Print

Undergraduate Arts and Sciences Electives

The Arts and Sciences Electives requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of Anthropology, Art History, Biology, Chemistry, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, Foreign Language, Geography, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Science, or Sociology courses. Additional courses outside of these areas that qualify as Arts and Sciences Electives are listed under the Additional Arts and Sciences Electives link below.

Anthropology

Art History

Biology

Chemistry

Criminal Justice

Economics

Environmental Studies

Foreign Language - French

Foreign Language - Japanese

Foreign Language - Spanish

History

Mathematics

Music

Philosophy

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Science

Sociology

Additional Arts and Sciences Electives

COURSE CODE
COURSE TITLE
CREDITS
Arts and Sciences Electives

 

 

X
 
 
ARTS106

ARTS106 - Museum Discovery

This course introduces students to the world of art museums, galleries, auction houses, and various other art institutions, through a series of site visits and some involvement in actual gallery work. By exploring venues and the communities they serve, students will address the question, "What is an art museum or gallery, and why is it a part of our society?"

X
Museum Discovery
3
ARTS126

ARTS126 - Principles of Design & Color

This course is an introduction to the theories and concepts of design and color with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one’s life and as a way to complement one’s aesthetic needs. This is a lecture/discussion/critique course with visual material, critical essays, individual expression, and museum/gallery trips. NOTE: First year Graphic Design majors should seek out the majors-only section when enrollling.

X
Principles of Design & Color
3
BUSS335

BUSS335 - Business & Society

This course explores the effects of business decisions upon soci­ety. Students examine the relationships between business, government, and society, and how each entity must coexist with the other. Ethical issues and public policy are considered when making business decisions. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BUSS 101, HEM 101, FASH 101, or SMGT 102 ; Junior standing.

X
Business & Society
3
COM101

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

X
Understanding Mass Media
3
COM103

COM103 - Human Communication

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships.

X
Human Communication
3
COM205

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

X
Media Ethics & Society
3
COM212

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

X
Intercultural Communication
3
COM222

COM222 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

X
Special Topics in Communication
3
COM315

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM 101.

X
Communication Research
3
COM321

COM321 - Media & Children

This course examines the uses and effects of mass communication among children and adolescents. By taking a developmental perspective, the course explores how youth at different stages of cognitive development watch, understand, and respond to media content. The first part of the course focuses on children’s uses and processing of media. The second part of the course reviews the effects of various types of content (e.g., advertising, stereotypes, violence). The final part of the course considers the role of interventions (e.g., media literacy, ratings, parental mediation) in preventing media-related outcomes that are harmful and promoting those that are positive. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to critically evaluate the role of media in the lives of children. Prerequisites: COM 101 or PSYC 101.

X
Media & Children
3
COM322

COM322 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

X
Special Topics in Communication
3
COM418

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

X
Media Literacy
3
COM422

COM422 - Special Topics in Communication

This is an advanced, discussion-oriented course in which students study a specific issue in the field of communication. The course will usually focus on mass media, but sometimes on other areas of communication. Students are responsible for substantial written and oral work in research and/or critical analysis of media content. Topics might include: the family on the American stage and screen, violence in the mass media, race, age, or gender images in mass media, the law and mass media, education and mass media. Prerequisites: ENG 102, a 200 level English or Communications course.

X
Special Topics in Communication
3
FASH200

FASH200 - Fashion History

This course covers the evolution of fashion from the time of early civilization to the mid-nineteenth century. Students learn how to identify various characteristics of clothing by studying both the social and psychological aspects of western culture. An understanding of fashion trends in relationship to art, architecture, and human behavior throughout history, and the various social implications clothing has on a given society are also explored. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to interpret fashion as a cultural language with identifiable characteristics. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102, or permission of instructor.

X
Fashion History
3
FASH342

FASH342 - Fashion & Culture

This course evaluates the concept of fashion in the cultural context and its impact on human behavior as non-verbal communication, including the expression of national identity. Through a historical and contemporary study of the connection between fashion and society, the relationships between clothing, culture, ethnicity, social and political events, economic status, and geographical location are examined. Students explore the symbolic aspects of clothing from the personal and consumer standpoints. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

X
Fashion & Culture
3
GRAP106

GRAP106 - Graphic Design History

This course introduces students of design to the origins of the discipline. It emphasizes the Modernist period, during which design rapidly evolved as typography, photography and new printing methods were explored by artists of the Bauhaus and other European schools and movements. The course demonstrates how these innovators influence graphic design as we know it today.

X
Graphic Design History
3
HS101

HS101 - Human Services: Systems & Skills

This course encourages an examination of one’s own value system, motivations and interests in relation to the wish to pursue a career working with people. Students are introduced to the history and development of the field: the concept of the social welfare system; resources and services offered by a range of community agencies; a model to understand social and psychological problems; and interventions to address social needs interventions range from individual case management and counseling to community organizing and planning). The course highlights a social justice basis for human service work. A service learning requirement enables students to examine their interests and apply the concepts learned in class.

X
Human Services: Systems & Skills
3
LS101

LS101 - Foundations of American Legal System

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the law. Students are introduced to the basics of the legal system in the United States including its organization and operation. The course covers major areas of legal practice and the legal principles that apply. Legal concepts are explained and legal terminology defined.

X
Foundations of American Legal System
3
LS203

LS203 - Justice, Law & the Constitution

This course serves as an introduction to American constitutional interpretation. Topics to be covered include legal precedent, legal issues surrounding the executive and legislative branches of the federal government, the role of the Supreme Court as a political institution, and the Court’s interpretations of issues dealing with the Bill of Rights.

X
Justice, Law & the Constitution
3
LS204

LS204 - Criminal Law

This course examines the history and contemporary practice of criminal law. Topics include the purposes of the law, categories and general features of crime, elements of criminal offenses for prosecution, and categories of defenses. Prerequisite: LS 101 or CJ 101.

X
Criminal Law
3
LS210

LS210 - Special Topics in Legal Studies

This course provides specialized offerings in Legal Studies in order to satisfy interests of both faculty and students. Examples of topics are: Property or Real Estate Law. Cyberlaw, or Law and Education.

X
Special Topics in Legal Studies
3
LS214

LS214 - Communication Law

This course provides students with a basic understanding of the law and governmental regulations that apply to communication practitioners. Course topics include the First Amendment, defamation and libel, invasion of privacy law, copyright, advertising regulation, obscenity, pornography, internet law, protecting “news sources” for journalists, FCC regulation of broadcasting, and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. Prerequisite: COM 101 or LS 101.

X
Communication Law
3
LS305

LS305 - Comparative Law & Legal Systems

This course introduces students to the complex issues involved in comparing various laws and legal systems around the contemporary world. The course focuses on the main legal systems in terms of the structure and sources of their laws and against the historical and political background in which these laws were formed. Prerequisite: LS 101.

X
Comparative Law & Legal Systems
3
LS307

LS307 - Tort & Personal Injury Law

This course is designed to give the student a basic overview of concepts in tort and personal injury law. Topics to be covered include: defamation, negligence, intentional torts, and general personal injury law. Prerequisite: LS 101.

X
Tort & Personal Injury Law
3
LS311

LS311 - The American Court System

This course provides students with a working knowledge of the major structures and basic legal concepts that underlie the criminal courts. In addition, the course explores the rules of criminal procedure, including their underlying assumptions, how they evolved, and the goals they hope to achieve. Students learn how the dynamics of the courtroom and the criminal justice system itself affect the actual application of the law. Prerequisite: POLS 101 or LS101

X
The American Court System
3
LS320

LS320 - Philosophy of Law

This course explores selected philosophical issues in law. Topics include human and civil rights, personal autonomy and the right of the state to regulate conduct, the extent to which an individual’s rights should be sacrificed for the common good, and other concepts of justice.

X
Philosophy of Law
3
LS325

LS325 - Evidence

This course provides a detailed examination of the law of evidence. Topics include types of evidence, principles of exclusion, evaluation and examination of evidence, competency of witnesses, and the rule against hearsay evidence and the exceptions to this rule. Prerequisite: LS 101 or CJ 101.

X
Evidence
3
LS402

LS402 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law

This upper-level course is designed to identify and discuss issues of justice in society today, including but not limited to issues of gender, race, and other relevant historical and contemporary political issues and movements. It is the capstone course for the Legal Studies major. Limited to Legal Studies majors. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior Standing.

X
Selected Topics in Justice & Law
3
LS441

LS441 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law I

This fall portion of the Capstone course is designed to identify and discuss various legal and political issues in society today, including but not limited to issues of gender, race, and other relevant historical and contemporary political topics and movements. This first semester develops the student’s ability to research, write and debate current issues. This is a writing intensive and speaking across the curriculum course. Limited to Legal Studies and Law and Public Affairs majors. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

X
Selected Topics in Justice & Law I
3
LS442

LS442 - Selected Topics in Justice & Law II

The spring semester of the Capstone course focuses on the process of producing a final legal research paper on one of the topics of the first semester. Students hone their research and writing skills culminating in the presentation of a final capstone project presentation. This is a writing intensive and speaking across the curriculum intensive course. Prerequisites: LS 441 and Senior standing.

X
Selected Topics in Justice & Law II
3
PERF107

PERF107 - Introduction to Theater Arts

This is an introduction to the principles and practice of the correlated arts that constitute the production of a play in the theatre. It includes analysis of the dramatic script in terms of the actor, the director, the scenic, costume, and lighting designers, and the techni­cians. Lab theatre productions integrate the content of the course.

X
Introduction to Theater Arts
3
SMGT101

SMGT101 - Sport & Society

This course explores the factors that shape sport in a culture and how sport mirrors the society in which it exists. It examines the contributions of recreational and competitive sport to a culture. It includes the role of business in sport and how business interests in sport have served as a catalyst for growth.

X
Sport & Society
3