Sports Communication

Sports Communication

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions Department Faculty

Through a series of media studies courses, students learn about the functions and influences of the media, so they enter the profession with an awareness of the cultural impact their work will have, as well as associated social and ethical issues regarding the roles and functions of the media in our society.

In addition, consistent with Lasell's connected learning philosophy of education, communication majors will gain hands-on experience in and outside of the classroom throughout their four years of studies. There are numerous opportunities to work on class projects at our state-of-the-art Lasell College Radio station, in programming, production, and promotions, in our high-tech multimedia lab, as well as the studios of NewTV, Newton's community-access cable television located just three miles from the Lasell campus. Students interested in print media can become involved in the 1851 Chronicle student newspaper or the award-winning campus fashion magazine, Polished. Required courses like Human Communication include a service-learning component to connect students with organizations in the real world.

The communication major culminates in a capstone course in Media Literacy and a required professional internship. Lasell is ideally located for internship opportunities at some of the most prestigious media outlets and organizations in the country, such as The Greater Boston Radio Group, Community Newspapers, Boston Celtics, New England Patriots, Boston Herald, ABC5-TV, FOX25, WMJX-FM (MAGIC 106.7), and the Arnold Worldwide advertising agency. Students gain valuable professional experience and significant contacts through internships and professional mentoring within the communication industry.

Upon graduation, students are well-prepared to pursue careers in the growing and exciting fields of communication from journalism, public relations and advertising to television, radio production and interactive multimedia. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication (with a concentration of their choice). The department also offers minors in Communication and Sports Communication. The Communication Department offers a Master of Science with three areas of concentration: Health Communication, Integrated Marketing Communication, and Public Relations. The Graduate Program is described elsewhere in the catalog.

The Academic Standard for Communication majors is: Students must earn a grade of C or above in each of the following core courses that are 
Major Requirements:

COM 101 Understanding Mass Media 3
COM 103 Introduction to Human Communication 3
COM 105 Writing for the Media 3
COM 203 Effective Speaking 3
COM 205 Media Ethics and Society AI (ME) 3
COM 212 Intercultural Communication AI (MC) 3
COM 315 Communication Research 3
COM 399 Internship Seminar 1
COM 400 Field Experience (capstone course)  4
COM 418 Media Literacy (capstone course) 3

Failure to receive a minimum grade of C in any one of these courses will result in the student having to repeat the course.

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Communication:

Goal 1: Effective Writing
Upon completion of the major program of study in Communication, students will be able to

  1. Articulate their thoughts clearly in written form
  2. Write in the style demanded of their chosen profession

Goal 2: Effective Speaking
Upon completion of the major program of study in Communication, students will be able to

  1. Demonstrate effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills in professional presentations

Goal 3: Visual Articulation
Upon completion of the major program of study in Communication, students will be able to

  1. Demonstrate currency with technical media
  2. Demonstrate their own personal aesthetic

Goal 4: Research
Upon completion of the major program of study in Communication, students will be able to

  1. Find information to support a thesis
  2. Conduct an argument that advances a thesis

Goal 5: Knowledge of Media
Upon completion of the major program of study in Communication, students will be able to

  1. Define the functions of media
  2. Explain the influences of media in society
  3. Identify the ethical decisions and issues in the Communication field

Additional Requirements: 9 credits
Choose one additional COM or SMGT course: 3 credits
Any 200-level ENG course: 3 credits
Additional Social Science Elective (SOC, PSYC, POLS, etc.): 3 credits

Communication students who have not declared a Concentration must complete all of the courses for the Major Requirements (29 credits), and ten (10) courses selected from the lists of courses under the Concentrations (30 credits).

Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:
Moral and Ethical
COM 205: Media Ethics and Society
SMGT 202: Ethics in Sport
Multicultural
COM 212: Intercultural Communication
Psychological and Societal
SMGT 101: Sport and Society 

General Education Core Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 55 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120

Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
COM101 Understanding Mass Media 3
COM103 Human Communication 3
COM105 Writing for The Media 3
COM203 Effective Speaking 3
COM205 Media Ethics & Society 3
COM212 Intercultural Communication 3
COM315 Communication Research 3
COM399 Internship Seminar 1
COM400 Field Experience I 4
COM418 Media Literacy 3
Concentration Courses
COM208 Public Relations 3
COM209 Journalism 3
COM215 Radio Production 3
COM309 Sports Communication 3
SMGT101 Sport & Society 3
SMGT102 Contemporary Sport Management 3
SMGT202 Ethics in Sport 3
SMGT304 Sports Information & Communication 3
Com Major AI PS
CJ101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
ECON101 Principles of Econ-Micro 3
ECON103 Economics of Social Issues 3
LS101 Foundations of American Legal System 3
POLS101 American Government 3
POLS201 State & Local Government 3
POLS202 Issues in Contemporary Political Thought 3
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives 3

Additional Requirements: 9 credits
Choose one additional COM or SMGT course: 3 credits
Any 200-level ENG course: 3 credits
Additional Social Science Elective (SOC, PSYC, POLS, etc.): 3 credits

Communication students who have not declared a Concentration must complete all of the courses for the Major Requirements (29 credits), and ten (10) courses selected from the lists of courses under the Concentrations (30 credits).

Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:
Moral and Ethical
COM 205: Media Ethics and Society
SMGT 202: Ethics in Sport
Multicultural
COM 212: Intercultural Communication
Psychological and Societal
SMGT 101: Sport and Society 

General Education Core Requirements and remaining Unrestricted Electives: 55 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 120

ENG208 - The Structure of the English Language

This course focuses on essential elements of the structure of the English language: its phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), and syntax (sentence structure). Students draw on their own knowledge of language as they examine spoken English; they then study the relationship between spoken and written language. As students discuss issues pertinent to teachers and to writers, the relevance of linguistic analysis both to written language development and to writing practice is considered. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG209 - Intro to Literature & Literary Studies

This is a foundations course required for the major and the minor in English. The course provides an introduction to a variety of forms and styles in poetry, drama, short story, fiction, memoir, and essay; European, African, North American, Central and South American, and Asian literatures are considered. The focus is on interpreting texts; students are introduced to various schools of interpretation and to standards for supporting an interpretation. Students become familiar with the conventional elements of each genre and with the terminology of critical interpretation. The course introduces print and database tools for research on literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG210 - Survey of American Literature

This course surveys representative periods, authors, or genres in American literature from beginnings in Native American oral literatures through contemporary works. Individual sections organize study of classic and contemporary texts around particular themes, such as Queering American Literatures, American Migrations, Hemispheric American Literature, or Americans on the Edge: "Frontiers" in the American Imagination. Individual sections also trace twentieth- or twenty-first-century movements to their roots in or resistance to earlier movements or forms. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG218 - British Literature

This course surveys British writing in poetry, fiction, and drama, with a focus on key periods in the development of British literature. Emphasis is on representative writers in each period. Periods and movements surveyed include Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary or Postmodern. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG304 - Stories of Origin

This course considers both written and oral traditional texts. Texts originating in expressions of faith, devotion, cultural origin or expression, and ethnic identity are examined, with attention to narration, characterization, sacred mystery, moral /ethical content, and interpretation. Readings include selections from Ancient Greek and Roman literature, the Bible and/or the Qur’an, and world myths and folktales. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

ENG312 - Literature of Postcolonial World

In this course, students consider issues, movements, or traditions in literatures that respond to a history of colonization and/or imperialism. Latin American, African, and Asian cultures or traditions are emphasized in English or in English translations; issues addressed might include matters of publication and criticism, myths about the "third world," nationalism, fundamentalism, human rights, technology, and cultural resistance. Example topics include The Novel in India, Caribbean Dub Poetry, Prison Writing, Major South African Writers, Magic Realism. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

ENG313 - American Multiethnic Literature

This course focuses on the history, variety, and aesthetic conventions of one or more racial-ethnic traditions in American writing. Individual courses might focus on key forms or authors; distinct traditions such as African-American, Latino, Asian-American, or Native American literature; or a survey across several traditions. Examples include Barack Obama and the African-American Tradition, Contemporary Latino Literatures, or Haiti and the US in Haitian-American Writing. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200-level English course.

HUM419 - Seminar in Hum: Readings & Research

This capstone course serves as the direct complement to HUM420. Whereas HUM420 is a writing-intensive course, this course is research and reading intensive; students work in a tutorial fashion (i.e., one on one) with the instructor to choose a research topic, read closely in pertinent sources, and report back through informative and exploratory writing assignments and conversations. Like HUM420, this course focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and the solution of problems; when taken together, these courses serve as a capstone experience. Prerequisite: senior standing. Humanities Department and IDS majors only.

HUM420 - Seminar in Humanities

This capstone course focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and problem solving. The topic will change; however, the course emphasizes extensive research projects related to students' fields of interest. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisites: HUM419 and senior standing. Humanities Department and IDS majors only.

PSYC221 - Child Development

This course examines the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development of the child from birth to adolescence. The contributions of social and cultural experiences as well as the role of biological factors in development are examined as are major theories of development. Students are introduced to the research approaches used to study human development and may be required to carry out observations in various settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC223 - Adolescent Psychology

This course provides a survey of contemporary knowledge of the human brain, examining normal developmental brain processes and common brain functions. The course also covers common disorders and emphasizes understanding the impact of atypical brain development and the consequences of brain trauma. Intervention strategies and treatment are included. Prerequisite: PSYC101

Janice Barrett

Professor of Communication

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Marie Campagna Franklin

Associate Professor of Journalism

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Dana Janbek

Associate Professor of Public Relations

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Michael Laramee

Assistant Professor of Communication

Office: Donahue Center for the Creative and Applied Arts

Meryl Perlson

Chair of Communication; Associate Professor of Communication

Office: Donahue 107

Erin Vicente

Associate Professor of Communication

Office: Donahue Center for Creative and Applied Arts

Brian Wardyga

General Manager, Lasell College Radio; Associate Professor of Communication

Office: Brennan Library

COM101 - Understanding Mass Media

This course surveys the theories, history, economics, audience, and regulations of the major forms of mass media, including newspapers, magazines, motion pictures, radio, television, and new electronic communication. Students develop a basic understanding of the roles of mass media and their effects on society and the individual. The course focuses on the relationship between mass media and society, so students can identify current trends that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students examine and debate many current controversial issues concerning the mass media and their effects on our society and culture. Students discuss significant aspects of mass communication, including ethics and policy formulation that are playing key roles in the materialization of a new global communication era.

COM103 - Human Communication

This course is a basic survey of human communication, especially interpersonal and group. Attention is given to perception, language and meaning, listening, theories of persuasion, verbal and nonverbal communication, small group discussion, interpersonal conflict, and interviewing. The course focuses on understanding how human communication is fundamentally related to issues of interpersonal relationships; the history of human communication and language development; perception and intrapersonal communication; leadership; group/team work; multicultural diversity in organizations; decision-making; power; public speaking; and ethical challenges. This course helps students to develop and practice skills that will guide effective action in their professional careers and interpersonal relationships. This course includes a Service Learning component.

COM105 - Writing for The Media

This course provides students with a basic introduction to and overview of communication writing that focuses on channels of communication (clients, audiences, formats); creating writing samples; conducting writing exercises; developing strategies for soliciting feedback; and engaging in peer editing exercises. Students learn about various media writing formats, such as news releases, features, profiles, columns, editorials, reviews, speeches, public service announcements, backgrounders, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM203 - Effective Speaking

This course provides instruction and practice in preparing and delivering the various kinds of oral presentations encountered by professionals. Students learn how to analyze audiences, organize different types of presentations, prepare and use visual aids, deliver presentations to different audiences and respond to questions. Students are taught to express themselves in a clear, confident, responsible, and appropriate manner. The classroom environment is conducive to confidence building and overcoming the fear of speaking.

COM205 - Media Ethics & Society

This course explores such significant questions as: What constitutes sound, ethical communication practice in the mass media professions (TV, radio and internet), advertising, journalism and public relations? What are the moral and practical rules anyone involved in mass media professions must follow to maintain that all-important bond of trust between the client and the consumer of information? What constitutes ethical behavior in the news business, PR and advertising, and why is it vital to the functioning of a democratic society? This course uses two avenues of inquiry; one exploring the philosophical basis of media ethics and another outlining case histories from the media. Current trends in the news and popular culture’s view of the ethical lapses in the mass media, journalism, advertising, and public relations are also explored. The examination of media ethics is done from a constructively critical point of view, with a particular focus on the intersection of media and society. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM212 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social encounters, and business transactions. Interdisciplinary approaches are applied to the study of how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication; such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries. Prerequisite: COM 101 or SOC 101 or PSYC 101.

COM315 - Communication Research

This course introduces students to methods of social research that are applied to communication theory and practice. This includes both academic research on human communication and the kinds of professional research conducted in media industries, such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students conduct individual and group research projects during the term. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM399 - Internship Seminar

This seminar helps students to develop objectives and identify potential sites for their internships. Topics include the application of communication course work to a professional career and the development of skills necessary to locate an internship. The final goal of this course is to secure an internship. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COM400 - Field Experience I

This course is the professional component of the capstone experience in the Communication Department. The course provides students with a work/skill development opportunity to practice communication theory and skills in a real work setting. Students also keep a journal reflecting on their experiences and complete mid-and end-of-semester self-evaluations. The internship itself for 150 plus hours per week, the weekly seminar, and its assignments constitute the principle of the course.

COM418 - Media Literacy

This course encourages students to take the mass media seriously through critical analysis of media content. Students study the power of the mass media in communicating cultural values and other messages. This capstone course reinforces the tools needed to think critically about the mass media in order for the students to then help others to do the same. Throughout their time in the communication program, students have been introduced to a variety of issues in the media (e.g., media content, media effects, ethics, and regulation). This course helps emphasize how all of these issues relate to one another. In the capstone paper and presentation, students have the opportunity to demonstrate the important research, writing, and oral communication skills they have developed. This course serves as the theoretical component of their capstone experience and is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

COM208 - Public Relations

In this course, students explore the evolution, theoretical basis for, and practice of professional Public Relations. Students review the history and current practices of Public Relations and examine the differences between: PR and advertising; press relations and public affairs; promotions and news events; marketing and media placements. Students gain insights into the Public Relations function for corporations, high tech companies, government agencies, politics, education, the entertainment industry, sports, and non-profit institutions. Lectures, case studies, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local and national publicity, special events, and community and government relations for organizations. Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM209 - Journalism

In this course, students learn reporting and writing techniques necessary to produce a variety of types of articles. Assignments may include politics, sports, entertainment, and interviews. There is discussion of roles of reporters, columnists, editorial writers, editors, photographers, and graphic designers in the daily process of journalism as decisions are made in the news­room as to what stories to cover; what stories, photographs and video clips to publish or broadcast; and on what page to display them or in which order to broadcast them. The various reporting specialties covered in journalism – Health, Education, Business, Arts, Sports, Lifestyle, Entertainment, Travel - are explored. Students have the opportunity to publish their work in the campus newspaper, The 1851 Chronicle. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

COM215 - Radio Production

This course introduces students to the basics of radio production. Students learn announcing techniques, the fundamentals of microphones and sound mixing, as well as the skills to produce quality radio. The course also provides a general overview of the behind-the-scenes radio business and industry. Projects include a news announcement, radio interview, public service announcement, and a short music format radio show. Much of this class takes place outside of the classroom at the Lasell College Radio station.

COM309 - Sports Communication

This course explores the unique writing and research style of sportswriters, while emphasizing the fundamentals of good journalism. Students learn how to write advance, follow-up, feature, and human-interest stories and columns. This course stresses the practical necessity of the fundamentals of reporting, research, interviewing, and ethics, and then demonstrates, through examples and experiences, how to turn information into accurate, readable stories. This course offers students the tools needed to be able to write sports stories worthy of publication, with one potential vehicle being The 1851 Chronicle student newspaper. Students learn about writing for newspapers, broadcast media, and magazines.

SMGT101 - Sport & Society

This course explores the factors that shape sport in a culture and how sport mirrors the society in which it exists. It examines the contributions of recreational and competitive sport to a culture. It includes the role of business in sport and how business interests in sport have served as a catalyst for growth.

SMGT102 - Contemporary Sport Management

This course provides an overview of general principles and practices of the sport industry, covering all facets of sport management, including leadership, sociology, marketing, legal aspects, finance, and governance, in both professional and amateur sports setting. Students learn and understand those unique aspects of sport management that distinguish it from other management fields. Students gain an increased awareness of various career opportunities in the sport industry.

SMGT202 - Ethics in Sport

This course examines theories of ethics as well as personal moral development as applied to sports. It explores the importance of personal ethics and organizational responsibility and the role of professional ethics in sport management.

SMGT304 - Sports Information & Communication

This course examines the fundamentals in sport information, publicity, and promotions. Preparation of news releases, local features, publications of programs and brochures, statistical breakdowns, dealing with the press, and the promotion of specific events, teams, and individuals are included. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

CJ101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course is an overview of the history, philosophy, ethics, and legal issues related to the criminal justice system. The course provides an overview of the criminal justice system, focusing on critical decisions with an emphasis on contemporary issues, controversies, and trends.

ECON101 - Principles of Econ-Micro

This course is an introduction to the principles of the economic behavior of individuals, firms, and industries in the mixed economic system. Topics include consumer demand; elasticity; supply and costs of production; the allocation of economic resources; international trade; and the role of government in promoting economic welfare.

ECON103 - Economics of Social Issues

This course examines a broad range of social issues from an economics perspective. Designed for non-business majors, the course provides an introduction to economic reasoning and to some basic economic concepts which are then used to analyze a variety of social problems. Possible topics include poverty, unemployment, agriculture, discrimination, crime, pollution, education, health care, social security, and third world development. .

LS101 - Foundations of American Legal System

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the law. Students are introduced to the basics of the legal system in the United States including its organization and operation. The course covers major areas of legal practice and the legal principles that apply. Legal concepts are explained and legal terminology defined.

POLS101 - American Government

This is an examination of the basic principles that form the foundation for the structure and practice of American government. The impact of the political system on the citizen is explored along with the central assumptions and concepts that serve as the basis for the field of political science.

POLS201 - State & Local Government

This course begins with the constitutional and legal basis for state and local government. The functions of the executive and legislative branches are examined. Governmental bureaucracy and budgetary processes are studied as well as political parties, interest groups, public opinion, and political reporting in the press.

POLS202 - Issues in Contemporary Political Thought

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to selected contemporary American political issues. The course is designed to create a deeper understanding and interest in these issues and develop students' capacities as citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future. Its topics change frequently to keep up with the latest developments in the field. Throughout the semester, the local impact of national issues are discussed.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.