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Undergraduate Arts and Sciences Electives

The Arts and Sciences Electives requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of Anthropology, Art History, Biology, Chemistry, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, Foreign Language, Geography, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Science, or Sociology courses. Additional courses outside of these areas that qualify as Arts and Sciences Electives are listed under the Additional Arts and Sciences Electives link below.

Anthropology

Art History

Biology

Chemistry

Criminal Justice

Economics

Environmental Studies

Foreign Language - French

Foreign Language - Japanese

Foreign Language - Spanish

History

Mathematics

Music

Philosophy

COURSE CODE
COURSE TITLE
CREDITS
PHIL

 

 

X
 
 
PHIL101

PHIL101 - Introduction to Philosophy

This course is an introduction to the basic problems of philosophy, such as the sources of knowledge, the relationship between mind and body, freedom as opposed to determinism, and the nature of values.

X
Introduction to Philosophy
3
PHIL106

PHIL106 - World Religions

This course provides an overview of the major religious traditions: Taoism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Central themes from these traditions are studied through selected scriptures and texts of each tradition.

X
World Religions
3
PHIL110

PHIL110 - Ethics

This course is an introduction to analysis of conduct, moral reasoning, and foundation of ethical values in a search for the ultimate meanings of human experience. The following specific problems are examined: life and death issues; human experimentation; sexuality; truth-telling in medicine; honesty in business; cheating and lying; stealing and reparation; egoism, obligation; and capital punishment.

X
Ethics
3
PHIL202

PHIL202 - Aesthetics

This course explores creativity, interpretation, expression, style, symbolism, evaluation, art, and society–all from the philosophical perspective. Students are exposed to a variety of approaches to the question “what is beauty?” The arts and everyday experiences are examined in an effort to answer the question about beauty, as well as the other questions such exploration raises. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

X
Aesthetics
3
PHIL203

PHIL203 - Existentialism

This course examines such questions as: “who am I?” “what relationship(s) do I have with myself?” “with others?” “with the universe?” Readings are taken from Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Buber, Jaspers, Sartre, and others. The influence of existentialism on psychology, society, art, religion, and politics is explored. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

X
Existentialism
3
PHIL204

PHIL204 - Philosophies of Love

This is an investigation of affectivity centering on different meanings of the emotion “love,” including friendship, spirituality, ecstasy, and romance. The course is a philosophical inquiry into the person-as-sexed, freedom, choice, responsibility, object, subject, and authenticity. Readings are drawn from philosophy, history, psychology and literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

X
Philosophies of Love
3
PHIL205

PHIL205 - Political & Social Philosophy

This course introduces students to the primary understandings of social and political justice. Theory is related to practical and political problems. The notion of peace is also addressed. We shall wonder about the nature of the state and mutual obligations between governors and the governed. What makes a government legitimate? What freedoms and controls are needed to make modern society work? How do we choose to structure the ways in which we live together? In other words, what does it mean to be a participatory member of a particular society or a citizen of a particular country? Selected topics may include morality and human rights, status and treatment of women, hunger, poverty, and the environment. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

X
Political & Social Philosophy
3
PHIL208

PHIL208 - Knowing & Reality

This course is a comparative analysis of eastern and western perception of reality in philosophy and literature, beginning with an historical overview of theories of knowledge and truth as well as the psychological factors in learning. Prerequisites: PHIL 101, PSYC 101.

X
Knowing & Reality
3

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Science

Sociology

Additional Arts and Sciences Electives