2013 - 2014 Academic Catalog

Graduate Course Descriptions

COM701 - Communication, Ethics, & Society

This course is designed to present students with a graduate-level overview of contemporary mass communication. We focus on the relationship between mass media and society and the ethical issues inherent in that relationship; in the process, we identify current trends, particularly in technology, that are changing the nature and function of traditional mass communication. Students gain insight into the influences of mass communication on business, government, politics, education, the home environment, and non-profit instutions, as well as related ethical issues.

COM702 - Organizational Communication

This course focuses on both theoretical understanding and practical knowledge of the context and applications for organizational communication. Topics include: leadership, new technologies and their impact on organizations, organizational climate and culture, ethics, formal and informal channels of communication within organizations, management of diversity and conflict, relational communication (with interpersonal and group work), and issues of power and politics within the context of organizational settings. During the first half of the course, the focus is on the theoretical bases for organizational communication; then emphasis shifts to professional perspectives on organizational communication and practical applications for “real life” situations in the work environment.

COM703 - Communication Research

This course provides students with an understanding of the concepts, roles, processes, techniques, and strategies of communication research. The course examines research conducted in both the professional and academic settings, and includes quantitative (surveys, experiments, content analyses) and qualitative (focus groups, etc.) methods. The main goal of this course is to help students become intelligent "consumers" of research -- to provide the tools needed to evaluate and interpret research, as well as the ability to make knowledgeable decisions about the uses and benefits of research.

COM704 - Corporate Communication

This course is designed to present an overview of corporate public relations in contemporary society. The rapidly changing nature of global markets and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways that communication professionals achieve their goals. The course explores the trends and issues affecting corporations, crisis management, public affairs communication, consumer affairs, employee relations, environmental issues, investor relations, issues of multinationals, ethics, and governmental relations.

COM705 - Media Relations

Managing media relations for organizations is the focus of this course. The course is intended to increase knowledge of the principles and methods of generating publicity as well as the basics of planning and writing media relations campaigns. The rapidly changing nature of global companies and the convergence of new information technologies are influencing the ways that communication professionals achieve their goals. Students work individually or in teams to plan a comprehensive media relations program, to communicate a clear message, and to evaluate the effectiveness of public relations strategies for a chosen client. Lectures, readings, group work, guest speakers, and class discussions focus on techniques useful in such areas as local & national publicity, special events, and in community and government relations for organizations.

COM706 - Global Media

This course introduces students to theory, trends, and issues in the global media landscape. Students are exposed to a number of topics including: theoretical perspectives of global media, global media development, challenges and barriers of global media, ethical considerations in global media, the role of advertising and public relations in global media, and case studies from regions around the world.

COM709 - Negotiations & Conflict Resolution

This is a communication skills course designed to better understand the nature of conflict and its resolution through persuasion, collaboration, and negotiation. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and its resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. Students assess their own styles, skills, and values, and develop techniques to better resolve disputes, achieve objectives, and exert influence.

COM713 - Writing for Public Relations

Public relations writing focuses on multiple aspects of communication such as client needs, target audiences, and various formats. In this course, students learn how to craft effective written and visual messages for press releases, speeches, brochures, newsletters, broadcast outlets, web pages etc., and they develop strategies for soliciting and evaluating feedback from designated target audiences.

COM721 - Principles of Public Relations

This course is in-depth study of the profession of public relations with a focus on contemporary issues, problems, and challenges using guided discussion and analysis of case studies. The course examines public relations and its role in mass media and in society and the challenges facing public relations professionals today. Upon completing this course, each student should: 1) understand what the field of public relations is and how to recognize best practices for public relations professionals; 2) be able to evaluate the effectiveness of public relations strategies; 3) be familiar with issues and concerns public relations professionals face in today’s increasingly global society; and 4) understand the importance of ethical behavior in public relations.

COM722 - Crisis Communication

This course prepares students for anticipating the seven major types of crises faced by communication managers in organizations (skewed values and ethics, deception, management misconduct, natural disasters, technological crises, confrontations and boycotts, malevolence, and disinformation) and how to make preparations to deal with them effectively and competently. Students explore which organizational cultures and government practices create vulnerability to crises. The course examines appropriate leadership styles, management actions, and communications strategies before, during, and after a crisis. Students review issues such as leadership initiatives, management monitoring, crisis analysis, action strategy and determination, and implementation of communication strategies. Students learn how to minimize the damage to reputation caused by a crisis; engage in sound media relations; prepare risk communication programs; communicate with key stakeholders; and contribute to the post-crisis recovery and renewal of an organization.

COM724 - International Corporate Communication

This course focuses on the major role of multinational corporations in the global arena. They must interact with one another, with national and supranational governments, and with non-governmental organizations.  Their concerns revolve around issues such as resistance to globalization, anger abroad toward the United States, climate change, human rights, sustainability, transfer of technology, and recruitment of human resources. These issues will be reviewed and strategies discussed that guide management thinking for strategic communications. The strategies are drawn from the fields of public relations, public affairs and marketing.

COM725 - Advertising

The emphasis in this course is on the role of strategic thinking about promotional elements in the field of advertising. The development of an integrated marketing communications program requires an understanding of the overall marketing process, including how organizations plan for advertising and determine their advertising goals and objectives. Students in this course examine the process of planning, developing, and executing an advertising campaign and related integrated marketing communications programs, as well as the various factors and considerations that influence this process. Advertising starts with research, and moves through analysis, planning, action and evaluation; hence, this course requires students to undertake the kind of strategic thinking, planning, and execution that is done by marketers, researchers, media planners, and copywriters. Throughout the course, students learn how advertising is regulated and about the key social issues and consumer problems with advertising.

COM730 - Graphic Design for the Marketplace

This course is designed to engage students historically, theoretically, and practically in terms of Graphic Design and its relationship to the consumer marketplace. The goal is to introduce student's to new ways of thinking about consumer driven Graphic Design principles by reading a wide range of texts, exploring and researching contemporary design solutions, and presenting original design marketing strategies.

COM731 - Video Production

This course teaches graduate students the techniques of video production from an EFP (Electronic Field Production) perspective. Students learn both the functionality and art of digital videography and nonlinear editing. The course also provides a genuine understanding of the business of video production. By the end of the semester, students should be able to: Successfully operate a JVC GR HD-1 digital camcorder to shoot quality EEP on the fly - Differentiate between quality shots and poor videography - Produce short narrative through story boarding, directing, shooting, and editing - Perform basic nonlinear editing using Avid Xpress Pro - Converse in "TV Talk," using standard media vocabulary

COM738 - Persuasion & Public Opinion

This course introduces students to the dynamics of social influence. Students learn the theories, strategies, and techniques of persuasion as a means of shaping public opinion and attitudes. The course examines how individuals, business, government, and institutions craft messages and communicate through the press, entertainment media, advertising, and public relations. Primarily through public opinion research, students can ascertain and understand the beliefs, attitudes, and values of groups and society. Students learn how to craft persuasive messages, how to evaluate the attempts of others to persuade audiences, and how to recognize and avoid unethical attempts at persuasion.

COM742 - Integrated Marketing Communications

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of integrated marketing communication (IMC) and provide an overview of developments in the field. Students learn about the profession of corporate communication and its interface with society. Some of the topics addressed in the course include the relationship between public relations (PR) and marketing, the history and development of advertising and public relations, public opinion and its role in IMC planning, media relations, research for campaign design, global communication, and crisis management.

COM743 - Integrated Marketing Com & the Internet

This course introduces students to web based public relations and marketing strategies and emphasizes the effectiveness of the Internet as a direct and interactive communication channel with target audiences. Emphasis is placed on the role of the Internet as a critical element of the marketing communications mix with a focus on how the web has altered traditional marketing and public relations strategies.

COM744 - Integrated Marketing Com Planning

This course introduces students to the four-step process in planning and solving corporate communication problems. Students learn to apply course concepts to hypothetical situations through individual and group work on IMC cases. Group project assignments enable students to (1) gain experience in doing collaborative work and (2) develop a problem-solving approach to on-the-job situations that an IMC professional is likely to encounter. An important aspect of working on problems in class is an introduction to the various techniques and strategies of communicating with target audiences. In addition to the assigned reading material, the course also features guest speakers from the advertising and public relations professions to bring a real world dimension to the material.

COM750 - Intercultural Communication

This course examines communication issues that arise from contact between people from different cultural backgrounds in everyday life, social service encounters, and business transactions. The course uses interdisciplinary approaches to study how verbal and nonverbal presentation, ethnic, gender, and cultural differences affect communication. The course provides exercises in participation, analysis, and criticism of interethnic and interracial communications in small group settings. Students examine factors of international communication, such as the cultural, economic, political, and social influences and the role of communication in affecting social change in a wide variety of cultures and countries.

COM751 - Health Communication

This course provides students with an understanding of how to design and deliver media support services for health media productions, health communication campaigns, and organizations developing their health communication capacity. Focused activities reflect health and science themes to benefit the public at large, as well as special populations and health care institutions, such as hospitals. Students learn to use and value the media in its potential to be a resource for lifelong learning, health promotion, and positive social change through educating the population about health messages and wellness themes.

COM752 - Community Relations

This course provides an examination of the evolution of community relations, the theory behind it, and the techniques employed by its professionals. Using a case study approach, students learn how to select a site for expansion; conduct a community relations audit; work with state, local, and federal governments; and develop sound relationships with the media and advocacy groups in the corporate and nonprofit arenas.

COM753 - Public Relations in Non-Profit Settings

Students examine the role of managed communication and marketing in public relations problems unique to health, education, arts, and human- and public-service organizations. The course focuses on analysis of organizational structure, public relations and communication programs, and fund-raising practices of these agencies.

COM754 - Governmental Relations

This course aims to assist students with their understanding of the complex ideas associated with the role of the media in our democracy. Because the media have become a central force in American political life, students need to become aware of how the governance of our country is influenced by the intersection of the media and politics. Through a variety of activities, cases, and readings, students learn how to work with elected officials who have made their media strategies a key component of their leadership on public policy issues that affect citizens, corporations and non-profit organizations.

COM755 - Communication Law

This course presents a study of the laws that apply to communication practitioners. Topics include the First Amendment; defamation; invasion of privacy; copyright; regulation of advertising, obscenity and indecency; and the emerging field of Internet Law.

COM756 - Health Promotions & Campaigns

This course takes an applied approach to researching, planning, implementing, and evaluating health communication efforts. Through exposure to rich health communication campaign cases, students learn where and why some campaigns worked and others failed. Students design their own heath campaigns informed by theory and health models.

COM758 - Branding Health Services

Students in this course learn about branding as a marketing tool applied to health products, services, and campaigns. This course integrates theory with applications through the analysis of multiple case studies and branding strategies.

COM761 - Communicating in Groups and Teams

This course focuses on communication skills needed to lead teams and groups in interpersonal communication contexts. It examines leadership skills and communication strategies necessary for developing and maintaining effective professional relationships. Leading teams involves the use of communication skills in facilitating different personalities, cultures and competing agendas. Topics include enhancing professional relationships, attitudes and values, nonverbal communication, language, and methods of conflict resolution in group interactions.

COM762 - Communication Strategies for Leaders

This course provides a foundation for understanding the significance of communication strategies and skills and their application to developing capabilities for leadership in today’s complex and multi-faceted organizations. Students are exposed to many different styles of communication used by effective leaders, including contemporary collaborative models. The theoretical frames for communication and leadership provide students with perspectives that assist them in developing their own personal model for effective communication in their leadership roles.

COM796 - Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive examination provides evidence of student knowledge of key concepts, skills, and other important materials related to the communication field. Preparation throughout the semester includes regular study group meetings with faculty and peers focused on reading and discussing case studies related to the major, as well as preparing written analyses of issues and concepts found in the case studies. The full-day exam requires analyzing case studies in the major and in the area of concentration, and developing written responses that integrate skills and understandings derived from coursework and other educational experiences in the degree program. Prerequisite: COM 703

COM797 - Thesis

Students completing a master’s thesis design, conduct, and report original research related to their concentration, working closely with a faculty advisor in the department and following detailed guidelines provided by the department. Prerequisites: COM 703 and prior preparation in statistics.

COM798 - Special Study Project

The project can be a document, a video, or a multi-media presentation developed under the guidance of a Lasell College faculty member to applying communication skills and professional expertise derived from the student's program of graduate study. Such projects are designed to solve some problem in communication that is relevant to the student's area of concentration in public relations or integrated marketing communications.Prerequsite: COM703

COM799 - Professional Internship

The internship is a hands-on working experience in the field of the student’s concentration. Students who opt for the internship are expected to complete 150 hours in organizations that are committed to providing interns a high quality educational experience by having a supervisor available with time expressly for the purpose of teaching and guiding the intern. As a part of their internship, students undertake meaningful projects, including regular reflection, analysis, and written products, under the supervision of both an employer and Lasell College faculty member.The internship is a hands-on working experience in the student’s field of concentration requiring a minimum of 150 hours of placement under the supervision of both an employer and a faculty member. Beginning in the semester preceding the internship placement, the student identifies what type of organization they desire for their internship. The student holds primary responsibility for obtaining a field experience site and is responsible for setting up interviews with prospective internship sites.. The internship supervisor monitors student performance and visits internships sites as needed. On completion of the internship, the student submits a reflection paper to the faculty supervisor on their experience. Students may not perform internships at their current place of employment without prior consent of the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies. Each student makes a public and professional presentation of the Graduate Internship experience. This course is taken during the student’s final graduate semester. Prerequisite: COM 703.

ED711 - Curriculum & Assessment Diverse Learners

This course considers research, principles, and strategies for effective instruction and classroom organization, particularly in the context of supporting diverse learners and teaching in diverse settings. Topics include differentiated instruction, curriculum planning and resources, formal and informal assessments of student progress, modifications appropriate to meet linguistic and cultural differences, and accommodations for special needs learners. Requires classroom observations at multiple locations.

ED712 - Literacy Instruction: Elementary

This course explores literacy learning and teaching in grades 1 – 6. Topics include the role of phonemic awareness, phonics, and word analysis in reading and writing; the relationship among vocabulary development, comprehension, and fluency; formal and informal assessments to measure literacy development and guide classroom instruction; and effective instructional strategies and materials to support elementary learners in reading and writing. Includes focus on differentiating instruction for readers and writers with diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Requires a pre-practicum.

ED713 - Reading Supports for Elementary Learners

This course examines formal and informal assessments of reading difficulties, especially those currently in use, and their analysis, interpretation, and application to classroom instruction and placement. Students explore strategies, materials, and modifications appropriate for classroom teachers, as well as specialized programs. Requires classroom observations. Prerequisite: ED 712.

ED720 - Mathematics Concepts & Curriculum

This course explores central areas of mathematics in the elementary classroom, as well teaching strategies and methods appropriate for learners at various stages of understanding. Topics include number and operations; functions and algebra; geometry and measurement; statistics and probability; and problem solving. Requires classroom teaching.

ED721 - Science & Technology Concepts/Curriculum

This course provides understanding of essential concepts in the physical and life sciences, including technology and environmental science. Reviews standards for teaching and learning science and technology, as well exploring area resources for teachers and elementary students. Integrates technology appropriate for elementary classrooms.

ED722 - Social Studies Concepts & Curriculum

This course provides understanding and critical examination of major events and eras in American and world history through varied perspectives. Includes strategies for integrating social studies and other content areas, including literacy and arts. Students explore local resources for teaching social studies and become familiar with Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

ED751 - Research, Policy, Practice in Education

This course explores critical issues in education, with particular focus on policy and practice implications. Specific topics vary, including both perennial concerns (for example, inclusion and accommodations for special needs learners; assessment goals, strategies, and instruments; literacy instruction and assessment; school choice) and emerging concerns related to legislative initiatives, budget considerations, and major research findings.

ED752 - Collaboration for Student Success

This course emphasizes effective communication skills in a variety of contexts, both within and outside of school settings, related to elementary student success. Students develop strategies for collaborating with a variety of professionals, including school professionals in general education and special education and professionals in medical and mental health agencies; and for engaging families/caregivers, particularly from diverse backgrounds, community members, and outside agencies.

ED753 - Literacy Across the Curriculum

This course provides principles, strategies, and resources for teaching and using literacy skills in content-area subjects in elementary grades. Focuses on comprehension of narrative and informational texts, text types, integration of literature in content areas, study skills, and vocabulary development.

ED754 - Phonics & Spelling in Elementary Grades

This course focuses on language processes, including phonological and orthographic language systems related to literacy development. Research and theory related to letters, sounds and their relationship, word analysis, and spelling are used to critique and evaluate reading programs and design customized assessment and instruction.

ED771 - Understanding/Using Educational Research

This course explores major paradigms of educational research, including concepts, methods, and terminology related to each. Students read, analyze, and discuss both seminal and current research in relevant areas; study trends in educational research; and apply findings to their own practice by designing a classroom-based research project. Prerequisite: completion of at least 18 credits in the graduate education program.

ED772 - Teacher as Researcher

This course focuses on refining, completing, and reporting the research project designed in ED 771. Requires presenting findings in symposium setting. Prerequisite: ED 771.

ED773 - Teacher as Leader

This course explores various aspects of leadership and change in education, business, and other professions. Includes theories and models of leadership, organizational change and behavior, and policy analysis, as well as approaches to mentoring and coaching. Helps participants identify their own leadership styles and goals. Prerequisite: completion of at least 21 credits in the graduate education program.

ED796 - Practicum: Elementary

This course provides a minimum of 300 hours of student teaching experience in an elementary classroom under the supervision of a qualified professional. Includes a weekly seminar to discuss issues such as management, planning, professional development, and moral and ethical aspects of teaching. Prerequisites: Pass all required MTEL; cumulative minimum GPA of 3.0; complete at least 27 credits in the graduate education program.

MGMT700 - 21st Century Global Leadership

21st Century Global Leadership

MGMT701 - Fundamentals of Executive Management

This course introduces the fundamentals of management principles. It emphasizes creative management in dynamic organizations, assessing business opportunities, organizational linkages, ethics and social responsibility, and bench-marking.

MGMT702 - Research Methods

This course introduces both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, providing the student with an overview of the different steps in the research process. The course evaluates common methods of data analysis, develops skills in critical thinking, and provides experience in data analysis using SPSS.

MGMT703 - Strategic Information Management

This course presents the conceptual foundations of information technology and examines the development, application, and advances of information technology resources in organizations. With a focus on the managerial perspective, students investigate issues related to the development of contemporary systems development approaches.Formerly - Management Information Systems

MGMT704 - Financial Management

This course focuses on understanding the fundamental principles of finance, including financial statement analysis, present/future value/ NPV/discounted cash flows, capital budgeting, and risk analysis.

MGMT705 - Organizational Theory

This course studies the behavior of individuals and groups within organizations, and the influence that the environment has on such behaviors. The course is primarily experiential and case-based. Formerly - Organizational Behavior

MGMT706 - Marketing Management

This course provides a decision-oriented overview of marketing management in modern organizations. The emphasis is on developing skills in identifying marketing opportunities, utilizing segmenting, targeting and positioning, and planning and communicating integrated marketing strategies.

MGMT707 - Operations Strategy

This course involves the study of concepts relating to the operations function in both manufacturing and service organizations. Students study how the operations process is responsible for planning, organizing, and controlling resources in order to effectively and efficiently produce goods and services. Formerly - Operations Management

MGMT708 - Aging & Technology

This course identifies and explores aging demographic trends as they relate to technological products, prototypes, and processes and the effect of technology on healthcare, long term care facilities, and the home.

MGMT713 - Fundraising & Development

This course examines the critical role of fundraising and development in successful non­profit organizations. Students learn to analyze, plan, and evaluate a comprehensive fundraising program and to create elements of a professional fundraising portfolio. The course explores management and leadership issues associated with the rapidly changing field of development and philanthropy.

MGMT714 - Principles of Project Management

This course focuses on the essentials of project management. It approaches project management from the standpoint of managing a single, stand-alone project that is small to medium in size. The course takes attendees through the project life cycle in the same sequence they would face when managing a real project in the workplace. Topics covered include the product and project life cycles, including initiation, planning, executing, controlling, and closing.

MGMT720 - Social Gerontology

This course develops the student's understanding of the physiological, psychological, and social effects of aging.

MGMT721 - Elder Care Policy & Politics

This course examines the environment in which elder care services are delivered. The course examines legal, regulatory and public policy issues, as well as some of the resulting financing options (e.g. Medicare, Medicaid, and private long-term care insurance).

MGMT722 - Housing & Long-Term Care Options

This course introduces issues related to housing and long-term care options for older adults. The course examines the continuum of care available, including home care, adult day care, assisted living, CCRCs, nursing homes, and general retirement communities.

MGMT724 - Marketing to Seniors

This course utilizes a combination of family life cycle and cohort marketing frameworks to understand the issues in marketing products and services to elderly consumers. Students prepare detailed marketing plans and implementation programs for firms or organizations specializing in senior customers.

MGMT726 - Services & Programs for Older Adults

This course examines the theory and practices relevant to the management and administration of programs for the elderly. Deficiencies in current programs and alternative modes of care for the elderly are explored.

MGMT728 - Human Resources Management

This course examines the staffing function of management including planning, recruiting, selection, training, motivation, appraisal, compensation, labor laws, and organizational development. The course also addresses the current issues affecting the human resource manager including the changing work force and need to increase productivity as well as changes in the areas of unions and affirmative action.

MGMT730 - Health Management for Seniors

Health management for older adults is a major issue in contemporary society. This course pro­vides the knowledge base and skill set necessary for interdisciplinary professional practice. The course is conducted in collaboration among Harvard Medical School, Simmons School of Social Work, Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, and Northeastern University School of Pharmacy.

MGMT731 - Human Resource Law

This course introduces students to individual employment law, which is concerned with rules that govern the relations between employers and employees, primarily as applicable to non-unionized workers. The course includes such subject areas as identifying a contract of employment, creation and modification of the employment relationship, the common law obligations of employee and employer, the employer’s statutory obligations to its employees, privacy in the workplace, human rights legislation in the workplace, and the termination of employment.

MGMT733X - Navigating Fin Systems in Elder Care

This course describes and analyzes the financing of the health and long term care system for the elderly and adults with disabilities. Course will review the current long term care system; core financing public mechanisms of Medicare and Medicaid; integration of Medicare and Medicaid for dual eligibilities; intersection of long term care finance with different models of care (PACE, Special Needs Plans); additional mechanisms of long term financing along with relative strengths and limitations; role of government, private sector, and individuals in financing long term care; shortcomings of the current long care system and needs for the future delivery and financing of care; exploration of future policy directions and agendas.

MGMT734 - Aging in American Society

Aging in American Society

MGMT735 - Planning & Writing Grant Proposals

Federal, state and local governments and private foundations have billions of dollars in grant funding to help non-profit organizations carry out their missions. But demand for these resources has increased tremendously in recent years. If an organization is going to compete effectively for the funds it needs, it must develop and carry out a coherent fundraising strategy. Course presentations and exercises cover differences among funding sources, how to research these sources and match a group's mission to a funder's philosophy, and a detailed discussion of how to convert an organization's needs and assets into a successful grant proposal.

MGMT737 - Capital Campaigns & Major Gifts

The core of any fundraising effort is the annual campaign. This course focuses on development of skills for entry or advancement in the fundraising profession. Topics include campaign organization (goals, plan, and calendar); the board and volunteers (their roles, responsibilities, recognition, care and handling); expanding the donor base; solicitation techniques and methods, prospects, ratings, and assignments; direct mail; special events; meetings and agendas; major gifts; and the organizational process.

MGMT740 - Consumer Behavior

This course explores how and why consumers behave the way they do. Consumers can be indi­vidual households buying goods and services for their own consumption or they can be buyers in industrial and other business-related markets. The course takes an interdisciplinary, in-depth approach to the study of buyer behavior.

MGMT741 - Marketing Research

This course provides an understanding of the theory and the methods of marketing research through class discussions and project work. The emphasis in this course is on marketing research as an aid to management decision making.

MGMT743 - Fundraising Concepts/ Practices

Fundraising Concepts/ Practices

MGMT744 - Global Marketing

The purpose of this course is to explore the nature of marketing in a global context. This includes the decision of extending or adapting domestic marketing strategies for use abroad and the special demands of managing the marketing functions globally. Major emphasis is on devel­oping global marketing strategies. However, the course also addresses issues of importance to entrepreneurs just entering global markets.

MGMT745 - Marketing Strategy

This course emphasizes the development of analytical skills for marketing decision making, strategic marketing management concepts, and the effective formulation/implementation of strategic market plans. A variety of teaching methods are used, including cases, lectures, discussion and a computerized marketing simulation. Prerequisite: completion of at least two marketing courses.

MGMT746 - E-Commerce

This course addresses issues related to developing an Internet strategy for both pure play e-tailers and existing brick and mortar organizations. In particular, the course investigates opportunities and threats created by e-commerce, driving Web traffic and developing a customer focus, dealing with disruptive technologies, implementation strategies for new technologies, building trust through security, electronic payment systems, and the international, ethical and public policy challenges raised by electronic commerce.

MGMT748 - Social Marketing

This course is an application-based course that concentrates on marketing plans for non-profit organizations and marketing plans to implement changes in social policy.

MGMT749 - Ethical Theory & Management

This introduces the discipline of ethical analysis and its application to management. The course examines different methods of value clarifications, the sources of ethical conflict in management practices, the structure of ethical argu­ments, as well as the ethical theories and principles associated with management. The course also explores how these concepts are concretely applied in organizations and professional life.

MGMT751 - Business Strategy

This course studies strategy formulation and implementation in international and domestic business enterprise. Case analysis and other appropriate methodologies are used to develop the skills and judgment necessary to provide overall direction to the organization. In particular, the course emphasizes the translation of strategy formulation to strategy implementation.

MGMT752 - Change Management

This course focuses on how organizational change can be managed. In order to survive in rapidly changing and highly competitive operating environments, organizations must learn how to continually adapt, evolve, contract, expand, and innovate. Organizational change management is about implementation of business strategies, and more generally, new ideas and practices.

MGMT798 - Research Project Capstone

In this course, students undertake comprehensive research projects under the direction of a faculty mentor. The project is an intensive study based on action research models from the behavioral sciences enabling the student to demonstrate the mastery of the concepts, ideas, knowledge, and insights implicit in the Master of Science in Management curriculum. No later than the semester preceding the undertaking of the Research Project, the student should present to the designated faculty mentor a two-page summary of the proposed research. Each student makes a public and professional presentation of their Capstone Project findings. This course is taken during the student's final graduate semester.The internship is a hands-on working experience in the student’s field of concentration requiring a minimum of 150 hours of placement under the supervision of both an employer and a faculty member. Beginning in the semester preceding the internship placement, the student identifies what type of organization they desire for their internship. The student holds primary responsibility for obtaining a field experience site and is responsible for setting up interviews with prospective internship sites.. The internship supervisor monitors student performance and visits internships sites as needed. On completion of the internship, the student submits a reflection paper to the faculty supervisor on their experience. Students may not perform internships at their current place of employment without prior consent of the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies. Each student makes a public and professional presentation of the Graduate Internship experience. This course is taken during the student’s final graduate semester.

MGMT799 - Internship Capstone

The internship is a hands-on working experience in the student’s field of concentration requiring a minimum of 150 hours of placement under the supervision of both an employer and a faculty member. Beginning in the semester preceding the internship placement, the student identifies what type of organization they desire for their internship. The student holds primary responsibility for obtaining a field experience site and is responsible for setting up interviews with prospective internship sites.. The internship supervisor monitors student performance and visits internships sites as needed. On completion of the internship, the student submits a reflection paper to the faculty supervisor on their experience. Students may not perform internships at their current place of employment without prior consent of the Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies. Each student makes a public and professional presentation of the Graduate Internship experience. This course is taken during the student’s final graduate semester.

SMGT701 - Current Issues in Sports

This course analyzes contemporary issues including the use of performance enhancing drugs, gambling, escalating salaries, violence, and institutional cheating in sports. Case studies are investigated and students engage in critical thinking and discussions to understand what has created these issues.

SMGT702 - Hist & Func of Sport in Society

This course provides a historical, sociological, and operational analysis of sport and how it shapes our world. As a microcosm of society, the effect that sport has on the moral, ethical, economic, social, political, and religious landscape of society is investigated.

SMGT703 - Sport Sponsorship & Marketing

This course gives students a thorough overview of the multi-billion dollar sport sponsorship and marketing industry. In this era of globalization, all facets of this growing industry are analyzed including advertising, promotions, sponsorships, product licensing, and market segmentation. Principles of marketing and marketing management are introduced and how they relate to the global sport industry.

SMGT704 - Sport & the Law

This course introduces the fundamental tenets of the law and familiarizes students with legal structure and basic legal terminology. Various aspects of law are examined including negligence, tort law and risk management, and how they impact the sports industry. In addition, legal issues that relate to professional sport leagues and amateur governing bodies are analyzed.

SMGT705 - Fin Management in the Sport Industry

Financial Management in the Sport Industry is a study of the principles, theories, and competencies essential for working with the fiscal and economic conditions and factors involved in global sport organizations. This course will provide students with basic fiscal and economic principles, strategies, and techniques essential for the leadership, management, and administration of global sports programs. Course activities and requirements have been designed to familiarize the student with the fiscal, economic, budgeting, sources of funding, and impact analyses issues associated with sport in a global society.

SMGT707 - Exec & Strat leadership in the Sport Ind

Executive and Strategic leadership is often referred to as the highest level and most complex planning activity in any organization. This is also true for sport organizations. As such, it falls to the League Commissioner, Athletic Director, Director of Recreation, and his or her top leadership teams to design, chart, and evaluate corporate level strategy. This course introduces you to the executive and strategic leadership processes in the sport industry and does so by placing you in the role of Commissioner, Athletic Director or Sport manager. In this role, you will be required to make and defend a broad range of strategic decisions. This class will dwell almost exclusively on comprehensive case analysis, or as it is generally called, the Strategic Analysis and the strategic decision-making processes used in the sport industry.

SMGT711 - Sport Leadership to Shape the Future

In this course, students explore the role of leadership in shaping sport organizations. The role of leadership of individuals and groups to generate and sustain significant processes of change is explored.

SMGT712 - Intercollegiate Rules & Procedures

This course explores the policies and procedures of intercollegiate governing bodies. Areas discussed are bylaws, rules, compliance, and athlete eligibility that apply to member institutions in America.

SMGT721 - Introduction to Sport Hospitality

This course provides an overview of the basic organizational and business structure of the sport hospitality industry. Students examine the role hospitality plays in professional and collegiate sports, with particular focus on hosting patrons of sporting events.

SMGT722 - Managing Sport Facilities/Special Events

This course examines the processes for planning and managing major sporting events and their specific venues. Topics include crowd management, concession and alcohol management, medical emergency/evacuation plans, and facility design and maintenance.

SMGT723 - Sport Sales Strategies

This course provides an overview of strategies for premium seating, season ticket, group ticket and luxury suite sales. Box office ticket operations and database management as well as customer service and client retention principles are presented.

SMGT731 - Ethical Non-Profit Sport Management

In this course, leaders in the sport non-profit sector demonstrate best practices by being cognizant of legal mandates, as well as ethical and fiscal responsibilities within the strategic organizational framework.

SMGT780 - Research & Design in the Sport Industry

Research in Sport Management requires students to identify, describe, analyze, and report on a sport industry issue or problem at their own workplace by drawing on the relevant literature. The issue could be related to collective bargaining, the introduction of new technology in sport, sexual harassment, sport marketing, employment equity, overtime working, worker motivation and productivity, seniority, discipline, or management rights. By the end of the course students must submit a research project, paper, or report stating the sport industry problem or issue examined, setting out their analysis of the causes of the problem, data collected, analysis of findings, summary or conclusions with recommendations for their proposed remedies, and discussion of the potential impact of their proposed recommendation on the sport industry

SMGT781 - Capstone Thesis

Capstone Thesis

SMGT798 - Capstone Thesis

In this course, students complete research and a written project/research thesis under the direction of a graduate faculty advisor. It is the culminating work of the Sport Management Masters program and must include research, analysis design, evaluation, organization, a literature review, and conclusions relating to the findings of the research. A written thesis should be augmented by the use of PowerPoint or web portfolio application.

SMGT799 - Capstone Internship

The field experience includes supervised work for 400 hours in a sport management setting. Practical experience can be gained in any number of positions in the sport industry, including sales, marketing, public relations, operations, facilities, and event management.