2014 - 2015 Academic Catalog

Fashion Communication and Promotion

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions

Through application of Lasell's Connected Learning philosophy, Fashion students have ongoing opportunities to apply theoretical concepts through industry- oriented assignments and by working in the field with recognized leaders in the fashion industry. The upper-level professional courses are oriented toward a critical thinking and decision-making environment that graduates will face when making the transition from college to middle- and upper-management positions. Students learn how to plan strategically, organize for profitability, and cultivate creativity. These elements of learning are carefully woven together, and additionally include student engagement in community service-learning projects and a focus on social responsibility.

Fashion students are directly involved in fashion show productions as designers, producers, set designers, or stylists, both on and off campus. Senior capstone courses combine the knowledge accumulated throughout the program while cultivating students' interests and preparing graduates with a dynamic skill-set to enable fulfilling career goals. Fashion graduates pursue careers such as; stylists, technicians inventory planners, merchandisers, magazine writers, and visual merchandisers for a variety of product categories. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Fashion Communication & Promotion.

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete a major program of study in Fashion:

Goal 1: Professional attitudes and skills
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. demonstrate competency in the job search process.
  2. demonstrate collaborative skills.
  3. apply appropriate leadership styles.
  4. demonstrate the ability to critique one's self and others constructively.

Goal 2: Application of business practices relevant to the contemporary global fashion industry
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. demonstrate proficiency in applying discipline-specific technology.
  2. apply appropriate theory related to the fashion industry.
  3. interpret the elements and principles of design demonstrating aesthetic sensibility.
  4. research the historical and contemporary drivers in the fashion related business as they pertain to the global economic and cultural environment.

Goal 3: Social awareness
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. apply persuasion appropriately to create goodwill and trust.
  2. employ sustainable practices.
  3. implement moral and ethical business practices to support social. and economic responsibility in the global environment.
  4. identify and interpret social, cultural, economic, technological, ethical, political, educational, language, and individual influences on the global fashion industry.

Goal 4: Effective communication
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. employ appropriate oral communication skills.
  2. employ effective written communication practices.
  3. demonstrate professional visual communication.
  4. use technology effectively to present ideas and concepts.

Goal 5: Critical thinking
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. formulate and coordinate effective workflow processes.
  2. evaluate data in order to formulate effective solutions to problems.
  3. evaluate and choose among varied approaches to professional and creative challenges.


Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
ARTS120 Three-D Design 3
ARTS126 Principles of Design & Color 3
COM101 Understanding Mass Media 3
COM208 Public Relations 3
COM212 Intercultural Communication 3
COM221 Advertising 3
FASH101 Contemporary Issues in Fashion 3
FASH200 Fashion History 3
FASH207 Digital Tools for Fashion 3
FASH210 Textiles 3
FASH212 Visual Merchandising 3
FASH216 Digital Marketing for Fashion 3
FASH218 Fashion Communication 3
FASH301 Fashion Promotion 3
FASH306 Fashion Styling for Photography 3
FASH307 Fashion Branding 3
FASH315 Trend Forecasting 3
FASH317 Ethics in the Fashion Industry 3
FASH401 Fashion Industry Professional Dev 3
FASH415 Internship 4
FASH422 Fashion Communication Capstone 3
Choose 1 from the following:
FASH303 History of 20th Century Fashion 3
FASH342 Fashion & Culture 3
Choose 2 from the following:
ARTS219 Digital Photography 3
COM209 Journalism 3
COM213 Writing for Public Relations 3
COM218 Digital Video Editing 3
COM223 Advertising: Copy & Design 3
COM225 Producing 3
COM226 TV II: Production 3
COM314 Magazine & Feature Writing 3
COM319 Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns 3

Arts and Sciences Electives- 3 credits
This requirement may be fulfilled by courses in the following disciplines; Anthropology, Art History, Biology, Chemistry, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, Foreign Language, Geography, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Science, or Sociology.

Core Curriculum Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 45 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120

Courses listed below fulfill Knowledge Perspective requirements:
Aesthetics & Creativity

ARTS 126 Principles of Design & Color



FASH101 - Contemporary Issues in Fashion

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historic, economic, and contemporary influences, giving students a basic understanding of the terms and concepts associated with the fashion and retail industries. Topics include: technological applications, environmental influences on fashion; the fashion cycle; trend forecasting; fashion marketing; women's, men's, and children's apparel; supply chain management; foreign and domestic market centers; and retail merchandising.

FASH200 - Fashion History

This course covers the evolution of fashion from the time of early civilization to the mid-nineteenth century. Students learn how to identify various characteristics of clothing by studying both the social and psychological aspects of western culture. An understanding of fashion trends in relationship to art, architecture, and human behavior throughout history, and the various social implications clothing has on a given society are also explored. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to interpret fashion as a cultural language with identifiable characteristics. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102, or permission of instructor.

FASH201 - Merchandise Planning & Control

This course provides an understanding of business strategies related to assortment planning, buying, and allocating inventory. Building upon retail math fundamentals, students create stock and sales plans in accordance with the goals and objectives of a given seasonal sales strategy, including methods of figuring markups, sales projections, turnover, average stock, stock-to-sales ratios, open-to-buy, markdowns, and gross margin. Negotiation skills related to terms of sale, shipping and pricing strategies are explored within the wholesale/retail business relationship. Both manual and computer-based calculations are explored through the use of Excel and other industry-based software. Prerequisite: FASH 101 & MATH116

FASH204 - Fashion Research Abroad

This course brings design and merchandising fashion students together in an international setting to offer exposure to and research of the ever changing global fashion industry. The spring portion of the This course focuses on the host country’s culture and fashion industry, setting the stage for an intensive study abroad experience. Course structure abroad is a combination of lecture and field practice. In addition to Lasell faculty, professionals from the host country’s fashion industry teaching a variety of topics. Hands-on workshops may play an important role in exploring content. Cultural immersion includes a community service project that engages students in reflecting on the evolving social consciousness in the global fashion market place. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH206 - Sustainability in the Fashion Industry

This course explores issues surrounding the concept of sustainability in relation to the fashion industry. The history and contemporary status of sustainability in a global fashion context will be explored, including the influence of social, cultural, and economic factors. Guest speakers include specialists in sustainable fashion design & production, the greening of the supply chain, merchandising, and promoting the sustainable product.

FASH207 - Digital Tools for Fashion

Technical skills are becoming more and more a required proficiency in all capacities of the fashion industry. This course introduces Fashion & Retail Merchandising and Fashion Communication & Promotion students to software prominently used for apparel manufacturing, retail and media. With a focus on methods of visual communication, projects include technical drawing, colorization, editing, and integration and manipulation of photographic images.

FASH208X - Monsters in my Closet: Waste Couture

The goal of ENV 208X/FASH 208X is to explore the environmental, social and economic issues and problems arising out of the global fashion industry. We will examine where and how our clothing is manufactured, distributed and disposed of as well as some of the innovative approaches some companies are taking in order to address some of the problems associated with the industry.

FASH210 - Textiles

This course introduces the study of textiles through exploration of the production of fibers and methods of creating fabrics. Students learn to identify fiber content, properties and various types of weaving and knitting applications. Other topics include the study of fiber characteristics, quality and care of fabric finishes, and a practical assessment of fabrics in realtionship to particular end uses.

FASH211 - Fashion Retail Management

This course explores the principles of retail management. Topics include; technological applications, marketing strategies, store image considerations, competitve analysis, legal constraints,consumer behavior,decision making and critical reasoning associated with reatail store practices. Principles are explored and applied through class discussion and lecture, and case studies exploration.Prerequisite: FASH101

FASH212 - Visual Merchandising

This course builds a foundation in basic visual methods to promote products. The use of interior, P.O.P., and exterior displays, fixturing, graphics and signage are discussed. Various hands-on projects develop an aptitude for working with color and proportion to create visual solutions for product promotion. Exploring color analysis and proportion, students create visual solutions that demonstrate artistic sensitivity and express a mood or idea. Additionally, students become familiar with journalistic reporting and written analysis through various media applications. Prerequisite: FASH 101, ARTS 120.

FASH216 - Digital Marketing for Fashion

The fashion and retail industry has changed radically with shifts into new digital channels. Omni-channel selling and communication models continue to be an opportunity for business growth and expansion. The rise of social media and the expanding proliferation of digital devices, platforms, and applications make digital marketing a necessity for corporate survival. Through a combination of case studies and exploration of innovative technology students learn how the elements of digital strategy work together with traditional media to attract prospective customers. This course will explore inventive kinds of marketing strategies where the new selling floor is the virtual world. Prerequisite: FASH 101

FASH218 - Fashion Communication

This course examines communication strategies in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different facets of communication including maintaining consistency with integrated and content marketing, navigating the global landscape, messaging through digital and various media channels, and managing emerging trends in social marketing. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Prerequisites: ENG 102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASH225 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH301 - Fashion Promotion

This course integrates fashion industry promotional activities centered around the "promotion mix." Through advertising, publicity, and special events including fashion shows, students create and execute promotional campaigns that link to various external constituents to stimulate consumption of a product or service. Prerequisite: FASH 212.

FASH302 - Retail Operations

This course builds on the concepts learned in FASH 201 Merchandise Planning & Control and FASH 211 Retail Management extending into retail store planning, trading area and site analysis, financial management, multi-channel retailing and performance metrics. All phases of merchandising and sales management, including merchandise logistics, enabling technology, distribution channels, retail assortment planning and labor administration are incorporated into a comprehensive study of retail operations. Technological applications that are industry specific are utilized throughout this course. Prerequisite: FASH 211

FASH303 - History of 20th Century Fashion

This course examines fashion from mid-nineteenth century to present day, exploring notable creators and addressing the aesthetic, economic, social, and political forces that impact the development of styles. Discussions and research focus predominantly on American and European culture, but endeavor to include a global perspective, taking into account issues of ethnicity, class, and sexuality. This course also includes first-hand examination of garments as part of an approach to develop critical thinking and “seeing.” Students utilize these observations to understand fashion as an art form, a commodity, and a symbol of cultural and personal identity. Prerequisites: ENG 102 and FASH 101 or permission of instructor.

FASH304 - Interior Display & Design

This course introduces students to the processes involved in designing a set, display, or interactive environment. The elements and principles of design are closely examined, developed, and applied. Students learn to solve problems of space, volume, color, texture, lighting, and design. Drafting techniques are emphasized, as are presentation skills. Practical modeling and construction techniques, including use of 3D computer software are used in the process of creating a setting and installations. Prerequisite: FASH 212.

FASH306 - Fashion Styling for Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation.

FASH307 - Fashion Branding

This course explores issues related to fashion branding and brand recognition by presenting an overview of brand management. Through case studies and analysis of contemporary media, students examine the notion that perceived value and ethos of a fashion brand can be increased through advertising, thematic control, and legal safeguards. The course also details how to build a fashion brand, maintain its brand equity, and re-tool a brand when its stature in the marketplace decreases due to consumer consumption and economic changes. Prerequisites: BUSS 220 or FASH 211.

FASH309 - Apparel Product Development

Exploring the global product development matrix, students in this course work together in teams to explore the product lifecycle in terms of sourcing and production. Class sessions combine cases with hands-on exercises to reinforce key concepts. Topics include planning time-and-action calendars, specification and technical package development, sizing, quality control, and evaluation of the global production environment. Prerequisite: FASH 211, or FASD 220, or FASH 218.

FASH315 - Trend Forecasting

This course teaches students to enhance their fashion forecasting ability through a combination of “pulse-point” research, analysis, and presentation. Exploring techniques for interpreting the social/cultural influences on fashion change facilitates the ability to recognize and predict fashion trends in the global context. Prerequisite: FASH 101.

FASH317 - Ethics in the Fashion Industry

This course integrates ethical, moral and legal issues regarding the fashion industry from design and manufacturing through distribution, promotion and sales. Grounded in theories of consumption, students will explore operating procedures for various aspects of the apparel business such as; responsible advertising, consumer privacy, compliance with sustainable practices, fair labor and working conditions, design with a focus on gender identity or age appropriateness, and recognizing fashion’s influence on body image and eating disorders. Students will address topics through in depth discussions using group models and by exploring and mastering decision making frameworks to generate solutions. Prerequisite: ENG 102

FASH325 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

FASH342 - Fashion & Culture

This course evaluates the concept of fashion in the cultural context and its impact on human behavior as non-verbal communication, including the expression of national identity. Through a historical and contemporary study of the connection between fashion and society, the relationships between clothing, culture, ethnicity, social and political events, economic status, and geographical location are examined. Students explore the symbolic aspects of clothing from the personal and consumer standpoints. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

FASH401 - Fashion Industry Professional Dev

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through simulated business activities, case studies, and meetings with faculty and industry experts. The course explores career development and professional strategies, each of which is designed to prepare students for FASH 403 Field Assignment. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: FASH 211, FASH218, & JR status

FASH405 - Fashion Retail & Merchandising Capstone

This course offers the student an opportunity to reflect and directly apply industry methods and practices acquired over the course of their degree studies. Students design and execute an in-depth project that engages them in research and experimentation, applying merchandising theories to a variety of situations. Prerequisite: FASH 415.

FASH406 - Global Retailing

This course teaches students the importance of the global economy through the study of retailers who operate internationally. Students learn the legal, social, cultural, and economic environments that affect the distribution of consumer products worldwide. Required research assignments cover a wide range of international retailers, encompassing both department stores and independent retailers. Prerequisites: FASH 211, BUSS 220.

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Prerequisites: FASH 401 and senior standing

FASH420 - Collection Research and Management

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH421X - Collection Research & Management II

This course is an extension of Fashion History for students who have excelled in their studies of historic dress. Students concentrate on developing research techniques and writing skills related to museum practices in` support of the Lasell Fashion Collection. Students learn and use a collection management system based on the Past Perfect software to document aquired items regarding time period and unique features. This is a challenging course with an independent study component that helps to preserve the integrity of the LFC while increasing the overall educational value by preparing and mounting exhibits on and off campus and presenting at academic symposia. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FASH422 - Fashion Communication Capstone

The Fashion Communications and Promotion Capstone draws upon prior educational and internship experiences, synthesizing them into a capstone project that enhances the student's bridge to the next step in his or her academic or professional life. The capstone project is student-driven and mentored by select faculty. The project includes research, planning, process management, execution, and reflection. Prerequisites: FASH415.

FASH425 - Special Topics

A variety of special topics courses offer students the opportunity to engage with diverse areas of fashion that are not covered within the required curriculum. Course content varies per semester with the goal of having faculty and students explore various industry concepts and theory in depth to meet special interests. Courses are be offered at the 200, 300, 400 level dependent upon the area of exploration. Prerequisites will be determined by level and content.

ARTS120 - Three-D Design

This course introduces students to the notion of creating within three-dimensional space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive perspectives. Students construct various models and/or maquettes. Problem solving and individual expression are emphasized.

ARTS126 - Principles of Design & Color

This course is an introduction to the theories and concepts of design and color with an emphasis on developing an awareness and sensitivity to art as an integral part of one’s life and as a way to complement one’s aesthetic needs. This is a lecture/discussion/critique course with visual material, critical essays, individual expression, and museum/gallery trips. NOTE: First year Graphic Design majors should seek out the majors-only section when enrollling.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

COM221 - Advertising

This course introduces students to the field of advertising, including the role of promotional elements (advertising, direct mail, promotion, etc.) found in an advertising agency or in the communication program of an organization. In this course, students learn that advertising is more than just ads on television, on a web page or in print. Advertising is a process that starts with research and moves through analysis, planning, action, and evaluation. The development of an effective advertising strategy requires an understanding of overall communication processes and theoretical principles, how organizations organize and brand themselves for advertising and other promotional functions, consumer behavior, and how to set goals and objectives. A cooperative learning project requires students to engage in the kind of strategic thinking, planning and execution that is done by advertisers, researchers, media planners, and copywriters. The course also addresses how the advertising industry is regulated and how key social issues and various consumer constituencies can present problems for advertising professionals. Prerequisite: COM 101.

FASH101 - Contemporary Issues in Fashion

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historic, economic, and contemporary influences, giving students a basic understanding of the terms and concepts associated with the fashion and retail industries. Topics include: technological applications, environmental influences on fashion; the fashion cycle; trend forecasting; fashion marketing; women's, men's, and children's apparel; supply chain management; foreign and domestic market centers; and retail merchandising.

FASH200 - Fashion History

This course covers the evolution of fashion from the time of early civilization to the mid-nineteenth century. Students learn how to identify various characteristics of clothing by studying both the social and psychological aspects of western culture. An understanding of fashion trends in relationship to art, architecture, and human behavior throughout history, and the various social implications clothing has on a given society are also explored. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to interpret fashion as a cultural language with identifiable characteristics. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102, or permission of instructor.

FASH207 - Digital Tools for Fashion

Technical skills are becoming more and more a required proficiency in all capacities of the fashion industry. This course introduces Fashion & Retail Merchandising and Fashion Communication & Promotion students to software prominently used for apparel manufacturing, retail and media. With a focus on methods of visual communication, projects include technical drawing, colorization, editing, and integration and manipulation of photographic images.

FASH210 - Textiles

This course introduces the study of textiles through exploration of the production of fibers and methods of creating fabrics. Students learn to identify fiber content, properties and various types of weaving and knitting applications. Other topics include the study of fiber characteristics, quality and care of fabric finishes, and a practical assessment of fabrics in realtionship to particular end uses.

FASH212 - Visual Merchandising

This course builds a foundation in basic visual methods to promote products. The use of interior, P.O.P., and exterior displays, fixturing, graphics and signage are discussed. Various hands-on projects develop an aptitude for working with color and proportion to create visual solutions for product promotion. Exploring color analysis and proportion, students create visual solutions that demonstrate artistic sensitivity and express a mood or idea. Additionally, students become familiar with journalistic reporting and written analysis through various media applications. Prerequisite: FASH 101, ARTS 120.

FASH216 - Digital Marketing for Fashion

The fashion and retail industry has changed radically with shifts into new digital channels. Omni-channel selling and communication models continue to be an opportunity for business growth and expansion. The rise of social media and the expanding proliferation of digital devices, platforms, and applications make digital marketing a necessity for corporate survival. Through a combination of case studies and exploration of innovative technology students learn how the elements of digital strategy work together with traditional media to attract prospective customers. This course will explore inventive kinds of marketing strategies where the new selling floor is the virtual world. Prerequisite: FASH 101

FASH218 - Fashion Communication

This course examines communication strategies in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different facets of communication including maintaining consistency with integrated and content marketing, navigating the global landscape, messaging through digital and various media channels, and managing emerging trends in social marketing. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Prerequisites: ENG 102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASH301 - Fashion Promotion

This course integrates fashion industry promotional activities centered around the "promotion mix." Through advertising, publicity, and special events including fashion shows, students create and execute promotional campaigns that link to various external constituents to stimulate consumption of a product or service. Prerequisite: FASH 212.

FASH306 - Fashion Styling for Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation.

FASH307 - Fashion Branding

This course explores issues related to fashion branding and brand recognition by presenting an overview of brand management. Through case studies and analysis of contemporary media, students examine the notion that perceived value and ethos of a fashion brand can be increased through advertising, thematic control, and legal safeguards. The course also details how to build a fashion brand, maintain its brand equity, and re-tool a brand when its stature in the marketplace decreases due to consumer consumption and economic changes. Prerequisites: BUSS 220 or FASH 211.

FASH315 - Trend Forecasting

This course teaches students to enhance their fashion forecasting ability through a combination of “pulse-point” research, analysis, and presentation. Exploring techniques for interpreting the social/cultural influences on fashion change facilitates the ability to recognize and predict fashion trends in the global context. Prerequisite: FASH 101.

FASH317 - Ethics in the Fashion Industry

This course integrates ethical, moral and legal issues regarding the fashion industry from design and manufacturing through distribution, promotion and sales. Grounded in theories of consumption, students will explore operating procedures for various aspects of the apparel business such as; responsible advertising, consumer privacy, compliance with sustainable practices, fair labor and working conditions, design with a focus on gender identity or age appropriateness, and recognizing fashion’s influence on body image and eating disorders. Students will address topics through in depth discussions using group models and by exploring and mastering decision making frameworks to generate solutions. Prerequisite: ENG 102

FASH401 - Fashion Industry Professional Dev

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through simulated business activities, case studies, and meetings with faculty and industry experts. The course explores career development and professional strategies, each of which is designed to prepare students for FASH 403 Field Assignment. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: FASH 211, FASH218, & JR status

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Prerequisites: FASH 401 and senior standing

FASH422 - Fashion Communication Capstone

The Fashion Communications and Promotion Capstone draws upon prior educational and internship experiences, synthesizing them into a capstone project that enhances the student's bridge to the next step in his or her academic or professional life. The capstone project is student-driven and mentored by select faculty. The project includes research, planning, process management, execution, and reflection. Prerequisites: FASH415.

FASH303 - History of 20th Century Fashion

This course examines fashion from mid-nineteenth century to present day, exploring notable creators and addressing the aesthetic, economic, social, and political forces that impact the development of styles. Discussions and research focus predominantly on American and European culture, but endeavor to include a global perspective, taking into account issues of ethnicity, class, and sexuality. This course also includes first-hand examination of garments as part of an approach to develop critical thinking and “seeing.” Students utilize these observations to understand fashion as an art form, a commodity, and a symbol of cultural and personal identity. Prerequisites: ENG 102 and FASH 101 or permission of instructor.

FASH342 - Fashion & Culture

This course evaluates the concept of fashion in the cultural context and its impact on human behavior as non-verbal communication, including the expression of national identity. Through a historical and contemporary study of the connection between fashion and society, the relationships between clothing, culture, ethnicity, social and political events, economic status, and geographical location are examined. Students explore the symbolic aspects of clothing from the personal and consumer standpoints. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOC 101.

ARTS219 - Digital Photography

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles. Assignments may include politics, sports, entertainment, and interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, and graphic designers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast; and on what page to display them or in which order to broadcast them. The various reporting specialties covered in journalism – Health, Education, Business, Arts, Sports, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Travel - are explored. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM213 - Writing for Public Relations

This course serves as a workshop in which students apply the fundamental skills of journalism to the different formats commonly used in writing copy for public relations and advertising, including press releases, public service announcements, profiles, brochures, and advertisements. In addition, students continue to sharpen their editing skills by revising their own work and by copyediting and critiquing the work of other students. Central to the objectives of this course is that students improve their ability to write clearly and concisely, avoiding common errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM218 - Digital Video Editing

This course teaches students the basics of editing digital media using the popular software program Adobe Premiere Pro. The aesthetics of editing are also discussed and analyzed through screening various types of edited media. Projects for the course include editing TV commercials, news packages, movie scenes, and music videos. It is recommended that students have acquired basic computer skills prior to taking this class.

COM223 - Advertising: Copy & Design

This course approaches the design and content of advertising from a variety of creative perspectives —from art to copy to production. The aim is to create eye catching, stand-out advertising —the kind that requires concentration, creativity, and focus. Students don’t have to be skilled graphic artists, but they do need to be able to explain in detail how a storyboard works and what message is intended for the consumer through an emphasis on: visual effects of the design; use of color and placement; and the significance of slogans, copy, and dialogue. This class duplicates as closely as possible the experience of working in a creative group within a real ad agency. Prerequisite: COM 221.

COM225 - Producing

Part I of this two-part course introduces students to the basics of TV producing. Students learn the process of writing a pitch, proposal, treatment, and budget. They also learn the fundamentals of basic screenwriting and production scheduling, as well as managing cast, crew and vendor relationships. The course also explores the roles of the casting director, location manager, production coordinator, and script supervisor. The course concludes with a preview of the production team and the role of the line producer, unit production manager, production manager and assistant directors involved in managing the physical production process of producing a television show.

COM226 - TV II: Production

Part II of this two-part course introduces students to the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment. Throughout the semester, students participate in a television crew to produce a high quality “Lasell TV” program to be aired on local access television. Students develop a genuine understanding of real-life television studio operation by rotating through the various positions in both control room and TV studio environments. Roles the students experience during the semester include: director, technical director, assistant director, computer graphics technician, audio technician, teleprompter operator, camera operator, and floor director. Prerequisite: COM 225 or Permission of Instructor

COM314 - Magazine & Feature Writing

This course is focused on the longer pieces of magazine writing, such as feature articles and interview profiles, and other forms of narrative, nonfiction journalistic writing. The course includes reading, analyzing, and modeling well-written newspaper and magazine articles that entertain as well as inform readers. Students have the opportunity to provide editorial support for and submit feature articles for publication to Polished, a Lasell College produced magazine. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 209.

COM319 - Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns

This course provides an environment for students to become engaged in a professional style media planning and buying campaign, which is an essential strategic focus of the advertising industry. Students develop a full advertising plan based on the current planning structure of a contemporary advertising agency. Working in teams, students conduct a detailed advertising analysis that allows them to provide strategic and creative solutions to problems they have identified in their research. Student teams construct an advertising plan that positions and promotes a product, a message, a politician, or a brand to a con­sumer audience. Each student team produces a comprehensive media campaign that identifies and targets the appropriate media outlets for advertising placements. The class has a modicum of pressure and intensity that reflects some of the challenges necessary to succeed in the advertising industry. Prerequisite: COM 221.