2013 - 2014 Academic Catalog

Athletic Training

Overview Requirements Course Descriptions Department Faculty

The mission of the Lasell College Athletic Training Education Program is to allow for the intellectual and personal growth of students pursuing a career as an Athletic Trainer. The role of an Athletic Trainer as part of the health care team, and the development of professional and ethical principles are emphasized within a comprehensive competency-based didactic and clinical education foundation designed to prepare the student for eligibility to take the Board of Certification (BOC), national certification examination. Athletic Trainers are involved in the care, prevention, evaluation and rehabilitation of injuries to athletes and the physically active. Athletic Trainers are recognized by the American Medical Association as Allied Health Professionals, and are employed in numerous settings including high schools, colleges and universities, professional sports, sports medicine clinics, industrial medicine settings and hospitals. The program is fully accredited under the guidelines set forth by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

The four-year program in Athletic Training includes formal classroom instruction along with extensive clinical experiences, for credit, under the direct supervision of Athletic Trainers. Clinical experiences take place at Lasell College and at affiliated off-campus sites, and include a variety of practice settings and sport exposures. Athletic Training majors participate in many service-learning experiences, including an early required course, Professional Interactions and Ethics. The program culminates with a capstone course designed to prepare students to engage in research at the graduate level. Additionally, the Athletic Training Program provides students the opportunity to acquire certifications in CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer, Strength and Conditioning and Coaching Education.

Candidates for admission to the freshmen class are expected to complete a college preparatory program of an approved secondary school, satisfying the following Carnegie Units:

4 Units of English
3 Units of Mathematics, including Algebra 1, Algebra 2, and Geometry
(4 recommended)
2 Units of Laboratory Science (3 recommended)
2 Units of Social Science (3 recommended)
2 Units of Foreign Language recommended (not required)

Lasell College will also consider applicants who have successfully fulfilled the requirements for a secondary school diploma or GED.

Academic Program Specific Requirements
Admission into the Athletic Training Major is competitive and includes: successful completion of all required Carnegie Units with a minimum two units of Laboratory Science (preferably Biology and Chemistry, or Physics), a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.7 on a 4.0 scale, and a minimum combined SATI score of 1000 (Critical Reading and Math sections only). With more applications than admission slots, the College may restrict enrollment into the Athletic Training Major. Both first year and transfer applicants who are admitted into the Athletic Training program enter directly into the major; there is no secondary selection process. Applicants are encouraged to complete the application process by January 15th for fall (September) consideration.

Transfer applicants may be accepted into the Athletic Training Program at Lasell College based upon their previous record of academic performance. Transfer students will only be considered on a space-available basis, as admission is competitive in nature, and need to be aware of the possibility of additional time beyond eight academic semesters of college work in order to complete all of the program requirements due to the sequencing of courses and their prerequisites.

Lasell College students (including students who are designated as Undeclared Allied Health) wishing to transfer into the Athletic Training Education Program will be considered on a space-available basis following their freshmen year. A change of major form should be filed with the Program Director at the end of the spring semester of their freshmen year. The applicants' grades for their freshmen year will then be reviewed. Specifically, a "C" or better is needed for all AT, EXSC and BIO courses. A cumulative GPA of 2.3 or better will be required for admission into the Athletic Training Education Program and to enroll in AT 203. Graduates of the program receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Athletic Training.


Program Fee
Each Athletic Training student is charged a program fee for each semester. The program fee is used to provide instructional supplies, discipline-specific technology, guest speaker honorariums, educational opportunities outside of the classroom and miscellaneous materials/supplies needed to maximize student learning.

Students in the Athletic Training major may incur some extra costs associated with their clinical education experience. Additional expenses may include costs associated with travel to off-campus affiliated clinical sites and dress code requirements. If the students do not have access to an automobile, public transportation is available.

The following goals and associated learning outcomes delineate what we strive for students to achieve when they complete the major program of study in Athletic Training:

Goal 1: Communication
Upon completion of the major program of study in Athletic Training, students will be able to:

  1. Engage in disciplinary research
  2. Understand and engage in discipline specific written work (i.e., SOAP notes, injury documentation)
  3. Engage in reflective writing for the purpose of self assessment
  4. Interact professionally and educate clients, patients, peers, colleagues, and medical/athletic personnel
  5. Utilize and incorporate technology into discipline specific written and oral work

Goal 2: Ethical Decision Making
Upon completion of the major program of study in Athletic Training, students will be able to:

  1. Adhere to the National Athletic Training Association (NATA) code of ethics
  2. Identify ethical issues
  3. Translate ethical issues into responsible actions as a healthcare provider

Goal 3: Educational Competencies
Upon completion of the major program of study in Athletic Training, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in 8 athletic training content areas as required by the CAATE (The Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education)
  2. Demonstrate skills in 8 athletic training content areas as required by CAATE (The Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education)
  3. Demonstrate clinical integration proficiencies in 8 athletic training content areas as required by the CAATE (The Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education)

Goal 4: Professional Decision Making/Critical Thinking
Upon completion of the major program of study in Athletic Training, students will be able to:

  1. Incorporate evidence based practice into clinical decision making
  2. Develop ideas based on course content and discipline specific subject matter
  3. Collect and analyze information from various sources
  4. Produce results/conclusions based on collection, analysis, and interpretation of information

Goal 5: Professional and Personal Development
Upon completion of the major program of study in Athletic Training, students will be able to:

  1. Engage in continuous improvement of content in Athletic Training Performance Domains
  2. Engage in professional conduct and behavior

General Education Core: 15 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 121
* In order to qualify for Clinical Education, students must obtain and maintain certificates in First Aid/ CPR. Some clinical sites may require a CORI check of students.

** The following courses may require additional coursework depending upon Math placement:
Math 208: Statistics

*** Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:
Moral and Ethical/Multicultural
EXSC 104: Professional Interactions & Ethics
Scientific
BIO 205 & BIO 205L: Anatomy & Physiology I
Quantitative
MATH 208: Statistics
Psychological and Societal
PSYC 101: Intro to Psychology

Program Course Retake Policy
Students in the program are limited to only one retake of one required AT or EXSC course during their enrollment in the ATEP. Students will progress through the program on a case by case basis after meeting with the Program Director and Department Chair to review their transcript if a repeat of a required course is needed to determine their eligibility to progress in the ATEP.

Retention Policy
The following requirements exist for progression through the Lasell College Athletic Training Education Program. The ATEP coursework, with associated prerequisites, need to be completed in sequence to successfully fulfill the guidelines for progression through the academic program.

Freshman Year
In order to advance into the second semester of your first year in the athletic training education program, you must receive a grade of "C" or better in all AT, BIO and EXSC courses. Failure to do so will necessitate the repetition of this course and the inability to progress in the program without consultation with the Program Director and Department Chair.

Sophomore Year
Prior to beginning the sophomore professional coursework of the ATEP, each student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 30 hours of college coursework.
  2. Completion of BIO 205, BIO 206, AT 202, AT 103, AT 101 and AT 104 with grades of "C" or better.
  3. A minimum of a 2.3 cumulative GPA in all college coursework.
  4. Proof of appropriate vaccinations (Tetanus, Hepatitis B)
  5. Proof of current CPR/AED and First Aid certification (ProfessionalRescuer/AED)

Junior Year
In order to continue into the junior year professional coursework of the ATEP, the students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 60 hours of college coursework.
  2. Completion of the following courses with a grade of "C" or better: AT 203, AT 204, AT 211, AT 212 and EXSC 222.
  3. Minimum of a 2.3 cumulative GPA in all college coursework.
  4. Proof of current CPR/AED and First Aid certification (ProfessionalRescuer/AED).
  5. Demonstration of minimal proficiency in the 8 content areas required by the CAATE..

Senior Year
In order to continue into the senior professional coursework of the ATEP, the student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 90 hours of college coursework.
  2. Completion of the following courses with a grade of "C" or better: AT302, AT 303, AT 304, AT 305, and AT 301.
  3. Minimum of a 2.3 cumulative GPA in all college coursework.
  4. Proof of current CPR/AED and First Aid certification (Professional Rescuer/AED).
  5. Demonstration of minimal proficiency in the 8 content areas required by the CAATE.

Graduation Requirements
In order to successfully complete the athletic training education program, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 121 hours of college coursework.
  2. Completion of the College General Education requirements and the requirements of the athletic training program
  3. Completion of all AT, BIO, EXSC courses with a grade of "C" or better.
  4. Demonstration of minimal proficiency in the 8 content areas as required by the CAATE.
Course Code Course Title Credits
Core Courses
AT101 Essentials of Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2
AT103 Techniques of Emergency Care 3
AT104 Professional Interactions 3
AT202 Foundations in Sport Medicine 4
AT203 Clinical Athletic Training I 3
AT204 Clinical Athletic Training II 3
AT211 Assessment Diagnosis I 4
AT212 Assessment Diagnosis II 4
AT213 Assessment & Diagnosis: Head & Spine 2
AT301 Pathophysiology 3
AT302 Clinical Athletic Training III 3
AT303 Therapeutic Modalities 4
AT304 Therapeutic Exercise & Rehab Techniques 4
AT305 Clinical Athletic Training IV 3
AT402 Clinical Athletic Training V 3
AT405 Clinical Athletic Training VI 3
AT421 Advanced Concepts in Patient Care 3
AT430 Athletic Training Capstone 3
BIO205 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO206 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
CHEM203 General Chemistry I 4
EXSC104 Principles & Problems of Coaching 3
EXSC107 Lifestyles & Human Behavior 3
EXSC209 Performance Nutrition 3
EXSC222 Kinesiology 4
EXSC302 Exercise Physiology 4
EXSC305 Strength Training & Conditioning 4
EXSC340 Research Concepts 3
MATH203 Precalculus 3
MATH208 Statistics 3
PHYS111 General Physics I 4
PSYC101 Psychological Perspectives 3

General Education Core: 15 credits

Minimum credits required for graduation: 121
* In order to qualify for Clinical Education, students must obtain and maintain certificates in First Aid/ CPR. Some clinical sites may require a CORI check of students.

** The following courses may require additional coursework depending upon Math placement:
Math 208: Statistics

*** Courses listed below fulfill Area of Inquiry requirements:
Moral and Ethical/Multicultural
EXSC 104: Professional Interactions & Ethics
Scientific
BIO 205 & BIO 205L: Anatomy & Physiology I
Quantitative
MATH 208: Statistics
Psychological and Societal
PSYC 101: Intro to Psychology

Program Course Retake Policy
Students in the program are limited to only one retake of one required AT or EXSC course during their enrollment in the ATEP. Students will progress through the program on a case by case basis after meeting with the Program Director and Department Chair to review their transcript if a repeat of a required course is needed to determine their eligibility to progress in the ATEP.

Retention Policy
The following requirements exist for progression through the Lasell College Athletic Training Education Program. The ATEP coursework, with associated prerequisites, need to be completed in sequence to successfully fulfill the guidelines for progression through the academic program.

Freshman Year
In order to advance into the second semester of your first year in the athletic training education program, you must receive a grade of "C" or better in all AT, BIO and EXSC courses. Failure to do so will necessitate the repetition of this course and the inability to progress in the program without consultation with the Program Director and Department Chair.

Sophomore Year
Prior to beginning the sophomore professional coursework of the ATEP, each student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 30 hours of college coursework.
  2. Completion of BIO 205, BIO 206, AT 202, AT 103, AT 101 and AT 104 with grades of "C" or better.
  3. A minimum of a 2.3 cumulative GPA in all college coursework.
  4. Proof of appropriate vaccinations (Tetanus, Hepatitis B)
  5. Proof of current CPR/AED and First Aid certification (ProfessionalRescuer/AED)

Junior Year
In order to continue into the junior year professional coursework of the ATEP, the students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 60 hours of college coursework.
  2. Completion of the following courses with a grade of "C" or better: AT 203, AT 204, AT 211, AT 212 and EXSC 222.
  3. Minimum of a 2.3 cumulative GPA in all college coursework.
  4. Proof of current CPR/AED and First Aid certification (ProfessionalRescuer/AED).
  5. Demonstration of minimal proficiency in the 8 content areas required by the CAATE..

Senior Year
In order to continue into the senior professional coursework of the ATEP, the student must meet the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 90 hours of college coursework.
  2. Completion of the following courses with a grade of "C" or better: AT302, AT 303, AT 304, AT 305, and AT 301.
  3. Minimum of a 2.3 cumulative GPA in all college coursework.
  4. Proof of current CPR/AED and First Aid certification (Professional Rescuer/AED).
  5. Demonstration of minimal proficiency in the 8 content areas required by the CAATE.

Graduation Requirements
In order to successfully complete the athletic training education program, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 121 hours of college coursework.
  2. Completion of the College General Education requirements and the requirements of the athletic training program
  3. Completion of all AT, BIO, EXSC courses with a grade of "C" or better.
  4. Demonstration of minimal proficiency in the 8 content areas as required by the CAATE.

ANTH103 - Human Origins

This course considers the morphological, behavioral and life history features that distinguish the primates from other mammals, and the hominoids from other primates. We begin with an overview of the primates and their behavioral ecology, and then explore in detail the adaptations of each of the major groups of extant primates. Finally, we apply our knowledge of morphology and behavioral patterns in living primates to the fossil record.

BIO101 - Principles of Biology

This is an introductory lecture and laboratory course in biology to develop an appreciation for the patterns and functions that characterize living organisms. Emphasis is placed on cellular biology. Topics include: the chemistry of life, cell structure, and cell metabolism (respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis.) Corequisite: BIO 101L.

BIO102 - Diversity of Living Organisms

This course emphasizes the evolutionary history of life on earth. Topics include: Darwinian evolution, genetics, a survey of the five kingdoms of life, principles of ecology, and human ecology. The laboratory introduces the student to the diversity of living organisms. Corequisite: BIO 102L.

BIO110 - Nutrition

This course focuses on the function of nutrients and their requirements throughout the life cycle. The course reviews current nutrition issues as they relate to personal health. Topics include disease prevention, weight and fitness management, fad diets and nutritional trends.

BIO112 - Human Biology

This is a one semester lab course focusing on the functions of the human body in health and disease. The structure and function of the major body systems are emphasized. Systems discussed include: skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, excretory, reproductive, nervous and endocrine. Corequisite: BIO 112L.

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH 104. Corequisite: CHEM 203L.

CJ205 - Forensics

This course provides an introduction to the modern methods used in the detection, investigation, and solution of crimes. Practical analysis of evidence such as: fingerprints and other impressions, ballistics, glass, hair, handwriting and document examination, and drug analysis are studied. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or LS 101.

ENG208 - The Structure of the English Language

This course focuses on essential elements of the structure of the English language: its phonology (sound structure), morphology (word structure), and syntax (sentence structure). Students draw on their own knowledge of language as they examine spoken English; they then study the relationship between spoken and written language. As students discuss issues pertinent to teachers and to writers, the relevance of linguistic analysis both to written language development and to writing practice is considered. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG209 - Intro to Literature & Literary Studies

This is a foundations course required for the major and the minor in English. The course provides an introduction to a variety of forms and styles in poetry, drama, short story, fiction and memoir, or essay, including European, African, North, Central and South American, and Asian literature. The focus is on interpreting texts, including an introduction to preferred approaches of various schools of interpretation and standards for supporting one’s interpretation. Students become familiar with the conventional elements of each genre and the terminology of critical interpretation. The course introduces print and database tools for research on literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG210 - Survey of American Literature

This course surveys representative periods, authors, or genres in American literature from beginnings in Native American oral literatures through the present day. Individual sections organize study of classic and contemporary texts around particular themes, such as Queering American Literatures, American Migrations, Hemispheric American Literature, or Americans on the Edge: "Frontiers" in the American Imagination. Individual sections also trace twentieth or twenty-first century movements to their roots in or resistance to earlier periods or movements, such as captivity narratives and colonial "Brief and True Relations," American Romanticism and the American Renaissance, escaped slave narratives and the Civil War, Reconstruction and Reform, American Modernism, Harlem Renaissance, Beat Generation, Southern Gothic, or Postmodernism. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG218 - British Literature

This course surveys British writing in poetry, fiction, and drama, with a focus on key periods in the development of British literature. Emphasis is on representative writers in each period. Periods and movements surveyed include Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Victorian, Modern, and Contemporary or Postmodern. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG304 - Stories of Origin

This course considers both written and oral traditional texts. Texts originating in expressions of faith, devotion, cultural origin or expression, and ethnic identity are examined, with attention to narration, characterization, sacred mystery, moral /ethical content, and interpretation. Readings include selections from Ancient Greek and Roman literature; the Bible and/or the Qur’an, and world myths and folktales. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

ENG312 - Literature of Post-Colonial World

In this course, students consider issues, movements, or traditions in literatures that respond to a history of colonization and/or imperialism. Latin American, African, and Asian cultures or traditions are emphasized in English or in English translations; issues addressed might include matters of publication and criticism, myths about the "third world," nationalism, fundamentalism, human rights, technology, and cultural resistance. Examples include The Novel in India, Caribbean Dub Poetry, Prison Writing, Major South African Writers, Magic Realism. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

ENG313 - American Multi Ethnic Literature

This course focuses on the history, variety, and aesthetic conventions of one or more racial-ethnic traditions in American writing. Individual courses might focus on key forms or authors; distinct traditions such as African-American, Latino, Asian-American, or Native American literature; or a survey across several traditions. Examples include Barack Obama and the African-American Tradition, Contemporary Latino Literatures, or Haiti and the US in Haitian-American Writing. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

ENG340 - Classics of World Literature

This course explores representative fiction, poetry, or drama by major figures in world literature, centering on a theme such as love, tragedy, comedy, immortality, madness, wasteland, quest for knowledge, voyages, or exploration. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: Any 200 level English course.

HIST123 - American Civilization I

This course examines the chief political, social, and cultural features of American society as they have developed through the period of Reconstruction. Emphasis is on Colonial America, the War of Independence, the Constitution, and the emergence of the Republic through the Civil War.

HIST124 - American Civilization II

This course is a continuation of HIST 123 from the period of Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis is on reconstruction, industrializa­tion, immigration, constitutional issues, and the emergence of American foreign policy. There is some examination of American political life in the nuclear age.

HIST203 - The History of Women in U.S.

This course explores the social history of women in the United States, beginning in the colonial period and ending with an examination of twen­tieth century issues. Emphasis is on the image of women held during these periods, in contrast to actual conditions. Contributions of women to social change and the growth of women’s move­ments are also analyzed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST204 - Recent American History

This course focuses on the presidencies beginning with Kennedy to the present. Work is divided roughly into three areas: foreign affairs; domestic politics; economic, social, and cultural needs. Topics range from the Vietnam War to the Iraq War, the weakening of Congress and the expansion of the presidency, the women's movement, changes in popular culture, and domestic economic developments. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST207 - African American History

This course explores the history of African Americans in the United States from their African beginnings to the present. It traces the lives and status of African Americans, enslaved and emancipated, as they confronted the barriers of legal, institutional, and cultural prejudices; examines the socioeconomic and political experiences of blacks in America; and investigates strategies of accommodation, resistance, and protest in the struggle of African Americans to gain human and first-class citizenship rights. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST208 - Sub-Saharan Africa after 1800

This survey of sub-Saharan African history explores the ongoing story of African political, social, and economic developments from the post trans-Atlantic slave trade period to the present. The course includes treatment of the impact of European merchants, missionaries, and adventurers on Africa from the time immediately preceding imperialism and colonialism up through the emergence of nationalism and decolonization and liberation movements. The new nation-states, their post-colonial economies, and their developing systems of justice, education, and rule are investigated. Finally, topics such as soil erosion, disease, conservation, famine, and Africa’s relationships with the wider world are discussed. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST209 - China from 1600 to Present

This course is a survey of modern Chinese history from the founding of the Qing Dynasty in the seventeenth century to Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms of the 1990s. Special attention will be paid to modernization, Western and Japanese imperialism in China, and the rise of Communism under Mao Zedong. In addition to learning about important milestones in Chinese history, students will also be introduced to aspects of Chinese art, culture, and women's issues through primary sources translated into English. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST210 - Latin Amer Colonial Period to Present

This survey looks at Latin American history from pre-Columbian to contemporary times. Emphasis is on native cultures, the “discovery” of the New World, European presence, colonialism, imperialism, the creation of the peasantry, wars of independence, the formation of nation-states, the role of the military, slavery and racism, development and underdevelopment, the Catholic Church, liberation theology, poverty, and revolution. Major emphasis in South America is on Argentina, Columbia, Peru, Chile, Venezuela, and the Portuguese speaking nation of Brazil. The course also includes examination of foreign intervention and inner instability in Mexico, including struggles for democracy, economic rights, and social justice. In the Hispanic Caribbean and Central America, especially, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama, land and labor systems, gender relations, race and ethnicity, and varied forms of rule are discussed. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST211 - Middle East & Islamic World Since 1800

This course looks at the Middle East and its relations with the wider world, from the appearance of Napoleon to the present. Topics include attempts at reform and modernization in the Ottoman Empire; the impact of Western imperialism on the region as a whole; and twentieth-century developments in the area, including nationalism, pan-Arabism, pan-Islamism, the cult of the personality, coup, revolution, Zionism, and the Palestinian-Israeli confrontation. The economic and social impact of oil, the influence of fundamentalism, and the Great Power rivalry down through the position of the United States toward the area are investigated. The efforts of Iran to gain acceptance in/by the contemporary world is examined, as is the shifting attitude of Egypt toward modernity. Finally, connections between the region and the rest of the Islamic world are explored. This is a writing-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST212 - Mod Japan: Culture & History

This course is a survey of Japan's modernization from the fall of the "warring states" period to the economic bubble of the 1980s. Special attention will be paid to the contributions of the "early modern" Tokugawa Shogunate, the Meiji period of cultural borrowing from the West, and the cultural nationalism of the Japanese empire until 1945. In addition to learning about important milestones in Japanese history, students will be introduced to aspects of Japanese art and culture through a variety of primary and secondary sources and film clips. This is a presentation-intensive course. Prerequisite: a 100 level history course or ENG 102.

HIST330 - Europe & The World/ Age of Expansion

This course examines political, economic, social, scientific, and religious developments that contributed to European desire for land and power, and also to fantasies and phobias directed by European conquerors toward those whom they subdued and subjected to Western rule. The reaction toward the white Westerners on the part of those exploited is also explored. The period covered is from the mid-fifteenth century through the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: a 200 level history course or permission of instructor.

HUM420 - Seminar in Humanities

This capstone course focuses on the acquisition of knowledge and problem-solving. The topic will change; however, the course emphasizes extensive research projects related to students' fields of interest. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: HUM419 and Senior standing. Humanities Department and IDS majors only.

PHIL101 - Introduction to Philosophy

This course is an introduction to the basic problems of philosophy, such as the sources of knowledge, the relationship between mind and body, freedom as opposed to determinism, and the nature of values.

PHIL110 - Ethics

This course is an introduction to analysis of conduct, moral reasoning, and foundation of ethical values in a search for the ultimate meanings of human experience. The following specific problems are examined: life and death issues; human experimentation; sexuality; truth-telling in medicine; honesty in business; cheating and lying; stealing and reparation; egoism, obligation; and capital punishment.

PHYS111 - General Physics I

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS 111L.

SCI103 - Science for Educators I

This course provides education students with an introduction to the scientific principles governing the contemporary technological world. Topics include scientific methodologies, gravity, energy, electricity, magnetism, light, and introductory chemistry. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lecture.

SCI104 - Science for Educators II

This course provides education students with an introduction to earth science, astronomy, and environmental science. Topics include the weather, solar system, stars, the universe, and global pollution. Laboratory experiments are conducted to complement the material covered in lectures.

SCI105 - Principles of Astronomy

This course is an introduction to descriptive astronomy. The course covers general physical principles that lead to an understanding of how the universe was formed, the laws of planetary motion, how stars shine, and the creation of black holes. Other special topics in astronomy are covered. Special evening sessions for observing the stars and planets may be offered.

Marisa Hastie

Associate Professor and Program Director of Exercise Science

Office: 70 Maple Street

Cristina Haverty

Chair of Athletic Training & Exercise Science; Associate Professor of Athletic Training

Office: 70 Maple Street

Ron Laham

Visiting Assistant Professor of Athletic Training

Office: 70 Maple Street

Dominique Ross

Assistant Professor of Athletic Training and Coordinator of Clinical Education

Office: 70 Maple Street

AT101 - Essentials of Musculoskeletal Anatomy

This course provides students with foundational concepts associated with the healthcare and fitness industry. Through connected learning projects, emphasis is placed on understanding musculoskeletal anatomy and medical nomenclature. Formerly - AHLT101

AT103 - Techniques of Emergency Care

This course emphasizes principles and techniques for recognition and management of life-threatening and non-life-threatening medical emergency situations. Additionally, the course content includes a variety of injury and illness prevention techniques including, taping, bracing and proper hydration. The lab component of the course includes techniques for immobilization, airway management, athletic equipment management, and removal in emergency situations. At the completion of the course students will be eligible for certification in CPR Professional Rescuer/AED and First Aid by the American Red Cross.

AT104 - Professional Interactions

This seminar style course introduces students to current concepts and theories of medical ethics and ethical decision making, understanding personal and professional values, exposure to multiculturalism and diversity and patient instruction in various professional settings. This course has a connected learning component that develops professional communication skills, patient education and recognition of cultural, ethical and socioeconomic diversity through a discipline-specific environment. Students also complete a service-learning component to gain a greater understanding of civil responsibility, multiculturalism and diversity and personal values. Prerequisite: EXSC 101 or AT101

AT202 - Foundations in Sport Medicine

This course is a basic athletic training course providing an overview of prevention, recognition, and initial management of common athletic injuries. Additional topics covered in the course include: issues in health care administration, nutritional considerations, environmental issues, protective equipment, tissue healing, bloodborne pathogens and rehabilitation concepts. Formerly - AT201

AT203 - Clinical Athletic Training I

This course requires a minimum of 125 hours of supervised clinical education experience at affiliated athletic training sites. Clinical education experiences include working with intercollegiate athletic teams with an emphasis placed on understanding the operation of an AT facility, policies and procedures, implementation of emergency techniques and first aid, application of taping and bracing techniques and engaging in professional interactions. The laboratory component of the course meets 2 hours weekly and focuses on musculoskeletal anatomy, taping and bracing, wound care and basic injury evaluations. Prerequisites: AT 103, AT 104

AT204 - Clinical Athletic Training II

This course requires a minimum of 125 hours of supervised clinical education experience at affiliated athletic training sites. Emphasis is placed on the athletic trainer’s role in working with an athletic team. The laboratory component meets two hours weekly to develop additional evaluation techniques and knowledge of anatomical landmarks. Prerequisites: AT 211

AT211 - Assessment Diagnosis I

This course focuses on techniques for orthopedic and neurological assessment of musculoskeletal injuries to the lower extremities and low back. The lab component emphasizes developing clinical skills including palpation of bony landmarks, manual muscle testing, goniometry measurements, stress tests and special tests. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisites: AT 202 & BIO 205Formerly - AT350/350L

AT212 - Assessment Diagnosis II

This course focuses on techniques for orthopedic and neurological assessment of musculoskeletal injuries to the upper extremities, thorax, and cervical spine. The course includes assessment of head and facial injuries. The laboratory component emphasizes developing clinical skills including palpation of bony landmarks, performing stress and special tests. Prerequisite: AT 211.Corequisite: AT212L

AT213 - Assessment & Diagnosis: Head & Spine

Course Description:This course provides a comprehensive study of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine. Topics include applied biomechanics, techniques for orthopedic and neurological assessment, and rehabilitation/management techniques. These topics are addressed through a problem-based learning format. Through lecture and laboratory opportunities, the student will develop a systematic approach to the evaluation process and develop accurate impressions and treatment protocols. Prerequisite: AT 211, AT 212

AT301 - Pathophysiology

In this course, major pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach relating them to the practice of the health care professional. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. The course also describes the impact of cellular dysfunction, interpretation of medical laboratory tests and drug interaction and pharmacology for the health care provider. The course encourages critical analysis of clinical data to identify logical connections and integration. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

AT302 - Clinical Athletic Training III

This course requires between 150 and 225 hours of supervised clinical experience in the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Students may have peer teaching responsibilities. The laboratory component meets two hours per week. Emphasis is placed on identification of anatomical landmarks and evaluation techniques being stressed. Prerequisite: AT 204.

AT303 - Therapeutic Modalities

This course is an examination of the treatment of athletic injuries through the use of cold and heat modalities, hydrotherapy, and electrical modalities. Emphasis is placed on theoretical and physiological effects on healing, and on indications and contraindications for use of each modality. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

AT304 - Therapeutic Exercise & Rehab Techniques

This course presents intermediate and advanced principles and techniques of rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Emphasis is placed on designing rehabilitation progressions and integrating them appropriately for return to sport activity. The lab component focuses on proper techniques for specific exercises, exercise contraindications, and use of special rehabilitation equipment.Corequisite AT304L. Prerequisite: EXSC 222.

AT305 - Clinical Athletic Training IV

This course requires between 150 and 225 hour of supervised clinical experience in the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Students are exposed to increasing amounts of responsibility and advanced tasks within the role of the athletic trainer. Students may have peer teaching responsibilities. The laboratory component of the course meets 2 hours weekly and focuses on rehabilitation techniques with an emphasis on therapeutic exercise. Prerequisite: AT 302.

AT402 - Clinical Athletic Training V

This course requires between 150-225 hours of supervised clinical experience in the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Students have increasing responsibility for coordinating all aspects of athletic training services for an athletic team. Increasing amounts of administrative and peer teaching responsibilities are provided. The laboratory component meets for two hours weekly with emphasis on rehabilitation techniques, specifically therapeutic modalities. Prerequisite: AT 305.

AT405 - Clinical Athletic Training VI

This course requires between 150-225 hours of supervised clinical experience at the Lasell College Athletic Training facility or an affiliated site. Increased emphasis on research, peer teaching, and presentations. The laboratory component meets for two hours weekly to review anatomical landmarks and special techniques. Prerequisite: AT 402.

AT421 - Advanced Concepts in Patient Care

This course focuses on pharmacology, ethics, psychosocial aspects of care and athletic training for special populations. Emphasis is placed on advance concepts intended to prepare students for entry-level jobs in the field of athletic training. Prerequisites: Senior standing, PSYC 101, AT 301

AT430 - Athletic Training Capstone

This course is designed to serve as a capstone course for seniors in the athletic training education program. The primary goal is to better prepare students to engage in research at the graduate level. The content of this course focuses on opportunities for undergraduate research, with three course design options: development of original case study research, with focus on adhering to written and oral presentation standards within the field; development of an original research question, with focus on methodology, data collection and statistical analysis; development of an understanding of the research process, with focus on review of the literature, defining the research question, and study methodology. Prerequisites: Senior standing, EXSC340

BIO205 - Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a comprehensive course focusing on the structure and function of the human body. The course introduces students to aspects of human biology ranging from the chemical basis of life and cell biology to the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems. Topics covered include: cell biology, major body tissues, and the structure and function of the following systems: skin, skeletal, muscular, and nervous. The laboratory component includes dissection. Students should have successfully completed one year of at least secondary (high school) level Biology before electing this course. Corequisite: BIO 205L.

BIO206 - Anatomy & Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 205. The following systems are covered during the semester: endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive. The laboratory component includes dissection. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Corequisite: BIO 206L.

CHEM203 - General Chemistry I

The course begins with a study of measurement and matter. An introduction to atomic theory follows. Mass relationships in chemical reactions are introduced, followed by the study of chemical reactions in aqueous solutions. The gas laws are then covered, followed by an introduction to thermodynamics. Concepts of chemical bonding are studied along with periodic relationships among the elements. Quantum theory is used to explain the electronic structure of atoms. Laboratory experiments complement the material covered in lecture. The laboratory experiments are designed to introduce methods, materials, and equipment of chemistry as well as to illustrate important chemical principles. Prerequisite: MATH 104. Corequisite: CHEM 203L.

EXSC104 - Principles & Problems of Coaching

This course provides students with an introduction to the profession of coaching. Students develop a base of knowledge through the study of principles and concepts from the areas of coaching philosophy, sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology, and sports management. Upon successful completion of the course, students have a thorough understanding and appreciation of possible solutions for those problems that are most frequently encountered in coaching, as well as the ability to apply principles of coaching to individual athletes and/or a team.

EXSC107 - Lifestyles & Human Behavior

This course focuses on the benefits of a healthy lifestyle and the interactive principles of human behavior across the lifespan from adolescence through adult development. Topics include exercise adherence and maintenance, weight management, smoking cessation, and stress management. Formerly - AHLT107

EXSC209 - Performance Nutrition

This course studies the effects, benefits, and sources of major nutrients. It includes an overview of nutritional issues involved in disease processes and nutritional needs for an active population. Special focus on patient assessment and development of dietary plans based on energy expenditure. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC222 - Kinesiology

This course examines the anatomical and mechanical concepts required for critical assessment, description, and qualitative analysis of human motion. The laboratory component includes analysis of human motion. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206, PHYS 111.

EXSC302 - Exercise Physiology

This course explores the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the structure and function of the body with an emphasis on the acute responses of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neuromuscular systems. Various concepts related to physical fitness such as body composition, skill related fitness, and cardiovascular fitness are introduced. The practical applications of major principles are demonstrated in a laboratory setting. Students are advised that the capability to exercise moderately and maximally may be required and that documentation of a medical examination indicating cardiopulmonary status and exercise capacity may be requested by the instructor. Writing intensive course. Prerequisites: BIO 205, BIO 206.

EXSC305 - Strength Training & Conditioning

Lecture and practical sessions include principles of weight training and conditioning, orientation to different modalities, including free weights, weight machines (i.e., Nautilus), and circuit training and development of individual and group exercise programs. Students may be required to obtain medical clearance prior to participation. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

EXSC340 - Research Concepts

This course covers research concepts in the healthcare and fitness industy including the logic of experimental and correlational designs, issues of control, sampling, measurement of variables, ethical issues in research, use of online professional search procedures, and writing in APA style. Students engage in various aspects of the research process culminating in a research paper on a discipline specific topic. Prerequisite: MATH 208.

MATH203 - Precalculus

This course prepares students for the study of calculus, physics and other courses requiring precalculus skills. Included is a review of algebra, coordinate geometry, the solution of systems of equations, and the analysis and graphing of lin­ear, quadratic, inverse, polynomial, and rational functions. There is a thorough treatment of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. An important goal is for students to develop a geometric understanding of functions and their properties. Prerequisite: MATH 104 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing. Restrictions: not open to students who have completed 205, 206, or any 300 level mathe­matics course successfully.

MATH208 - Statistics

This is an introductory course in descriptive and inferential statistics with an emphasis on applications in business and the social and biological sciences. Topics include: data analysis, and graphical methods of describing data, measures of central tendency and variability, probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 104, MATH 109, or MATH 204 with a grade of C or better or demonstrated competency through placement testing and ENG 102.

PHYS111 - General Physics I

This is the first semester of a one-year course that surveys the field of physics at a non-calcu­lus level. Topics include motion in one and two dimensions, force, uniform circular motion, work and energy, and statics of rigid bodies. The laws of thermodynamics are introduced. Laboratory experiments are conducted to com­plement the material covered in lecture. Prerequisite: MATH 203 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: PHYS 111L.

PSYC101 - Psychological Perspectives

In this course, students learn to think like psychologists as they study classic and contemporary topics in human behavior, feeling, and thought. Students learn to apply psychological perspectives of thought, including biological, cognitive, sociocultural, humanistic, psychodynamic, and behaviorist, to better understand the human experience. Students will learn to use these perspectives to explore how individual behavior is influenced by and influences one’s biology, family, community and society. Topics may include human development, personality, psychopathology, human relationships, language, memory, perceptual processes, and intelligence, among others.