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Undergraduate Arts and Sciences Electives

The Arts and Sciences Electives requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of Anthropology, Art History, Biology, Chemistry, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, Foreign Language, Geography, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Science, or Sociology courses. Additional courses outside of these areas that qualify as Arts and Sciences Electives are listed under the Additional Arts and Sciences Electives link below.

Anthropology

COURSE CODE
COURSE TITLE
CREDITS
ANTH

 

 

X
 
 
ANTH101

ANTH101 - Principles of Anthropology

Anthropology offers the student a cross-cultural, comparative perspective on the human condition. In this course, students explore the varieties of ways in which human societies are organized. The five sub-disciplines of anthropology are introduced: cultural, biological or physical, archaeological, linguistic, and applied. Students gain an appreciation for the unique perspective of anthropology, including how anthropologists conduct fieldwork and contributions anthropology can make to effect social change. The aim of this course is to provide an overview of the field of anthropology, and to teach the student how to think systematically about how social groups work and how to understand human behavior in its cultural context.

X
Principles of Anthropology
3
ANTH103

ANTH103 - Human Origins

This course considers the morphological, behavioral and life history features that distinguish the primates from other mammals, and the hominoids from other primates. We begin with an overview of the primates and their behavioral ecology, and then explore in detail the adaptations of each of the major groups of extant primates. Finally, we apply our knowledge of morphology and behavioral patterns in living primates to the fossil record.

X
Human Origins
3
ANTH210

ANTH210 - Folklore & Folklife

This course serves as an introduction to folklore and folklife, the ways that individuals, families and communities express themselves, their beliefs, and their values within their own culture. It emphasizes the understanding of meaning revealed in the full range of folkloristic genres: oral literature such as the tales, sayings and poetry; material culture, the individual skills and techniques displayed by craftspeople and artists and the products resulting from their application; the social customs of rites of passage and festivals; and the aesthetically subtle performing folk arts such as singing and dancing. The primary focus of the course for each student is the folklore and folklife of his or her own family and/or a Lasell Village elder's family and community, which is documented in archive-ready format and organized in a personal report of Family Folklore. Class activities are designed to get at the "feel" of folklore and folklife.

X
Folklore & Folklife
3
ANTH212

ANTH212 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

X
Special Topics in Anthropology
3
ANTH213

ANTH213 - Visual Anthropology

This course focuses on the encounter of the anthropologist and the filmmaker with that of his or her subjects and deals with issues of cultural perspective, gender, power, and authorship. Through the film screenings, lectures, ethnographies, theoretical readings, classroom discussions and the creation of their own documentary film, students develop a critical perspective for viewing films, videos, and television presentation and representation of different peoples and cultures. Students learn the fundamentals of viewing and undertaking ethnography, screenwriting, working with a digital camera, and editing. A key course objective is for students to acquire the basic skills to create visually interesting artistic statements through film that are a meta-commentary on contemporary youth culture.

X
Visual Anthropology
3
ANTH214

ANTH214 - Documentary Film for Social Change

This course considers the history and development of anthropological, ethnographic, and trans-cultural filmmaking. It is an in-depth examination of important anthropological films in terms of content, methodology, techniques, and strategies of expression such as the storyline, themes, editing, inter-titles, narration, voice-over, dialogue, subtitles, style (artistic and aesthetic sensibilities,) accuracy, and film truth. Through the film screenings, lectures, theoretical readings, classroom discussions and the creation of their own documentary short film, students develop a critical perspective for viewing films, videos, television presentation, and representation of different peoples and cultures.

X
Documentary Film for Social Change
3
ANTH312

ANTH312 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

X
Special Topics in Anthropology
3
ANTH412

ANTH412 - Special Topics in Anthropology

This course examines special topics from the perspective of anthropology, looking at the diversity of forms that cultures have adopted to deal with human concerns. Its purpose is to allow faculty and students to explore issues that meet special interests but which may not be offered on a regular basis. Courses could be offered at the 200, 300, or 400 levels, depending on the level of work to be required and the number of prerequisites for the course.

X
Special Topics in Anthropology
3

Art History

Biology

Chemistry

Criminal Justice

Economics

Environmental Studies

Foreign Language - French

Foreign Language - Japanese

Foreign Language - Spanish

History

Mathematics

Music

Philosophy

Physics

Political Science

Psychology

Science

Sociology

Additional Arts and Sciences Electives