basic problems of philosophy, such as the sources of knowledge, the relationship between mind and body, freedom as opposed to determinism, and the nature of values.

PHIL106 - World Religions

This course provides an overview of the major religious traditions: Taoism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Central themes from these traditions are studied through selected scriptures and texts of each tradition.

PHIL110 - Ethics

This course is an introduction to analysis of conduct, moral reasoning, and the foundation of ethical values in a search for the ultimate meanings of human experience. The following specific problems are examined: life and death issues, human experimentation, sexuality, truth telling in medicine, honesty in business, cheating and lying, stealing and reparation, egoism, obligation, and capital punishment.

PHIL202 - Aesthetics

This course explores creativity, interpretation, expression, style, symbolism, evaluation, art, and society–all from the philosophical perspective. Students are exposed to a variety of approaches to the question “What is beauty?” The arts and everyday experiences are examined in an effort to answer the question about beauty, as well as the other questions such exploration raises. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

PHIL203 - Existentialism

This course examines such questions as “Who am I?” or “What relationship do I have with myself,with others, and with the universe?” Readings are taken from Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Buber, Jaspers, Sartre, and others. The influence of existentialism on psychology, society, art, religion, and politics is explored. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

PHIL204 - Philosophies of Love

This is an investigation of affectivity centering on different meanings of the emotion of love, including friendship, spirituality, ecstasy, and romance. The course is a philosophical inquiry into the person-as-sexed, freedom, choice, responsibility, object, subject, and authenticity. Readings are drawn from philosophy, history, psychology, and literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

PHIL205 - Political & Social Philosophy

This course introduces students to the primary understandings of social and political justice. Theory is related to practical and political problems. The notion of peace is also addressed. We shall wonder about the nature of the state and mutual obligations between governors and the governed. What makes a government legitimate? What freedoms and controls are needed to make modern society work? How do we choose to structure the ways in which we live together? In other words, what does it mean to be a participatory member of a particular society or a citizen of a particular country? Selected topics may include morality and human rights, status and treatment of women, hunger, poverty, and the environment. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

PHIL208 - Knowing & Reality

This course is a comparative analysis of Eastern and Western perceptions of reality in philosophy and literature, beginning with an historical overview of theories of knowledge and truth as well as the psychological factors in learning. Prerequisites: PHIL 101 and PSYC 101.

PHIL302 - Ethical Reasoning

This course will address the interaction between the lives we lead and the application of traditional (and some nontraditional) ethical theories and principles to important decision points in our lives. Students will take on real-life ethical problems and dilemmas for each class; each student will be responsible for presenting a number of issues, as well as for guiding the discussion of those issues in class. The problems we address will largely span a lifetime of experiences and concerns. Students will also write several papers that evaluate formal arguments, using standard tools of critical thinking and philosophy. The course is discussion based, so a willingness to read carefully, to think critically, and to engage in classroom presentations and discussions is essential. Prerequsite: Jr Standing & ENG102

PHYS111 - General Physics I (KP)

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS 111L.

PHYS112 - General Physics II (KP)

This is a continuation of PHYS 111. Topics include waves motion, electric potential, electric current, resistance, capacitance, and magnetism. Geometrical and wave optics are introduced. Atomic and quantum theory are also included. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Corequisite: PHYS 112L.

POLS101 - American Government

This is an examination of the basic principles that form the foundation for the structure and practice of American government. The impact of the political system on the citizen is explored along with the central assumptions and concepts that serve as the basis for the field of political science.

POLS201 - State & Local Government

This course begins with the constitutional and legal basis for state and local government. The functions of the executive and legislative branches are examined. Governmental bureaucracy and budgetary processes are studied as well as political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and political reporting in the press.

POLS202 - Issues in Contemporary Political Thought

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to selected contemporary American political issues. The course is designed to create a deeper understanding and interest in these issues and develop students' capacities as citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future. Its topics change frequently to keep up with the latest developments in the field. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

POLS208 - Contemporary International Relations

Basic concepts and major contemporary problems of international relations are examined in this course. Topics include the Middle East, East-West relations, deterrence versus disarmament, human rights, and developing countries. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

POLS210 - Political Theory

In this course, central questions in political theory are addressed. What is justice? What is freedom? What is the state? What makes a government legitimate? Is there any general obligation to obey the state? The course also focuses on theories of modernity and communities, the evolution of liberalism and individualism, and the relationship between politics and economics. Readings range from the Greeks to modern thinkers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

POLS211X - Politics & Culture of the Cold War

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the Cold War, from the end of World War II to the collapse of the Soviet Union. The course will focus primarily the Cold War’s effects on domestic policy and American society, especially in film and literature; as well as its effects on U.S. foreign policy in Europe, the Far East, and Central and South America

POLS302 - The Conspiracy in American Politics

This basis of this course will be an in- depth examination of various conspiracies in American Politics and Culture, beginning with the Salem Witch trials through the Lincoln Assassination Conspiracy, the Sacco & Vanzetti case and to the present day. More recent conspiracies include an examination of the JFK and RFK Assassinations, the Pentagon Papers case, the Watergate Conspiracy, the Iran/Contra scandal, Whitewater, the "Vast Right Wing Conspiracy," the World Trade Center bombing, the Oklahoma City Bombing, Bush/Gore 2000, Global Warming, and the 9/11 Investigation. The "Obama Birther" controversy will also be covered.

POLS303 - The American Presidency

This course examines the dynamics of public policy-making in the United States at the national, state, and local levels. The course explores the factors influencing policy formation in a variety of areas: health, education, welfare, and urban planning. An analysis of how policy outcomes are evaluated is also covered.

POLS320 - Policy Making & the Political Process

This course examines the dynamics of public policy-making in the United States at the national, state, and local levels. The course explores the factors influencing policy formation in a variety of areas: health, education, welfare, and urban planning. An analysis of how policy outcomes are evaluated is also covered.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives (KP)

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC104 - Positive Psychology

Historically, much of Psychology has focused on decreasing maladaptive emotions and behaviors (neurosis, disorders, stress, aggression, etc.). This focus has largely ignored more optimal functioning like happiness, optimism, and life satisfaction. In recent decades more scientific research has aimed at promoting and sustaining psychological health. The emerging field of Positive Psychology is the study of how human beings prosper and overcome adversity. Its goal is to identify and enhance human strengths and virtues and allow individuals and communities to thrive. This introductory-level course will detail the history of this emerging field and focus on current research in social and positive psychology on happiness, virtue, and personal development. The course will explore research that has helped highlight factors that promote and sustain psychological health. Additionally, we will look at tools and techniques that have been shown to help cultivate thoughts and behaviors that effectively contribute to well being. This coursewould substitute for PSYC101 (Psychological Perspectives) whenever that class is needed as a pre-requisite for an upper-level class but can be taken in addition to PSYC101.

PSYC111 - Generations in America

This course offers a social-developmental, multidisciplinary overview of issues related to the expanding age population in the United States. Students examine aging stereotypes, characteristics of aging populations, and the impact of age-related forces on individuals in American society. The course is geared toward students in a variety of disciplines and provides a knowledge base that can be applied to other areas of study.

PSYC201 - Psychology of Drugs & Behavior

The course examines the relationship between drugs and behavior, including evidence about the effects of drugs on the brain. Several classes of drugs, including chemically or psychologically addictive substances, psychoactive and therapeutic agents, as well as recreational drugs, are examined. Drug use is related to psychological variables such as personality structure and interpersonal relationships, and theories of addictive processes and factors influencing drug use are examined, as are treatment strategies. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC202 - Psychology of Personality

This course introduces students to a variety of the most important theories of personality: i.e., Freud, Jung, Adler, Rogers, and others. Case studies are examined with the intent of making theories more practical and useful. Prerequisite: Any 200 level psychology course.

PSYC205 - Human Sexuality

This course is designed to introduce factual information about gender identity and gender role theories, sexual preference and sexual orientation, and psychosexual development. The course examines issues related to research on human sexuality and behavior, as well as sexual education, sexual disorders, and societal impacts on sexuality. Students are challenged to think critically about many issues surrounding human sexuality and all of its manifestations. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC206 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC209X - Psyc of the Black American Experience

This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Blacks in the United States, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. Connections between Africa, the Caribbean, and Black America will be examined with respect to culture, belief systems, and values. At the same time, we will also explore the many differences in history, culture, and experience within numerous groups and individuals of African-descent in the U. S. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC218 - Dynamics of Small Groups

This class examines the basic theory and application necessary to understand and facilitate small groups. Topics may include group types, formation, roles and stages; group process; cultural awareness; group interventions and ethics within the field of psychology and human service; therapeutic value of groups; and the family, classroom, and peers as small groups. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC220 - Social Psychology

This is an introduction to the study of social interactions from a psychological perspective. Research reviewed focuses on topics such as: social perception, group interaction, attitude formation, attitudinal change, aggression, conflict, and pro-social behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC222 - Social Psychology in Film

This course uses film to examine social psychological concepts and research and provides an opportunity for students to explore how people influence and are influenced by their social relationships, communities, and larger society. Films illustrate a range of social encounters that are examined from a social psychological perspective. Topics include conflict, love, personal and group behavior, prejudice, roles, privilege, and oppression. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC240 - Sport Psychology

This course examines settings such as school, recreational, and professional where sport activities occur. It covers topics such as motivation, anxiety, competition, cooperation, gender issues, and age and developmental level in relation to sport activities. Behavioral problems such as substance abuse and eating disorders, along with psychological factors in prevention and treatment of injuries are included. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC241 - The Psychological Life of Girls & Women

This course utilizes intrapersonal, psychosocial, and sociocultural perspectives to explore the psychological strengths and problems experienced by girls and women. Topics may include the mental health system, eating disorders, depression, women in families, violence against women, friendship, identity and diversity, immigrant experiences, biological influences, sexuality, issues at school and in the workplace, leadership, and research bias. Literature is examined critically for gender, racial, ethnic, and sexual preference biases, power dynamics, and limitations imposed on both females and males by gender imperatives. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 or PSYC 223, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC302 - Biological Basis of Behavior

This course examines current research in the fields of biology, neuroscience, and psychology that explain the role of neural mechanisms in evoking and controlling human behavior. Topics include: thirst and hunger, sleep and arousal, sexual behavior, emotion, aggression, learning, memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC304X - Sensation & Perception

if you are talking to your friends, you might not realize that someone just walked in the room, even though you probably did hear the door creak and their footsteps. Clearly you 'sensed' all the information, but because your brain didn’t interpret it, you didn’t 'perceive' the person walking in. This scenario highlights the central question that we will discuss in this course: how and why are we so wonderfully inefficient and delusional sometimes? It is estimated that our five senses take in 11,000,000 bits of information per second, yet we weed out all but 40 bits. This ability to sense but selectively perceive allows us to survive and live our life without being bombarded. Throughout this course, I hope to convince you that we don't perceive things as they are, we perceive things as we are - so don't be surprised if next time you are watching a RedSox game, a gorilla could run off the field without you noticing it at all. This course will substitute for Cognitive Processes for Psychology majors. Pre-reqs: Psyc 101.

PSYC306 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC307 - Forensic Psychology

This course deals with the application of psychological knowledge to the judicial process and the criminal justice system. Topics covered include effects of defendant, juror and case characteristics on verdicts, variables affecting eyewitness accuracy, identification and testimony, and the role of forensic psychologists in competency and criminal responsibility assessments as well as criminal profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or PSYC 101.

PSYC316 - Psychology of Diversity

This course explores diversity and its relation to identity, relationship, and power. Areas of diversity that may be a focus of the course include race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, immigration status, disabilities, aging and/or health status. Students study diversity on micro, meso and macro levels including perspectives on individual and group identity, prejudice and discrimination, and psychological well-being. Students are challenged to explore their own identities and the assumptions they make about various forms of diversity. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Social Science course.

PSYC318 - Abnormal Psychology

This course examines the wide range of personality and behavioral disorders. Both traditional and contemporary theories of psychopathology are reviewed. Emphasis is also placed on the tools, techniques, and process of both the diagnosis and the treatment of various disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 202 or PSYC 220.

PSYC322 - Abnormal Child Development

This course examines common psychological disorders that affect children and adolescents. Students review factors that contribute to emotional, behavioral, cognitive and social problems in children and adolescents, as well as specific diagnostic criteria of psychological disorders. In addition, treatment of childhood disorders is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 221.

PSYC323 - Brain Function & Dysfunction

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

PSYC328 - Cognitive Processes

This course studies the ways that humans learn, remember, communicate, think, and reason. Emphasis is on the role of experimental data in development and evaluation of cognitive theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 & MATH 208

PSYC331 - Experimental Design in Psychology

This laboratory course covers concepts of the scientific method in psychology including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. As part of the lab, students carry out an experiment and learn to use SPSS to create a database and perform statistical analyses. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the instructor.

PSYC333 - Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and Permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

PSYC345 - Assessment of Individual Differences

This course studies a wide variety of tests and measurements used to assess intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality in clinical and counseling psychology, in education, and in business. Consideration of the history and theory of these tests is complemented by discussion of practical concerns related to their selection, their administration, and their interpretation in specific settings. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and PSYC 101.

PSYC406 - Special Topics in Psychology

This course provides for specialized offerings in psychology in order to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on work required and announced prerequisites.

PSYC714 - Psyc of Sport, Injury & Rehabilitation

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the theory and application of psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation. Topics covered include emotion, motivation, mental skills training and use, psychological antecedents of injury, psychology of injury and rehabilitation, career transition and termination, disabilities, rehabilitation/exercise adherence, eating disorders, alcohol and drug/substance abuse, gender and cultural diversity, and research methods related to the psychology of sport, injury, and rehabilitation.

RAC100 - Research across the Curriculum

This course is linked to three or four credit courses across the curriculum. Students in this course participate in a research project that includes an information literacy and written and/or oral communication component. Students wishing to enroll in a RAC Linked-Credit course must have the permission the instructor and must submit a proposal to the Director of the Fuss Center for Research on Aging and Intergenerational Studies. Research projects involving human subjects as participants must have the approval of the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects (CPHS) before research data can be collected. Restrictions: Students may enroll for only one RAC Linked-Credit  in a given semester; students may complete up to, but not more than, three RAC Linked-Credits towards completion of the bachelor's degree in a the host course. The RAC Linked-Credit cannot be taken pass/fail, and cannot be linked t a course that is taken pass/fail. This credit counts toward an unrestricted elective. It does not satisfy other degree requirements unless authorized by an academic department.

RSCI701 - Advance Kinesiology and Biomechanics

The course involves a study of joint structure, joint function, and the biomechanical principles underlying the kinetics and kinematics of human motion, including normal gait and human movement. Emphasis is placed on the interaction between biomechanical and physiological factors in musculoskeletal and neuromuscular function, and the application of kinesiological principles to clinical rehabilitation practice.

RSCI702 - Pathokinesiology

The student will be introduced to a systematic evaluation approach based on the pathokinesiological model. The pathokinesiological model will examine human movement systems and it significance to regions of the human body. These regions will be recognized as potential sites for integrated pre-habilitation and rehabilitation exercise programs.

RSCI703 - Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment

The emphasis of this course is on the assessment of functional orthopedic conditions and musculoskeletal screening. The course emphasizes the application of systems analysis principles to clinical situations. The course goal is to improvethe clinician's ability to evaluate the patient's complaint as related to movement andidentify those patients who require additional orthopedic evaluation & referral whileassessing patient complaints in a logical deductive manner. Screening and assessment tools will be demonstrated as part of the process. In addition, the student is able to assess clinical scenarios as illustrated by relevant case studies.

RSCI704 - Concepts & Application of Manual Therapy

This hands-on course provides the theory and clinical application of current best practices in manual therapy techniques utilized in the treatment of orthopedic conditions that limit functional movement. The skills acquired in this course intend to produce any or all of the following effects: improve tissue extensibility; increase range of motion; mobilize soft tissues and joints; improve muscle function; modulate pain; and reduce soft tissue inflammation or restrictions in movement. A certification in a manual therapy technique will be acquired at the completion of the course.

RSCI705 - Evidence Based Rehabilitation

The purpose of this course is to increase student understanding of various rehabilitation issues facing America and the world today. This course focuses students toward the ever-changing contemporary issues that impact direct and indirect client care.

RSCI706 - Rehabilitation Program Design for Human

on limit function and dysfunction. The student will receive detailed insight into the design of corrective exercise programs. The systematic approach of an integrated corrective exercise design uniquely blends the variables of available flexibility, isolated and integrated strengthening, and exercise design to provide the student with the necessary foundation in designing and developing safe prevention and corrective exercise programs.

RSCI708 - Applied Nutrition for Health Promotion

This course provides an in-depth exploration of contemporary issues nutrition for active individuals across the life span. Course topics will include: nutrition timing, caloric expenditure, performance enhancement dietary supplements, dietary lipids and heart disease, dietary fiber and health, and influence of lifestyle factors on nutrition. Controversies in nutrition, ergogenic aids and cultural aspects of food are also discussed. In addition, the course covers energy and nutrient needs for physical and athletic activities. Common myths and fallacies concerning diet and athletic performance as well as appropriate dietary approaches for specific activities and active people will be addressed.

RSCI712 - Field Experience

This course is designed for students interested in completing a field experience in their area of study. Students are expected to complete a minimum of 150 hours of supervised experience in an approved setting. For students in New England, the department will facilitate the placements at an approved affiliated site. For students outside of New England, the department chair must approve the field experience site prior to enrolling in the course.

RSCI713 - Pharmacology

This course serves as a foundation to general pharmacology, focusing on categories of medications and their interaction with body systems. At the completion of this course, students will be able to integrate pathophysiological principles of pharmacology and patient assessment finds to formulate an imporession and implement a pharmacologic management plan.

RSCI715 - Advanced Pathophysiology

This course involves an in-depth evaluation of disease and injury processes across the lifespan and their relevance totherapeutic rehabilitation are presented. Attention is given to all major physiological systems and their significance in the rehabilitation sciences.

RSCI716 - Ethical Issues in Healthcare Professions

This course is a study of the application of ethical principles, which includes the legal factors and professional behavior, which impact patient management and the rights of the consumer in the provision of medical and rehabilitation services. Ethical issues explored include: human value development, decision making, basic principles of health care, the nature of rights, confidentiality and management of health care information, professional gate keeping as a function of role fidelity, autonomy and paternalism, and justice and the allocation of scarce resources.

RSCI717 - Healthcare Leadership & Decision Making

This course is intended to prepare students for the leadership decisions and actions that are inherent in performance enhancement management and fitness practice. Professional and personal growth will be discussed. Principles and applications of leadership will be explored, including persuasiveness, leading and directing teams, leading within organizations, and leadership opportunities in shaping fitness policy. Techniques for managing change and empowering others are included in this course. Topics related to effective leadership are issues of power, motivation, delegation, team building, persuasion and negotiation, and total quality improvement. Topics related to business management include management theory, financial management, personnel management, record keeping, risk management and technology issues.

RSCI780 - Quantitative & Qualitative Research

This course provides an overview of foundations of research design and the uses and interpretation of results. Content includes: reviewing the literature, developing research problems/questions; hypothesis testing, experimental, quasi-experimental and other research designs; and evaluating research studies as they relate to evidence-based practice in the health professions. The intended outcome is to familiarize students with the evidence-based guidelines associated to clinical outcomes and evidence-based practice.

RSCI781 - Capstone

Through the completion of a research based project, on a topic within the field of study, this course serves as an essential outcome component to augment the professional development and new learning that occurs in didactic course work and demonstrates the ability of the graduate to make significant contributions to the profession and/or serve as a change agent in the field of study as a scholar.

SCI103 - Science for Educators I (KP)

This course provides education students with an introduction to the scientific principles governing the contemporary technological world. Topics include scientific methodologies, gravity, energy, electricity, magnetism, light, and introductory chemistry. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture.

SCI104 - Science for Educators II (KP)

This course provides education students with an introduction to earth science, astronomy, and environmental science. Topics include the weather, solar system, stars, the universe, and global pollution. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lectures. Prerequisite: ED Majors only

SCI105 - Introduction to Astronomy (KP)

Introduction to astronomy for the non-science major with a focus on our place within the universe. Topics include the formation and evolution of stars and planetary systems, our Solar System, the Milky Way Galaxy, and the large scale structure of the universe

SCI106 - How Things Work (KP)

This course explores how things from our everyday lives work according to the rules of nature. The principles that influence how objects fall, cars move, scales weigh, planes fly, stoves heat, copiers copy give insight into the workings of the universe. Connections between our immediate surroundings and the universe at large are illustrated.

SCI107X - Topics in Science (KP)

Topics in Science (KP)

SCI113X - Physics in Daily Life (KP)

In this course, you will learn the reasons behind events that happen in our daily life and how these laws make life easier to live and understand. For example: When you open doors, you push them but why do some doors need more push than others? Why is it hard to walk in icy conditions than a normal road? Why is it hard to balance when you walk downhill and why you put more energy to walk uphill? Do blinking eyes or our breath relate to any physical law? Why do we feel hot or cold? What is difference between music and noise? Students will conduct inquiry-based laboratories and projects focusing on areas of interest. SCI 208-Decisions about how and where we live can have significant impacts on the environment and human health across the life span. This course will integrate the physical and social sciences as we work together to design contemporary communities. Topics will include environmental health, industrial ecology, and sustainable energy along with social-psychological well-being.

SCI114 - Modern Science & Technology (KP)

This course introduces the history of Science from antiquity to the present and demonstrates how the various areas of science work together to develop the technology and the materials we are familiar with in our daily lives.  Topics include role of measurement and experiments and revolutions of modern science (advances in chemistry, biology, astronomy and technology).Students will conduct inquiry-based projects focusing on areas of interest. The goal of this course is to help students develop the practices of science such as asking researchable questions, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing data and other related skills that will enhance their quality of life and professional success.

SJA100 - Social Justice Activism

This course is linked to three or four credit course across the curriculum. Students in this course complete a project that involves participation in activities specifically aimed at promoting social justice and which recognizes and describes social justice, analyzes the issues that cause social and economic disparities, and includes action to address issues of justice by raising awareness or advocating for change. Students wishing to enroll in a SJA Linked-Credit course must have the permission of the instructor and must submit a proposal to the Director of the Nancy Lawson Donahue '49 Institute for Diversity, Ethics and Inclusion. Restrictions: Students may enroll for only one SJA Linked-Credit in a given semester; students may complete up to, but not more than, three SJA Linked-Credits towards completion of the bachelor's degree in a the host course. The SJA Linked-Credit cannot be taken pass/fail, and cannot be linked t a course that is taken pass/fail. This credit counts toward an unrestricted elective and could count towards the electives for the minor in Human Rights. SJA credits do not satisfy other degree requirements unless authorized by an academic department.

SMGT101 - Sport & Society

This course explores the factors that shape sport in a culture and how sport mirrors the society in which it exists. It examines the contributions of recreational and competitive sport to a culture. It includes the role of business in sport and how business interests in sport have served as a catalyst for growth.

SMGT102 - Contemporary Sport Management

This course provides an overview of general principles and practices of the sport industry, covering all facets of sport management, including leadership, sociology, marketing, legal aspects, finance, and governance, in both professional and amateur sports setting. Students learn and understand those unique aspects of sport management that distinguish it from other management fields. Students gain an increased awareness of various career opportunities in the sport industry.

SMGT201 - Legal Aspects of Sports

This course is an exploration of the relationship of the law to organized secondary school, collegiate, and professional sports. It provides an overview of a wide range of legal principles that relate to the sport management field. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SMGT 102 or LS101

SMGT202 - Ethics in Sport

This course examines theories of ethics as well as personal moral development as applied to sports. It explores the importance of personal ethics and organizational responsibility and the role of professional ethics in sport management. Prerequisite: SMGT102

SMGT205 - Pre-Practicum I

This course is designed for students to complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and approval of Instructor.

SMGT206 - Sports Administration

This course studies the basic concepts, theories and organizations of administration as applied to sport. Areas covered include budgeting, human resources management, facilities, and legal issues.Prerequisite: SMGT102

SMGT207 - Special Topics in History of Sport

This course explores various aspects of sports and their historical development. The integration of gender, ethnic, religious, and other factors are discussed. The role that each area of sport plays within our society is examined.

SMGT208 - Sport Governance

This course focuses on the important role that governance plays within the sport industry. Students study the governance structures of various sports and sports governing bodies, including professional sports leagues, players’ associations, intercollegiate athletics, and Olympic sports, both within the United States and internationally.

SMGT209X - NCAA Compliance & Rules Admin

NCAA Compliance and Rules Administration is designed for students to gain an understanding of the enforcement policies, practices, and procedures, as well and the complexity of the rules and regulations governing NCAA and intercollegiate athletics. Student will review compliance cases, NCAA enforcement guidelines, and historical and contemporary compliance and rules administration cases.

SMGT301 - Sport Facility & Event Management

This course explores the roles and functions of facility and events managers. It examines a variety of public assembly and privately managed sport facilities; the steps and skills required to effectively plan, organize, lead, and evaluate an event, and facilities to meet the needs of sports organizations. The course also examines resource allocation, strategic planning, and risk management and facility maintenance requirements. Prerequisites: SMGT 102 and a 200 level Sport Management course or HEM 301.

SMGT302 - Sport Marketing

This course explores sport as a product, its consumer markets, and sports products markets. It examines the processes of sport marketing, research, information management, identification of target markets, and the development of a sport marketing mix and strategies. Prerequisites: SMGT 102, BUSS 220.

SMGT303 - Sport Finance

This course is a study of the financial challenges faced by sport administrators and those working within the sports industry. Topics include economic impact analysis, ticket operations, concessions, public-private partnerships, sport sponsorships, and fundraising. Prerequisites: SMGT 102, BUSS 203.

SMGT304 - Sports Information & Communication

This course examines the fundamentals in sport information, publicity, and promotions. Preparation of news releases, local features, publications of programs and brochures, statistical breakdowns, dealing with the press, and the promotion of specific events, teams, and individuals are included. Prerequisite: ENG 102 & SMGT102

SMGT305 - Pre-Practicum II

This course is designed for the students to complete 30 hours of supervised fieldwork with the Lasell College athletic department or at an approved off-campus site. Prerequisite: SMGT 205.

SMGT306 - Sport Leadership

This course teaches concepts, principles, and skills of leadership for managers in the sports industry. Styles of successful sport coaches and managers are examined and analyzed in the context of their times and their settings. Prerequisite: SMGT102 & SMGT206 or Permission of Dept Chair.

SMGT307 - Sport Sponsorship

This course provides an examination of the relationship between sport and corporate sponsorship, and strategies for selling sponsorship packages. Topics covered include the theoretical rationale for sponsorship, strategic communication through sponsorship, determining the value of a sponsorship, evaluation of sponsorship activities, and techniques used to sell sponsorship packages. Perspectives from the event holder (i.e., property) offering a sponsorship and from the organization functioning as the sponsor are considered. Prerequisite:SMGT102 or Permission of Dept Chiar

SMGT308X - The Business of Sports

Multiple industries now makeup the overall “business of sports”. Amateur sports, professional sports, youth sports, athletic performance gear and fashion apparel, fantasy sports, memorabilia & sports media are each multibillion dollar industries in their own right. This course will explore the social and economic challenges faces by managers in various sectors of the sports industry as they attempt to address the ever increasing competition for fans, sponsors, broadcast viewership, media exposure, public financing and athletic talent.Students will learn what it is like to work in various divisions of the sports industry. Industry practitioners will walk the students through the day to day operations of these departments and explain successful strategies for obtaining these jobs. Students will go beyond wins and losses on the field to examine the fundamental business challenges that sports managers’ confront in a variety of industry sectors prerequisite: SMGT102 or permission of Dept Chair

SMGT396 - Research in Sport Industry

Using Research in the Sport Industry is designed for students to gain an understanding of the principles, procedures, processes, and types of writing and reports used to answer problems in the Sport Industry. Students will learn to identify, describe, analyze, and report on an issue or problem at their own workplace by drawing on the relevant sport and related literature.

SMGT401 - Special Topics in Sport Management

This course explores special segments and contemporary trends in the sport management industry. Topics may include sports medicine, health promotion, intercollegiate athletics, campus recreation, sport tourism, and international sport.

SMGT403X - Managing Diversity in Sport Org

Managing Diversity in Sport Organizations offers an overview of various diversity and inclusion theories and examines the applications of these theories to sport organizations. Students will study the impact and interconnectedness of diversity issues, social responsiveness, and the financial impact of these issues on professional, intercollegiate, interscholastic, and Olympic sport organizations. Students will also discuss and practice strategies to resolve diversity and inclusion related problems commonly faced by the sport and business manager. In conjunction with Lasell College Connected Learning philosophy, an emphasis will be placed on connecting diversity and concepts and initiatives to the sport and business industries.

SMGT406 - Globalization of Sport

The Globalization of Sport is the study of the principles, theories, and competencies essential for working with and in global organizations, leadership roles and responsibilities in the administration and management of programs across the global sports industry. The course is designed to familiarize the student with national, regional, and international issues associated with the place of sport in a global society. Prerequisite: SMGT306 or Permission of Dept Chair

SMGT407 - Sport Management Internship I

The internship provides students with administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisites: SMGT 205 and SMGT 305 . 

SMGT408 - Sport Management Internship II

The internship provides students with additional administrative experience in their chosen concentration. Students gain practical experience, enhance skills learned in the classroom, and acquire contacts with professionals in the sports management field. A minimum of 150 hours is required for Sports Management internships. This course includes a seminar which includes: strategies for seeking entry-level employment, long-term career planning and post graduate study options. Prerequisite: SMGT 407. 

SMGT496 - Sport Management Capstone

This course is a culminating experience designed to provide the student with an opportunity to demonstrate synthesis of knowledge, practice, and skills developed throughout the program of study. Capstone assignments reflect the integration of research methodology, theory, and advanced knowledge in an area of specialization. Students develop a web-portfolio to showcase their work in the Sport Management program. Students incorporate aspects of past course assignments into a reflective thesis paper. Students also participate in a required service learning activity. To be completed in either the fall or spring semester of the final academic year of the student's program. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SMGT396

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination (KP)

This course is designed to help students develop their ability to think critically about the world around them using the framework of sociology. Students explore the relationship between individual and society – how personal experience is shaped by social forces, but also how society is created and changed through individual interaction. The focus is on the interrelationships of groups, social organization, and social institutions such as education, religion, family, and the economic and political order.

SOC102 - Introduction to Women's Studies (KP)

This course is designed to help students develop a critical framework for examining feminist thought and gender-related behaviors. Utilizing sociology, anthropology, history, and literature the course examines the roles and stereotypes society ascribes to women and how those roles impact the development of a feminist perspective in a contemporary world.

SOC206 - Food and Culture

In the Sociology of Food and Culture, we study "food ways"; that is, how food and eating reflects and impacts social life.   The course examines the beliefs, rituals, norms, and subcultures associated with food choice.   Further, we look at food in the larger contexts of politics, the economy, and cultural survival.  Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSYC 101

SOC207X - Wealth & Poverty

Wealth & Poverty

SOC208 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

SOC212 - Wellness & Society

This course explores the social dimension of health and illness. Both health and illness vary across times and cultures – and this is related to how we define “normal”. Our wellbeing is also closely related to our position in society – socio-economic status, race, gender, class, ethnicity, and physical ability impact life chances, lifestyles, access to care, and attitudes towards health and illness. This course therefore covers the social distribution of illness; health disparities; global comparisons in the health of populations; the social construction of illness; the structure of health care systems and institutions; and various historical and contemporary health care debates.

SOC214 - Family Diversity

This course explores the meaning of "family" in a historical and cross-cultural context - it looks at the way families and households are constructed, and at how these institutions are impacted by social forces including demographic, ideological, and economic changes in societies. Family diversity is discussed in the context of social constructions such as race, class, and gender. Current themes in family sociology that are covered include, amongst others, sexuality, marriage, parenting, violence, divorce and remarriage, and family policy. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC221 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course examines conditions and issues that result in tension and disorder. Examples drawn primarily from American society include: labeling and social control of deviants, oppression of minorities, poverty, violence, ageism, and ecological concerns. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC223X - Social Movements

You are breathing clean air right now thanks to the environmental movement. Maybe you can vote thanks to the Civil Rights or women’s suffrage movement. And don’t forget the labor movement, the folks who brought you the weekend! What other changes will social movements bring to your life? This course will bring US and global social movements to life through videos, photos, stories, interactive exercises, writing and discussing By the end of the course you will understand the strategic choices people in movements make and why movements succeed or fail. If you dream of making a difference, this course will tell you how. But even if you never expect to join a social movement, learning how movements work will make you a more savvy citizen.

SOC301 - Race & Ethnicity

This course examines the changing nature of race and ethnic relations with primary emphasis on the United States. Topics include: the origins and consequences of racial/ethnic discriminations; immigration policies; movements for integration and separatism; the role of class, religion, and gender on issues of race/ethnicity; the impact of widely differing cultural heritages on our national life: and specific present day problems and trends. Prerequisite: Any 200 level Social Science course.

SOC307X - Action & Social Justice

Mass incarceration, police brutality, climate change, sexual assault, excessive student debt: small groups waging brief social action campaigns have won victories on these problems and many others social justice issues. In this hands-on course, students will pick an injustice, develop achievable goals, design and carry out a group campaign to promote social justice. Students will learn many skills needed for future community engagement, including meeting facilitation, group decision-making, strategizing, persuasive communication, social media advocacy, graphic design, lobbying, coalition-building and event planning.

SOC308 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

SOC310 - Sociological Perspectives

This course introduces classical and contemporary perspectives in sociology. Theories are examined as explanatory tools in the understanding of social structure and social change, and as reflections of the societal conditions from which they emerged. Theories are evaluated in terms of their applicability to contemporary issues in society. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Sociology course and Junior or Senior standing.

SOC331 - Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This laboratory course introduces students to the basic methods used in sociological research. Topics include scientific method, measurement, sampling, experiments, survey research, and qualitative approaches such as content analysis and field studies, and ethical issues in conducting research. As part of the lab, students learn to use SPSS to perform statistical analysis and to access and draw upon large data sets. Students learn to use professional online search procedures and write reports in accepted professional formats. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the Dept Chair.

SOC333 - Sociology Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisite: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

SOC335 - Social Policy

This course examines historical and contemporary factors influencing the making of social policy and introduces the student to processes used to identify and solve social problems. Special attention is given to the relationships of values to social policy and the impact of social policy decisions on the provision of social and human services. Approaches to the analysis of social policy are examined. Prerequisite: Any 200 Level Sociology course or permission by the department chair.

SOC406 - Selected Topics in the Lives of Women

This capstone course examines topics important to the study of women’s issues. Representative topics that might be covered include violence against women, women in public life, social policy related to women, women and work, and reproductive issues. Prerequisite: one of the following: SOC 102, PSYC 303, or HIST 203.

SOC408 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the required and announced prerequisites.

SPAN111 - Elementary Spanish I

This course introduces students to the elements of Spanish through the multiple skills of understanding, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. It is open to students who are beginning their postsecondary Spanish language study and have not had more than two years of secondary school Spanish. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SPAN112 - Elementary Spanish II

This course is a continuation of SPAN 111, with continued focus on understanding, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or 111 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN125X - SPT Spanish

SPT Spanish

SPAN211 - Intermediate Spanish I

This course reviews and reinforces prior grammar knowledge through speaking, listening, reading, and writing; more advanced grammar constructs are introduced to support written and spoken language growth. Texts and discussion focus on Hispanic culture, art, and society. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or 112 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN212 - Intermediate Spanish II

In this course, students continue to develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through the analysis and discussion of cultural and literary texts. The course includes a review of advanced grammatical structures. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or 211 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN225X - SPT Spanish

SPT Spanish

SPAN311 - Advanced Spanish I

Students in this course study composition and conversation, with emphasis on the Hispanic cultures and their contribution to world civilizations. Geography, history, and the artistic evolution of Spain and Latin America are presented through readings, literary texts, and visual materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 212 or SPAN 202 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN312 - Advanced Spanish II

Students in this course engage in textual and cultural analysis through writing. Students learn to read and interpret complex literary texts and visual materials, to discuss them analytically in class, and to write about them in formal and informal writing assignments. By the end of this course, students should be able to approach a text (narrative, poetry, drama, or film) with a series of critical questions and write interpretively about the work. Students also acquire a general understanding of literary and cultural movements in Hispanic cultures. Grammar points are reviewed as needed. Prerequisite: SPAN 311 or SPAN 301 (with C or better), demonstrated competency through placement, or permission of instructor.

SPAN314 - Cinemundo

This course is designed as an advanced seminar in Spanish. Discussions focus on films, historical writings, and literary texts, as four general categories are explored: memory and oblivion, immigration and exile, identities marginalized, and the Hispanic in the globalizing world. Native speakers are welcome, and the course offers a special opportunity for Honors students to complete an Honors component. Prerequisite: SPAN201or SPAN211 (with C or better) or permission of instructor.

SPAN325X - SPT in Spanish

In this SPT course, students working in Spanish at an advanced level have the opportunity to focus on one subject, one writer, or one period. Engaging in analysis, criticism, and/or research, students complete substantial written and oral work on a special topic around which the course is developed. This course may be repeated for credit, as different special topics are offered. Prerequisite: SPAN311 or permission of instructor.

SPED711 - Learners with Special Needs

This course provides information on characteristics of special needs learners, including physical, emotional, and learning disabilities, with a focus on how these needs may affect classroom organization, planning, and instruction. Introduces assessment, models of special education delivery, and multiple perspectives on educating special needs learners. Requires classroom observations.

SPED712 - Curriculum & Resources in SPED

This course provides experience in curriculum planning and instruction that meets the needs of special education learners with specific disabilities. Requires classroom observation and teaching.

SPED721 - Inclusive Education

This course provides knowledge and resources related to teaching special needs learners in an inclusive classroom. Topics include collaborating with other professionals to plan and deliver instruction, co-teaching, classroom management techniques, behavior interventions, assistive technology, and appropriate modifications, adaptations, and accommodations. Requires classroom observation and teaching.

SPED722 - Policy, Law, & Disability

This course provides in-depth understanding of federal and state laws and regulations related to special education. Introduces resources for special needs learners, parents or care-takers, and teachers, including school professionals, services available in area communities, advocacy groups, professional associations, mental health care professionals, and medical professionals. Includes focus on collaboration among these various groups to support special needs learners and their families. Recommended prerequisites: SPED 711, SPED 712.

SPED753 - Assistive Technology in Education

This course is an in-depth exploration of current technology available for adaptive, assistive, and instructional applications. Students research and evaluate available applications and develop a professional resource file.

SPED754 - Advanced Assessment & Modification

This course explores selection, administration and interpretation of assessments related to special needs learners, particularly those used to assess intelligence, aptitude, and achievement; communication of results to school professionals, students, and parents/caregivers; and applications to classroom settings. Students should be generally familiar with assessment and referral processes. Includes field assignments.

SPED795 - Practicum: Moderate Disabilities PK - 8

This course provides a minimum of 300 hours of student teaching in two different classrooms under the supervision of qualified professionals. May be full time in an inclusive general education classroom or 75 hours in an inclusive general education classroom and 225 hours in a classroom for students with moderate disabilities. Includes a weekly seminar to discuss issues such as planning, teaching, collaboration, and moral and ethical aspects of teaching. Prerequisites: Pass all required MTEL; cumulative minimum GPA of 3.0; complete at least 27 credits in the graduate education program.

SS101 - Washington Semester

Washington Semester

SVL104 - Seminar for Writing Tutors

In this course, students are trained as peer writing tutors and work two hours per week with peer tutees. Students participate in weekly seminars and individual tutoring supervision; preparation involves assigned readings and both reflective and analytic writing on the tutoring experience.

SVL108 - SVL: Tax Volunteer

This course consists of study and training in federal income taxation, as well as tax return preparation using IRS software for electronic filing. Students also learn how to file Massachusetts returns electronically and conduct research on selected federal and state income tax issues. After passing a proficiency test at the conclusion of the training, students receive an IRS certificate. The test is provided by the IRS and requires the students to recognize tax status and income issues in the preparation of appropriate tax returns. Upon being certified by the IRS, students can prepare basic tax returns in the program without personal liability. Using computer software, students prepare and electronically file taxpayers’ returns as a community service. Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

SVL111X - Service-Learning to Make a Difference

This one-credit intergenerational service course will include residents from Lasell Village as well as students at Lasell College. We will explore a pressing social problem -- such as sustainability/going green, immigration -- or the upcoming national presidential election. The group will decide together on the issue and we will partner with an organization to provide a service to that organization. Class will be held at Lasell Village.

SVL115 - Service Learning

This course is linked to three- or four-credit courses across the curriculum. Course content includes both 15 – 20 hours of community service and related written and/ or oral assignments. Students wishing to enroll in an SVL Linked-Credit course must have the permission of the instructor. Restrictions: Students may enroll for only one SVL Linked-Credit in a given semester; students may complete up to, but no more than, three SVL Linked- Credits towards completion of the bachelor’s degree. To receive credit and a grade for an SVL linked option, students must receive a passing grade in the host course. The SVL Linked-Credit cannot be taken pass/fail, and cannot be linked to a course that is taken pass/fail. This credit counts toward an unrestricted elective. It does not satisfy other degree requirements unless authorized by an academic department.

SVL201 - Service Learning Internship

The Service-Learning Internship provides individually arranged participation in a community-based or other non-profit organization in which the student provides 100 hours of meaningful service to that organization. Students may also be placed at a for-profit organization to work on a service project for the community. The primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing the internship, with support of the Center for Community-Based Learning (CCBL). Students meet regularly with the Director of the CCBL to discuss the internship. Evaluation of the internship is based on the students' reflections about that experience, a site visit, and communication with the internship site supervisor. Students may do six credits of service-learning internships. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing and the approval of the Director of the CCBL and the agency representative are required. This internship fulfills unrestricted elective credit; it does not supplant any internship requirement within a major.

SVL202 - Introduction to Community Organizations

This course provides a forum for community service house residents to explore challenging service opportunities. The residents have opportunities to examine past service experience in order to identify more clearly with a cause or find an area about which they wish to learn more. They also have opportunities to research service needs for Greater Boston or for their hometowns, and to challenge themselves to envision events that would meet those needs. The course explores different ways of gaining insight into and knowledge of the service-learning field through discussion, peer-led activities, reflection, learning circles, and guest speakers. The materials and discussion serve to empower the residents to find and/or initiate meaningful service events. Open only to service house residents. Pass/Fail.

SVL203 - Env Service-Learning in Ecuador

This fall semester course is linked to ten days of service-learning and study in Ecuador during January break.  The course is designed to educate students about the history, people, culture, politics, eco-systems, climate, and language of Ecuador.  The experience in Ecuador includes group accommodations in home-stays or lodges, full days of travel, outdoor manual labor and reflective intellectual work. We learn through service alongside community members at foundations, schools, government agencies, and local businesses.  The goal of both the course and the experience is to immerse students in the culture of Ecuador, while exploring the natural environment and the impact humans have over time.  Students must apply and may only register with the permission of the Ecuador program director.

SVL204 - Seminar in Speech Tutoring

In this course, students are trained as peer speech tutors. They participate in bi-weekly seminars and individual tutoring supervision. In addition, students keep journals of their weekly tutoring experience one hour per week in the Academic Achievement Center. Preparation involves assigned readings and both reflective and analytic writing on the tutoring experience. The weekly seminar is a discussion-based training/coaching class where students have the opportunity to share training/coaching class. They are provided with special guidelines, oral communication tutoring tips, problem-solving strategies, and communication skills to improve their oral communication knowledge and tutoring skills. Here, they also get the opportunity to share their ideas and experiences from tutoring speech. Permission of instructor required.

SVL206 - Student Academic Counselors

This course provides upper class Social Science majors with the opportunity of mentoring two or three first year social science majors during their first semester at Lasell. The student counselors meet with a faculty member once every two weeks to plan activities for the students they are mentoring during the week in between meetings. They meet with their tutees in the planned activity every other week. The student counselors evaluate each activity, and at the end of the semester write a summative evaluation reflecting on the mentoring process and making recommendations for improving the experience. One goal is to develop a portfolio of activities and interactions that help first year students evaluate the match between themselves and the major and become identified with the social science department academically.

SVL207 - Seminar for Accounting Facilitators

In this course, student facilitators are trained to work with the instructor in support of the connected learning project of Monopoly in Financial Accounting - BUSS 201.  The student facilitators participate in the weekly classes by providing individual and group instruction and supervision.  The facilitators also work with students as they complete their project providing the necessary tutoring to enhance the students learning of accounting. 

SVL209 - Seminar for Math Tutors

This course is about learning to tutor, and tutoring to understand mathematics in depth. It targets Math Minors (and other students who are strong in math) and trains them as tutors/mentors for peers who need extra math help. Students maintain a journal of their weekly tutoring experience (one hour a week in the Academic Achievement Center) and participate in a weekly MATH SENSE seminar, which is a discussion-based training/coaching class. They are provided with special guidelines, math tutoring tips, problem solving strategies, and communication skills to improve their math knowledge and tutoring skills. Here, they also get the opportunity to share their ideas and experiences from tutoring math. Permission of the instructor required.

SVL212X - Promoting Activism

The class offers students the unique opportunity to profoundly alter the landscape of their own community. The class will explore and develop a grassroots college-based social justice and human rights movement designed to directly impact and improve the experience of their local, city and state communities. Using, by example, the current and very public efforts by students nationwide to enact social change around sexual and domestic violence on college campuses, the students will create and implement their own multi-pronged campaign to inspire a cultural shift on their own campus, the larger Newton community and statewide with respect to domestic and sexual violence. With guidance and support from local and statewide activists and using a human rights lens, the students will innovate programs, community collaborations and other efforts to increase education and prevention with respect to sexual and domestic violence perpetrated on college campuses. Using the power of your voices and your activism, this exciting class will transform the very community in which you live, learn and socialize.

SVL214X - Tanzania: Shoulder to Shoulder

The basic service mission of this trip is to offer two weeks of English as a second language to grades one through seven in a rural Tanzanian school. What we offer, in terms of service, is essentially three things: we provide mentoring in basic English (and some math) skills to all students in a rural Tanzanian elementary school As part of the course we will develop a working ESL-type curriculum to use in the school. Since we also model small group and active learning, we will develop lesson plans and strategies for our mentoring. Our experience in Uganda is that many teachers are quite interested in our techniques and approaches, and often they will adapt them to their classroom teaching. We also provide a relationship which, ideally, we will develop over time – but even in a single visit our students provide role modeling, coaching, and encouragement to students whose exposure to the world beyond their immediate experience is somewhat limited. Much of the rest of the work in this course is an introduction to African, and Tanzanian, culture, history, and issues. Students will be expected to do considerable reading, to help design and deliver the curriculum, and to reflect on their experience in writing (most likely via a journal and a final reflection paper). The majority of the work of the course will take place during the trip itself, from mid-May to early June. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

SVL217X - Civic Engagement Practicum

This course is designed to enable a small group of students (4-8) to work with a community partner and a faculty member to engage in an academically-based investigation that meets an existing need as identified by the community partner. The faculty member designs the academic component, providing readings and at least 1 credit hour of academic content per week. The faculty member also mentors the student(s) through the research and practical process of providing an analysis and/or deliverable to the community partner. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, needs assessment, development of a research proposal and project design, completion of an IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, development of research/marketing/analysis materials, data analysis, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

SVL219X - Cultural Competence in Social Justice

This course explores issues related to cultural competence – having the attitude, knowledge, and skills to effectively connect and work with people of different cultures. This course will help students foster a sense of self-awareness about various identity dimensions (e.g., their culture, sexual orientation, sex, gender, ethnicity, race, and religion), and examine the ways these aspects of identity influence their perceptions of and interactions with others. Students will analyze course readings, films, online resources from various colleges, and participate in experiential exercises, in order to engage course content both intellectually and emotionally. In addition, students will collaborate in small groups to design and deliver programs and interventions to foster a more inclusive and welcoming environment at Lasell. This course is highly participatory.

SVL301 - Service learning Internship

The Service-Learning Internship provides individually arranged participation in a community-based or other non-profit organization in which the student provides 150 hours meaningful service to that organization. Students may also be placed at a for-profit organization to work on a service project for the community. The primary area of responsibility rests with the student in identifying and pursuing the internship, with the support of the Center for Community-Based Learning. Students meet regularly with the Director of the CCBL to discuss the internship. Evaluation of the internship is based on the students' reflections about that experience, a site visit, and communication with the internship site supervisor. Students may do six credits of service-learning internships. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and the approval of the Director of the CCBL and the agency representative are required. This internship fulfills unrestricted elective credit; it does not supplant any internship requirement within a major.