Fashion Communication and Promotion

Fashion Communication and Promotion

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions Department Faculty

Through application of Lasell's Connected Learning philosophy, Fashion students have ongoing opportunities to apply theoretical concepts through industry- oriented assignments and by working in the field with recognized leaders in the fashion industry. The upper-level professional courses are oriented toward a critical thinking and decision-making environment that graduates will face when making the transition from college to middle- and upper-management positions. Students learn how to plan strategically, organize for profitability, and cultivate creativity. These elements of learning are carefully woven together, and additionally include student engagement in community service-learning projects and a focus on social responsibility.

Fashion students are directly involved in fashion show productions as designers, producers, set designers, or stylists, both on and off campus. Senior capstone courses combine the knowledge accumulated throughout the program while cultivating students' interests and preparing graduates with a dynamic skill-set to enable fulfilling career goals. Fashion graduates pursue careers such as; designers, stylists, technicians, buyers, inventory planners, merchandisers, magazine writers, costume designers, visual merchandisers, and store managers for a variety of product categories. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science Degree in Fashion & Retail Merchandising or a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Fashion Communication & Promotion or Fashion Design & Production.

Program Fee
Each Fashion Design & Production student is charged a program fee for each semester. This program fee covers equipment, supplies, hardware, software, guest speaker honorariums and miscellaneous materials/supplies that are necessary to maximize student learning. Additional lab fees may also apply to specific courses within the Fashion department. This fee does not cover the cost of supplies for individual projects to be purchased separately.

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete a major program of study in Fashion:

Goal 1: Professional attitudes and skills
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. demonstrate competency in the job search process.
  2. demonstrate collaborative skills.
  3. apply appropriate leadership styles.
  4. demonstrate the ability to critique one's self and others constructively.

Goal 2: Application of business practices relevant to the contemporary global fashion industry
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. demonstrate proficiency in applying discipline-specific technology.
  2. apply appropriate theory related to the fashion industry.
  3. interpret the elements and principles of design demonstrating aesthetic sensibility.
  4. research the historical and contemporary drivers in the fashion related business as they pertain to the global economic and cultural environment.

Goal 3: Social awareness
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. apply persuasion appropriately to create goodwill and trust.
  2. employ sustainable practices.
  3. implement moral and ethical business practices to support social. and economic responsibility in the global environment.
  4. identify and interpret social, cultural, economic, technological, ethical, political, educational, language, and individual influences on the global fashion industry.

Goal 4: Effective communication
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. employ appropriate oral communication skills.
  2. employ effective written communication practices.
  3. demonstrate professional visual communication.
  4. use technology effectively to present ideas and concepts.

Goal 5: Critical thinking
Upon completion of a major program of study in Fashion, students will be able to;

  1. formulate and coordinate effective workflow processes.
  2. evaluate data in order to formulate effective solutions to problems.
  3. evaluate and choose among varied approaches to professional and creative challenges.

General Education Core Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 47 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120

Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:

Moral and Ethical
COM 205: Media Ethics & Society
COM 212: Intercultural Communication

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
ARTS120 Three-D Design 3
COM101 Understanding Mass Media 3
COM205 Media Ethics & Society 3
COM208 Public Relations 3
COM212 Intercultural Communication 3
COM225 TV I: Producing 3
COM226 TV II: Production 3
FASH101 Contemporary Issues in Fashion 3
FASH200 Fashion History 3
FASH207 Digital Tools for Fashion 3
FASH210 Textiles 3
FASH212 Visual Merchandising 3
FASH218 Fashion Communication 3
FASH301 Fashion Promotion 3
FASH306 Fashion Styling for Photography 3
FASH307 Fashion Branding 3
FASH315 Trend Forecasting 3
FASH401 Fashion Industry Professional Dev 3
FASH415 Internship 4
FASH422 Fashion Communication Capstone 3
Choose 1 from the following:
FASH303 History of 20th Century Fashion 3
Choose 2 from the following:
ARTS219 Digital Photography 3
COM105 Writing for The Media 3
COM209 Journalism 3
COM213 Writing for Public Relations 3
COM215 Radio Production 3
COM217 Video Production 3
COM223 Advertising: Copy & Design 3
COM302 Entertainment Media 3
COM314 Magazine & Feature Writing 3
COM319 Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns 3

General Education Core Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 47 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120

Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:

Moral and Ethical
COM 205: Media Ethics & Society
COM 212: Intercultural Communication

ANTH103 - Human Origins

This course considers the morphological, behavioral and life history features that distinguish the primates from other mammals, and the hominoids from other primates. We begin with an overview of the primates and their behavioral ecology, and then explore in detail the adaptations of each of the major groups of extant primates. Finally, we apply our knowledge of morphology and behavioral patterns in living primates to the fossil record.

CJ205 - Forensics

This course provides an introduction to the modern methods used in the detection, investigation, and solution of crimes. Practical analysis of evidence such as: fingerprints and other impressions, ballistics, glass, hair, handwriting and document examination, and drug analysis are studied. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 103 or placement in any math course above MATH 103.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development. Prerequisite: A grade of C or above in Math 103 or placement in any math course above Math 103.

ED109 - Invitation to Teaching

This course explores careers in teaching beginning with the unifying question: Why should I become a teacher? Students examine their motivations to become teachers while they learn about college and state requirements and expectations.

ED110 - Teaching & Learning in American Schools

This course provides students pursuing or considering initial teacher licensure with an overview of the teaching profession. Students study and discuss history and philosophies of education systems, as well as current trends and issues. Massachusetts professional standards and requirements for licensure are explored. This course is a prerequisite for all other ED courses. Twenty-five hours of observation and tutoring in varied school settings are required. This is a presentation-intensive course.

ED210 - Reading & Writing Across the Curriculum

This course emphasizes the processes of reading and the critical nature of reading to learn in the content areas. Focus will be on literacy strategies to support teaching in content areas, the influences of diversity, the current methods of instruction, and assessments used to inform instruction. In addition, the current research on reading to learn will be read, discussed, and integrated in all course activities. Requires a pre-practicum of 25 hours. Prerequisite: ED 219

ED219 - Supporting Learner Variability

This course introduces students to characteristics of learners with special needs in classroom and community settings. It focuses on principles of Universal Design for Learning in developing appropriate learning environments to meet the variability of all students in Pre-K through high school settings. A required 25-hour pre-practicum provides opportunities to teach and observe in area classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 110

ED308 - Responsive Teaching in Secondary Schools

tudents will develop strategies and tools necessary to be responsive secondary teachers. Participants in this course will observe secondary teachers, develop lesson plans, reflect on their teaching philosophy, apply leadership theory to classroom practice, explore current trends and issues that impact secondary classrooms, increase their cultural competence, and expand their toolkit of strategies for differentiating instruction to address the variability of secondary students. Requires classroom observations. Pre-requisite: ED 219

ED309 - Sheltered English Immersion

This course provides a grounding in current theory and practice related to teaching English Language Learners. In particular, students learn to effectively shelter their content instruction, so that ELL students can access curriculum, achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy. This course meets Massachusetts DESE standards for the required SEI endorsement. Course includes a 25-hour pre-practicum in license-appropriate classrooms. Prerequisite: ED 206 or Department permission

ED433 - Pre-practicum: Secondary English

Through a minimum of 150 hours of observation and reflection in public schools, and regular meetings with school and Lasell faculty, students in this course become familiar with the curriculum and organization of middle and/or high schools and English classrooms in preparation for the practicum. Prerequisite: Senior standing; passing scores on all required MTEL; permission of Department Chair

ED482 - Practicum: Secondary English

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary English classroom and meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Department Chair required. Prerequisite: ED 433; passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL.

ED484 - Practicum: Secondary History

In this course, students complete a minimum of 300 field hours observing and teaching in a secondary history classroom and meet regularly with both Lasell and school supervisors. Assignments incorporate all Massachusetts requirements for licensure and include topics such as the ethics of teaching, legal and moral responsibilities, student confidentiality, and working parents and community members. Permission of the Department Chair required. Prerequisite: ED 435; passing scores on all required sections of the MTEL

ED494 - Professional Standards & Ethics

Taken concurrently with ED 496 or ED 498, this capstone seminar engages students in ethical questions such as student confidentiality, testing, and communicating with various constituencies as well as practical aspects of preparing for an initial teaching position. It includes conducting and reporting on the classroom-based research project that was designed in ED 421. Co-requisite: ED 496 or ED 498.

ENG212 - Literature for Young Adults

This course is a survey of current books written for adolescent and teen readers. It prepares students to evaluate young adult books in terms of literary qualtiy, reader interest, and social and political perspectives. Strategies for use in the classroom are explored. A variety of genres of books are examined. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

HIST203 - The History of Women in U.S.

This course explores the social history of women in the United States, beginning in the colonial period and ending with an examination of twen­tieth century issues. Emphasis is on the image of women held during these periods, in contrast to actual conditions. Contributions of women to social change and the growth of women’s move­ments are also analyzed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST204 - Recent American History

This course focuses on the presidencies beginning with Kennedy to the present. Work is divided roughly into three areas: foreign affairs; domestic politics; economic, social, and cultural needs. Topics range from the Vietnam War to the Iraq War, the weakening of Congress and the expansion of the presidency, the women's movement, changes in popular culture, and domestic economic developments. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST207 - African American History

This course explores the history of African Americans in the United States from their African beginnings to the present. It traces the lives and status of African Americans, enslaved and emancipated, as they confronted the barriers of legal, institutional, and cultural prejudices; examines the socioeconomic and political experiences of blacks in America; and investigates strategies of accommodation, resistance, and protest in the struggle of African Americans to gain human and first-class citizenship rights. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST208 - Sub-Saharan Africa after 1800

This survey of sub-Saharan African history explores the ongoing story of African political, social, and economic developments from the post trans-Atlantic slave trade period to the present. The course includes treatment of the impact of European merchants, missionaries, and adventurers on Africa from the time immediately preceding imperialism and colonialism up through the emergence of nationalism and decolonization and liberation movements. The new nation-states, their post-colonial economies, and their developing systems of justice, education, and rule are investigated. Finally, topics such as soil erosion, disease, conservation, famine, and Africa’s relationships with the wider world are discussed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST209 - China from 1600 to Present

This course is a survey of modern Chinese history from the founding of the Qing Dynasty in the seventeenth century to Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms of the 1990s. Special attention will be paid to modernization, Western and Japanese imperialism in China, and the rise of Communism under Mao Zedong. In addition to learning about important milestones in Chinese history, students will also be introduced to aspects of Chinese art, culture, and women's issues through primary sources translated into English. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST210 - Latin Amer Colonial Period to Present

This survey looks at Latin American history from pre-Columbian to contemporary times. Emphasis is on native cultures, the “discovery” of the New World, European presence, colonialism, imperialism, the creation of the peasantry, wars of independence, the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, slavery and racism, development and underdevelopment, the Catholic Church, liberation theology, poverty, and revolution. Major emphasis in South America is on Argentina, Columbia, Peru, Chile, Venezuela, and the Portuguese speaking nation of Brazil. The course also includes examination of foreign intervention and inner instability in Mexico, including struggles for democracy, economic rights, and social justice. In the Hispanic Caribbean and Central America, especially, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama, land and labor systems, gender relations, race and ethnicity, and varied forms of rule are discussed. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST211 - Middle East & Islamic World Since 1800

This course looks at the Middle East and its relations with the wider world, from the appearance of Napoleon to the present. Topics include attempts at reform and modernization in the Ottoman Empire; the impact of Western imperialism on the region as a whole; and twentieth-century developments in the area, including nationalism, pan-Arabism, pan-Islamism, the cult of the personality, coup, revolution, Zionism, and the Palestinian-Israeli confrontation. The economic and social impact of oil, the influence of fundamentalism, and the Great Power rivalry down through the position of the United States toward the area are investigated. The efforts of Iran to gain acceptance in/by the contemporary world is examined, as is the shifting attitude of Egypt toward modernity. Finally, connections between the region and the rest of the Islamic world are explored. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST325 - The Intellectual Origins of Western Civ

This seminar traces the roots of modern western thought from ancient Greece through the Enlightenment by discussing and analyzing selections from the writings of major European thinkers. The seminar focuses on dominant figures representative of an historical epoch and examines their ideas in light of existing and future political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. Prerequisite: a 200 level history course or permission of instructor.

HIST330 - Europe & The World/ Age of Expansion

This course examines political, economic, social, scientific, and religious developments that contributed to European desire for land and power, and also to fantasies and phobias directed by European conquerors toward those whom they subdued and subjected to Western rule. The reaction toward the white Westerners on the part of those exploited is also explored. The period covered is from the mid-fifteenth century through the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: a 200 level history course or permission of instructor.

PHIL101 - Introduction to Philosophy

This course is an introduction to the basic problems of philosophy, such as the sources of knowledge, the relationship between mind and body, freedom as opposed to determinism, and the nature of values.

PHIL110 - Ethics

This course is an introduction to analysis of conduct, moral reasoning, and foundation of ethical values in a search for the ultimate meanings of human experience. The following specific problems are examined: life and death issues; human experimentation; sexuality; truth-telling in medicine; honesty in business; cheating and lying; stealing and reparation; egoism, obligation; and capital punishment.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course examines the adolescent period of life as one of multiple simultaneous changes in the mind and body that set the stage for adult life. Particular attention is paid to gender differentiated experiences in adolescence; how males and females differ in their experience of the changes that occur during adolescence. The role of culture in determining the adolescent experience is discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

Richard Bath

Associate Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Anne Bernays Trevenen

Assistant Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Lynn Blake

Chair of Fashion; Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Jill Carey

Associate Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Carol Emanuelson

Assistant Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Maritza Farrell

Associate Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Kristin Kinsky

Assistant Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center, 303

Luis Lopez-Preciado

Assistant Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Anne Vallely

Assistant Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Catharine Weiss

Assistant Professor of Fashion

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

ARTS120 - Three-D Design

This course introduces students to the notion of creating within three-dimensional space. Line, composition, planes, volume, and surfaces are studied from both additive and subtractive perspectives. Students construct various models and/or maquettes. Problem solving and individual expression are emphasized.

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

COM225 - TV I: Producing

Part I of this two-part course introduces students to the basics of TV producing. Students learn the process of writing a pitch, proposal, treatment, and budget. They also learn the fundamentals of basic screenwriting and production scheduling, as well as managing cast, crew and vendor relationships. The course also explores the roles of the casting director, location manager, production coordinator, and script supervisor. The course concludes with a preview of the production team and the role of the line producer, unit production manager, production manager and assistant directors involved in managing the physical production process of producing a television show.

COM226 - TV II: Production

Part II of this two-part course introduces students to the fundamentals of television production in a TV studio environment. Throughout the semester, students participate in a television crew to produce a high quality “Lasell TV” program to be aired on local access television. Students develop a genuine understanding of real-life television studio operation by rotating through the various positions in both control room and TV studio environments. Roles the students experience during the semester include: director, technical director, assistant director, computer graphics technician, audio technician, teleprompter operator, camera operator, and floor director. Prerequisite: COM 225 or Permission of Instructor

FASH101 - Contemporary Issues in Fashion

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the fashion business as it relates to cultural, historic, economic, and contemporary influences, giving students a basic understanding of the terms and concepts associated with the fashion and retail industries. Topics include: technological applications, environmental influences on fashion; the fashion cycle; trend forecasting; fashion marketing; women's, men's, and children's apparel; supply chain management; foreign and domestic market centers; and retail merchandising.

FASH200 - Fashion History

This course covers the evolution of fashion from the time of early civilization to the mid-nineteenth century. Students learn how to identify various characteristics of clothing by studying both the social and psychological aspects of western culture. An understanding of fashion trends in relationship to art, architecture, and human behavior throughout history, and the various social implications clothing has on a given society are also explored. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to interpret fashion as a cultural language with identifiable characteristics. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: ENG 102, or permission of instructor.

FASH207 - Digital Tools for Fashion

Technical skills are becoming more and more a required proficiency in all capacities of the fashion industry. This course introduces Fashion & Retail Merchandising and Fashion Communication & Promotion students to software prominently used for apparel manufacturing, retail and media. With a focus on methods of visual communication, projects include technical drawing, colorization, editing, and integration and manipulation of photographic images.

FASH210 - Textiles

This course introduces the study of textiles through exploration of the production of fibers and methods of creating fabrics. Students learn to identify fiber content, properties and various types of weaving and knitting applications. Other topics include the study of fiber characteristics, quality and care of fabric finishes, and a practical assessment of fabrics in realtionship to particular end uses.

FASH212 - Visual Merchandising

This course builds a foundation in basic visual methods to promote products. The use of interior, P.O.P., and exterior displays, fixturing, graphics and signage are discussed. Various hands-on projects develop an aptitude for working with color and proportion to create visual solutions for product promotion. Exploring color analysis and proportion, students create visual solutions that demonstrate artistic sensitivity and express a mood or idea. Additionally, students become familiar with journalistic reporting and written analysis through various media applications. Prerequisite: FASH 101, ARTS 120.

FASH218 - Fashion Communication

This course examines communication strategies in the fashion industry. Students analyze the different facets of communication including maintaining consistency with integrated and content marketing, navigating the global landscape, messaging through digital and various media channels, and managing emerging trends in social marketing. Guest speakers, connected learning projects, and field trips facilitate the transfer of theory into practice, providing the student with a platform for developing a viable body of work related to fashion communication. Prerequisites: ENG 102, COM 101 and FASH 101.

FASH301 - Fashion Promotion

This course integrates fashion industry promotional activities centered around the "promotion mix." Through advertising, publicity, and special events including fashion shows, students create and execute promotional campaigns that link to various external constituents to stimulate consumption of a product or service. Prerequisite: FASH 212.

FASH306 - Fashion Styling for Photography

Fashion Photo Styling is designed to provide fashion designers, stylists, and merchandisers with an understanding of the conventions and visual traditions of fashion photography. The principles of lighting are discussed particularly as it relates to the creation of mood and image. An exploration of the history of fashion photography familiarizes students with its various visual traditions and styles. The relationship between marketing principles and the determination of style in the context of image usage are explored. Regular photo shoots provide students with hands-on experience of image creation.

FASH307 - Fashion Branding

This course explores issues related to fashion branding and brand recognition by presenting an overview of brand management. Through case studies and analysis of contemporary media, students examine the notion that perceived value and ethos of a fashion brand can be increased through advertising, thematic control, and legal safeguards. The course also details how to build a fashion brand, maintain its brand equity, and re-tool a brand when its stature in the marketplace decreases due to consumer consumption and economic changes. Prerequisites: BUSS 220 and FASH 211.

FASH315 - Trend Forecasting

This course teaches students to enhance their fashion forecasting ability through a combination of “pulse-point” research, analysis, and presentation. Exploring techniques for interpreting the social/cultural influences on fashion change facilitates the ability to recognize and predict fashion trends in the global context. Prerequisite: FASH 101.

FASH401 - Fashion Industry Professional Dev

This course is designed to prepare students for the professional work environment through simulated business activities, case studies, and meetings with faculty and industry experts. The course explores career development and professional strategies, each of which is designed to prepare students for FASH 403 Field Assignment. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: FASH 309, FASH 302 (can be concurrent).

FASH415 - Internship

The internship field assignment provides students with hands-on experience in the business of fashion, applying classroom theory to the professional work environment. Objectives for the field assignment include: (1) exposure to major components of the fashion company’s operation, (2) first-hand experience in the professional working environment, and, (3) acquisition of professional skills required for this ever-changing fashion industry. The student completes a journal, analyzes the internship company and processes, and receives feedback and evaluation from the internship site supervisor. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised onsite work is required. Prerequisites: FASH 401 and senior standing

FASH422 - Fashion Communication Capstone

The Fashion Communications and Promotion Capstone draws upon prior educational and internship experiences, synthesizing them into a capstone project that enhances the student's bridge to the next step in his or her academic or professional life. The capstone project is student-driven and mentored by select faculty. The project includes research, planning, process management, execution, and reflection. Prerequisites: FASH415.

FASH303 - History of 20th Century Fashion

This course examines fashion from mid-nineteenth century to present day, exploring notable creators and addressing the aesthetic, economic, social, and political forces that impact the development of styles. Discussions and research focus predominantly on American and European culture, but endeavor to include a global perspective, taking into account issues of ethnicity, class, and sexuality. This course also includes first-hand examination of garments as part of an approach to develop critical thinking and “seeing.” Students utilize these observations to understand fashion as an art form, a commodity, and a symbol of cultural and personal identity. Prerequisites: ENG 102 and FASH 101 or permission of instructor.

ARTS219 - Digital Photography

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of digital imaging as applied to photography. Students combine traditional photographic methods with the latest digital techniques, using image manipulation software, scanning equipment and other computer-based tools. Students are responsible for providing their own digital camera.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles. Assignments may include politics, sports, entertainment, and interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, and graphic designers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast; and on what page to display them or in which order to broadcast them. The various reporting specialties covered in journalism – Health, Education, Business, Arts, Sports, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Travel - are explored. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM213 - Writing for Public Relations

This course serves as a workshop in which students apply the fundamental skills of journalism to the different formats commonly used in writing copy for public relations and advertising, including press releases, public service announcements, profiles, brochures, and advertisements. In addition, students continue to sharpen their editing skills by revising their own work and by copyediting and critiquing the work of other students. Central to the objectives of this course is that students improve their ability to write clearly and concisely, avoiding common errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM215 - Radio Production

This course introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell College Radio station.

COM217 - Video Production

This course introduces students to the basics of video production. Students learn basic videography techniques using professional video cameras such as the SONY HVR-HD1000U. In addition to videography, students learn the basics of digital video editing using industry-standard Avid nonlinear editing programs. Video projects include a video camera roll test, Avid editing assignment, news package, and a short movie where students shoot, direct, and edit their own creative narrative.

COM223 - Advertising: Copy & Design

This course approaches the design and content of advertising from a variety of creative perspectives —from art to copy to production. The aim is to create eye catching, stand-out advertising —the kind that requires concentration, creativity, and focus. Students don’t have to be skilled graphic artists, but they do need to be able to explain in detail how a storyboard works and what message is intended for the consumer through an emphasis on: visual effects of the design; use of color and placement; and the significance of slogans, copy, and dialogue. This class duplicates as closely as possible the experience of working in a creative group within a real ad agency. Prerequisite: COM 221.

COM302 - Entertainment Media

A focus on the entertainment media industry requires making sense of the material that captures the audience's attention, influences culture, and provides enjoyment to mass media consumers. Course topics include the business of entertainment media, the production and distribution of media content, and multimedia convergence. Students in this course examine the multiple genres for the content of entertainment media, such as drama, comedy, reality TV, and gaming. Students learn how the entertainment industry works, captures the interests of contemporary audiences, and influences our culture and values. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM314 - Magazine & Feature Writing

This course is focused on the longer pieces of magazine writing, such as feature articles and interview profiles, and other forms of narrative, nonfiction journalistic writing. The course includes reading, analyzing, and modeling well-written newspaper and magazine articles that entertain as well as inform readers. Students have the opportunity to provide editorial support for and submit feature articles for publication to Polished, a Lasell College produced magazine. Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 209.

COM319 - Advertising Planning: Media Campaigns

This course provides an environment for students to become engaged in a professional style media planning and buying campaign, which is an essential strategic focus of the advertising industry. Students develop a full advertising plan based on the current planning structure of a contemporary advertising agency. Working in teams, students conduct a detailed advertising analysis that allows them to provide strategic and creative solutions to problems they have identified in their research. Student teams construct an advertising plan that positions and promotes a product, a message, a politician, or a brand to a con­sumer audience. Each student team produces a comprehensive media campaign that identifies and targets the appropriate media outlets for advertising placements. The class has a modicum of pressure and intensity that reflects some of the challenges necessary to succeed in the advertising industry. Prerequisite: COM 221.