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Undergraduate Arts and Sciences Electives

The Arts and Sciences Electives requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of Anthropology, Art History, Biology, Chemistry, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, Foreign Language, Geography, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Science, or Sociology courses. Additional courses outside of these areas that qualify as Arts and Sciences Electives are listed under the Additional Arts and Sciences Electives link below.

Anthropology

Art History

Biology

Chemistry

Criminal Justice

Economics

Environmental Studies

Foreign Language - French

Foreign Language - Japanese

Foreign Language - Spanish

Geography

History

Mathematics

Music

Philosophy

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Science

Sociology

COURSE CODE
COURSE TITLE
CREDITS
SOC

 

 

X
 
 
SOC101

SOC101 - Sociological Imagination

This course is designed to help students develop their ability to think critically about the world around them using the framework of sociology. Students explore the relationship between individual and society – how personal experience is shaped by social forces, but also how society is created and changed through individual interaction. The focus is on the interrelationships of groups, social organization, and social institutions such as education, religion, family, and the economic and political order.

X
Sociological Imagination
3
SOC102

SOC102 - Introduction to Women's Studies

This course is designed to help students develop a critical framework for examining feminist thought and gender-related behaviors. Utilizing sociology, anthropology, history, and literature the course examines the roles and stereotypes society ascribes to women and how those roles impact the development of a feminist perspective in a contemporary world.

X
Introduction to Women's Studies
3
SOC206

SOC206 - Food and Culture

In the Sociology of Food and Culture, we study "food ways"; that is, how food and eating reflects and impacts social life.   The course examines the beliefs, rituals, norms, and subcultures associated with food choice.   Further, we look at food in the larger contexts of politics, the economy, and cultural survival.  Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSYC 101

X
Food and Culture
3
SOC208

SOC208 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests.

X
Special Topics in Sociology
3
SOC212

SOC212 - Wellness & Society

This course explores the social dimension of health and illness. Both health and illness vary across times and cultures – and this is related to how we define “normal”. Our wellbeing is also closely related to our position in society – socio-economic status, race, gender, class, ethnicity, and physical ability impact life chances, lifestyles, access to care, and attitudes towards health and illness. This course therefore covers the social distribution of illness; health disparities; global comparisons in the health of populations; the social construction of illness; the structure of health care systems and institutions; and various historical and contemporary health care debates.

X
Wellness & Society
3
SOC214

SOC214 - Family Diversity

This course explores the meaning of "family" in a historical and cross-cultural context - it looks at the way families and households are constructed, and at how these institutions are impacted by social forces including demographic, ideological, and economic changes in societies. Family diversity is discussed in the context of social constructions such as race, class, and gender. Current themes in family sociology that are covered include, amongst others, sexuality, marriage, parenting, violence, divorce and remarriage, and family policy. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

X
Family Diversity
3
SOC221

SOC221 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course examines conditions and issues that result in tension and disorder. Examples drawn primarily from American society include: labeling and social control of deviants, oppression of minorities, poverty, violence, ageism, and ecological concerns. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

X
Contemporary Social Problems
3
SOC301

SOC301 - Race & Ethnic Relations

This course examines the changing nature of race and ethnic relations with primary emphasis on the United States. Topics include: the origins and consequences of racial/ethnic discriminations; immigration policies; movements for integration and separatism; the role of class, religion, and gender on issues of race/ethnicity; the impact of widely differing cultural heritages on our national life: and specific present day problems and trends. Prerequisite: Any 200 level Social Science course.

X
Race & Ethnic Relations
3
SOC308

SOC308 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests.

X
Special Topics in Sociology
3
SOC310

SOC310 - Sociological Perspectives

This course introduces classical and contemporary perspectives in sociology. Theories are examined as explanatory tools in the understanding of social structure and social change, and as reflections of the societal conditions from which they emerged. Theories are evaluated in terms of their applicability to contemporary issues in society. Prerequisites: Any 200 level Sociology course and Junior or Senior standing.

X
Sociological Perspectives
3
SOC312X

SOC312X - Sociology of Immigration

Much of what we think we know about immigration is based on the coverage of current events in the media; it is ahistorical and misleading. In this class, students will explore the history and variety of migration in the United States and globally. They will also examine the social processes whereby immigrants become part of the larger cultural whole. Students will read sociological and demographic texts, will conduct archival research into their family history and will discuss the migration patterns of their own families. A service learning requirement enables students to apply their learning by working with recent immigrants who are part of the Lasell community.

X
Sociology of Immigration
4
SOC331

SOC331 - Research Methods in the Social Sciences

This laboratory course introduces students to the basic methods used in sociological research. Topics include scientific method, measurement, sampling, experiments, survey research, and qualitative approaches such as content analysis and field studies, and ethical issues in conducting research. As part of the lab, students learn to use SPSS to perform statistical analysis and to access and draw upon large data sets. Students learn to use professional online search procedures and write reports in accepted professional formats. Prerequisites: MATH 208 and either PSYC 101 or SOC 101 or permission of the Dept Chair. Co-requisite: SOC 331L

X
Research Methods in the Social Sciences
4
SOC333

SOC333 - Sociology Research Assistantship

This course is designed to enable 1-3 students to assist a faculty member who is engaged in research. The faculty member mentors the student(s) through the research process. The process may involve some or all of the following components: Literature review of previous research on the topic, development of the research proposal and project design, development of any materials needed for the research, completion of IRB application, follow-through with the IRB recommendations and approval process, implementation of the research, analysis of the data, and presentation of the work through writing, conference presentation, or Lasell presentation. Prerequisite: SOC 331 or PSYC 331 and permission of Department Chair. Students may enroll in the course for up to two semesters.

X
Sociology Research Assistantship
3
SOC335

SOC335 - Social Policy

This course examines historical and contemporary factors influencing the making of social policy and introduces the student to processes used to identify and solve social problems. Special attention is given to the relationships of values to social policy and the impact of social policy decisions on the provision of social and human services. Approaches to the analysis of social policy are examined. Prerequisite: Any 200 Level Sociology course.

X
Social Policy
3
SOC406

SOC406 - Selected Topics in the Lives of Women

This capstone course examines topics important to the study of women’s issues. Representative topics that might be covered include violence against women, women in public life, social policy related to women, women and work, and reproductive issues. Prerequisite: one of the following: SOC 102, PSYC 303, or HIST 203.

X
Selected Topics in the Lives of Women
3
SOC408

SOC408 - Special Topics in Sociology

This course examines different topics from a sociological perspective with the goal of allowing faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests.

X
Special Topics in Sociology
3

Additional Arts and Sciences Electives