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Undergraduate Arts and Sciences Electives

The Arts and Sciences Electives requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of Anthropology, Art History, Biology, Chemistry, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, Foreign Language, Geography, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Science, or Sociology courses. Additional courses outside of these areas that qualify as Arts and Sciences Electives are listed under the Additional Arts and Sciences Electives link below.

Anthropology

Art History

Biology

Chemistry

Criminal Justice

Economics

Environmental Studies

Foreign Language - French

Foreign Language - Japanese

Foreign Language - Spanish

Geography

History

Mathematics

Music

COURSE CODE
COURSE TITLE
CREDITS
MUS

 

 

X
 
 
MUS101

MUS101 - Music Appreciation I

This is a survey course in which students acquire listening skills and learn how to talk about music. The Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical periods of European music (1450-1800) are covered, with an emphasis on the history and development of music in its social and historical context. Students will learn to identify music from these three periods and will gain a more general understanding of music that can be applied to all eras and styles. Composers include Ockeghem, Palestrina, Byrd, Gabrieli, Purcell, Telemann, Bach, Handel, Haydn, and Mozart.

X
Music Appreciation I
3
MUS102

MUS102 - Music Appreciation II

In this course, students will explore the role of music in various contexts, in order to better understand its role in culture and in society. The hands-on curriculum calls for lots of listening and active participation; students will develop their listening skills, their awareness of the elements of music, and their understanding of the musical experience.

X
Music Appreciation II
3
MUS104

MUS104 - World Music

This course introduces students to the world of music through analysis and examination of music and culture from different ethnic groups. The musical characteristics of India, the Middle East, Indonesia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, Native American Indians, Ethnic North America, and the musical culture of Europe are addressed. Students listen to a selected repertoire and analyze the music and readings about music in class.

X
World Music
3
MUS107

MUS107 - Understanding & Playing the Blues

This course formally introduces students to the blues through theoretical study and practical application. As a result, students not only become familiar with all the basic blues elements (e.g., rhythm, harmony, form) but also learn how to play the blues on keyboards. (Prior keyboard or piano experience is NOT necessary.)

X
Understanding & Playing the Blues
3
MUS108

MUS108 - Blues: Harmony & Theory

This course develops an understanding and appreciation of music, covering genres including blues, pop, and jazz. Music theory, blues theory, harmony, and chordal theory are examined. Through a combination of listening to recordings and live examples, students apply their knowledge and gain a deeper understanding of music.

X
Blues: Harmony & Theory
3
MUS109

MUS109 - American Folk Music

Integrating folklore, American history, and songwriting, this course examines American culture through the lens of American folk songs-songs written by others and songs we will write ourselves. Readings, recordings, and class discussion illustrate the importance of love songs, protest songs, work songs, and ballads as resources for understanding and expressing American life.

X
American Folk Music
3
MUS201

MUS201 - Musical Theatre

This is a survey of the rise of the musical theatre from origins in England in the eighteenth century (Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera) through the 1920s in the United States. Works by Weill, Kern, Hammerstein, Rogers, Gershwin, Bernstein, Porter, Lerner and Loewe, Wilson, and others are studied.

X
Musical Theatre
3
MUS202X

MUS202X - Music Fundamentals

This course is designed for students who are interested in mastering basic music literacy and its application in basic piano skills. The course is appropriate for those who already read some music and would like to develop their written music skills; it is also appropriate for those who have little or no experience reading sheet music. Topics include musical notation, rhythm, and basic piano skills including but not limited to scale building, intervals, and chords.

X
Music Fundamentals
3
MUS203

MUS203 - Popular Music

The years after World War II found American society and culture evolving in ways that both led to and reflected the birth of rhythm 'n' blues, rock 'n' roll, and soul music, creating a new popular music. From pop music's roots in the blues, jazz, and country music to its flowering around 1970, this course will trace the pop explosion that created many styles still dominant today. Artists include Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, the Motown stable, Bob Dylan, James Brown, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Sly and the Family Stone.

X
Popular Music
3
MUS204X

MUS204X - Music for Educators:Classroom Folk Music

Music can connect all of the domains of learning. In this course, experiential and theoretical applications of music in education are considered. Students will learn how music enriches teaching and learning; they will extend their range by integrating music into classroom activities. This course fulfills the Area of Inquiry – Aesthetic [AI(A)].

X
Music for Educators:Classroom Folk Music
3
MUS207X

MUS207X - Songwriting: Craft & Creation

This course is designed for both experienced and first-time songwriters. We will study basic music theory and engage in ear training, melody writing, and lyric writing as we consider songs in a variety of contemporary and traditional styles. Class completion will include the study of songs within their musical, historical, and social context, and the creation and simple performance (live or recorded) of at least four original songs.

X
Songwriting: Craft & Creation
3
MUS215

MUS215 - History of Jazz

This is an in-depth study of the history of Jazz with an overview of the influences of African traditions and the development of the blues. Students gain insight into the various jazz idioms through recordings of significant artists and compositions. Topics covered range from Dixieland to contemporary styles with an emphasis on swing and bebop.

X
History of Jazz
3

Philosophy

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Science

Sociology

Additional Arts and Sciences Electives